Counting Your Carbon Footprint One Meal At a Time
At the COP26 conference this year, there’s a lot of grumbling among activists that official venues are serving meat, even if it’s locally-sourced meat. Animal agriculture has an outsized impact on global warming—up to 14.5% of annual global CO2 emissions, depending on which metrics you include. But here in Glasgow, a serving of meat also comes with a lesson in carbon footprint economics. Attendees here at COP26 are now informed of the carbon impact of their meals as they peruse the menus. At one restaurant, I was offered a choice between the traditional Scottish meal of haggis, neeps and tatties (stuffed,...
Source: TIME: Science - November 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Aryn Baker/Glasgow Tags: Uncategorized climate change Climate Is Everything Source Type: news

Counting Your Carbon Footprint One Meal At a Time
At the COP26 conference this year, there’s a lot of grumbling among activists that official venues are serving meat, even if it’s locally-sourced meat. Animal agriculture has an outsized impact on global warming—up to 14.5% of annual global CO2 emissions, depending on which metrics you include. But here in Glasgow, a serving of meat also comes with a lesson in carbon footprint economics. Attendees here at COP26 are now informed of the carbon impact of their meals as they peruse the menus. At one restaurant, I was offered a choice between the traditional Scottish meal of haggis, neeps and tatties (stuffed,...
Source: TIME: Science - November 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Aryn Baker/Glasgow Tags: Uncategorized climate change Climate Is Everything Source Type: news

Don't like your greens? Blame it on Brassica domestication
(SMBE journals (Molecular Biology and Evolution and Genome Biology and Evolution)) Delicious to some, but a bitter bane to others' taste buds, vegetables like broccoli rabe, bok choy and turnips are a dinner staple -- and picky eater conflict -- around the world. It all likely started in the mountains near present-day Afghanistan, where humans first domesticated turnips 3,500 to 6,000 years ago, according to a new study recently published in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 4, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Eating THESE vegetables can help prevent heart attacks
SOME of our least popular vegetables including sprouts, cabbage and turnips could help prevent blood vessel disease, heart attacks and stroke, a study shows. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Making Mayo's Recipes: Cream of chicken and wild rice chowder
A cornstarch slurry thickens this soup without loads of cream. You can also thicken soup with leftover mashed potatoes or mashed turnips, parsnips or cauliflower. It's hearty enough for a meal. Each Thursday, one of the more than 100 video recipes from the?Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program?is?featured on the Mayo Clinic News Network -- just [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - March 6, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

How trees and turnips grow fatter
(University of Cambridge) Two international research teams have identified key regulatory networks controlling how plants grow 'outwards,' which could help us to grow trees to be more efficient carbon sinks and increase vegetable crop yields. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 9, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

At the Farmers' Fair, Growers Display Foods for a Healthier Tajikistan
March 17, 2017Health workers are reaching beyond their health facilities to educate  communities on the power of food and water.Food and water —can’t live without ' em. They are two of the most basic necessities for a healthy life, and yet793 million people around the world remain undernourished and780 million people don ’t have access to clean drinking water.We ’re working to change that.IntraHealth International’sFeed the Future Tajikistan Health and Nutrition Activity (THNA) is helping health workers educate their communities about the power of food and WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene) so they can change...
Source: IntraHealth International - March 17, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Making Mayo's Recipes: Cream of chicken and wild rice chowder
A cornstarch slurry thickens this soup without loads of cream. You can also thicken soup with leftover mashed potatoes or mashed turnips, parsnips or cauliflower. It's hearty enough for a meal. Each Thursday one of the 100+ tasty video recipes from the?Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program?is?featured on the Mayo Clinic News Network, just in time [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - January 18, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Fall cover crops for livestock grazing may improve soil health, protect environment
Turning cattle out to graze in harvested fields was once a common practice. It ' s something that researchers would like to see used again--and improved by planting cover crops, such as such as oats, sorghum, turnips, radishes or millet. These have the potential to improve the soil health and utilize any remaining nutrients, thus preventing runoff that pollutes lakes and streams. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 18, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

21 Things to do if you get Shin Splints
Shin splints (also know as medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS)) feels like a sharp pain along the inner edge of the shinbone that may shoot up from your ankle to your kneecap. Shin splints are usually caused by repeated stress to the connective muscle tissue surrounding the shinbone. This is a common injury that affects athletes who engage in superfluous running, jumping and dancing. It is not considered a serious problem, but rather an inflammation of the muscle or other tissue at the front of the lower leg that results from repeated, minor trauma or irritation. It can be treated with home remedies that follow. Stay aw...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What The World’s Healthiest Diets Have In Common
To research his 2010 book The 5 Factor World Diet, celebrity trainer and nutritionist Harley Pasternak traveled to the healthiest countries around the world to learn more about what made their meals extra nourishing. He noted that Japanese people eat a wonderful variety of seaweeds, and that Chinese people tried to incorporate at least five different colors in every meal. But Pasternak also came away with some valuable observations about how different the North American way of life was compared to many other countries. For starters, we eat much bigger portions than people in other countries. We don’t prioritize eat...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 4, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

What The World’s Healthiest Diets Have In Common
To research his 2010 book The 5 Factor World Diet, celebrity trainer and nutritionist Harley Pasternak traveled to the healthiest countries around the world to learn more about what made their meals extra nourishing. He noted that Japanese people eat a wonderful variety of seaweeds, and that Chinese people tried to incorporate at least five different colors in every meal. But Pasternak also came away with some valuable observations about how different the North American way of life was compared to many other countries. For starters, we eat much bigger portions than people in other countries. We don’t prioritize eat...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Stephen Curry joins FLOTUS for #TurnipForWhat
The White House is turning up for turnips. (Source: WDSU.com - Health)
Source: WDSU.com - Health - April 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Behind the Headlines' 2015 Quiz of the Year
In 2015, Behind the Headlines covered more than 500 health stories that made it into the mainstream media. Why not test your knowledge of 2015's health news with our month-by-month quiz?If you've been paying attention, you should find this quiz both easy and fun.Answers are at the bottom of the page – no peeking! QuestionsIn January 2015's health news...1. What activity was said to increase the risk of heart disease?a) playing violent video games b) sexual role playing c) angry tweeting 2. Eating like a what was claimed to reduce obesity risk?a) a Native American b) a Zulu c) a Viking In February 2015's health ne...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Special reports Source Type: news

6 Food Trends To Help You Eat Better In 2016
Some of the trendiest foods that are popping up on Pinterest and appearing on 2016 food trend lists may just help you eat better in the year ahead. Here are six food trends to get on board with in 2016: 1. Power bowls Bowls are the new plates. All sorts of creative one-dish meals are being served in a bowl with various monikers – protein bowls, Buddha bowls, broth bowls, quinoa bowls and globowls – for globally inspired bowl meals. The same rules apply to breakfast bowls, which are being dubbed smoothie bowls, acai bowls and Banzai bowls. Just do a search on Pinterest, and you'll be bowled over. For lunch and ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news