When'Good' Cholesterol Is Bad for Older Women
FRIDAY, July 20, 2018 -- HDL cholesterol may be known as the " good " kind, but a new study suggests high levels of it are not always a good thing for women after menopause. The study, of nearly 1,400 postmenopausal women, found that those with... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 20, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

New study shows video games can improve health in children with obesity
(Louisiana State University) A new study from LSU's Pennington Biomedical Research Center showed for the first time that video games, in combination with fitness coaching and a step tracker, helped overweight children lose weight, lower their blood pressure and cholesterol and increase their physical activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Good cholesterol may increase risk of heart disease in older women
Hormonal changes during menopause can cause the 'healthy' HDL blood fat to become harmful - by enlarging the particles, say scientists at the University of Pittsburgh. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: 'Good cholesterol' may not be good in older women
" Good cholesterol " may not be a good indicator an older woman has a lower risk of developing cardiovascular disease, according to a study. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - July 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Good cholesterol' may not always be good
(University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences) Postmenopausal factors may have an impact on the heart-protective qualities of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) -- also known as 'good cholesterol.' The findings bring into question the current use of total HDL cholesterol to predict heart disease risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sleep Tied to Teenagers ’ Metabolic Health
Adolescents who got enough sleep had a lower risk of metabolic problems. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Sleep Cholesterol Blood Pressure Teenagers and Adolescence Source Type: news

In Vivo Gene Editing Lowers Cholesterol in Animal Model In Vivo Gene Editing Lowers Cholesterol in Animal Model
Inactivation of the gene PCSK9 in macaque liver using targeted meganuclease-mediated DNA breaks leads to stable reduction of serum cholesterol levels, researchers report.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - July 18, 2018 Category: Pathology Tags: Pathology & Lab Medicine News Source Type: news

Is Shellfish Healthy? Here ’s What the Experts Say
With all the talk about the disease-fighting, life-extending superpowers of the Mediterranean diet, a lot of people are trying to cram more seafood into their meals. But while there are endless articles extolling the healthful glories of fatty, omega-3-rich fish like salmon and mackerel, there’s not much talk about shellfish—or whether these sea creatures deserve space on your shopping list. As it turns out, they do. “Shellfish are high-quality protein sources—just like land animals—meaning they have all the essential amino acids,” says Faye Dong, professor emerita of food science and hu...
Source: TIME: Health - July 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

How fish oil supplements can CUT levels of good fat
THE millions who down fish oil to protect their heart would do better to eat vegetables instead, say experts. Popular supplements, including omega-3, provide little or no benefit and could even reduce levels of “good” cholesterol, analysis of studies showed. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientific expert reaction to Cochrane Review on omega-3 fatty acids
This study provides no evidence to suggest that this dietary advice should change.”Read the press releaseSee the media coverageDeclared interestsProf Tim Chico: “No conflicts.”Dr Ian Johnson: “Ian Johnson has previously held honorary academic appointments in the medical school at the University of East Anglia.”Prof Tom Sanders: “Scientific governor of British Nutrition Foundation, Honorary Director of Nutrition HEART UK.”The Science Media CentreThe Science Media Centre is an independent venture working to promote the voices, stories and views from the scientific community to the ne...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 17, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

FDA: Some Rx Drugs May Become Available Without Seeing a Doctor
TUESDAY, July 17, 2018 -- A new draft guideline from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration suggests Americans could get widely used prescription medicines for cholesterol, high blood pressure, asthma, and migraine headaches without having to see a... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 17, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Sleep Tied to Teenagers ’ All-Around Health
Adolescents who got enough sleep had a lower risk of metabolic problems. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Sleep Cholesterol Blood Pressure Teenagers and Adolescence Source Type: news

Tackling Stigma
Sadly, stigma around health conditions remains a part of many patients ’ lives. Many will not disclose a diagnosis for fear of being judged by peers, employers, health professionals, colleagues and wider society. In fact, there is clear evidence that such negative societal attitudes impact health outcomes, resulting in diagnosis delays and impaired treatment.Some diseases are heavily stigmatized – including mental health, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis and some skin conditions – leading people to restrict their participation in society, impairing their chances of living happy, healthy lives.However, to one extent or...
Source: EyeForPharma - July 17, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Lucy Fulford Source Type: news

Women with high cholesterol may struggle to have more than one child
The study, published in the BMJ Open journal, tracked Norwegian women aged 20 and over between 1994 and 2003. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Cochrane health evidence challenges belief that omega 3 supplements reduce risk of heart disease, stroke or death
New evidence published today shows there is little or no effect of omega 3 supplements on our risk of experiencing heart disease, stroke or death.Omega 3 is a type of fat. Small amounts of omega 3 fats are essential for good health, and they can be found in the food that we eat. The main types of omega 3 fatty acids are; alpha ­linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).  ALA is normally found in fats from plant foods, such as nuts and seeds (walnuts and rapeseed are rich sources). EPA and DHA, collectively called long chain omega 3 fats, are naturally found in fatty fish, su...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 16, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Heart attack symptoms: This food could help lower cholesterol and prevent the condition
HEART attack signs and symptoms include chest pain and breaking into a cold sweat. It could be possible to avoid the condition, however, by eating a healthy diet and exercising. Adding this food to the diet could help, they said. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers Find Link Between Vitamin D and Asbestosis
This study was not designed to explain whether supplementing with vitamin D will protect against asbestosis. This new research also does not examine if taking vitamin D will slow down the progression of existing ILD. Still, there are a lot of good reasons to pay attention to the sunshine vitamin. Regardless of whether a person has been exposed to asbestos, no one should ignore very low vitamin D levels. People already diagnosed with an asbestos-related cancer, may benefit from a quick check of vitamin D levels. According to the medical literature, up to 80 percent of people with cancer may be vitamin D deficient. People ca...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 16, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Heart attacks symptoms: Oranges could help lower cholesterol and prevent the condition
HEART attack signs and symptoms include chest pain and breaking into a cold sweat. It could be possible to avoid the condition, however, by eating a healthy diet and exercising. Adding this food to the diet could help, they said. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Is it true that 'healthy obesity' boosts death risk?
New research questions whether metabolically healthy obesity — obesity without diabetes, hypertension, or high cholesterol — actually increases mortality. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness Source Type: news

Are you eating too much avocado? Probably!
Avocados are packed with fiber, potassium, vitamin C, and healthy fat that helps to lower your bad cholesterol levels. But one avocado is 300 calories, and you can get the benefits with much less. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Recommended Dose podcast - JAMA Internal Medicine's Rita Redberg
This week influential Editor-in-Chief ofJAMA Internal Medicine Dr Rita Redberg joins host Ray Moynihan on Cochrane Australia's podcastThe Recommended Dose to share a wide ranging conversation on all things health. A Professor at the University of California San Francisco and high profile contributor to The Washington Post and New York Times, Rita is also a practising cardiologist who loves to see patients. She says that ‘being a doctor is really a privilege’.Together, Ray and Rita canvas many topics including shared decision making between doctors and patients, the tricky territory of medical device a...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 12, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

The Recommended Dose podcast - JAMA Internal Medicine's Rita Redberg
This week influential Editor-in-Chief ofJAMA Internal Medicine Dr Rita Redberg joins host Ray Moynihan on Cochrane Australia's podcastThe Recommended Dose to share a wide ranging conversation on all things health. A Professor at the University of California San Francisco and high profile contributor to The Washington Post and New York Times, Rita is also a practising cardiologist who loves to see patients. She says that ‘being a doctor is really a privilege’.Together, Ray and Rita canvas many topics including shared decision making between doctors and patients, the tricky territory of medical device a...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 12, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Systematic review examines walnut consumption on cardiovascular risk factors
(Edelman Seattle) An updated systematic review from Harvard University examines 25 years of evidence for the role of walnut consumption on cardiovascular risk factors, including cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, and weight. A diet supplemented with walnuts resulted in a significantly greater percent decrease in total cholesterol (3.25 percent), LDL cholesterol (3.73 percent), triglycerides (5.52 percent), and apolipoprotein B (4.19 percent). (Apolipoprotein B is the primary protein found in LDL cholesterol.) (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study: LDL quality is a novel, modifiable cardiovascular risk marker
(University of Helsinki) The presence of sticky, aggregation-prone LDL in circulation is an independent predictor of cardiovascular death. This novel finding indicates that in addition to LDL-cholesterol levels, the quality of the cholesterol-carrying LDL particles also needs to be considered when estimating the cardiovascular risk of a person, say the researchers from the University of Helsinki and Wihuri Research Institute. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gene Editing Reduces Monkeys & rsquo; Cholesterol
The results could lead to a treatment to lower cholesterol in patients with hypercholesterolemia. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - July 10, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Gene Editing Reduces Monkeys' Cholesterol
The results could lead to a treatment to lower cholesterol in patients with hypercholesterolemia. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - July 10, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Gene editing shown to lower cholesterol in monkeys
In a first-of-its kind study, genome editing is proven to reduce 'bad' cholesterol in large animals. The findings pave the way for human clinical trials. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cholesterol Source Type: news

Study Confirms Pro-Calcific Effects of Statins on Coronary Plaques in Low-Risk Patients Study Confirms Pro-Calcific Effects of Statins on Coronary Plaques in Low-Risk Patients
In patients without a history of coronary artery disease, statin use is associated with a slower progression of overall coronary atherosclerosis volume, a reduction of high-risk plaque features and accelerated plaque calcification, according to a new report from PARADIGM, a prospective multinational observational registry.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines - July 9, 2018 Category: Radiology Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Drink more black ginseng tea to prevent diabetes
(Natural News) Ginseng, a herb that’s been used in many traditional systems of medicine in Asia, can improve abnormally high levels of glucose, as well as blood cholesterol, to effectively regulate – or even prevent – Type 2 diabetes, according to a study by researchers from South Korea. In particular, researchers identified black ginseng, a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Portfolio Diet lowers cholesterol, inflammation and heart disease
(Source: St. Michael's Hospital News and Media)
Source: St. Michael's Hospital News and Media - July 6, 2018 Category: Hospital Management Tags: Hospital News Source Type: news

Vegetarian Diet Improves HbA1c, Reduces CV Risk in Diabetes Vegetarian Diet Improves HbA1c, Reduces CV Risk in Diabetes
Experts say a literature review builds on evidence that moving toward a vegetarian diet can help people with type 2 diabetes lower HbA1c and cholesterol and improve other cardiometabolic risk factors.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Post-stroke statin use linked to lower fracture risk
Patients treated with statins after a stroke show lower incidence of fractures, a study in the Journal of Clinical Metabolism reports.Healio (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - July 6, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Alfred Alberts, Lovastatin Discoverer, Dies
The Merck biochemist found the compound that led to a popular cholesterol-lowering drug. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - July 5, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Rhabdomyolysis and AKI Following Atorvastatin-Gemfibrozil Rhabdomyolysis and AKI Following Atorvastatin-Gemfibrozil
This case report demonstrates that severe rhabdomyolysis due to statins with or without fibrates may occur with few clinical symptoms and signs, even many weeks after discontinuation of therapy.Journal of Medical Case Reports (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - July 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care Journal Article Source Type: news

Alfred Alberts, Unsung Father of a Cholesterol Drug, Dies at 87
His discovery led to lovastatin, but he shunned the limelight — until he was a patient himself and doctors, learning who he was, treated him “ like a rock star. ” (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Alberts, Alfred W (1931-2018) Deaths (Obituaries) Statins (Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs) Merck & Company Inc Vagelos, P Roy Source Type: news

Preeclampsia Can Mean Higher Heart Risks Later
Women who had preeclampsia may be at higher risk for high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and high cholesterol later in life, new research suggests. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - July 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High blood pressure in pregnancy tied to heart disease risk afterward
(Reuters Health) - Women who develop high blood pressure during pregnancy may be more likely to experience it again later or be diagnosed with other risk factors for heart disease like high cholesterol or diabetes, a U.S. study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Hypertension in Pregnancy May Foretell Lifetime of Problems
(MedPage Today) -- Tied to risks of chronic high blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes (Source: MedPage Today Nephrology)
Source: MedPage Today Nephrology - July 2, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: news

Preeclampsia in Pregnancy Can Mean Heart Risks After
MONDAY, July 2, 2018 -- Women who have high blood pressure or preeclampsia during pregnancy might be more prone to developing hypertension, type 2 diabetes and high cholesterol afterwards, new research suggests. The emergence of these heart disease... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

10 Reasons why unfiltered apple cider vinegar is good for your health
(Natural News) If you are always on the lookout for the next big thing in health and wellness, you probably have heard of the health benefits of apple cider vinegar. Apple cider vinegar (ACV) contains a wealth of raw enzymes and beneficial bacteria and the fermentation process accounts for the many health benefits like lowering cholesterol... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dr Reddy's recalls 2.36 lakh bottles of cholesterol lowering tablets from US
A class III recall is initiated in a situation in which use of, or exposure to, a violative product is not likely to cause adverse health consequences. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - July 1, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Boysenberries found to improve cholesterol, help prevent heart disease
(Natural News) Eating delicious boysenberries can improve cholesterol and prevent heart disease, reported a Japanese study. During an earlier study, Japanese researchers from Toyo University found out that boysenberries packed more polyphenols than raspberries. Polyphenols are micronutrients that prevent degenerative diseases like heart disease, the second biggest cause of death in Japan. Boysenberries are also a potential source of antioxidants, which reduce... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mistrust may partly explain racial differences in statin use
(Reuters Health) - Black people in the U.S. are less likely than whites to take statins recommended to lower their cholesterol, and mistrust of the drugs and of doctors may partly explain the disparity, a recent study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Young binge drinkers may have higher heart risks
(American Heart Association) Young adults who said they frequently binge drink were more likely to have certain risk factors for cardiovascular disease than non-binge drinkers. Young men who reported that they repeatedly binge drink had higher systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol while young women who repeatedly binge drink had higher blood sugar levels compared to non-binge drinkers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Targeting inflammation molecules reduces heart and liver disease in mice
In mouse studies, researchers found mechanisms connecting molecules thought to promote inflammation and the increased risk of diseases caused by a high-cholesterol diet. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - June 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Matthew Walker on why sleep health is the "elixir of life"
New data suggests lack of sleep early in life can raise the risk of heart disease later. Research published in Pediatrics connects insufficient sleep in young teens to cardiac risk factors, including high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol and obesity. In the book, "Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams," Matthew Walker says sleep is underestimated as a prevention of disease. Walker, director of the Center for Human Sleep Science at the University of California-Berkeley, joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss the importance of sleep. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - June 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AHA: Can a Daily Cup of Tea Do a Heart Good?
MONDAY, June 25, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- The latest study on the coffee alternative suggests at least a cup a day may help your body cling to heart-helping " good cholesterol " as you age. Previous research has suggested more tea may... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 25, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Consuming Moringa oleifera powder is beneficial for diabetics
(Natural News) Researchers from the University of Guadalajara in Mexico have suggested that powdered Moringa oleifera leaves could provide some benefit for people with diabetes. In the study, published in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, the effects of M. oleifera on glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, corporal weight, and predominant groups of microbiota were evaluated. M. oleifera has been... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news