New study identifies wheat varieties that resist the destructive stripe rust disease
(American Phytopathological Society) Stripe rust is one of the most destructive wheat diseases in the world, especially in the United States. While the disease can be controlled by chemicals, those may be harmful to humans, animals, and the environment and the application can cost millions of dollars. Rather than use chemicals, many farmers would prefer to grow wheat varieties that resist stripe rust and the development of such varieties is a top priority for wheat breeding programs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 17, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What is the Allergen Cross-Reactivity Rate of Legumes?
Discussion There are 8 common foods which compromise 90% of food allergens with those being peanuts, soybeans, cow’s milk, eggs, fish, crustacean/shellfish, wheat and tree nuts. Some people believe that lupin (a legume) is 9th. Legumes belong to the Fabaceae family. They provide protein, fat, vitamins other essential nutrients and therefore are used in the human diet throughout the world. “[A]llergenicity due to consumption of legumes in decreasing order may be peanut, soybean, lentil, chickpea, pea, mung bean and red gram.” Other common legumes include alfalfa, clovers, beans, lupins, mesquite, carob...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - September 14, 2020 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Unmanned aerial vehicles help wheat breeders
(American Society of Agronomy) Usually, breeders pick the best wheat lines by hand, but unmanned aerial vehicles that record certain measures of plant health can help breeders select wheat lines more efficiently. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 3, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Inari secures total of $145 million to advance corn, wheat, soybean seed research
(Purdue University) Inari Agriculture, a biotechnology company developing next-generation seeds, has secured $145 million since its founding less than four years ago and is expanding its operations at its Purdue Research Park-based Seed Foundry. Funding will help Inari advance it research and expand its extensive " toolbox " of proprietary and exclusively licensed technologies to create new products and added production value for farmers around the globe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 2, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Consumer Health: Tips for going gluten-free
Celiac disease is an immune reaction to eating gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and rye. The cause of celiac disease isn't known, but there's good evidence that the disease is becoming more common. A gluten-free diet is essential for managing signs and symptoms of celiac disease. Following a gluten-free diet requires paying careful [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - August 31, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Taylor Farms brand BBQ ranch chopped salad kits recalled due to undeclared allergens: CFIA
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has issued a recall on a type of Taylor Farms brand salad kits that may contain undeclared gluten, sesame and wheat allergens. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - August 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/PEI Source Type: news

'Madsen' wheat as source of disease resistance
(American Society of Agronomy) Researchers show that 'Madsen,' a commonly used wheat variety, is resistant to more pests and diseases than recently thought, making it a good source of genes for breeding better wheat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study calls for review of rice and sugar in food subsidy programme
(Lancaster University) The nutritional benefit of rice and sugar distributed by a national food subsidy programme in India may be limited, says new research published today.India's main food subsidy program, the Public Distribution System (PDS) provides sugar, rice, and wheat to households at reasonably low costs to improve their nutrition intake and attain food security. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Site-directed mutagenesis in wheat via haploid induction by maize
(Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research) Site-directed mutagenesis facilitates the experimental validation of gene function and can speed up plant breeding by producing new biodiversity or by reproducing previously known gene variants in other than their original genetic backgrounds. However, its application is challenging in wheat owing to high genomic redundancy and highly genotype-dependent DNA transfer methods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 21, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

3 ways your employees can stay engaged with their health
For the past several months, the focus of the world has been on Covid-19 – and rightfully so. This is a major health threat that people of all ages should be taking seriously. As the result of this global pandemic, many businesses have had to adapt by moving to work-from-home environments. However, employers should still be doing their part to promote the importance of health and wellness to their employees. After all, a healthier workforce often leads to reduced absenteeism, higher productivity… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 20, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Dr. Deirdre Wheat Source Type: news

Putting zinc on bread wheat leaves
(American Society of Agronomy) Applying zinc to the leaves of bread wheat can increase wheat grain zinc concentrations and improve its nutritional content. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 2, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Patients embracing growing trend of connecting with their doctor virtually
As the result of the Covid-19 pandemic, working from home has become the new normal for millions of Americans. Employers and their employees are now relying heavily on videoconferencing and other forms of technology in order to conduct everyday business and as a replacement for in-office meetings. The same applies to doctor offices, too. While most health care settings remain open, many patients may be wary to visit their doctor, which has opened the door to telehealth. Primary care, specialty and… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Dr. Deirdre Wheat Source Type: news

Patients embracing growing trend of connecting with their doctor virtually
As the result of the Covid-19 pandemic, working from home has become the new normal for millions of Americans. Employers and their employees are now relying heavily on videoconferencing and other forms of technology in order to conduct everyday business and as a replacement for in-office meetings. The same applies to doctor offices, too. While most health care settings remain open, many patients may be wary to visit their doctor, which has opened the door to telehealth. Primary care, specialty and… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 21, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Dr. Deirdre Wheat Source Type: news

Lords seek to allow gene-editing in UK 'to produce healthy, hardier crops'
Changes could introduce gluten-free wheat and disease-resistant fruit and vegetables, say peersPeers are preparing plans to legalise the gene-editing of crops in England, a move that scientists say would offer the nation a chance to develop and grow hardier, more nutritious varieties. The legislation would also open the door to gene-editing of animals.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Science Editor Tags: Genetics Agriculture GM Science Environment Farming Source Type: news

Safeguarding Africa ’s Food Security in the Age of COVID-19
By Pritha Mitra and Seung Mo ChoiJun 5 2020 (IPS) Food security in sub-Saharan Africa is under threat. The ability of many Africans to access sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs has been disrupted by successive natural disasters and epidemics. Cyclones Idai and Kenneth, locust outbreaks in eastern Africa, and droughts in southern and eastern Africa are some examples. The COVID-19 pandemic is just the latest catastrophe to have swollen the ranks of 240 million people going hungry in the region. In some countries, over 70 percent of the population has problems accessing food. Sub-Saharan Africa ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Pritha Mitra and Seung Mo Choi Tags: Africa Aid Climate Change Economy & Trade Food & Agriculture Food Security and Nutrition Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Fire behaviour in wheat crops - effect of fuel structure on rate of fire spread - Cruz MG, Hurley RJ, Bessell R, Sullivan AL.
A field-based experimental study was conducted in 50 × 50 m square plots to investigate the behaviour of free-spreading fires in wheat to quantify the effect of crop condition (i.e. harvested, unharvested and harvested and baled) on the propagation rate o... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Breeding a fungal gene into wheat
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 21, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Wulff, B. B. H., Jones, J. D. G. Tags: perspective Source Type: news

Horizontal gene transfer of Fhb7 from fungus underlies Fusarium head blight resistance in wheat
Fusarium head blight (FHB), a fungal disease caused by Fusarium species that produce food toxins, currently devastates wheat production worldwide, yet few resistance resources have been discovered in wheat germplasm. Here, we cloned the FHB resistance gene Fhb7 by assembling the genome of Thinopyrum elongatum, a species used in wheat distant hybridization breeding. Fhb7 encodes a glutathione S-transferase (GST) and confers broad resistance to Fusarium species by detoxifying trichothecenes through de-epoxidation. Fhb7 GST homologs are absent in plants, and our evidence supports that Th. elongatum has gained Fhb7 through hor...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 21, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Wang, H., Sun, S., Ge, W., Zhao, L., Hou, B., Wang, K., Lyu, Z., Chen, L., Xu, S., Guo, J., Li, M., Su, P., Li, X., Wang, G., Bo, C., Fang, X., Zhuang, W., Cheng, X., Wu, J., Dong, L., Chen, W., Li, W., Xiao, G., Zhao, J., Hao, Y., Xu, Y., Gao, Y., Liu, W Tags: Botany, Genetics, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Tiny particle, big payoff
(University of California - Riverside) UC Riverside scientists have solved a 20-year-old genetics puzzle that could result in ways to protect wheat, barley, and other crops from a devastating infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 15, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists take a step closer to heat-tolerant wheat
(Lancaster University) Researchers working on molecular-level responses in crops have taken a step closer to their goal of producing heat-tolerant wheat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 4, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

COVID-19: India ’ s Harvests also Locked Down
Agricultural markets or mandis have few buyers due to the coronavirus lockdown across India. Credit: Neeta Lal/IPSBy Neeta LalNEW DELHI, Apr 24 2020 (IPS) Heartbreaking images of Indian farmers standing amidst swathes of rotting vegetables, fruits and grain have been flooding newspapers and TV screens lately. Crashing prices and transport bottlenecks due to the 40-day coronavirus lockdown in India, on till May 3, have driven some to set their unsold produce ablaze.    As a nationwide lockdown has confined a record 1.3 billion Indians to their homes since Mar. 24, one of the hardest hit communities has been that o...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Neeta Lal Tags: Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Food & Agriculture Food Security and Nutrition Food Sustainability Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition Foundation (BCF Source Type: news

Food allergy: What ’s on the horizon?
The current COVID-19 emergency has changed so much for those living with the risk of food hypersensitivity – allergy, intolerance and coeliac disease. Pre COVID-19, many initiatives to support those with food hypersensitivity had been gathering momentum: a significant change in food information law for foods prepared and packed on site, some key court cases and an underlying recognition of the exceptional risks, particularly from allergens such as milk and sesameWhilst about half of our food pre-lockdown was prepared and served for us though pubs, restaurants, hotels, schools, workplaces and many other catering ...
Source: The Nutrition Society - April 23, 2020 Category: Nutrition Authors: Jade Mitchell Source Type: news

Good news for the wheat-sensitive among us
(Edith Cowan University) A joint project between Edith Cowan University (ECU) in Australia and CSIRO has revealed key insights about the proteins causing two of the most common types of wheat sensitivity - non-coeliac wheat sensitivity and occupational asthma (baker's asthma). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Recurrent genomic selection for wheat grain fructans
(American Society of Agronomy) Development of Climate-Resilient, Nutritionally Improved Wheat (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Breeding a hardier, more nutritious wheat
(American Society of Agronomy) High-fructan wheat provides benefits for growers and consumers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How probiotic Bifidobacteria could help celiac disease patients
(American Chemical Society) Gluten is enemy No. 1 for those with celiac disease, and it's hard to avoid. Episodes of this chronic autoimmune illness can be triggered by ingesting gluten, a key protein in wheat and some other grains. Researchers have been exploring how gut bacteria, especially Bifidobacteria, could be used as a treatment. Now, scientists publishing the results of laboratory experiments in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry report how specific types of Bifidobacteria work. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 15, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Zimbabwe: Biti Questions Govt Logic in Sinking $2.7b On Failed Wheat Farming Instead of Fighting COVID-19
[New Zimbabwe] MDC Alliance Vice President Tendai Biti has questioned the logic behind government's decision to commit $2.7 billion towards its controversial 2020 Command Winter Programme instead of injecting the scarce funds on fighting the spread of coronavirus. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 13, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

USDA-ARS scientists find new tool to combat major wheat disease
(US Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their colleagues have discovered a gene that can be used to develop varieties of wheat that will be more resistant to a disease that is a major threat both overseas and to the nation's $10 billion annual wheat crop. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 10, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hummus
This easy Mediterranean spread is made with chickpeas. Serve with whole-wheat pita bread. (Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed)
Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed - April 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Help for a wheat fungal disease comes from a surprising source
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 9, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Stokstad, E. Tags: Ecology In Depth Source Type: news

Life in the Times of Corona: Lockdown & Livelihood in the Lurch
Anand Vihar Bus Terminal, New Delhi, March 28, 2020. Credit: IMPRIBy Dr. Balwant Singh Mehta, Dr. Simi Mehta and Dr. Arjun KumarNEW DELHI, Mar 30 2020 (IPS) The worldwide spread of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is severely affecting the global economy and as per the recent updates almost one-third to half of the global population are now under some form of a lockdown. This has threatened an economic bloodbath, where practically all economic activities around the world are witnessing a closure. According to the International Labour Organization, nearly 25 million jobs could be lost worldwide due to the pandemic and ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Dr. Balwant Singh Mehta Tags: Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights TerraViva United Nations OPINION/NGO Source Type: news

Supporting Informal Workers During the COVID-19 Crisis
Credit: Jency Samuel/IPSBy Vijay MahajanHYDERABAD, India, Mar 30 2020 (IPS) Farmers, agricultural labourers, and informal sector workers are the worst hit by COVID-19 and the resulting lockdowns. Here are some steps that the government and banks can take to help them cope financially. According to the last published Census of India data, there are as many as 480.2 million workers in India. Of these, only 30.3 million are in the formal sector; the remaining 93 percent includes 110.9 million farmers, 140.4 million landless agricultural workers, and 210.9 million non-agricultural workers. Almost none of them get a monthly pay...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Vijay Mahajan Tags: Asia-Pacific Headlines Health Labour TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Scientists optimize prime editing for rice and wheat
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) Recently, a research team led by Prof. GAO Caixia of the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the optimization of a prime editing system (PPE system) for creating desired point mutations, insertions and deletions in two major cereal crops, namely, rice and wheat. The main components of a PPE system are a Cas9 nickase-RT fusion protein and a pegRNA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 16, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ancient Wheat Genome Reveals Clues to the Agricultural Past
A museum sample of a 3,000-year-old Egyptian crop plant yields genomic information that helps researchers track the plant ’s domestication and migration. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 1, 2020 Category: Science Tags: Notebook Magazine Issue Source Type: news

Best supplements for cholesterol: The natural supplement shown to lower cholesterol
BEST supplements for cholesterol can seem hard to come by but research can help you separate the wheat from the chaff. While some supplements have only shown to have a modest impact on cholesterol levels, one natural remedy led to a significant reduction in harmful cholesterol. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Novel biotechnological route developed to obtain fine chemicals from agricultural waste
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Preliminary calculations show that the new biotechnological route can increase the value of sugarcane bagasse and wheat straw up to 5,000-fold and multiply the price of ferulic acid by a factor of up to 75 when these residues are converted into coniferol. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pulses for a Sustainable Future
By Zoltán KálmánROME, Feb 10 2020 (IPS) Reducing poverty and inequalities, eliminating hunger and all forms of malnutrition and achieve food insecurity for all – these are some of the most important objectives of the Sustainable Development Goals. Still, the rate of poverty and inequalities is increasing and over 820 million people are going hungry. In addition, 2 billion people in the world are food insecure with great risk of malnutrition and poor health. This alarming situation is further aggravated by current trends such as the rate of population growth, impacts of climate change, loss of bio...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Zoltan Kalman Tags: Climate Change Development & Aid Economy & Trade Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity Natural Resources Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Harrington Seed Destructor kills nearly 100 percent of US agronomic weed seeds in lab study
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) In the battle against herbicide-resistant weeds, farmers are increasingly eager to add non-chemical control methods to their management toolbox. Impact mills, which destroy weed seeds picked up by a combine, have been shown to kill 70-99% of weed seeds in soybeans, wheat, and other small-statured cropping systems. And a recent Weed Science study from the University of Illinois shows even seeds that appear unscathed after impact milling don't germinate the following spring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The 'free from' aisle CON: Health snacks that are dairy, gluten or wheat free are packed with sugar
EXCLUSIVE: A side-by-side comparison of the 'free from' aisle and biscuit section in a London Sainsbury's showed 30 'healthy' products had a higher sugar percentage than a packet of McVitie's. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Overuse of herbicides costing UK economy £ 400 million per year
(Zoological Society of London) Scientists from international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) have for the first time put an economic figure on the herbicidal resistance of a major agricultural weed that is decimating winter-wheat farms across the UK. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 23, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Comparing heirloom and modern wheat effects on gut health
(American Chemical Society) Amid concerns about gluten sensitivity, increasing numbers of people are avoiding wheat. Most have not been diagnosed with a wheat-related medical condition, yet they seem to feel better when they don't eat gluten-containing foods. A possible explanation is that modern varieties of wheat are responsible. But now, researchers reporting in ACS'Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have shown that a popular modern variety does not impair gastrointestinal health in mice compared with heirloom wheat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chicken soup recalled at H-E-B stores in Texas after wheat and soy were left off ingredients label
Canyon Creek Soup Company, which makes H-E-B soup in Canada but distributes it exclusively in Texas, recalled it's Butter Chicken Soup after failing to declare wheat and soy as two ingredients. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Making Mayo's Recipes: Stock your freezer with homemade meatballs
Meatballs are a quick, make-ahead option for turning ground turkey, chicken or lean beef into dinner. You can roll and freeze uncooked meatballs when you have time. Then thaw and bake for 15 minutes on a busy night. Need some ideas for serving meatballs? Make meatball subs made with whole-wheat buns, marinara sauce and a [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - December 12, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Cochrane systematic review informs WHO guidelines, policy
Originally published in the Cornell ChronicleFolate is an essential B-vitamin that is needed for DNA synthesis and cell division. Folate deficiency can lead to anemia, and deficiency early in pregnancy can lead to neural tube defects – birth defects of the brain, spine and spinal cord, including spina bifida.A Cochrane systematic review on the benefits and safety of fortifying wheat or maize flour with folic acid and population health outcomes, led by scientists in the  Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell, found that fortification with folic acid (the synthetic form of folate) may improve folate sta...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - December 10, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Video from RSNA 2019: Dr. Paul Chang on AI and radiology
CHICAGO - What's the current state of the art in artificial intelligence (AI)?...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: What to look for in AI and IT at RSNA 2019 Video from GTC 2019: Dr. Paul Chang gives a reality check to AI in radiology Video from RSNA 2018: Dr. Paul Chang on AI and radiology Video from RSNA 2017: How will AI change radiology?Comments: 12/2/2019 8:28:14 PMJimboboy I was watching Paul Chang interview on AM today. He explains that in order for us to consume AI, we will have to develop the proper infrastructure. By which he means we need to think up ways for us human rads to interface with ...
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 3, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Food storage tips: Why you need to stockpile wheat before SHTF (Plus a recipe for "prepper's bread")
(Natural News) When SHTF, it’s a good thing to have a supply of ready-to-eat meals and snacks to save time on food prep. However, you also need access to ingredients that can be used to make fresh food to ensure that your body gets all the nutrition it needs. This is where wheat comes in. (h/t... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sudan: OCHA Sudan Sitrep - Rift Valley Fever Outbreak in Sudan
[Radio Dabanga] Khartoum -The Sudanese Ministry of Health has announced an outbreak of Rift Valley fever (RVF) in the country. RVF task force committees have been activated in the most affected states of Red Sea and River Nile. Prices of locally grown stable foods began to decline with the start of the harvest in October, while prices of imported wheat increased, the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) reported in its latest Situation Report on Thursday. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 25, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Mexico City to host Interdrought 2020
(International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT)) Interdrought 2020 will take place from March 9 to 13, 2020, in Mexico City. Registration and abstract submissions are now open at www.interdrought2020.com. The congress aims to facilitate the development of concepts, methods and technologies associated with plant production in water-limited environments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How Climate Change is Clobbering Kids ’ Health
Let’s pretend the 195 nations that signed the 2016 Paris Climate Accord really do take all of the steps necessary to reach the agreement’s key goal: limiting the increase in global temperature to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. In that world, any children born today would grow up to witness some happy milestones. If they lived in the United Kingdom, they’d see their country phase out the use of coal by the time they turned six. If they lived in France, they would see gasoline-powered cars eliminated by their 21st birthday. And, as all of the 195 countries similarly reached their individual targets,...
Source: TIME: Health - November 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Children climate change embargoed study Environment global warming health Source Type: news

How Climate Change is Clobbering Kids ’ Health
Let’s pretend the 195 nations that signed the 2016 Paris Climate Accord really do take all of the steps necessary to reach the agreement’s key goal: limiting the increase in global temperature to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. In that world, any children born today would grow up to witness some happy milestones. If they lived in the United Kingdom, they’d see their country phase out the use of coal by the time they turned six. If they lived in France, they would see gasoline-powered cars eliminated by their 21st birthday. And, as all of the 195 countries similarly reached their individual targets,...
Source: TIME: Science - November 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Children climate change embargoed study Environment global warming health Source Type: news