Novel biotechnological route developed to obtain fine chemicals from agricultural waste
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Preliminary calculations show that the new biotechnological route can increase the value of sugarcane bagasse and wheat straw up to 5,000-fold and multiply the price of ferulic acid by a factor of up to 75 when these residues are converted into coniferol. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pulses for a Sustainable Future
By Zoltán KálmánROME, Feb 10 2020 (IPS) Reducing poverty and inequalities, eliminating hunger and all forms of malnutrition and achieve food insecurity for all – these are some of the most important objectives of the Sustainable Development Goals. Still, the rate of poverty and inequalities is increasing and over 820 million people are going hungry. In addition, 2 billion people in the world are food insecure with great risk of malnutrition and poor health. This alarming situation is further aggravated by current trends such as the rate of population growth, impacts of climate change, loss of bio...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Zoltan Kalman Tags: Climate Change Development & Aid Economy & Trade Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity Natural Resources Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Harrington Seed Destructor kills nearly 100 percent of US agronomic weed seeds in lab study
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) In the battle against herbicide-resistant weeds, farmers are increasingly eager to add non-chemical control methods to their management toolbox. Impact mills, which destroy weed seeds picked up by a combine, have been shown to kill 70-99% of weed seeds in soybeans, wheat, and other small-statured cropping systems. And a recent Weed Science study from the University of Illinois shows even seeds that appear unscathed after impact milling don't germinate the following spring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The 'free from' aisle CON: Health snacks that are dairy, gluten or wheat free are packed with sugar
EXCLUSIVE: A side-by-side comparison of the 'free from' aisle and biscuit section in a London Sainsbury's showed 30 'healthy' products had a higher sugar percentage than a packet of McVitie's. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Overuse of herbicides costing UK economy £ 400 million per year
(Zoological Society of London) Scientists from international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) have for the first time put an economic figure on the herbicidal resistance of a major agricultural weed that is decimating winter-wheat farms across the UK. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 23, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Comparing heirloom and modern wheat effects on gut health
(American Chemical Society) Amid concerns about gluten sensitivity, increasing numbers of people are avoiding wheat. Most have not been diagnosed with a wheat-related medical condition, yet they seem to feel better when they don't eat gluten-containing foods. A possible explanation is that modern varieties of wheat are responsible. But now, researchers reporting in ACS'Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have shown that a popular modern variety does not impair gastrointestinal health in mice compared with heirloom wheat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chicken soup recalled at H-E-B stores in Texas after wheat and soy were left off ingredients label
Canyon Creek Soup Company, which makes H-E-B soup in Canada but distributes it exclusively in Texas, recalled it's Butter Chicken Soup after failing to declare wheat and soy as two ingredients. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Making Mayo's Recipes: Stock your freezer with homemade meatballs
Meatballs are a quick, make-ahead option for turning ground turkey, chicken or lean beef into dinner. You can roll and freeze uncooked meatballs when you have time. Then thaw and bake for 15 minutes on a busy night. Need some ideas for serving meatballs? Make meatball subs made with whole-wheat buns, marinara sauce and a [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - December 12, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Cochrane systematic review informs WHO guidelines, policy
Originally published in the Cornell ChronicleFolate is an essential B-vitamin that is needed for DNA synthesis and cell division. Folate deficiency can lead to anemia, and deficiency early in pregnancy can lead to neural tube defects – birth defects of the brain, spine and spinal cord, including spina bifida.A Cochrane systematic review on the benefits and safety of fortifying wheat or maize flour with folic acid and population health outcomes, led by scientists in the  Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell, found that fortification with folic acid (the synthetic form of folate) may improve folate sta...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - December 10, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Video from RSNA 2019: Dr. Paul Chang on AI and radiology
CHICAGO - What's the current state of the art in artificial intelligence (AI)?...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: What to look for in AI and IT at RSNA 2019 Video from GTC 2019: Dr. Paul Chang gives a reality check to AI in radiology Video from RSNA 2018: Dr. Paul Chang on AI and radiology Video from RSNA 2017: How will AI change radiology?Comments: 12/2/2019 8:28:14 PMJimboboy I was watching Paul Chang interview on AM today. He explains that in order for us to consume AI, we will have to develop the proper infrastructure. By which he means we need to think up ways for us human rads to interface with ...
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 3, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Food storage tips: Why you need to stockpile wheat before SHTF (Plus a recipe for "prepper's bread")
(Natural News) When SHTF, it’s a good thing to have a supply of ready-to-eat meals and snacks to save time on food prep. However, you also need access to ingredients that can be used to make fresh food to ensure that your body gets all the nutrition it needs. This is where wheat comes in. (h/t... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sudan: OCHA Sudan Sitrep - Rift Valley Fever Outbreak in Sudan
[Radio Dabanga] Khartoum -The Sudanese Ministry of Health has announced an outbreak of Rift Valley fever (RVF) in the country. RVF task force committees have been activated in the most affected states of Red Sea and River Nile. Prices of locally grown stable foods began to decline with the start of the harvest in October, while prices of imported wheat increased, the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) reported in its latest Situation Report on Thursday. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 25, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Mexico City to host Interdrought 2020
(International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT)) Interdrought 2020 will take place from March 9 to 13, 2020, in Mexico City. Registration and abstract submissions are now open at www.interdrought2020.com. The congress aims to facilitate the development of concepts, methods and technologies associated with plant production in water-limited environments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How Climate Change is Clobbering Kids ’ Health
Let’s pretend the 195 nations that signed the 2016 Paris Climate Accord really do take all of the steps necessary to reach the agreement’s key goal: limiting the increase in global temperature to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. In that world, any children born today would grow up to witness some happy milestones. If they lived in the United Kingdom, they’d see their country phase out the use of coal by the time they turned six. If they lived in France, they would see gasoline-powered cars eliminated by their 21st birthday. And, as all of the 195 countries similarly reached their individual targets,...
Source: TIME: Health - November 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Children climate change embargoed study Environment global warming health Source Type: news

How Climate Change is Clobbering Kids ’ Health
Let’s pretend the 195 nations that signed the 2016 Paris Climate Accord really do take all of the steps necessary to reach the agreement’s key goal: limiting the increase in global temperature to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. In that world, any children born today would grow up to witness some happy milestones. If they lived in the United Kingdom, they’d see their country phase out the use of coal by the time they turned six. If they lived in France, they would see gasoline-powered cars eliminated by their 21st birthday. And, as all of the 195 countries similarly reached their individual targets,...
Source: TIME: Science - November 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Children climate change embargoed study Environment global warming health Source Type: news

Why Modern-Day Foragers Want You to Eat Weeds for Dinner
Illustration by Natalya Balnova for TIME Thistles, a kind of flowering plant often covered in angry-looking prickles, are probably not an ingredient in any of your go-to recipes. But Katrina Blair wants you to try eating them anyway. “I love to take the root, fresh or dry, and blend them into a chai,” she says. She also recommends combining the greens with lemons, apples and water for a refreshing lemonade — just be sure to strain out the spikes, she warns. Blair, 50, is the founder of Turtle Lake Refuge, a Durango, Colorado-based nonprofit that advocates for, among other things, foraging and eating weed...
Source: TIME: Health - November 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized Food onetime Source Type: news

Research brief: Origin of deadly wheat pathogen revealed
(University of Minnesota) A team of researchers has uncovered the basis of stem rust pathogen Ug99's wide virulence, attacking a direct threat to the world wheat supply. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Making Mayo Recipes: Whole wheat pumpkin pancakes
Your next brunch or sleepover party calls for healthy, hearty whole-wheat pumpkin pancakes. This recipe uses fat-free greek yogurt and if you want to prepare the batter ahead of time, keep the dry and wet ingredients separate until ready to cook. Each Thursday, one of the more than 100 video recipes from the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - October 31, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Death by wheat-loaded cartridge: a case report - Okdemir E, Keten A, Av şar A, Kaya Ö.
The materials used to produce shotgun ammunition can have different properties depending on the purpose, and ammunition can be fabricated or loaded manually. In Turkey, wheat-loaded cartridges are manufactured for use as sound cartridges. This ammunition i... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Drug Helps Plants Resist Drought: Study
The small molecule is effective in tomato and wheat in laboratory trials, but its scalability and applicability to real-world agriculture remains to be seen. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - October 24, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Dynamic control of plant water use using designed ABA receptor agonists
Drought causes crop losses worldwide, and its impact is expected to increase as the world warms. This has motivated the development of small-molecule tools for mitigating the effects of drought on agriculture. We show here that current leads are limited by poor bioactivity in wheat, a widely grown staple crop, and in tomato. To address this limitation, we combined virtual screening, x-ray crystallography, and structure-guided design to develop opabactin (OP), an abscisic acid (ABA) mimic with up to an approximately sevenfold increase in receptor affinity relative to ABA and up to 10-fold greater activity in vivo. Studies i...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 24, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Vaidya, A. S., Helander, J. D. M., Peterson, F. C., Elzinga, D., Dejonghe, W., Kaundal, A., Park, S.-Y., Xing, Z., Mega, R., Takeuchi, J., Khanderahoo, B., Bishay, S., Volkman, B. F., Todoroki, Y., Okamoto, M., Cutler, S. R. Tags: Botany, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

95% Of Baby Foods Tested Contain Lead, Arsenic, Or Other Toxic Metal
By Sandee LaMotte, CNN (CNN) — Toxic heavy metals damaging to your baby’s brain development are likely in the baby food you are feeding your infant, according to a new investigation published Thursday. Tests of 168 baby foods from major manufacturers in the US found 95% contained lead, 73% contained arsenic, 75% contained cadmium and 32% contained mercury. One fourth of the foods contained all four heavy metals. One in five baby foods tested had over 10 times the 1-ppb limit of lead endorsed by public health advocates, although experts agree that no level of lead is safe. The results mimicked a previous&nb...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Consumer Featured Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Source Type: news

Global Challenges for the ‘NextGen’
By Lindsay FalveyMELBOURNE, Oct 15 2019 (IPS) Success has many parents – so the saying goes. In the case of the massive successes of international agricultural research, no one person can claim parentage. There are heroes along the way such as Norman Borlaug and his early cereal breeding, and the team that eliminated the cattle disease Rinderpest from the world – smallpox is the only other disease that has been totally eradicated. Another is the founder of The Crawford Fund, Derek Tribe, who was also instrumental in the creation of what is now the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), which I chair...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Lindsay Falvey Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Education Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Migration & Refugees Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

4 Health benefits of buckwheat, a nutrient-rich whole grain
(Natural News) Buckwheat, despite what its name suggests, is neither a cereal nor wheat product. It’s a fruit seed that comes from the buckwheat plant (Fagopyrum esculentum), and it is more closely related to rhubarb and sorrel. Buckwheat belongs to a food group commonly called pseudocereals – seeds that are consumed similarly to grains but don’t grow... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Making Mayo's Recipes: Cracked wheat chili
Try this quick, zesty vegetarian chili packed with bell peppers, bulgur wheat, beans, tomatoes and spices. The bulgur wheat looks like ground beef and adds a lot of fiber. As a result, this healthy vegetarian chili looks a lot like traditional chili. Each week, one of the more than 100 video recipes from the Mayo Clinic [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - October 3, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Special diet that restricts some carbs can relieve IBD symptoms within a month
A low-FODMAP diet limits foods with wheat, dairy, and fructose. More than half of participants in the KIng's College London study following the diet saw a reduction in symptom severity. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Africa: Fifth of World's Calories Threatened As Climate Scientists Sound Alarm Over Wheat
[Thomson Reuters Foundation] Rome -Climate scientists say the world must prepare for "unprecedented" shocks to production of the crop, a staple food in many countries (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 30, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Dogs, but not wolves, lose their sensitivity toward novelty with age - Hansen Wheat C, van der Bijl W, Temrin H.
Selection of behavioral traits holds a prominent role in the domestication of animals, and domesticated species are generally assumed to express reduced fear and reactivity toward novel stimuli compared to their ancestral species. However, very few studies... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Non-Human Animals and Insects Source Type: news

What Affects the Nutritional Quality of Plant-Based Milk Substitutes?
Discussion People today may be eating more plant-based products because of: Allergen avoidance – lactose or cow’s milk allergy, 14% of people with cow’s milk allergy will also have soy allergy. Cultural importance Contamination avoidance e.g. growth hormone or antibiotic residues in cow’s milk production Specific diseases, e.g. cholesterol/lipid issues Environmental impact Ethical or religious considerations Improved nutrition With population growth “[t]he demand for food is expected to grow by 70% until 2050….While the expected protein consumption is believed to grow by 80%.” ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - September 30, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Whose Data is it Anyway?
When cancer patient Pete started to look into who held records about his illness and treatment, mapping the journey of his data proved to be no easy feat. Tracking where his information was held, had been used, and might yet be used in the future took tens of hours of searching and filing requests.     As a member of use MY data, a UK-based patient group working to build confidence in the use of healthcare data, he is helping to demonstrate how much work the industry has to do when it comes to transparency around patient data.     This lack of accessibility, coupled with the wider suspicion ...
Source: EyeForPharma - August 30, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Andrew Stone Source Type: news

Why Parents Are Turning to a Controversial Treatment for Food Allergies
This article was originally published on Undark. Read the original article. (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - August 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Esther Landhuis / Undark Tags: Uncategorized allergies health onetime syndication Source Type: news

The Rise of the Pea: How an Unassuming Legume Emerged as a Frontrunner in the Race to Replace Meat and Dairy
No one denies peas are nutritious. Whether they’re delicious—that’s debatable. But arguments over taste no longer matter because peas, specifically yellow peas, are being formulated into so many products, they’re unavoidable, and often invisible. As a crop, the pea has risen and fallen in favor, but today everyone seems to agree that it checks the box against the biggest problems plaguing the Earth: climate, food and health. From a sustainability standpoint, peas, in the legume family, do everything wheat, corn and soy don’t. They require less water, are drought tolerant, reduce the need for n...
Source: TIME: Science - August 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Larissa Zimberoff Tags: Uncategorized Food Source Type: news

Too much wheat and gluten in early stages of infancy raises risk of coeliac disease
Experts in Sweden only looked at rates of coeliac disease among genetically predisposed youngsters. The findings were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (stock) (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Farmers harvest crop for neighbor battling stage 4 cancer
Farmer Larry Yockey's wheat was ready for harvest. But he's battling stage 4 skin cancer and could no longer work his fields. So as "CBS Evening News" anchor Norah O'Donnell explains, his neighbors decided to step in and help. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - July 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Contest Rewards Asian American, Pacific Islander Caregivers
A sticker placed on the screen door of Mary ’s home warns visitors of Alex’s severe allergies. ... He has a very restrictive diet and is 100 percent allergic to all dairy, peanuts, wheat, eggs as we... (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - July 28, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Rising CO2 levels could boost wheat yield but slightly reduce nutritional quality
(American Chemical Society) Levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are rising, which experts predict could produce more droughts and hotter temperatures. Although these weather changes would negatively impact many plants' growth, the increased CO2 availability might actually be advantageous because plants use the greenhouse gas to make food by photosynthesis. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry say that a much higher CO2 level could increase wheat yield but slightly reduce its nutritional quality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Arbor Biosciences Partners with Curio Genomics for Analysis of IWGSC Wheat Exome
Arbor Biosciences, a division of Chiral Technologies, Inc and worldwide leader in next generation sequencing (NGS) target enrichment, announces a partnership with Curio Genomics for bioinformatics... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - July 18, 2019 Category: Science Tags: The Scientist The Marketplace Source Type: news

Nearly 13,000 Pounds of Beef, Chicken Recalled
Nearly 13,000 pounds of beef and chicken cubes has been recalled by Fieldsource Food Systems, Inc. because the label does not warn that it may contain wheat, a known allergen, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) says. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - July 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Celiac Disease | Medscape Celiac Disease | Medscape
Celiac disease (also known as celiac sprue and gluten-sensitive enteropathy) is a prevalent food hypersensitivity disorder of the small intestine caused by an inflammatory response to wheat gluten and similar proteins of barley and rye. The condition can manifest with a previously unsuspected range of clinical presentations. (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - July 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Resource Center Source Type: news

Plan to sell 50m meals made from electricity, water and air
Solar Foods hopes wheat flour-like product will hit target in supermarkets within two yearsA Finnish company that makes food from electricity, water and air has said it plans to have 50m meals ’ worth of its product sold in supermarkets within two years.Solar Foods is also working with the European Space Agency to supply astronauts on a mission to Mars afterdevising a method it says creates a protein-heavy product that looks and tastes like wheat flour at a cost of €5 (£4.50) per kilo.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 29, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Daniel Boffey in Helsinki Tags: Food Environment Finland Science Conservation Europe World news Business Source Type: news

Scientists discover how plants breathe -- and how humans shaped their 'lungs'
(University of Sheffield) Eperts led by the Institute for Sustainable Food at the University of Sheffield reveal how plants provide a steady flow of air to every cell. Study shows humans have bred wheat plants to have fewer pores on their leaves and use less water. Findings pave the way to develop more drought-resistant crops. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 27, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Long-term outlooks: Australian farmers eliminate herbicide-resistant "superweeds" using natural non-herbicidal methods
(Natural News) Decades ago, Australian farmers stopped using glyphosate and other herbicides to get rid of superweeds and seeds in their plots. Instead, they used natural methods of weed control and management that worked much better than toxic chemicals. Farms in Western Australia raise wheat and barley as the main food crops. The biggest threat comes from ryegrass superweeds that... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Try to guess the main ingredient in this wheat-free pasta
(Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cereal grains scientists fight hidden hunger with new approach
(AACC International) Global demand for staple crops like maize, wheat, and rice is on the rise -- making these crops ideal targets for improving nutrition through biofortification. Biofortification is the process of developing micronutrient-dense staple crops by combining traditional breeding practices with modern biotechnology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How A Nurse With a Hole in Her Skull Changed The Medical History of Migraines
The following is adapted from an excerpt from social and medical historian Katherine Foxhall’s new book, Migraine: A History, published by Johns Hopkins University Press, and out June 18, 2019. In 1936, Alfred Goltman, a physician from Tennessee, reported on one of his cases in the prominent medical journal Allergy. The patient was a 26-year-old woman with a history of headaches, nausea, and vomiting since childhood. Goltman believed the observations he had made on this patient helped reveal the pathological physiology of migraine. He had first met the woman, a registered nurse, in 1931. He recorded that for as lon...
Source: TIME: Health - June 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine Foxhall Tags: Uncategorized Headache History Migraine Source Type: news

Genetically Modified Wheat Found in a Field in Washington State
The unapproved crop is resistant to glyphosate in the weedkiller Roundup, but doesn't seem to have entered the food supply. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - June 9, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

USDA investigates unapproved GMO wheat found in Washington state
The U.S. Department of Agriculture has confirmed the discovery of unapproved, genetically modified (GM) wheat plants growing in an un-planted agricultural field in Washington state. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Behavioural correlations of the domestication syndrome are decoupled in modern dog breeds - Hansen Wheat C, Fitzpatrick JL, Rogell B, Temrin H.
Domestication is hypothesized to drive correlated responses in animal morphology, physiology and behaviour, a phenomenon known as the domestication syndrome. However, we currently lack quantitative confirmation that suites of behaviours are correlated duri... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

Making Mayo's Recipes: Whole-wheat orzo with roasted vegetables
This would be a great dish for the weekend. Make sure you chop the vegetables about the size of cooked orzo. And to make this dish vegetarian, substitute no-salt-added vegetable stock for the chicken stock. Each week, one of the more than 100 video recipes from the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program is featured on the Mayo Clinic [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - June 6, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

MusclMasster LLC Issues Voluntary Nationwide Recall of Al-Er-G Capsules Because it Contains the Banned Substance Ephedra
MusclMasster, LLC of Wheat Ridge, CO is recalling all bottles of Al-Er-G Capsules because they contain the presence of Ephedra Herb, an FDA banned ingredient. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids pose a risk of serious adverse events, including heart attack, stroke, and death, and that these risks are unreasonable in light of any benefits that may result from the use of these products under their labeled conditions of use. (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - June 5, 2019 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: FDA Source Type: news