Access to vital health services fell during COVID, particularly for poorer Americans
Americans ’ use of common outpatient health services dipped sharply at the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic, then rebounded to near-normal levels by the end of 2020, only to decline again during the second surge in January–February 2021, according to a new UCLA-led study.But the 2020 recovery in care wasn ’t equal for all, researchers found. Some of the most socioeconomically disadvantaged patients — those with Medicaid or Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibility insurance — were far less likely than those with other insurance plans to return to using outpatient services at rates approaching normal, ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 22, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

The lessons of COVID-19, two years on
When Robert Kim-Farley heard that COVID-19 had reached the United States, on Jan. 20, 2020, he immediately recalled the grim images from China that he had been seeing online, with people dying in the streets outside of overwhelmed hospitals.“The pandemic has reached us, and it’s going to be bad,” the UCLA epidemiologist thought.With the U.S. reaching the second anniversary of that first U.S. case, Kim-Farley has been reflecting on what the scientific community got right during the medical crisis, and what it could have done better.On a scale of 1 to 10, he said he ’d give the U.S. a 7 for how local,...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 20, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Breastfeeding mothers don ’t pass COVID to infants, study suggests
In the largest study to date on COVID-19 and breast milk, a UCLA-led research team found no evidence that the virus is transmitted from mothers to children through breastfeeding.The study,published today in the journal Pediatric Research, analyzed breast milk samples taken from 110 lactating women between March and September 2020. Of these women, 65 had tested positive for COVID-19, 36 were symptomatic but were not tested and nine had symptoms but tested negative.While researchers initially found some COVID-19 genetic material, or RNA, in seven of the samples belonging to the 101 women who either tested positive or were sy...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 19, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How California ’s Whole Person Care pilot program met the challenges of the pandemic
Serving the needs of some of California ’s most high-need low-income patients — those who frequently use emergency rooms for care and are affected by multiple chronic conditions, severe mental illness, substance abuse issues, homelessness or recent incarceration — can prove difficult even during the best of times. But the COVID-19 c risis presented an entirely new set of hurdles.Anew study by theUCLA Center for Health Policy Research examines how the state ’s Whole Person Care program, a pilot project launched in 2016 to integrate medical care, mental health services and social supports like ho...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 18, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA leaders address employee questions about omicron variant at town hall
As the omicron wave nears its projected peak in the United States, UCLA leaders hosted a town hall for faculty and staff on Jan. 13 to offer the latest information on policies designed to keep the Bruin community as healthy as possible.  The hour-long Zoom meeting addressed topics ranging from how staff and students can get free masks to the factors under consideration for returning to in-person work and learning.Some highlights:New mask requirements: Whenever indoors, all students, faculty and staff must use upgraded masks, such as well-fitting KN95s, N95s or medical-grade masks. UCLA is making masks available for fr...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 14, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Signaling mechanisms in pancreatic cancer cells could provide new target for treatment
Research led by scientists at theUCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center provides new insights into molecular “crosstalk” in pancreas cancer cells. The study, published in the journal Cell Reports, identifies vulnerabilities that could provide a target for therapeutic drugs already being studied for several different types of cancer. It was led by Dr. Caius Radu, a UCLA professor of molecular and medical pharmacology, and Dr. Timothy Donahue, a pancreatic cancer surgeon.The study centered  on an immune system signaling molecule that impairs the proliferation of cancer cells in lab studies but tends t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 14, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA-led team refines ‘kick and kill’ strategy aimed at eliminating HIV-infected cells
In a study using mice, a UCLA-led team of researchers have improved upon a method they developed in 2017 that was designed to kill HIV-infected cells. The advance could move scientists a step closer to being able to reduce the amount of virus, or even eliminate it, from infected people who are dependent on lifesaving medications to keep the virus from multiplying and illness at bay.The strategy, described in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Communications, uses cells that are naturally produced by the immune system to kill infected cells that hide in the body, potentially eradicating them, said Dr. Jocelyn Kim, an assistan...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 12, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Tomato concentrate could help reduce chronic intestinal inflammation associated with HIV
New UCLA-led research in mice suggests that adding a certain type of tomato concentrate to the diet can reduce the intestinal inflammation that is associated with HIV. Left untreated, intestinal inflammation can accelerate arterial disease, which in turn can lead to heart attack and stroke.The findings provide clues to how the altered intestinal tract affects disease-causing inflammation in people with chronic HIV infection, suggesting that targeting the inflamed intestinal wall may be a novel way to prevent the systemic inflammation that persists even when antiviral therapy is effective in controlling a person ’s HI...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 11, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How much do students learn when they double the speed of their class videos?
Recorded lectures have become a routine part of course instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic, and college students often try to pack more learning into a shorter span by watching these recordings at double their normal speed or even faster. But does comprehension suffer as a result?Surprisingly, no — up to a point. Anew UCLA study shows that students retain information quite well when watching lectures at up to twice their actual speed. But once they exceed that limit, things begin to get a little blurry, said Alan Castel, the study ’s senior author and a UCLA professor of psychology.With 85% of UCLA student...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 11, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Ditching cigarettes for smokeless tobacco can help cut cardiovascular risks, study finds
Regular smokers are at heightened risk of developing cardiovascular disease, but crushing the butts in favor of a “smokeless” alternative like chewing tobacco, snuff or tobacco lozenges may go a long way toward bringing the danger down to a more normal level, a new UCLA-led study shows.The findings also indicate that the primary culprit in smokers ’ increased risk is not nicotine but other chemicals found in tobacco smoke. Both cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products contain large quantities of nicotine.The study,published today in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research, involved a team of resea...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 8, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA gene therapy gives new life to girl born with fatal immune disorder
In every visible way, Marley Gaskins is an average 12-year-old — she enjoys painting, playing online games like Roblox with her friends and taking ukulele lessons. But until recently, her life was far from normal.Marley was born with a one-in-a-million genetic disorder called leukocyte adhesion deficiency-1, or LAD-1, which cripples the immune system and results in recurring infections, coupled with slow wound healing.“She started getting what looked like ant bites on her skin when she turned 1,” said Marley’s mother, Tamara Hogue. “When she was 3, she got a really big skin abscess on her stom...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 17, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

2021 reflections: In an amazing year of achievements, nothing topped the return to campus
As we approach the end of December, it ’s a natural time to look back at the year that was. In 2021, UCLA welcomed students, faculty, staff, alumni and visitors back to our home in Westwood, though of course it wasn’t exactly the way things had been.Different from pre-pandemic times: Masks remain present. Better (much better): UCLA officially opened the Black Bruin Resource Center.Even with all the changes, UCLA persisted as a force for public good, guided by our mission of teaching, research and service. In the past year,  professors continued helping us better understand our world with their research, st...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 17, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Q & A: Dr. Thomas Rando on preventing age-related diseases and turning discoveries into cures
For Dr. Thomas Rando, the path to becoming a physician-scientist began with something that hedidn ’t learn in high school biology.After one class that touched on the connections between neurons and muscle fibers, Rando took it upon to himself to find all the information he could about how cells communicate through electrical signals.Soon, he began pursuing that interest at Harvard University, where he completed his undergraduate work, a doctorate in cell and developmental biology and his medical degree.Rando joined the neurology faculty at the Stanford University School of Medicine in 1995.There, he founded a clinic ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 10, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

A longer-lasting COVID vaccine? UCLA study points the way
FINDINGSResearchers at the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have identified rare, naturally occurring T cells that are capable of targeting a protein found in SARS-CoV-2 and a range of other coronaviruses.The findings suggest that a component of this protein, called viral polymerase, could potentially be added to COVID-19 vaccines to create a longer-lasting immune response and increase protection against new variants of the virus.BACKGROUNDMost COVID-19 vaccines use part of the spike protein found on the surface of the virus to prompt the immune system to produc...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 10, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Natural infection and vaccination together provide maximum protection against COVID variants
A combination of vaccination and naturally acquired infection appears to boost the production of maximally potent antibodies against the COVID-19 virus, new UCLA research finds.The findings, published today in the peer-reviewed journal mBio, raise the possibility that vaccine boosters may be equally effective in improving antibodies ’ ability to target multiple variants of the virus, including the delta variant, which is now the predominant strain, and the recently detected omicron variant. (The study was conducted prior to the emergence of delta and omicron, butDr. Otto Yang, the study ’s senior author, said t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 7, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA in the time of AIDS: In the beginning
When Tom Gillman and his partner opened Hardware, a small clothing shop on Melrose Avenue in late-1970s Los Angeles, it was an instant hit. And having spent weeks at a time in New York ’s Fire Island Pines the previous six summers, their decision to open a seasonal shop there was a no-brainer.In an era of rampant homophobia, Fire Island Pines was a gay mecca — a summer sanctuary where young gay men reveled on the beaches, boardwalks and at parties, unconstrained by the need to hide their identities. The two California men signed a three-year lease and opened Hardware @ the Pines in 1979, and with a wellheeled c...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 2, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Exposing inequalities: The underlying connection between COVID and AIDS
It was mid-March 2020 and Brad Sears had a good indication of what was going to happen next. He had survived the AIDS epidemic four decades ago and based on that experience knew COVID-19 would quickly expose existing social inequalities.As a young man in the early 1980s and on a career track in law, Sears was well aware of the policy discussions around HIV/AIDS. Much of that discussion at the federal level characterized AIDS as a gay men ’s disease and thus not a priority for the Reagan-era United States. The impact of oppression and discrimination — whether measured by access to health care, poverty, mental he...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 1, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Muted progress: 40 years after the start of the AIDS epidemic, HIV remains criminalized
In 1981, when UCLA physicians reported the first cases of what was described as “newly acquired immunodeficiency” — the disease now known as AIDS — contracting the virus was a virtual death sentence. Over the next four decades, research into the disease has made major advances that have thankfully made it possible to live a healthy life with HIV.However, as much as the medical treatment has progressed, laws that criminalize a person based on their HIV-positive status remain on the books across the United States and continue to be enforced in ways that discriminate, said Nathan Cisneros, the primary ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 1, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Understanding omicron, the new COVID-19 variant
Countries around the world are making preparations against omicron, a new variant of the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. Although it hasn ’t yet been detected in the United States (as of Nov. 29, 2021), health officials are once again cautioning the public about getting vaccinated, frequent testing and potentially stepping up tried-and-true measures to prevent transmission such as mask-wearing and hand-washing.We spoke with  Shangxin Yang, a pathologist at UCLA Health, about the new variant and what everyone needs to know.How is the omicron variant different from the delta variant and others?It has ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 30, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Nearly half of California caregivers experienced financial stress during 2020
In 2020, an estimated 6.7 million Californians provided care for a family member or friend with a serious or chronic illness or disability.According to a study by theUCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 44.4% of those caregivers reported experiencing some level of financial stress due to their roles, and 13.5% experienced a physical or mental health problem due to their caregiving work.In the study, which used data from the center ’s 2020 California Health Interview Survey, UCLA researchers write that caregivers received little financial support for their work: One in four caregivers in California provided 20 or m...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 29, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Researchers discover an unexpected regulator of heart repair
FINDINGSA study using mice by scientists atthe  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA reveals that cardiac muscle cells play a pivotal role in determining how the heart heals following a heart attack.  The findings challenge a longstanding paradigm about heart repair and identify a protein that could serve as a target for drugs to treat or prevent heart failure.BACKGROUNDHeart attack is the leading cause of heart failure, which kills more than 600,000 people in the U.S. each year.  An optimal repair response is critical for minimizing the amount of scarring after...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 23, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Too many firefighters are dying of cancer. UCLA ’s Derek Urwin aims to change that
They ’re our modern-day superheroes — charging into burning buildings without hesitation, rescuing those in peril, staving off destruction. Butin risking their lives for us, firefighters pay a heavy price, with cancer rates that far outpace the public at large.Derek Urwin, a longtime firefighter who expects to complete his Ph.D. in chemistry during the winter quarter, is out to change that, using his knowledge of chemistry to  improve firefighter health and safety and, ultimately, bring these cancer rates down. It’s a mission that had a very personal origin.In 2014, Urwin ’s brother Isaac,...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 22, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Vaccinated people with breakthrough COVID infections had lower viral loads
This study was supported by the National Institutes of Health. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 19, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA scientists make strides toward an ‘off-the-shelf’ immune cell therapy for cancer
Immunotherapies, which harness the body ’s natural defenses to combat disease, have revolutionized the treatment of aggressive and deadly cancers. But often, these therapies — especially those based on immune cells — must be tailored to the individual patient, costing valuable time and pushing their price into the hundreds of thousa nds of dollars.Now, in a study published in the journal Cell Reports Medicine, UCLA researchers report a critical step forward in the development of an “off-the-shelf” cancer immunotherapy using rare but powerful immune cells that could potentially be produced...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 16, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

43 UCLA scholars among most highly cited researchers for 2021
​​The world’s most influential researchers include 43 UCLA scholars.In its latest annual list, Clarivate Analytics names the most highly cited researchers — the scholars whose work was most often referenced by other scientific research papers in 21 fields in the sciences and social sciences. The researchers rank in the top 1% in their fields, based on their widely cited studies. The 2021 list is produced using research citations from January 2010 to December 2020.Current UCLA faculty members and researchers who were named to the list, and their primary UCLA research field or fields, are:Carri...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 16, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Xist marks the spot: How an RNA molecule silences the X chromosome
In one of the mysteries of mammalian development, every cell in the early female embryo shuts down one of its two copies of the X chromosome, leaving just one functional. For years, the mechanics behind this X chromosome inactivation have been murky, but scientists from theEli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLAhave now taken a major step forward in understanding the process.Their findings, based on research on mouse stem cells, upend previous assumptions about how X inactivation is initiated in female embryos and could lead to new ways to treat some genetic disorders, as well as...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 12, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

WWII veteran, 102, regains his hearing and social life, thanks to UCLA cochlear implant program
As a World War II pilot flying B-17 bombers behind enemy lines in Europe, Irvin Poff never backed down in the face of danger.In 1944, while he was flying in formation with a squadron of 28 other Army Air Force planes, an engine on Poff ’s plane failed five minutes before he was ordered to drop 6,000 pounds of explosives over an Austrian oil refinery. Knowing Nazi fighters liked to pick off solo flyers, he diverted full-throttle emergency power to his remaining three engines.“We were supposed to limit emergency power to six minutes to prevent the engines from overheating and exploding,” Poff recalled. &ldq...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 11, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Anne Rimoin named to new Gordon –Levin Chair in Infectious Diseases and Public Health
Anne Rimoin, an internationally recognized expert on emerging infections, global health, infectious disease surveillance systems and vaccinations who has been engaged in pandemic preparedness and response work for more than two decades, has been appointed to the newly established Gordon –Levin Endowed Chair in Infectious Diseases and Public Health at theUCLA Fielding School of Public Health.The chair was established by a $2 million gift from Tom and Edna Gordon and the Don S. Levin Trust to support the teaching and research activities of a faculty member with expertise in the epidemiology, transmission and control of...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 9, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

The American Dream is more attainable for TV characters than Americans
The American Dream may have faded, but it is unrealistically — and perhaps detrimentally — alive and well on teenagers’ favorite TV programs, according to areport published today byUCLA ’s Center for Scholars and Storytellers.The persistence in popular entertainment of that dream — that anyone, regardless of their race or socioeconomic status, can achieve success through hard work and talent — ignores not only the stark economic realities of 21st-century America but the systemic inequities faced by people of color and the poor, say the report’s authors, who assessed th e ways in wh...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 9, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

In UCLA survey, most California Latino, Asian immigrants perceive racial discrimination at work
In reports published today by theUCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 70% of Latino and Asian immigrants said they perceived that immigrants in California experienced discrimination at work due to their skin color or accent.The survey of 2,000 immigrants living in California also found that 65% felt — incorrectly in some cases — that immigrants would be prevented from gaining legal U.S. immigration status if they used government benefits such as income assistance, health care, food programs and housing aid.The findings are laid out in two fact sheets: one focusing on immigrants ’ negativeperceptions of...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 8, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Discrimination increases risk for mental health issues in young adults, UCLA-led study finds
A UCLA study has found that young adults who have experienced discrimination have a higher risk for both short- and long-term behavioral and mental health problems.Researchers examined a decade ’s worth of health data on 1,834 Americans who were between 18 and 28 years old when the study began. They found that the effects of discrimination may be cumulative — that the greater number of incidents of discrimination someone experiences, the more their risk for mental and behavioral proble ms increases.  They study also suggests that the effects of discrimination in young adults are connected with disparities ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 8, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

‘I could be killed at any time’: The anguish of being wrongfully convicted of murder
Maurice Caldwell spent 20 years in prison before his wrongful conviction for a 1990 murder in San Francisco was finally overturned.Paul Abramson, a UCLA professor of psychology who was hired as an expert by Caldwell ’s legal team to assess the psychological harm Caldwell suffered, conducted 20 extensive interviews with Caldwell between 2015 and 2020, in addition to interviewing prison correctional officers and reviewing court hearings and decisions, depositions, psychological testing results and experts’ re ports.In a paper published in the  peer-reviewed Wrongful Conviction Law Review, Abramson ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 29, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

For people of color in L.A., misinformation, past injustices contribute to vaccine hesitancy
New UCLA research identifies several factors influencing how people of color in Los Angeles County are making decisions about COVID-19 vaccination.The study, published in the peer-reviewed JAMA Network Open, reveals that misinformation and politicization, awareness of past injustices involving medical research, and fears about the inequitable distribution of vaccines all contributed to people ’s hesitancy to be vaccinated.Racial and ethnic minority communities in Los Angeles County have had an exceptionally high risk for COVID-19 infection, severe illness and death. To prevent further disparities, the study ’s ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 27, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

In memoriam: Dr. Lissy Jarvik, 97, pioneer in the field of psychogeriatics
This study, still the only one of its kind, would evolve into her life ’s work, which focused on the mental changes that occur in both healthy and physically impaired people as they age, eventually helping guide the field of Alzheimer research.  “What Lissy Jarvik accomplished in her lifetime is truly remarkable,” said Dr. Alex Young, interim chair of the department of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences and interim director of the Semel Institute for Neuroscience& Human Behavior at the medical school. “Her seminal contributions to the field of psychogeriatrics and Alzheimer’s resea...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 22, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

VR experiment with rats offers new insights about how neurons enable learning
Scientists have long understood that the region of the brain called the hippocampus is important for memory, learning and navigation.Now, scientists in a UCLA lab led by neurophysicist Mayank Mehta are gaining a deeper understanding of how the hippocampus works on a circuit level — that is, functions involving networks of millions of neurons. That knowledge could be an important step toward the development of treatments for neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and epilepsy, all of which are related to dysfunction in the hippocampus.In their latest study, published in the journal Nat...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 21, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Women are not receiving needed mental health care through state ’s public programs
Among women in California who have recently experienced mild to moderate psychological distress and are eligible for public health services, 4 out of 5 said they received no treatment, areport published today by the  UCLA Center for Health Policy Research shows.Those who qualify for these public services — a third of all women over the age of 18 — were also more likely than their privately insured counterparts to have experienced moderate or serious psychological distress (31% vs. 21%), according to the study, which analyzed data from the center’sCalifornia Health Interview Survey from 2018 and 2019....
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 20, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Three UCLA faculty members elected to National Academy of Medicine
Three faculty members of theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine, among the highest honors in the fields of medicine and health.New members are elected by their peers through a process that recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and commitment to service.The honorees are:Dr. Helena Hansen, professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences. She co-chairs the medical school ’s Research Theme in Health Equity and Translational Social Science, which cultivates research collaborations between social and biomedica...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 19, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

End-of-life care program at UCLA benefited dying patients and loved ones despite COVID restrictions
A program offered by UCLA Health ’s intensive care units is providing meaningful and compassionate support for dying patients and their families, despite the challenges brought about by COVID-19. A study about the initiative, published in the journalCritical Care Explorations, is the first to show empirically that a palliative care program could be adapted — and even expanded — during the pandemic. It also could serve as a case study for improving end-of-life care during an era when visiting restrictions and infection control have introduced extraordinary new challenges for health care providers.Rese...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 18, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

A decade after gene therapy, children born with deadly immune disorder remain healthy
Over a decade ago, UCLA physician-scientists began using a pioneering gene therapy they developed to treat children born with a rare and deadly immune system disorder.They now report that the effects of the therapy appear to be long-lasting, with 90% of patients who received the treatment eight to 11 years ago still disease-free.ADA-SCID, oradenosine deaminase –deficient severe combined immunodeficiency, is caused by mutations in the gene that creates the ADA enzyme, which is essential to a functioning immune system. For babies with the disease, exposure to everyday germs can be fatal, and if untreated, most will die...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 15, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

A visit from a social robot improves hospitalized children ’s outlook
A new  study from UCLA finds a visit from human-controlled robot encourages a positive outlook and improves medical interactions for children who are hospitalized.Robin is a social companion robot that stands about 4 feet tall and has the capabilities to move, talk and play with others while being remotely controlled by humans. Specialists fromUCLA Mattel Children ’s Hospital’s Chase Child Life Program conducted hour-long video visits with young patients using Robin, comparing it to interactions using a standard computer tablet, from October 2020 to April 2021.At the conclusion of the study perio...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 8, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Concussions and kids: Project co-led by UCLA gets $10 million grant from NIH
A research project co-led by theUCLA Steve Tisch BrainSPORT Programaimed at improving the assessment and treatment of concussions in school-aged children has been awarded $10 million by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of the National Institutes of Health.The grant to the Four Corners Youth Consortium, agroup of academic medical centers studying pediatric concussions, will supportConcussion Assessment, Research and Education for Kids, or CARE4Kids, a multisite study that will enroll more than 1,300 children and teens nationwide, including an estimated 240 in Southern California.CARE4Kids re...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 7, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA study maps major circuit in the mouse brain
A UCLA study using mice reveals new insights into the wiring of a major circuit in the brain that is attacked by Parkinson ’s and Huntington’s diseases. The findings could hone scientists’ understanding of how diseases arise in the human brain and pinpoint new targets for treatment.Published today in Nature, the research is part of a package of 17 articles  bytheBRAIN Initiative Cell Census Network. The national consortium of neuroscientists aims to unlock the mysteries of the primary motor cortex, a part of the mammalian brain that controls movement.With funding from the National Institute of Mental...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 6, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

$6.2 million NIH grant to support UCLA study of how COVID-19 causes multiple organ failure
Researchers from the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of  Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have received a $6.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study how the SARS-CoV-2 virus causes damage throughout the body.The Director ’s Transformative Research Award was presented through the NIH’s prestigious High Risk, High Reward program, which supports creative and unconventional approaches to major challenges in biomedical and behavioral research. What makes SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, so dangerous for some people is that although it is a respi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 5, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

mRNA COVID vaccines highly effective at preventing symptomatic infection in health workers
COVID-19 are highly effective in preventing symptomatic illness among health care workers in real-world settings.The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that health care personnel who received a two-dose regimen of Pfizer –BioNTech vaccine had an 89% lower risk for symptomatic illness than those who were unvaccinated. For those who received the two-dose regimen of the Moderna vaccine, the risk was reduced by 96%.The researchers also found that the vaccines appeared to work just as well for people who are over age 50, are in racial or ethnic groups that have been disproportionately affected ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 5, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA raises $611 million in 2020 –21, supporting students and advancing critical research
UCLA raised more than $611 million in gifts and pledges in the fiscal year ending June 30, exceeding its annual goal and drawing donors from all 50 states and 72 countries.“Generous donors at all levels have continued to partner with UCLA to effect meaningful change on campus, in the community and around the world,” said Chancellor Gene Block. “Despite a challenging year, our friends have once again demonstrated their extraordinary commitment to UCLA’s mission of education, research and service.”In response to conditions created by the COVID-19 pandemic, many donors focused on students ’...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 4, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Lara Cushing named to new Fielding Presidential Chair in Health Equity
Lara Cushing, an assistant professor of environmental health sciences whose work focuses on issues of environmental justice, has been appointed the inaugural holder of the Jonathan and Karin Fielding Presidential Chair in Health Equity at theUCLA Fielding School of Public Health.The endowed chair was established by  Dr. Jonathan Fielding, a national public health leader and distinguished professor-in-residence at the Fielding School, and Karin Fielding, also a longtime public health advocate, to support the work of an early-career faculty member who is developing innovative ways to solve persistent health dis parities...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 1, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Black patients ’ Lyme disease often diagnosed late, possibly due to missed signs
FINDINGSA UCLA study suggests that many physicians may not have the knowledge or training to properly recognize how Lyme disease appears on the skin of Black patients. The disease, caused by the tick-borne Borrelia bacterium, generally begins with a bull ’s-eye–shaped rash on the skin, along with fever, headache, chills and muscle pain; if not diagnosed promptly and treated with antibiotics, it can lead to more severe and long-lasting symptoms.UCLA ’s Dr. Dan Ly found that approximately 1 in 3 Black patients who were newly diagnosed with Lyme disease already had related neurological complications such as ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 1, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Ophthalmologist Patricia Bath inducted posthumously into National Inventors Hall of Fame
Dr. Patricia Bath, the first female faculty member in ophthalmology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, has been inducted posthumously into the National Inventors Hall of Fame.She and Marian Croak,  vice president of engineering at Google, are the first Black women to be honored by the organization, an achievement noted byNational Public Radio, CNN andFast Company. “Dr. Bath was a trailblazer for women and minorities in the field of ophthalmology,” said Dr. Bartly Mondino, department chair of ophthalmology and director of the UCLA Stein Eye Institute.Bath is credited with in...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 29, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center receives $5 million CIRM grant for research training program
TheEli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLAhas been awarded $5 million by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the state ’s stem cell agency, to train young scientists and physicians to become leaders in the stem cell and regenerative medicine field.The five-year grant will enable the center to expand its Stem Cell Training Program, which was established in 2006 and funded by CIRM until 2015, when the agency changed its funding priorities. Since then, the program has been sustained by philanthropy. With the passage of Proposition 14 last fall, however, CIRM ha...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 23, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA research reveals how a year of change affected Californians ’ health
Although more Californians than ever had health insurance in 2020, disparities in access to health care among the state ’s racial and ethnic groups was magnified during a year of unprecedented challenges and changes.Those are among the key findings of the latestCalifornia Health Interview Survey, which is conducted by theUCLA Center for Health Policy Research. The survey included responses from 22,661 California households, including 21,949 adults, 1,365 adolescents and 3,548 children.“This is one of the most important data releases in the survey’s 20-year history because it sheds light on how impactful t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 22, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news