10 superfoods to boost a healthy diet

No single food — not even a superfood — can offer all the nutrition, health benefits, and energy we need to nourish ourselves. The 2015–2020 US Dietary Guidelines recommend healthy eating patterns, “combining healthy choices from across all food groups — while paying attention to calorie limits.” Over the years, research has shown that healthy dietary patterns can reduce risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, and certain cancers. Dietary patterns such as the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet and the Mediterranean diet, which are mostly plant-based, have demonstrated significant health benefits and reduction of chronic disease. However, there are a few foods that can be singled out for special recognition. These “superfoods” offer some very important nutrients that can power-pack your meals and snacks, and further enhance a healthy eating pattern. Superfoods list Berries. High in fiber, berries are naturally sweet, and their rich colors mean they are high in antioxidants and disease-fighting nutrients. How to include them: When berries are not in season, it is just as healthy to buy them frozen. Add to yogurt, cereals, and smoothies, or eat plain for a snack. Fish. Fish can be a good source of protein and omega-3 fatty acids, which help prevent heart disease. How to include it: Buy fresh, frozen, or canned fish. Fish with the highest omega-3 content are salmon, tuna steaks, mackerel, herring, trou...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Health Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

Publication date: Available online 2 June 2020Source: Pathology - Research and PracticeAuthor(s): Hyeongjoo Kim, Taewan Kim, Gunn Jaygal, Jongsoo Woo, Chang-Jin Kim, Moo-Jun Baek, Dongjun Jeong
Source: Pathology Research and Practice - Category: Pathology Source Type: research
ABSTRACT Objective To assess the outcome of an educational nutritional intervention in the quality of diet of women with breast cancer in adjuvant treatment. Methods Women with breast cancer and admitted for surgical treatment were divided in an intervention group (n=18) and a comparison group (n=78), and participated in a nonrandomized clinical trial. Participants were assessed before and after the treatment and/or intervention. A food frequency questionnaire was applied and the quality of diet was calculated using the Brazilian Healthy Eating Index Revised. The educational nutritional intervention lasted 12 months and wa...
Source: Revista de Nutricao - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 2 June 2020Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular DiseasesAuthor(s): Zeng-Pei Qiao, Kenneth I. Zheng, Pei-Wu Zhu, Feng Gao, Hong-Lei Ma, Gang Li, Yang-Yang Li, Giovanni Targher, Christopher D. Byrne, Ming-Hua Zheng
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 2 June 2020Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular DiseasesAuthor(s): Qi Zhao, Ting-Yu Zhang, Yu-Jing Cheng, Yue Ma, Ying-Kai Xu, Jia-Qi Yang, Yu-Jie Zhou
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Conclusions and Perspectives In this review, we have discussed important milestones from the early description of “Serum-sickness” as being due to antibodies directed against Neu5Gc epitopes all the way to the present-day therapeutic implications of these antibodies in cancer therapy. Some of these milestones have been represented in a concise timeline (Figure 6). While the “Xenosialitis” hypothesis is well-supported in the human-like mouse models, it has yet to be conclusively proven in humans. It remains to be seen if “Xenosialitis” plays a role in other uniquely-human diseases. FI...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Being diagnosed with breast cancer can make a person feel powerless, but there are some things women can do to potentially improve how they feel throughout the process. Here are some strategies recommended by experts—and others that are still being explored—which may help improve the effectiveness and symptoms of treatment. Physical activity “Exercise is one of the best things women can do for themselves,” says Dr. Ann Partridge, director of the Program for Young Women with Breast Cancer at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. “It doesn’t mean marathons or hot yoga, but walking three to five ti...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Breast Cancer breast cancer symptoms breast cancer treatment Exercise Meditation Nutrition TIME Health Breast Cancer yoga yoga cancer patients Source Type: news
You know the type. The macho guy who’s rough, tough, go-it-alone, leader-of-the-pack, help-not-wanted. Macho man may put off seeing a doctor for a checkup – because he thinks he’s invincible, doesn’t get sick, it’s a waste of time, only for the weak. Physicians at the University of Maryland Medical Center say some men only give in when they have symptoms, when major treatments are required, or when preventive steps are more demanding. Even so, it’s never too late to start on the road to health. June, Men’s Health Month, is a great time to focus on preventable health problems and en...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Health Tips Heart/Cardiac Care heart health mens health Source Type: blogs
What lifestyle changes should you make to stay healthy through your 40s? originally appeared on Quora - the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights. Answer by Keck Medicine of USC, 500+ internationally renowned doctors at a leading academic medical center, on Quora: Getting older has its perks. Chances are you're more confident, have more direction and a defined sense of self. While your health is likely not a primary concern, it's important to take steps now to stop subtle changes before they become major health issues. Your 40s is the decade that your habits sta...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This study builds on preliminary findings from the first phase of the INTERSTROKE study, which identified ten modifiable risk factors for stroke in 6,000 participants from 22 countries. The full-scale INTERSTROKE study included an additional 20,000 individuals from 32 countries in Europe, Asia, America, Africa and Australia, and sought to identify the main causes of stroke in diverse populations, young and old, men and women, and within subtypes of stroke. To estimate the proportion of strokes caused by specific risk factors, the investigators calculated the population attributable risk for each factor (PAR; an esti...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
"Dad bods" are the new fitness standard for a growing bunch of men across the United States. What's a dad bod? Well, think Seth Rogan, Jason Segel or Leonardo DiCaprio on summer vacation and between movie roles - overweight, out of shape, and happy and content with his pasta, rose', and Victoria's Secret models. Basically, pudgy, cuddly, doughy, don't really care about how you look any more - that's the "dad bod". And some women are supporting the new trend if you believe the studies - partly because having a dad bod as a partner takes some of the pressure off them to stay in shape. Another rationale is...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
More News: Acidophilus | Almonds | Blogging | Broccoli | Brussels Sprouts | Cabbage | Calcium | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Cardiology | Cashew Nuts | Cauliflowers | Chemistry | Cholesterol | Diabetes | Diets | Endocrinology | Fish | Fruit | Harvard | Hazelnuts | Heart | Heart Disease | Herbs | Hypertension | Kale | Lactobacillus Acidophilus | Lycopene | Minerals | Nutrition | Nuts | Oatmeal | Olive Oil | Omega 3 | Peanuts | Peas | Pecan | Probiotics | Prostate Cancer | Quinoa | Radish | Salads | Spinach | Study | Sugar | Switzerland Health | Tomatoes | Turnips | Urology & Nephrology | Vegetables | Vitamin A | Vitamin C | Vitamin E | Vitamins | Walnuts | Weight Loss | Wheat