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The High Cost of Ageing
Veena S. Kulkarni is Associate Professor, Department of Criminology, Sociology, & Geography, Arkansas State University, U.S.; Vani S. Kulkarni is Lecturer, Department of Sociology, University of Pennsylvania, U.S.; and Raghav Gaiha is (Hon.) Professorial Fellow, Global Development Institute, University of Manchester, EnglandBy Veena S. Kulkarni, Vani S. Kulkarni and Raghav GaihaNEW DELHI, Jun 23 2017 (IPS)Evidence shows that health systems must be recast to accommodate the needs of chronic disease prevention. Disability is the umbrella term for impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions. (Represen...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Veena Kulkarni Vani Kulkarni Tags: Aid Asia-Pacific Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Three Lifestyle Interventions May Slow Cognitive Decline
Cognitive training, management of hypertension, increased physical activity all help delay decline (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - June 23, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Neurology, Nursing, Psychiatry, Conference News, Source Type: news

Hope for Leonce: Kenyan boy ’s incredible journey with vein of Galen malformation
Boston is a long flight from Kenya — 22 hours long, in fact. That’s enough time to sleep, eat, read, watch countless YouTube videos and do it all over again, an experience that could make adults antsy, let alone two little boys. Yet it was a journey that Jane Nduta and Humphrey Njogu were eager to make. Just a few months earlier, their younger son, Leonce, had been diagnosed with a rare but life-threatening condition called vein of Galen malformation, or VOGM. In this blood vessel abnormality, misshapen arteries in the brain connect directly with veins instead of with capillaries. This causes a rush of high-pre...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 23, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Cerebrovascular Surgery and Interventions Center Dr. Darren Orbach International Health Services vein of Galen malformation (VOGM) Source Type: news

Clinical Trial Saves Baby ’s Lungs
Treatment TermsChildren's health CategoriesClinical trialsFamily health TagsPatient story Sub-Title Baby Collier Proves He ’s a Survivor Author Burgetta Wheeler Overview Collier Hart sat smiling in his crib repeatedly saying, “Wa wa.” Given a sippy cup of water, he threw back his head and drained it. He put his hands together, fingertips touching, and made the sign for “more.” None of this is unusual for a 2-year-old, but it is for Collier. He spent the first 15 months of his life at Duke Children’s Hospital af ter being born with severely underdeveloped lungs. Hero Imageco...
Source: dukehealth.org: Health Tips - June 23, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: klh85 at duke.edu Source Type: news

High blood pressure - condition could be linked to THESE deadly cancers
HIGH blood pressure - also known as hypertension - is associated with an increased risk of heart disease, heart attack and stroke. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High blood pressure - condition could be linked to THESE of deadly cancers
HIGH blood pressure - also known as hypertension - associated with an increased risk of heart disease, heart attack and stroke. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Evidence Is Encouraging but Insufficient That Three Interventions Might Slow Cognitive Decline and the Onset of Dementia
Cognitive training, blood pressure management for people with hypertension, and increased physical activity all show modest but inconclusive evidence that they can help prevent cognitive decline and dementia, but there is insufficient evidence to support a public health campaign encouraging their adoption, says a new report from the National Academies. Additional research is needed to further understand and gain confidence in their effectiveness. Although the strength of evidence does not warrant aggressive public health campaigns, it does suggest that information should be made available to the interested public. It is ap...
Source: News from the National Academies - June 22, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

High blood pressure? Mixing THIS breakfast food with medicine could be dangerous
HIGH blood pressure is a condition which affects thousands of people in the UK, but experts believe those who take certain medication to treat the condition should avoid one type of fruit. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New report examines evidence on interventions to prevent cognitive decline, dementia
(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) Cognitive training, blood pressure management for people with hypertension, and increased physical activity all show modest but inconclusive evidence that they can help prevent cognitive decline and dementia, but there is insufficient evidence to support a public health campaign encouraging their adoption, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pharma Leads the Charge on NCDs
A disaster in slow motion; that is how Dr Githinji Gitahi, CEO of African health NGO AMREF, describes the threat of non-communicable diseases (NCDs).Long thought of as diseases of the richer countries, the threat of NCDs – including cancer, diabetes and hypertension – is growing in low-to-middle-income countries, which now account for three-quarters of the annual death toll of more than 40 million.A toxic mix of modernization, urbanization and lifestyle changes has seen this growth in NCDs in developing countries, a scenario that has already played out in developed countries, where smoking, alcohol, processed f...
Source: EyeForPharma - June 21, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Anonymous Source Type: news

Latest health evidence shows that making changes to diet, physical activity and behaviour may reduce obesity in children and adolescents
Two new Cochrane Reviews arethe last in a series of related systematic reviews summarizing evidence on the effects of different interventions for treating obesity and overweight in childhood and adolescence.The reviews summarize the results of 114 studies which involved more than 13,000 children and young people. They show that a combination of diet, physical activity, and behavioural change interventions may reduce weight in children aged six to 11 years and in adolescents aged 12 to 17, but there are limitations in the studies and variation in the results.Childhood and adolescent obesity is one of the leading global publ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - June 21, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: nowens at cochrane.org Source Type: news

High blood pressure? Your medication could cause THIS unwanted side-effect
High blood pressure medication - statins, or even medicine to cure infections could be causing unwanted side-effects and these prescription medicines are taken by hundreds of people in the UK every year. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rick Wakeman: I owe it to my family to stay as healthy as I can
THE legendary rock star talks to ROZ LEWIS about his continuing battles with Type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mild-to-Moderate Sleep Apnea Ups Risk for Hypertension, Diabetes Mild-to-Moderate Sleep Apnea Ups Risk for Hypertension, Diabetes
Early detection and treatment of sleep apnea are important to prevent future cardiometabolic diseases in young and middle-aged adults, researchers say.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Is pre-eclampsia caused by the baby's DNA?
The Nottingham University findings help to solve the puzzle of what causes pre-eclampsia, or high blood pressure during pregnancy, which can affect one in 20 expecting mothers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Obamacare improves access for Mexican-Americans with hypertension
A recent study finds the Affordable Care Act narrows the healthcare gap between Mexican-Americans and white Americans with high blood pressure. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - June 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Live Near an Airport? Nighttime Airplane Noise May Cause HTN Live Near an Airport? Nighttime Airplane Noise May Cause HTN
When might sleeping with ear plugs avert new hypertension? A rare longitudinal cohort study explored the CV effects of living in a community adjacent to a major airport.Heartwire from Medscape (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

What Causes Hearing Heartbeat in Ears?
Title: What Causes Hearing Heartbeat in Ears?Category: Doctor's& Expert's views on SymptomsCreated: 6/16/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 6/16/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet High Blood Pressure General)
Source: MedicineNet High Blood Pressure General - June 16, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Obamacare key to improving access in Mexican-American patients with hypertension
(Drexel University) A Drexel study found that the Affordable Care Act, if embraced, can dramatically reduce disparities between Mexican-heritage people and white patients with hypertension. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Home Blood Pressure Monitors Wrong 7 of 10 Times: Study
Title: Home Blood Pressure Monitors Wrong 7 of 10 Times: StudyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 6/14/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 6/15/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet High Blood Pressure General)
Source: MedicineNet High Blood Pressure General - June 15, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Home Blood Pressure Monitors Wrong 7 of 10 Times
Checking your device against ones used at your doctor's office may be advised, experts say Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: High Blood Pressure, Medical Device Safety (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - June 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nighttime Airport Noise May Raise Heart Risks
More research needed to confirm that exposure to aircraft noise is the cause of health issues Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Heart Diseases, High Blood Pressure, Noise (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - June 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nighttime Airport Noise May Raise Heart Risks
WEDNESDAY, June 14, 2017 -- Aircraft noise, particularly at night, may be linked to an increased risk of high blood pressure and heart flutter in people who live near large airports, a new study suggests. It's one of the first long-term follow-up... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 14, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

High blood pressure symptoms: Where you LIVE could be causing hypertension and this is why
HIGH blood pressure - also known as hypertension - is a condition which can increase the risk of heart attack, heart disease and put pressure on the organs. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Does the sound of airplanes raise blood pressure risk?
A new study investigates the effect of long-term exposure to aircraft noise on the risk of high blood pressure, cardiac arrhythmia, and stroke. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Public Health Source Type: news

Airport noise increases risk of heart disease, study suggests
The highest noise levels, particularly at night, are associated with a greater risk of high blood pressure and heart flutter, say scientstsPeople who live close to an airport and are constantly barraged by the sound of planes taking off are at increased risk of heart disease, research suggests.A study found that people who were exposed to the highest noise levels, particularly at night, were at greater risk of developing high blood pressure and heart flutter.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Medical research Air transport Health Heart attack Science Society Source Type: news

Mortality Risk of Serum Potassium Levels in Hypertension Mortality Risk of Serum Potassium Levels in Hypertension
This study examined the relation between serum potassium and all-cause mortality in patients with hypertension. Might a narrower definition of the normal range improve outcomes?European Heart Journal (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Exposure to aircraft noise linked to high blood pressure
Noise at night seems to have greatest impact on blood pressure, study suggests Related items fromOnMedica Living near a major road may impair kidney function Air pollution may shorten lung cancer patient survival Traffic noise linked to larger waistlines Clues to why air pollution raises risk of heart disease Blood pressure link to pollution long-term exposure (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - June 14, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Long-Term Exposure to Aircraft Noise at Night Tied to High Blood Pressure (FREE)
By Amy Orciari Herman Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM Exposure to high levels of aircraft noise at night may be associated with increased risk for hypertension, … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - June 14, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Noise May Raise Blood Pressure Risk
A study of people who lived near Athens International Airport found that the more nighttime noise, the higher the risk of high blood pressure. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Noise Blood Pressure Airports Hypertension Source Type: news

Being overweight, not just obese, still carries serious health risks
Conclusion This impressively large global study demonstrates that the prevalence of obesity is increasing worldwide among both children and adults. It supports what has long been thought, that increased body mass index (BMI) contributes to a range of illnesses and is ultimately responsible for a large number of deaths, particularly from cardiovascular disease. One potential limitation is the use of self-reported BMI or health outcome data in some of the studies, although the majority used a specific independent measurement so this is unlikely to have biased results too much. It is also always difficult from observational d...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity Source Type: news

High blood pressure: Natural cure could MIMIC effects of regular drugs to treat symptoms
HIGH blood pressure affects one in four people in the UK, and is currently often treated using a combination of medicines to control symptoms such as difficulty breathing and fatigue. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Millions of patients are being OVERDOSED with blood pressure medication, study reveals
(Natural News) Often touted as a “silent killer,” hypertension or high blood pressure affects some 1.13 billion people worldwide — that’s around one in three adults in the United States. If you are on blood pressure medication, then chances are you are being overdosed. A new first-of-its-kind study showed that smaller doses are just as... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Believe It Or Not, There's A Smart Way To Procrastinate
How many times have you started an important task, only to find yourself mindlessly scrolling through Instagram 20 minutes later ― and then chastising yourself for getting distracted? Because of common (read: inevitable) instances like this, most people have negative, guilt-inducing associations around the concept of procrastination. But Dr. Josh Klapow, a clinical psychologist and co-host of the radio show “The Web,” says procrastination itself isn’t necessarily a bad thing. It’s how you approach it that determines whether it becomes a burden or a tool. Procrastination is defined simply as &ldquo...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 12, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Believe It Or Not, There's A Smart Way To Procrastinate
How many times have you started an important task, only to find yourself mindlessly scrolling through Instagram 20 minutes later ― and then chastising yourself for getting distracted? Because of common (read: inevitable) instances like this, most people have negative, guilt-inducing associations around the concept of procrastination. But Dr. Josh Klapow, a clinical psychologist and co-host of the radio show “The Web,” says procrastination itself isn’t necessarily a bad thing. It’s how you approach it that determines whether it becomes a burden or a tool. Procrastination is defined simply as &ldquo...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Overfed and Underfed: Global Food Extremes
The international community of nations has made commitments to eliminate hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition by 2030 and also to promote and protect health through nutritious diet, healthy eating and increased physical activity. Credit: IPSBy Joseph ChamieNEW YORK, Jun 12 2017 (IPS)Global food extremes of chronic undernourishment and obesity have brought about a bipolar world of hundreds of millions of underfed and overfed people. Of the world’s population of 7.5 billion the proportions suffering from chronic undernourishment and those afflicted by obesity are similar, approximately 11 percent or tog...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Joseph Chamie Tags: Development & Aid Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories Source Type: news

Canada 'poor performer' when it comes to high drug costs for common conditions: study
Canada had the second-highest medication costs for common conditions such as high blood pressure and cholesterol in 2015 compared to nine other affluent countries with universal health-care systems, suggests a new study calling for a national drug plan to lower prices. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - June 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

What are Indications for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)?
DiscussionObstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is defined as a “disorder of breathing during sleep characterized by prolonged partial upper airway obstruction and/or intermittent complete obstruction (obstructive apnea) that disrupts normal ventilation during sleep and normal sleep patterns.” It is different than primary snoring which is snoring without apnea, sleep arousals, or problems with gas exchange. OSAS symptoms include snoring (often with snorts, gasps or pauses), disturbed sleep (often frequent arousals) and daytime neurobehavioral problems. Sleepiness during the day can occur but is less common in...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - June 12, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Lessons from Fire Prevention: Why We Can Head Off Disease Without Sacrificing Cure
This insightful and data-filled evidence-based article from the Boston University School of Public Health  illustrates the work EMS can, and should, do to prevent disease where we cannot control curing it: Public health is concerned with creating a healthier world, preferably one where we prevent disease before it starts. This inevitably occasions grappling with our overwhelming investment in medicine and curative care, and arguing for a recalibration of our investment towards the social, economic, and cultural factors that promote health. We can educate people how to reduce their chances of suffering heart attacks, ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - June 11, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: A.J. Heightman, MPA, EMT P Tags: Training News Source Type: news

Deals this week: Marina Biotech, Strekin, H. Lundbeck
Marina Biotech has acquired Prestalia, a drug indicated for the treatment of hypertension to low blood pressure from Symplmed Pharmaceuticals. (Source: Drug Development Technology)
Source: Drug Development Technology - June 8, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

High blood pressure symptoms: Beware doing THIS at the gym
HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE affects one in four adults in the UK, but a popular gym exercise may be exacerbating it. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How To Tell If You're Too Sick To Get On A Flight
The Question: I’m supposed to get on a flight but I’m not feeling well. How do I know if I am too sick to fly?  The Answer: There’s a hard line in the sand when it comes to certain illnesses and traveling on an airplane. Sometimes it really is best to stay back. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends ditching a flight if you you have an illness that can quickly spread to another person, such as the flu. And symptoms like diarrhea, vomiting or high fever are also reasons to forgo traveling, says Timothy Lahey, an infectious disease specialist and associate professor of med...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Being married 'protects your health'
It might lessen the impact of big heart disease risk factors, including high blood pressure, researchers claim. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - June 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hemopericardium and Tamponade
The patient with hypertension and syncope had cardiac tamponade. Causes, symptoms, and treatment described here. (Source: ConsultantLive)
Source: ConsultantLive - June 6, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Brady Pregerson, MD Tags: Cardiovascular Diseases Hypertension Source Type: news

High blood pressure symptoms: Taking THIS dose of medication could reduce side effects
HIGH blood pressure - also known as hypertension - is often treated with medication that triggers a number of unpleasant side effects. However, new research may have discovered a way to avoid this by changing the dose of drugs given. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Syncope and Sweat in a 65-Year-Old Man
A man with a history of hypertension had syncope and felt “sweaty.” Chest x-ray was normal. What’s your next test? (Source: ConsultantLive)
Source: ConsultantLive - June 6, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Brady Pregerson, MD Tags: Cardiovascular Diseases Hypertension Source Type: news

Moving Toward a Better Blood Pressure Pill
Title: Moving Toward a Better Blood Pressure PillCategory: Health NewsCreated: 6/5/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 6/6/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet High Blood Pressure General)
Source: MedicineNet High Blood Pressure General - June 6, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Terros Health unveils its first integrated model in Maryvale this week
After providing behavioral health care for nearly 50 years, Terros Health will begin adding physical health care treatment, offering a whole person integrated approach for the first time. This week, the Phoenix nonprofit will open its first integrated center at 4616 N. 51st Ave., north of Abrazo Maryvale campus. People with mental health disorders are more likely than those without such disorders to experience alcohol, substance use or a chronic condition, such as diabetes or high blood pressure,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - June 6, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Angela Gonzales Source Type: news

Smaller dose combos effective for blood pressure
Quarter-dose therapy had fewer side effects Related items fromOnMedica Blood pressure monitors in GP waiting rooms save time Scientists find new markers for high blood pressure Diet for lowering blood pressure also reduces risk of kidney disease End-organ damage in hypertension (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - June 6, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Why Black Women Should Care About Congress Taking Away Health Care
By Erica Hilton In 2013, I woke up one day and was unable to open my left eye. Daylight tortured my eye. Bright lights were impossible. This was a painful interruption in the excitement and promise of my life. I had recently earned my master’s degree and started my “dream job” as an online activism manager. Here I was in the middle of this new journey, and I couldn’t keep one eye open. I made an emergency appointment with an ophthalmologist who then sent me to see a specialist. The inflammation in my eye remained for weeks. Eventually it cleared up only to reoccur again a few weeks later. Since 2013...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news