New Lipid-Lowering Drug Earns FDA Approval New Lipid-Lowering Drug Earns FDA Approval
The non-statin drug bempedoic acid was granted approval for adults with familial hypercholesterolemia or established atherosclerotic CVD.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - February 21, 2020 Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiology News Alert Source Type: news

More Evidence Backs LDL Below 70 to Reduce Recurrent Stroke More Evidence Backs LDL Below 70 to Reduce Recurrent Stroke
Following an ischemic stroke with evidence of atherosclerosis, targeting a lower LDL cholesterol level was associated with avoidance of major cardiac events on follow-up, new evidence demonstrates.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - February 21, 2020 Category: Cardiology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Quick tips for diabetic foot ulcer wound care
If you have diabetes, you know you're more prone to injury than the average patient. Foot ulcers are especially common for those with diabetes – and can unfortunately lead to hospitalization or infection. In fact, 14 to 24 percent of patients with diabetes who develop a foot ulcer will need an amputation, according to American Podiatric Medical Association. The reason foot ulcers tend to prey on diabetic patients is because the condition causes reduced circulation in the extremities, often leading to neuropathy. This lack of feeling makes it difficult for diabetic patients to recognize the pain before the sore be...
Source: Advanced Tissue - February 20, 2020 Category: Dermatology Authors: AdvancedTissue Tags: diabetic wound care Source Type: news

Plant-based relatives of cholesterol could give boost to gene therapy
(Oregon State University) Gene-infused nanoparticles used for combating disease work better when they include plant-based relatives of cholesterol because their shape and structure help the genes get where they need to be inside cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Follow-up study suggests brain stents are safe and effective for reducing recurrent stroke risk
(American Heart Association) Placing stents in cholesterol-clogged brain arteries may be an option to reduce the risk of a repeat stroke.However, it is too soon to know if stenting in the brain arteries improves long-term patient outcomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Clinicians in the dark about potential harms of commonly prescribed beta blocker
Better understanding needed to stave off overdose deaths, warns HSIB Related items fromOnMedica Withdrawn valsartan meds not linked to short-term cancer risk Too few women take part in many CVD clinical trials Pharmacists could offer high-dose statins direct to patients Cannabinoids not recommended to treat cancer-related pain GPs defend practice on prescribing statins (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 19, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Statins 'block an enzyme thought to trigger ovarian cancer' 
Women who naturally exhibit lower levels of an enzyme blocked by statins have an estimated 40 per cent lower risk of ovarian cancer, a study by Bristol University found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could statins lower the risk of ovarian cancer?
In the UK, ovarian cancer is the sixth most common cancer in females*. A new study has found evidence to suggest that statins could lower the risk of women developing ovarian cancer. The research led by the University of Bristol, and funded by Cancer Research UK, is published today [18 February] in JAMA. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 18, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, Research, International; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, Institutes, Bristol Population Health Science Institute; Press Release Source Type: news

Heart attack: Study confirms popular breakfast food not associated with heart attack risk
HEART ATTACKS are often caused by coronary heart disease, and risk of developing this is increased by a high-fat diet, high cholesterol and being overweight or obese. Research in the past has found a link between eating certain foods and heart disease, but a new study has confirmed a popular breakfast food is not as bad as first though. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Best supplements for cholesterol: Two of the best according to studies
BEST supplements for cholesterol: Cholesterol is an organic molecule and a type of liquid. It's essential for a healthy body, however, like a double edged sword, having too much of it puts a person at greater risk of serious cardiovascular diseases. Fortunately, there is a healthy and easy way to reduce one's cholesterol and taking these two supplements could make all the difference. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How low is too low? Lowering "bad" cholesterol by using medication could be bad for you, warn experts
(Natural News) Is there really “good” cholesterol and “bad” cholesterol? The medical community has branded low density lipoprotein, or LDL, cholesterol “bad” because high levels are linked to plaque buildup in the arteries, heart disease, and risk of ischemic stroke. However, a new study from Penn State University argues that LDL cholesterol is necessary in... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cholesterol Drugs Might Help Curb Prostate Cancers
The study couldn't prove cause and effect, but it found that statins, taken alone or with metformin, did seem associated with an increase in survival. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cholesterol Drugs Might Help Curb ‘ High - Risk ’ Prostate Cancers
(Source: Fertility News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Fertility News - Doctors Lounge - February 14, 2020 Category: Reproduction Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Oncology, Pharmacy, Reproductive Medicine, Diabetes, News, Source Type: news

Cholesterol Drugs Might Help Curb'High-Risk' Prostate Cancers
FRIDAY, Feb. 14, 2020 -- Drugs that many men with prostate cancer might already be taking -- cholesterol-lowering statins -- may help extend their survival if they have a " high-risk " form of the disease, new research suggests. High-risk patients... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 14, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Cholesterol Drugs Might Help Curb 'High-Risk' Prostate Cancers
Title: Cholesterol Drugs Might Help Curb 'High-Risk' Prostate CancersCategory: Health NewsCreated: 2/14/2020 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 2/14/2020 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - February 14, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic study looks at changes in outcomes for coronary revascularization
(Mayo Clinic) The most common type of heart disease -- coronary artery disease -- affects 6.7% of adults and accounts for 20% of 2 in 10 deaths of adults under age 65. The condition builds over time as inflammation and cholesterol-containing plaques settle in the heart's arteries, where they can eventually cause narrowing and blockages that lead to a heart attack. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

#DYK African American women often have more heart attack risk factors than white women, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol & diabetes? Get tips on managing these conditions & making #HeartHealthy decisions: http://www.fda.gov/womenshearthealth   … via @FDAWomen
#DYK African American women often have more heart attack risk factors than white women, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol & diabetes? Get tips on managing these conditions & making #HeartHealthy decisions: http://www.fda.gov/womenshearthealth … via @FDAWomen (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - February 13, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: ( at US_FDA) Source Type: news

Fears China ’s lockdown could impact on medicines supplies
Department of Health and Social Care asks medicines suppliers to assess risks and hold on to Brexit stockpiles Related items fromOnMedica Remedy quest GPs need more time to treat complex needs Pharmacists could offer high-dose statins direct to patients Clinicians need better options if we are to stop over-medication Poor pain management - a major cause of opioid crisis (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 13, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

More healthcare professionals to be allowed to prescribe
The Medicines and Medical Devices Bill will expand number of prescribers of low-risk medicines to reduce GP workload Related items fromOnMedica Variations in uptake of prescribing guidance impact on patients Antibiotic scrip rates lower in CAM-trained practices Pharmacists could offer high-dose statins direct to patients Clinicians need better options if we are to stop over-medication NI launches ‘One Health’ plan to tackle antimicrobial resistance (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 13, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Good oral hygiene isn’t just for the mouth: It benefits brain health too
(Natural News) Heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases (e.g., stroke) are the leading causes of death in western countries. These diseases are caused by several factors, such as hypertension, high blood cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, smoking and obesity. However, recent studies have found that there is another unexpected contributor to the development of atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis (blood clot... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

PET shows cardiac meds may reduce beta-amyloid buildup
Patients who were on cardiovascular medications like cholesterol-lowering drugs...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Amyloid-PET advocates take their case to Congress PET/MRI sheds light on cerebral vascular risk factors PET model tracks beta amyloid, Alzheimer's risk Florbetapir-PET links lack of financial acumen to dementia Alzheimer's biomarkers could affect races differently (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 12, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Key Features of the 2018 Guidelines on Cholesterol Management Key Features of the 2018 Guidelines on Cholesterol Management
This article summarizes the main clinical recommendations as presented in the 2018 Guideline on the Management of Blood Cholesterol, a collaborative effort of key cardiology societies.American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - February 12, 2020 Category: Pathology Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Best supplement for cholesterol: Take this leaf extract daily to lower your cholesterol
BEST supplements for cholesterol: Your body needs a healthy amount of cholesterol to build healthy cells but having too much of a certain type of the waxy substance can pose grave health risks. While there is no one solution to reducing harmful levels of cholesterol, taking a natural leaf extract daily has been shown to lower "bad" cholesterol. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Chemical found in drinking water linked to tooth decay in children
IMAGE: Being exposed to PFAS--a class of chemicals found in drinking water--has been linked to higher rates of cancer, heart disease, thyroid dysfunction and other conditions. WVU School of Dentistry researchers...viewmore Credit: Aira Burkhart/West Virginia University Children with higher concentrations of a certain chemical in their blood are more likely to get cavities, according to a new study byWest Virginia UniversitySchool of Dentistry researchers. Manufactured chemical g roups called perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances are universal as a result of extensive manufacturing and use. Although manuf...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - February 11, 2020 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Statins may lower mortality in high-risk prostate cancer patients
(Thomas Jefferson University) Statin use alone or with metformin is associated with lower prostate cancer mortality from all causes, among high-risk patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 10, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Adverse drug reactions of statins in children and adolescents: a descriptive analysis from VigiBase, the WHO global database of individual case safety reports - Conte C, Rousseau V, Vert C, Montastruc F, Montastruc JL, Durrieu G, Olivier P.
In adults, statins safety profile is well known. However, literature data on their adverse drug reactions (ADRs) remain scarce in children in real life setting. In order to better characterize ADRs related to "real-life" use of statins in children, we revi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

7 Benefits that make coconut oil a really healthy "fat"
(Natural News) Coconut oil originally had a bad rap among health experts and health buffs alike, being branded with terms like “deadly” or “unhealthy.” This is mostly due to its significant saturated fat content, which experts claim to increase cholesterol levels and increase your risk of a heart attack. However, coconut oil eventually dragged itself... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eggs May Not Be Unhealthy For The Heart, Study Says
BOSTON (CBS) — For years doctors have warned people with high cholesterol not to eat too many eggs, but a new large study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition finds regular egg consumption may not be that bad for the heart. Researchers in Canada looked at data on almost 180,000 people from 50 countries and found that people who ate at least an egg a day were no more likely to have high cholesterol, cardiovascular events like heart attacks or strokes and no more likely to die prematurely than people who rarely ate eggs. That said, you can make eggs unhealthy by adding unhealthy fats, so be careful h...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch News Syndicated CBSN Boston Dr. Mallika Marshall Health News Heart Health Source Type: news

Healthy Habits Backslide After Starting Heart Meds
Healthy Habits Backslide After Starting Statins, Antihypertensives (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - February 6, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Study finds that statins CAUSE Type 2 diabetes
(Natural News) If you’ve ever suspected that certain medical treatments seem to be trading one problem for another, you may be onto something. Case in point: A recent study revealed that people who take statins in hopes of reducing their risk of cardiovascular events could be raising their risk of diabetes in the process. In... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Healthy Habits Backslide After Starting Statins, Antihypertensives Healthy Habits Backslide After Starting Statins, Antihypertensives
New findings suggest initiating these preventive medications is associated with lifestyle changes, some positive and others negative.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - February 6, 2020 Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Largest ever evaluation of the cardiovascular risk of rosiglitazone published
Analysis of raw individual patient level data gives more accurate picture of drug ’s link to heart problems Related items fromOnMedica People on statins at greater risk of skin infections and diabetes Adding insulin to metformin linked to higher mortality Vitamin D does not reduce kidney damage in type 2 diabetes Raised risk of MI and mortality when starting sulfonylurea Use of DPP-4 inhibitors associated with increased risk of IBD (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 6, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Normal resting heart rate varies widely
Normal resting heart rate can vary from person to person by up to 70 beats per minute Related items fromOnMedica Good midlife heart health linked to lower dementia risk later on Patients question GPs ’ motives for prescribing statins Papworth Hospital cleared to resume heart ops Marathon running can boost vascular age Migraine may be linked to heightened cardiovascular disease risk (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 6, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Heart Medications Can Make Healthy Habits Slide
Of more than 41,000 middle-aged Finnish adults researchers followed, those who started on cholesterol or blood pressure drugs were more likely to stop exercising or gain weight in the years afterward. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Statins and blood pressure pills are not a 'free pass' to avoid healthy habits, experts warn
A study of 40,000 people in Finland suggests unhealthy habits could render the drugs - which are supposed to prevent life-threatening events such as heart attack and stroke - pointless. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Healthy Habits Can Slide After Starting Heart Medications
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 5, 2020 -- Some people let healthy habits fall by the wayside after they start medications for high cholesterol or high blood pressure, a new study finds. Of more than 41,000 middle-aged Finnish adults researchers followed, those... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 5, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Some Lifestyle Changes Suffer With Start of Meds to Cut CV Risk
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 5, 2020 -- Initiation of antihypertensive and statin medication is associated with favorable and unfavorable lifestyle changes, according to a study published online Feb. 5 in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Maarit J.... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 5, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New Study Finds an Egg a Day Does Not Increase Cardiovascular Risk
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 5, 2020 -- One egg per day is not tied to an increase in the risk for heart disease, including cholesterol levels, according to a study published onlune Jan. 21 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Mahshid Dehghan, Ph.D.,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 5, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

People on blood pressure, cholesterol meds often let healthy habits slip
Finnish researchers found that adults in their country at risk for heart disease and stroke who took cholesterol- or blood pressure-lowering medications were more likely to reduce their activity levels and gain weight. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Meds are not a ‘free pass’ to start or maintain bad habits
People who started CVD meds were more likely to gain weight and cut exercise, as well as to drink less and quit smoking Related items fromOnMedica Should we recognise obesity as a disease? Statins of small and uncertain benefit in primary prevention Vitamin D supplements do not confer cardiovascular protection Pharmacists could offer high-dose statins direct to patients More Scottish GPs needed to fight heart disease (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 5, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

A potential cholesterol-lowering agent in olive leaves?
(Natural News) Diabetes, particularly Type 2 diabetes, is now considered a global pandemic. According to the World Health Organization, the global prevalence of diabetes among adults has risen from five percent to nearly nine percent in 2014. Diabetes is a chronic condition that can cause blindness, heart attacks, kidney failure, stroke and even death. Statistics show that in 2016, diabetes... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Liquid biopsy is effective predictor of melanoma relapse
Assessment of circulating tumour cells at first clinic visit could help identify patients who need most aggressive therapy Related items fromOnMedica Cancer patients using complementary meds die sooner UK cancer survival improved, but lags behind similar nations Is crowdfunding for cancer patients paying for ‘quackery’? NHS must improve access to screening to save lives Pharmacists could offer high-dose statins direct to patients (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 4, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Doctors unite with campaigners in calling for smokefree 2030
Government must force tobacco manufacturers to fund measures to make England smokefree by 2030 Related items fromOnMedica NHS must improve access to screening to save lives Cancer strategies failed to improve one-year survival Pharmacists could offer high-dose statins direct to patients Doctors urge government to act on rising alcohol impact Health-focused line on drugs misuse would save lives and money (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 4, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Best supplements for cholesterol: This seed is proven to help lower your levels
BEST supplements for cholesterol: High cholesterol can cause a dangerous accumulation in the body and the walls of the arteries. Eating too much fatty foods increases a person's level of LDL cholesterol in the blood. There is a way to help counteract the buildup of cholesterol and taking a certain seed could help. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

1% of doctors account for half of all opioid doses and a quarter of scrips in US
Efforts to discourage inappropriate opioid prescribing should focus on those high prescribers and their patients Related items fromOnMedica Health-focused line on drugs misuse would save lives and money Marijuana legalisation linked to rise in abuse and car crashes Statins of small and uncertain benefit in primary prevention Pharmacists could offer high-dose statins direct to patients Prescription drug dependence linked to deprivation (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - January 31, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Statin drugs claim to lower cholesterol but are INEFFECTIVE at preventing heart disease
(Natural News) We’ve all had it drilled into our heads that high cholesterol is bad and bringing it down with statins can prevent a heart attack. However, that doesn’t explain why many people who take statins still end up developing cardiovascular disease. A recent study shows that there’s far more to the cardiovascular disease equation... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

LDL and Stroke Prevention: How Low to Go LDL and Stroke Prevention: How Low to Go
Dr Christoph Diener reviews a new study looking at cholesterol management in secondary stroke prevention, plus other recent studies in neurology.Medscape Neurology (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - January 29, 2020 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Commentary Source Type: news

Working together to prevent strokes in Copeland
Kevin Walsh of the Rotary Club and Julie Clayton, Head of Communications and Engagement at NHS North Cumbria Clinical Commissioning Group, explain how they have helped identify people at risk of stroke Related items fromOnMedica Ending the postcode lottery of stroke care Low cholesterol may increase risk for haemorrhagic stroke Traffic exhaust fumes at residential address increases the risk of stroke Good sleep patterns can reduce susceptibility to heart disease and stroke Innovative stroke detection monitor given green light (Source: OnMedica Views)
Source: OnMedica Views - January 28, 2020 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

A new model has been developed that simulates the accumulation of lipids in membranes
(Universitat Rovira i Virgili) A team of physicists has designed an experiment that simulates the formation of a new type of lipid raft on a nanometric scale. The researchers has also discovered a new role of cholesterol that will help to understand the development of some diseases and cell processes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Does "bad cholesterol" have a role in early-onset Alzheimer's disease?
(Natural News) Alzheimer’s disease is a chronic illness that robs a person of his memory and thinking skills. In the US, as many as five million adults suffer from this debilitating illness, with most symptoms appearing after age 60, based on data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, there are some cases where people develop symptoms... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news