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Weekend Recipe: Steel-Cut Oats and Chai Porridge
The cold weather inspires me to nourish myself with warm foods and there’s no better warm, comfort food than porridge. I love the creamy and chewy texture of steel-cut oats, slowly simmered with warming aromatics such as vanilla bean, cinnamon and ginger. You can also add other spices or fruits such as smashed banana or diced apple. When serving this porridge, it’s important to have an extra pot of steaming hot milk on the side, ready to pour over. I think serving with hot milk is probably the most important rule in porridge making as it allows all the flavours to come together in perfect balance. You can serv...
Source: TIME: Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Teresa Cutter — The Healthy Chef Tags: Uncategorized Food healthytime Recipes Source Type: news

The Moment Of Truth Is Coming For Struggling And Expensive Cholesterol Drugs
The future of the expensive new cholesterol drugs largely depends on the results of the Sanofi/Regeneron ODYSSEY Outcomes trial coming out next month. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - February 15, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Larry Husten, Contributor Tags: NYSE:SNY NASDAQ:REGN NASDAQ:AMGN Source Type: news

HOPE-3: No Effect of CVD Drugs on Erectile Function HOPE-3: No Effect of CVD Drugs on Erectile Function
A prespecified analysis of the large HOPE-3 trial finds neither help nor harm on erectile function from cardiovascular drugs, including statins or the antihypertensive combination of candesartan plus low-dose thiazide.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Cholesterol-removing gene may prevent heart disease
Researchers have discovered that a gene once believed to be 'useless' actually helps to remove excess cholesterol from the blood vessels. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Newly discovered gene may protect against heart disease
Scientists have identified a gene that may play a protective role in preventing heart disease. Their research revealed that the gene, called MeXis, acts within key cells inside clogged arteries to help remove excess cholesterol from blood vessels.Published in the journal  Nature Medicine, the UCLA-led study in mice found that MeXis controls the expression of a protein that pumps cholesterol out of cells in the artery wall.MeXis is an example of a “selfish” gene, one that is presumed to have no function because it does not make a protein product. However, recent studies have suggested that these so-called &...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Chemicals in packaging, carpets and non-stick pans 'may contribute to obesity'
Studies have also linked compounds called perfluoroalkyl substances to cancer, high cholesterol and immune problemsChemicals used to make non-stick pots and pans, stain-resistant carpets, and food packaging may contribute to high levels of obesity by disrupting the body ’s ability to burn calories, scientists say.Researchers at Harvard University examined the effects of compounds calledperfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), which have already raised concerns among some health experts after animal experiments and other studies linked them to cancer, high cholesterol and immune problems.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Source Type: news

Chemicals In Food Wrappers Are Linked to Weight Gain
Chemicals known as perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)—used frequently in fast-food wrappers and other products for their oil- and water-repellant properties—have been linked to hormone disruption, immune dysfunction, high cholesterol and even cancer. Now, a new study suggests that exposure to the chemicals could make it harder to keep weight off after dieting. The study, published in PLOS Medicine, found that levels of PFAS in the blood were linked to greater weight gain in a group of people who had recently shed pounds, especially among the women. Another finding may hint at why: People with higher blood levels ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Environmental Chemicals Found in Non-Stick Pans Are Linked to Weight Gain
Chemicals known as perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)—used frequently in fast-food wrappers and other products for their oil- and water-repellant properties—have been linked to hormone disruption, immune dysfunction, high cholesterol and even cancer. Now, a new study suggests that exposure to the chemicals could make it harder to keep weight off after dieting. The study, published in PLOS Medicine, found that levels of PFAS in the blood were linked to greater weight gain in a group of people who had recently shed pounds, especially among the women. Another finding may hint at why: People with higher blood levels ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

PFASs, chemicals commonly found in environment, may interfere with body weight regulation
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) Boston, MA - A class of chemicals used in many industrial and consumer products was linked with greater weight gain after dieting, particularly among women, according to a study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The chemicals -- perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) -- have been linked with cancer, hormone disruption, immune dysfunction, high cholesterol, and obesity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Newly discovered gene may protect against heart disease
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) Scientists have identified a gene that may play a protective role in preventing heart disease. Their research revealed that the gene, called MeXis, acts within key cells inside clogged arteries to help remove excess cholesterol from blood vessels. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Educated natural killer cells show dynamic movement of the activating receptor NKp46 and confinement of the inhibitory receptor Ly49A
Educated natural killer (NK) cells have inhibitory receptors specific for self major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and kill cancer cells more efficiently than do NK cells that do not have such receptors (hyporesponsive NK cells). The mechanism behind this functional empowerment through education has so far not been fully described. In addition, distinctive phenotypic markers of educated NK cells at the single-cell level are lacking. We developed a refined version of the image mean square displacement (iMSD) method (called iMSD carpet analysis) and used it in combination with single-particle tracking to...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - February 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Staaf, E., Hedde, P. N., Bagawath Singh, S., Piguet, J., Gratton, E., Johansson, S. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

New research shows shorter fitness test still accurately predicts risk of mortality
(Queen's University) Queen's University researcher Louise de Lannoy has determined a short, five minute treadmill test can predict the risk of mortality. This risk is determined independent of other traditional risk factors including age, weight, blood pressure, smoking status, diabetes, cholesterol, and family history. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Can Microbubbles Deliver Gene Therapy?
An Italian diagnostic imaging company is teaming with a Chicago startup to study whether microbubbles can deliver personalized gene therapy to treat high LDL cholesterol. Microbubble technology, combined with contrast-enhanced ultrasound, has been used diagnostically for years and more recently has inspired research for treatment of disease. Milan-based Bracco Imaging, S.p.A. is working with Steven Feinstein, a professor of medicine at Rush University Medical Center and president of SonoGene, LLC to pursue the treatment possibilities further. A CEUS researcher, Feinstein is also co-president of the  International Cont...
Source: MDDI - February 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: R & D Source Type: news

How to beat heart disease with diet and lifestyle
(Natural News) You can prevent heart disease — eating a healthy diet, such as a plant-based diet, and making healthy lifestyle changes are just some of the steps you can make. Cholesterol is the greatest risk factor for coronary heart disease. It increases in levels because of poor diets. Most people who were raised on a conventional... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Considerations for Statin Use, Toxicity, and Interactions Considerations for Statin Use, Toxicity, and Interactions
This brief primer gives an overview of the specific pharmacology for the various statin drugs, their adverse effects, and potential for drug interactions.Southern Medical Journal (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Statin Critic Accused Of Image Manipulation In Earlier Research
A journalist who has been a frequent critic of statins has been publicly accused of scientific misconduct involving image manipulation in an earlier research paper. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - February 8, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Larry Husten, Contributor Source Type: news

Eating Fruit Can Actually Help You Lose Weight. A Nutritionist Explains
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cynthia Sass / Health.com Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Circulating lipids play roles in many diseases
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Lipids are fatty molecules that play important signaling and storage roles in the body, but having an excess of some lipids, like cholesterol, is a risk factor for many metabolic diseases. Recent articles in the Journal of Lipid Research investigate the role of cholesterol and other lipids in the blood in cardiovascular disease, hepatitis, and rare genetic disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cholesterol crystals impede nerve repair
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Chen, Y., Popko, B. Tags: Cell Biology perspective Source Type: news

Keeping cholesterol at bay
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Cell Biology, Neuroscience twis Source Type: news

Defective cholesterol clearance limits remyelination in the aged central nervous system
Age-associated decline in regeneration capacity limits the restoration of nervous system functionality after injury. In a model for demyelination, we found that old mice fail to resolve the inflammatory response initiated after myelin damage. Aged phagocytes accumulated excessive amounts of myelin debris, which triggered cholesterol crystal formation and phagolysosomal membrane rupture and stimulated inflammasomes. Myelin debris clearance required cholesterol transporters, including apolipoprotein E. Stimulation of reverse cholesterol transport was sufficient to restore the capacity of old mice to remyelinate lesioned tiss...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Cantuti-Castelvetri, L., Fitzner, D., Bosch-Queralt, M., Weil, M.-T., Su, M., Sen, P., Ruhwedel, T., Mitkovski, M., Trendelenburg, G., Lütjohann, D., Möbius, W., Simons, M. Tags: Cell Biology, Neuroscience reports Source Type: news

Pediatric Lipid Testing Remains Low Despite Recommendations
Professional groups disagree on the need for universal lipid screening in pediatrics. Where do you stand? (Source: ConsultantLive)
Source: ConsultantLive - February 7, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Veronica Hackethal, MD Tags: Cholesterol Disorders Source Type: news

Impotence Among Heart Patients Not the Fault of Meds, Study Finds
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 7, 2018 -- Worried that the drugs you're taking to lower cholesterol or blood pressure might make you more apt to develop erectile dysfunction? That's not likely, a new Canadian study suggests. The study involved about 2,000 men... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

PCSK9 Inhibitors: Economics and Policy PCSK9 Inhibitors: Economics and Policy
Currently, list prices of PCSK9 inhibitors in the United States are substantially higher than generic statins. Do they make economic sense?Journal of the American College of Cardiology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

No Relation Between Common Heart Drugs and Erectile Dysfunction (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Statins, hypertension meds exonerated in trial data (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - February 2, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Why People are Wearing Red Today
Women (and men) across America will be color-coordinating today for National Wear Red Day 2018, which aims to dispel myths surrounding heart diseases. The day is intended to help raise awareness of heart disease, in particular among women. It’s often generally associated with men, but cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of women. Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women. National Wear Red Day® helps us raise awareness. Join us in 2 days for #WearRedDay and #WearRedandGive. https://t.co/UlWjA4Tdo8 pic.twitter.com/fSFCn08xFX — American Heart Assoc (@American_Heart) January 31, 2018 Every ye...
Source: TIME: Health - February 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Flora Carr Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Heart Disease onetime Source Type: news

It ’s National Wear Red Day. Here’s Why People Are Dressing Up
Women (and men) across America will be color-coordinating today for National Wear Red Day 2018, which aims to dispel myths surrounding heart diseases. National Wear Red Day is intended to help raise awareness of heart disease, in particular among women. Heart disease is often generally associated with men, but cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of women. Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women. National Wear Red Day® helps us raise awareness. Join us in 2 days for #WearRedDay and #WearRedandGive. https://t.co/UlWjA4Tdo8 pic.twitter.com/fSFCn08xFX — American Heart Assoc (@American_Heart) January...
Source: TIME: Health - February 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Flora Carr Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Heart Disease onetime Source Type: news

Today Is National Wear Red Day. Here ’s Why People Are Dressing Up
Women (and men) across America will be color-coordinating today for National Wear Red Day 2018, which aims to dispel myths surrounding heart diseases. National Wear Red Day is intended to help raise awareness of heart disease, in particular among women. Heart disease is often generally associated with men, but cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of women. Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women. National Wear Red Day® helps us raise awareness. Join us in 2 days for #WearRedDay and #WearRedandGive. https://t.co/UlWjA4Tdo8 pic.twitter.com/fSFCn08xFX — American Heart Assoc (@American_Heart) January...
Source: TIME: Health - February 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Flora Carr Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Heart Disease onetime Source Type: news

Full-fat milk raises good  cholesterol levels
The University of Copenhagen in Denmark found 'bad' cholesterol levels did not differ between people drinking skimmed and full fat milk. But whole milk raised good cholesterol levels. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Primary Prevention With Statins in the Elderly Primary Prevention With Statins in the Elderly
Recommendations on the use of statin therapy for primary ASCVD prevention in those over 65 differs markedly among guidelines. Are statins being underutilized in the elderly?Journal of the American College of Cardiology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Blood pressure medications 'don't cause impotence'
A study has found that despite previous warnings, statins and blood pressure tablets do not cause impotence. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

U.S. judge sentences Novelion's Aegerion in drug marketing case
BOSTON (Reuters) - A federal judge on Tuesday sentenced Aegerion Pharmaceuticals Inc for improperly marketing a cholesterol drug and ordered that some of the $40.1 million it agreed to pay to resolve a U.S. investigation go to the company's victims. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

This Type of Non-Dairy Milk is the Healthiest, Study Says
That almond milk latte may be delicious, but a study just published in the Journal of Food Science and Technology suggests that the trendy beverage also has some drawbacks. When researchers compared the nutritional profiles of four popular “alternative” milks, they found that soy milk came out on top—and that almond, rice and coconut “milks” all lacked essential nutrients important for overall health. Plant-based “milks” are often marketed as wholesome and appropriate substitutes for the real thing. To find out if these claims measured up, scientists at McGill University in Canada ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized almond milk almond milk calories almond milk nutrition coconut milk Diet/Nutrition healthytime is soy milk fattening Lactose Intolerance onetime soy milk calories soy milk nutrition soy milk vs milk Source Type: news

Ezetimibe With Statin Therapy for Stroke Prevention in ACS Ezetimibe With Statin Therapy for Stroke Prevention in ACS
Can the addition of ezetimibe to simvastatin in patients stabilized after acute coronary syndrome reduce the frequency of ischemic stroke?Circulation (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Arno Motulsky, a Founder of Medical Genetics, Dies at 94
Dr. Motulsky narrowly escaped the Nazis as a teenager and went on to become what one scientist called “ a maestro of human genetics. ” (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DENISE GRADY Tags: Motulsky, Arno Deaths (Obituaries) Genetics and Heredity Cholesterol Holocaust and the Nazi Era Refugees and Displaced Persons University of Washington Source Type: news

Scientists Discover a Bone-Deep Risk for Heart Disease
Few doctors, and even fewer patients, have heard of C.H.I.P. But it is emerging as a major cause of heart attacks and stroke, as deadly as high blood pressure or cholesterol. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Heart Stem Cells Leukemia Genetics and Heredity Stroke Bone Marrow Blood Arteriosclerosis and Atherosclerosis McCarroll, Steven A (1970- ) Kathiresan, Sekar Walsh, Kenneth Source Type: news

Medications to treat cardiovascular risk factors do not impact erectile function
(Elsevier) Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a major public health problem. Men being treated for cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol are at increased risk of developing ED and often consider this condition a side effect of their medications. However, a new study into the effects of cholesterol-lowering statins and blood-pressure lowering candesartan/HCTZ concludes that these medications do not negatively affect erectile function. The study is published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stryker touts post-market Wingspan stent trial results
Stryker (NYSE:SYK) today released results from the post-market Weave trial of its Wingspan stent system designed for treating intracranial atherosclerotic disease. Data from the study was presented at the International Stroke Conference, the Kalamazoo, Mich.-based company said. The Weave trial is a multi-center, prospective, post-market surveillance study which aimed to evaluate rates of stroke or death within 72 hours in patients treated with the Wingspan stent system. Results from the FDA-mandated trial indicated that patients receiving treatment with the Wingspan stent system had a 2.6% rate of stroke or death...
Source: Mass Device - January 26, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Stents Vascular Stryker Source Type: news

Medical News Today: How does high cholesterol cause cancer? Study sheds light
Researchers have discovered a cell mechanism in which cholesterol influences the proliferation of stem cells and the growth of intestinal tumors in mice. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cholesterol Source Type: news

Stenting system shown to benefit certain stroke patients
(Cedars-Sinai Medical Center) A specialized stenting system used to open blocked arteries in the brain resulted in a low complication rate among a specific group of patients with stroke histories, a study led by Cedars-Sinai researchers has found. The Wingspan ® Stent System Post-Market Surveillance Study (WEAVE ™ ) trial examined patients with a narrowing of the arteries in the brain, called intracranial stenosis, resulting from a buildup and hardening of fatty deposits called cholesterol plaque. The condition can lead to strokes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCLA study could explain link between high-cholesterol diet and colon cancer
New UCLA research could help explain the link between a high-cholesterol diet and an elevated risk for colon cancer.In a study of mice, scientists from theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA discovered that boosting the animals ’ cholesterol levels spurred intestinal stem cells to divide more quickly, enabling tumors to form significantly faster. Published online in Cell Stem Cell, the study identifies a new target for colon cancer treatment.“We were excited to find that cholesterol influences the growth of stem cells in the intestines, which in turn accelerates the rate of tumor formation by more than 100-...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 25, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Pill Combo May Do More to Reduce Stroke Risk
THURSDAY, Jan. 25, 2018 -- A special combination of cholesterol- and blood pressure-lowering pills may be best at cutting the odds of stroke for people at high risk, new research shows. Taking daily doses of two blood pressure medications and a... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 25, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

UCLA study could explain link between high-cholesterol diet and colon cancer
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) UCLA scientists discovered that boosting mice's cholesterol levels spurred intestinal stem cells to divide more quickly, enabling tumors to form 100 times faster. The study identifies a molecular pathway that could serve as a new drug target for colon cancer treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 25, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

ADHD drug use has skyrocketed 345% among young women in 12 years according to the CDC, increasing birth defects
(Natural News) As Big Pharma and the medical establishment continue to convince people they have various medical conditions and need medications to function or even survive, we’re seeing rises in the use of everything from antidepressants to statins. However, a new report from the CDC is shedding light on one disturbing trend in particular: a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Herbal Supplements May Be Dangerous When You Take Certain Prescription Drugs
A number of common herbal supplements, including green tea and Ginkgo biloba, can interact with prescription medications, according to a new research review published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. These interactions can make drugs less effective—and may even be dangerous or deadly. Doctors know that herbs can affect medication regimens, wrote the researchers, from the South African Medical Research Council, in their new paper. But because people often don’t disclose to their healthcare providers what over-the-counter drugs and supplements they’re taking, it’s difficult for scienti...
Source: TIME: Health - January 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized are herbal supplements safe are supplements safe drug interactions drug side effects green tea healthytime herbal drugs medicine onetime supplement safety warfarin Source Type: news

Morning Break: DEA Relaxes on Opioids; Statin Resistance; TNS for PTSD
(MedPage Today) -- Health news and commentary from around the Web gathered by the MedPage Today staff (Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry)
Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry - January 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

Statins health alert: Nine common side effects - including nosebleeds and headaches
STATINS are a group of medicines used to lower blood cholesterol levels, but a review out this week says the drugs see next to no benefit. There are also a number of side effects, as outlined by the NHS. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - January 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New meta-analysis: Recreational football is broad-spectrum medicine
(University of Southern Denmark Faculty of Health Sciences) The most popular sport in the world is much more than entertainment: football is broad-spectrum medicine against lifestyle diseases. A new meta-analysis of 31 scientific studies provides strong evidence that short-term football training improves aerobic fitness, blood pressure, resting heart rate, fat percentage, LDL cholesterol and muscle strength for several patient groups. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Food resolution: Cook at home
There's a good chance you are thinking of ways to live healthier in the new year. Whether you want to drop 10 pounds, improve your cholesterol or have more energy, we have five food-related New Year's resolutions that will help you achieve your goals. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Understanding Cholesterol-Lowering Medications
Cholesterol Lowering Medications (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - January 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news