Back to class: How to talk to children about returning to school
For all the excitement about elementary schools reopening in Los Angeles County, children are facing some anxieties as well.There are the typical first-day jitters,  such as: Will I make new friends? What will my teacher be like? There are also new, pandemic-specific concerns: Will my friends recognize me with my mask on? Are we still allowed to play at recess? Is it really safe to go back to school?The most important thing parents and caregivers can do to prepare children for the transition from Zoom school to in-person learning is to have open conversations about what to expect, saidpsychologist and child traum...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 26, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA ’s Asian American Studies Center shares $1.4 million in state funding to address COVID-19
The UCLA Asian American Studies Center and the Stop AAPI Hate coalition have received $1.4 million in funding from California to support community programs and ongoing research that address the impact of COVID-19 on Asian American and Pacific Islander communities, including new research and analysis into hate incidents.The funds also will support theStop Asian American Pacific Islander Hate website and theCOVID-19 Multilingual Resources website, which was developed by faculty from the Asian American Studies Center and the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.“COVID-19 has had devastating and disparate impacts on man...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 24, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Older people often incorrectly assume medicines don ’t have potential side effects
FINDINGSOlder people correctly ascertained basic information such as dosage and duration of use for more than 70% of the medications they were prescribed, regardless of whether their physician explained it during an office visit. But when physicians failed to verbally provide information about potential side effects, people incorrectly assumed that about 55% of their prescribed medications had none. And even when physicians did discuss possible side effects, their patients incorrectly assumed there were no side effects for 22% of the medications.BACKGROUNDThere is a shortage of data about how well people understand basic i...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 24, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Reddit shows people with kidney stones have been less likely to seek treatment during pandemic
FINDINGSAccording to an examination of posts on Reddit, the pandemic has had a significant effect on the management of kidney stone disease. Researchers from the department of urology at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA used computational analysis and other techniques to explore unfiltered discussions related to kidney stones in real time on the website ’s discussion forums.The investigators found that patients ’ decision-making about how and when to seek treatment for kidney stones was driven by logistical barriers and patients’ reluctance to risk exposure to COVID-19 in health care facilities....
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 23, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

For UCLA-based startup, new muscular dystrophy treatment is a personal mission
Courtney Young helped develop the gene therapy at the heart of a biotech startup,MyoGene Bio, when she was a doctoral student at UCLA from 2013 to 2018. But the kernel of the company ’s endeavor is older still — and definitively personal.In 2008, when Young was in high school, she found out that her cousin, then just a toddler, had been diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. She made it her mission to cultivate the skills needed to provide better options for him and others who were suffering with the deadly muscle-wasting disease.“I directed my career toward working on Duchenne,” said Young, My...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 23, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How public health research can shape inclusive immigration policies
President Joseph Biden and the Democrat-controlled Congress have started boldly with immigration. On Feb. 18, Democrats introduced the U.S. Citizenship Act of 2021, which would rollback many of Donald Trump ’s policies and bring comprehensive immigration reform, including a pathway to citizenship for the estimated 10.5 million undocumented immigrants in the United States. Researchers and community advocates are recognizing a renewed opportunity to use public health research and advocacy lenses to inf orm the dialogue — and ultimately the policies — surrounding immigration reform.In this Q&A,Steven Wal...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 23, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Back to class: With the drop in COVID-19 cases, how can schools reopen safely?
With Los Angeles County school districts getting the green light from state officials to reopen elementary schools, everyone — parents, teachers, administrators and children — is understandably wondering about safety.Although the Los Angeles Unified School District ’s reopening plan has been approved, the district hasn’t set an opening date yet, and it will continue to offer 100% online schooling for those who want it through the end of the school year. While the county’s 1.5 million K–6 students and their parents wait to see what happens, UCLA Health professionals have insights on how s...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 23, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Internet trends suggest COVID-19 spurred a return to earlier values and activities
American values, attitudes and activities have changed dramatically during COVID-19, according to a new study of online behavior.Researchers from UCLA and Harvard University analyzed how two types of internet activity changed in the U.S. for 10 weeks before and 10 weeks after March 13, 2020 — the date then-President Donald Trump declared COVID-19 a national emergency. One was Google searches; the other was the phrasing of more than a half-billion words and phrases posted on Twitter, blogs and internet forums.The study is thelead research article in a special issue of the journal Human Behavior and Emerging Technologi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 18, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Drought restrictions had side benefit: Lowering risk of mosquito-borne disease
Shallow pools of water on lawns are ideal breeding grounds for the mosquitoes that transmit West Nile virus, the most common mosquito-borne disease in the United States.A new study by scientists from UCLA and three other universities found that reducing shallow pools of water where the insects lay their eggs is key to preventing the spread of the virus.The study, funded by a grant from the UC Office of the President and published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, found that California ’s water-use restrictions during the statewide drought from 2012 to 2016 led to a decrease in the number of mosquit...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 16, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Mexico ’s poor have little luck obtaining opioids intended for palliative care
If you ’re poor and terminally ill in southern Mexico, there’s far less chance you’ll get the painkillers you need for palliative care than your cousins in more prosperous regions, particularly those pharmacy-rich areas along Mexico–U.S. border, say UCLA researchers and colleagues who studied opioi d dispensing levels across the country.What ’s more, the researchers’ paper in the journalThe Lancet Public Health suggests it ’s likely that some of the opioids intended for Mexican citizens are ending up in American pockets.Despite a Mexican government initiative launched in 2015 to im...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 11, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Health receives $29 million gift to establish center in precision genomic medicine
UCLA has received a $29 million gift to establish a center where scientists and physicians will work side by side to examine the role of genetics in disease and develop therapies that improve patients ’ lives.The gift creates the Dr. Allen and Charlotte Ginsburg Center for Precision Genomic Medicine. The new center will build on UCLA ’s efforts in precision health to leverage large data sets and innovative genomic technologies such as CRISPR engineering to improve diagnosis and treatment of a wide variety of genetic disorders. They include both rare diseases and more common illnesses such as cardiovascular dise...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 11, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

The COVID-19 vaccines are safe and 7 other things you should know
People should get vaccinated. That ’s the message experts from UCLA Health want everyone to know.The two current vaccines against COVID-19 have been tested and approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration and have been shown to be both safe and highly effective.While about 43 million Americans have already received at least one dose of the vaccine, arecent poll showed that about 1 out of 4 are  hesitant about getting vaccinated.Hesitancy is understandable. This is a new and unfamiliar situation. But medical experts and public health officials are concerned that it is misinformation about the vaccines, rather...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 11, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Unlocking the mystery behind skeletal aging
This study is the first in vivo research to demonstrate that the loss of an epigenetic factor promotes adult stem cell deterioration and exhaustion in skeletal aging.The findings, the researchers say, hold promise for the eventual development of strategies to reverse bone-fat imbalance, as well as for new prevention and treatment methods that address skeletal aging and osteoporosis by rejuvenating adult stem cells.“The work of Dr. Wang, his lab members and collaborators provides new molecular insight into the changes associated with skeletal aging,” said Dr. Paul Krebsbach, dean of the UCLA School of Dentistry....
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 10, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study: Look beyond geography to identify smaller at-risk groups for pandemic relief
Delivering COVID-19 vaccines and other pandemic relief to certain small ethnic populations in California may be a particular challenge for a somewhat ironic reason: Many members of those groups do not live in neighborhoods that have been identified as being highly vulnerable to virus transmission.A newUCLA study looked at five ethnic groups — American Indians, Pacific Islanders, Cambodians, Filipinos and Koreans — which, current data suggests, have higher-than-average rates of COVID-19 infections or deaths.“The data we’ve been compiling show that Pacific Islander and other smaller Asian groups are t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 9, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study focuses on mental health of gay men amid pandemic
Sixty-three percent of men who participated in a new  UCLA-led study reported only leaving their home for essentials amid the COVID-19 pandemic. And that being in isolation contributed  to feelings of anxiety and loneliness, and dissatisfaction with their sex life.The study, by the  Gay Sexuality and Social Policy Initiative at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, was published in the Journal of Homosexuality. It focuses on a group that historically has been disproportionately affected by poor health outcomes.  The results are based on responses from more than 10,000 men in 20 countr...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 8, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Want to improve care for breast cancer patients? Listen to what they say on Twitter
FINDINGSInformation shared by women with metastatic breast cancer on social media platforms like Twitter may be a timely source of data for policymakers hoping to improve care and outcomes for these patients.UCLA researchers found that participants in a Twitter group chat about metastatic breast cancer identified a number of significant barriers to care, including communication gaps between health care providers and patients, delays in insurance authorizations for treatments and other procedures, insurance denials of palliative or specialized care, and challenges in obtaining disability benefits.Based on participants &rsqu...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 2, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Dean Tracy Johnson seeks to diversify the pipeline of future scientists and doctors
When Tracy Johnson was an undergraduate working in a lab at UC San Diego, she found herself suddenly jolted. Conducting research on gene function using fruit flies, she realized she was involved in something deeper and more fulfilling than a traditional classroom experience.“The idea that I was learning things that nobody else knew, that I could make some contribution,” says the dean of the division of life sciences in the UCLA College, “that was a game-changer.”Johnson, who holds the Keith and Cecilia Terasaki Presidential Endowed Chair in Life Sciences, joined the faculty of UCLA ’s Departme...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 1, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA leaders offer facts on COVID-19 vaccine safety and effectiveness at town hall
UCLA administrative and medical leaders provided updated COVID-19 vaccination information and answered faculty and staff questions at an hour-long town hall with nearly 2,000 viewers on Wednesday, Jan. 28. The event was the third town hall, including one for students, UCLA has offered this month to address the rollout of the vaccines.“We’re beginning to see the light at the end of a really long tunnel,” UCLA Chancellor Gene Block said. “Mass vaccinations obviously are going to be the key to pulling out of this.” Block thanked UCLA Health personnel for their extraordinary efforts to vaccinate a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 28, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Nearly half of California adolescents report mental health difficulties
Mirroring a national trend, 45% of California youth between the ages of 12 and 17 report having recently struggled with mental health issues, with nearly a third of them experiencing serious psychological distress that could interfere with their academic and social functioning, according to a UCLA  policy brief released today.TheUCLA Center for Health Policy Research study  also highlights the elevated incidence of mental health distress among certain segments of the adolescent population — including poor, multiracial, gender-nonconforming and foreign-born young people — and recommends polic...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 27, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists jump-start two people ’s brains after coma
In 2016, a team led by UCLA ’s Martin Monti reported that a 25-year-old man recovering from a coma had made remarkable progress following a treatment to jump-start his brain using ultrasound.Wired U.K. called the news one of the  best things that happened in 2016. At the time, Monti acknowledged that although he was encouraged by the outcome, it was possible the scientists had gotten a little lucky.Now, Monti and colleagues report that two more patients with severe brain injuries — both had been in what scientists call a long-term “minimally conscious state” — have made impressive pr...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 27, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA shares COVID-19 vaccine information with faculty and staff
 With two COVID-19 vaccines — one from Pfizer–BioNTech and the other from Moderna — having been approved for use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, vaccinations have begun across the United States, including at UCLA Health facilities, where the first doses were administered on Dec. 16, 2020. To date, more than 18, 000 UCLA Health personnel have received the vaccine, and thousands are being vaccinated each week.On Jan. 14, members of UCLA ’s COVID-19 Response and Recovery Task Force held a virtual town hall to update faculty and staff on the progress of UCLA Health’s vaccination pro...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 15, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

In lab study, nanoparticle shows promising results for treating severe allergies
For about 1 in 13 children in the U.S., usually harmless foodstuffs such as milk, eggs and peanuts can send the body ’s natural defenses into overdrive.Symptoms of food allergies can vary widely, but at worst, a systemwide allergic response can lead to anaphylaxis, a life-threatening condition characterized by a sudden drop in blood pressure and difficulty breathing.Although there are now some preventive measures for food-induced anaphylaxis, there are not yet any long-lasting solutions — treatments capable of locking the immune system into a state of tolerance, so that it doesn’t respond to allergens.Now...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 14, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study reveals new details about how bacterial toxins cause life-threatening colitis
FINDINGSResearch led by scientists from UCLA and Harvard University has uncovered details about how the bacterium Clostridioides difficile causes excessive inflammation in the gut that can lead to potentially deadly colitis. Studying C. difficile toxin A, one of two toxins released by the bacterium, the researchers produced two key findings.They pinpointed which part of the toxic protein can permeate cell membranes to gain entry to cellular structures called endosomes, demonstrating that even fragments of the protein that contain that key segment are capable of accessing endosomes.In addition, they revealed how the toxin m...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 8, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

MRI frequently underestimates tumor size in prostate cancer
FINDINGSA study led by researchers at theUCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center has found that magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, frequently underestimates the size of prostate tumors, potentially leading to undertreatment.The study authors found that such underestimation occurs most often when the MRI-measured tumor size is small and the PI-RADS score, which is used to classify lesions in prostate MRI analysis, is low.For prostate tumor treatments to be successful, both the MRI size measurement and PI-RADS score must be accurate because they allow physicians to determine precisely where tumors end and where the normal,...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 7, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

A step toward understanding why COVID-19 boosts stroke risk
A UCLA-led study may help explain how COVID-19 increases the risk for stroke. Scientists  made the finding by running fluid spiked with a COVID-19–like protein through a 3D-printed model of the arteries of a patient who had suffered a stroke. Although COVID-19 was first identified by its severe respiratory symptoms, the virus has caused strokes in young people who had no known risk factors. But little is known about how the virus increases the risk for stroke.To learn more, UCLA researchers used a 3D-printed silicone model of blood vessels in the brain to mimic the forces generated by blood pushing through ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 18, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New UCLA center to focus on health, safety and well-being of LGBTQ community
TheUCLA Fielding School of Public Health has launched a new center to promote the health of sexual and gender minorities through research and partnerships with the LGBTQ community, community-based organizations, public health officials and policymakers in Los Angeles and beyond.TheUCLA Center for LGBTQ Advocacy, Research&  Health, or C-LARAH, will develop and implement evidence-based strategies that address both the physical and mental health needs of LGBTQ individuals while working closely with local, national and global partners.“Both here at home and around the world, LGBTQ populations have a higher preva...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 17, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Hope, relief as first COVID-19 vaccines are administered at UCLA Health
In a burst of jubilance at UCLA Health — an emotional release after months of pandemic trauma — frontline health care workers began receiving the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccinations today. It was perhaps the most visible sign of hope since the pandemic struck the U.S. early this year.Staff members applauded and cheered “Woo-hoo!” as the first shots were administered atRonald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, in a large room with booths lined with plastic to separate patients.Mylar balloons hinted at the celebratory nature of the moment.“This is better than medical school graduation,” said Dr. Russell...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 17, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

2020 reflections: Bruins respond to the challenges of COVID-19
When people look back, COVID-19 will be what defines 2020 — and that applies to UCLA, just like everywhere else. From forcing us to shift to remote learning, move all but the most essential jobs off campus and ultimately close the campus to the public, the pandemic remade life in ways we couldn’t have imagined.But as difficult as the challenges were, Bruins everywhere responded withthe resilience, creativity and ingenuity that embody our values.Scientists, doctors and scholars continued to pursue the research that helped the public better understand the virus.Health care workers put themselves on the line day a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 16, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health introduces master of healthcare administration degree
TheUCLA Fielding School of Public Health is introducing an online master of healthcare administration degree program in 2021. The degree will be the first of its type to be offered by a University of California campus.The new graduate degree will launch as an online program to meet the growing need for health care management specialists by developing students ’ skills in finance, strategic marketing, quantitative problem solving and analytics. The program extends access to UCLA’s high-quality education for students across the country. Graduates will be equipped to start or advance their careers and to make a di...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 16, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

What goes well with tacos? Toothbrushes!
From cleanings to root canals to extractions in decidedly non-dental office environments, a  core part of UCLA dental students’ education includes critical oral health care delivery to people in underserved communities.Since its inception in 1964, the UCLA School of Dentistry ’s students, residents and faculty help thousands of people annually in community clinics across southern California to fulfill its historical mission of improving the oral health of Los Angeles, California and beyond. Their efforts continue to be essential as an estimated 5.2 million people in Ca lifornia do not have dental...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 15, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Gene could help predict response to cervical cancer treatment
FINDINGSUCLA researchers have identified a potential diagnostic marker that could help predict how likely someone with cervical cancer is to respond to the standard treatment of chemotherapy and radiation.The scientists found that PACS-1, a gene that resides on a small segment of the long arm of chromosome 11, is overexpressed in cancer tissues, which can result in cancer growth and spread.  Further, they discovered that translocation of the PACS-1 protein from outside to inside the cell nucleus — a function required for normal cell growth — plays a role in the development of cervical cancer that is r...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 11, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

A surgeon ’s birthday may be a dicey day for older patients
Older people who undergo emergency surgeries on theiroperating surgeon ’s birthday may be more likely to die withina month than patients who go through similar procedures on other days, a new UCLA-led study suggests.The study,published today in the peer-reviewed medical journal BMJ, shows that30-daymortality rates are approximately 23% higher for patients65 and older who aretreated on a surgeon ’s birthday. While the authors suspect that surgeons may be more distracted on their birthdays than other days, they said more research is needed to explain why this may happen.There have long been questions about h...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 11, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA nursing professor shares her experience as a subject in COVID-19 vaccine trial
In August, Kristen Choi, a UCLA assistant professor of nursing, thought about how important it would be to participate in the testing of one of the new COVID-19 vaccines. So she stepped out of her usual role of conducting research and volunteered to become a study subject.Choi describes her experience as a participant in the trial for a vaccine being developed by Pfizer and BioNTechin a perspective published in JAMA Internal Medicine. (The vaccine received emergency use authorization in the U.K. on Dec. 2 and health care workers there began administering it today.)Although she experienced about a day ’s worth of diff...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 9, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists discover how COVID-19 virus causes multiple organ failure in mice
UCLA researchers  are the first to create a version of COVID-19 in mice that shows how the disease damages organs other than the lungs. Using their model, the scientists discovered that the SARS-CoV-2 virus can shut down energy production in cells of the heart, kidneys, spleen and other organs.“This mouse model is a really powerful tool for studying SARS-CoV-2 in a living system,” said Dr. Arjun Deb, a co-senior author of a paper about the study and a member of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA. “Understanding how this virus can hijack our ce...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 8, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA creates nursing fellowship for Gluck Stroke Rescue Program with $1 million gift
UCLA has received $1 million from Mark and Laura Wittcoff to establish the Marjorie Scherck and Raymond Wittcoff Nursing Fellowship in Stroke Care Innovation. The fellowship will support nursing staff for the  UCLA Arline and Henry Gluck Stroke Rescue Program, which operates a mobile stroke unit that provides early diagnosis and care when patients are being transported to a hospital.The fellowship honors two of the Witcoffs ’ family members who were committed advocates for nursing care as supporters of Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, where Mark’s father, Raymond Wittcoff, was chairman of the board at ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 7, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA receives $7.3 million grant to build state-of-the-art facility for developing gene, cell therapies
UCLA has received a $7.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to build a state-of-the-art facility in which to produce gene and cell therapies aimed at treating a host of illnesses and conditions.The new 13,000-square-foot facility, to be constructed in UCLA ’s Center for the Health Sciences, will provide a highly regulated environment with features such as systems to manage air flow and filtering, laboratory spaces and bioreactors. The new facility is expected to be ready for use in 2023.“This grant provides critical funds to build a facility that will enable the development of a new generation...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 4, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA, UCSF gain FDA approval for prostate cancer imaging technique
The University of California ’s two nationally ranked medical centers, UCSF and UCLA, and their nuclear medicine teams have obtained approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to offer a new imaging technique for prostate cancer that locates cancer lesions in the pelvic area and other parts of the body to which the t umors have migrated.Known as prostate-specific membrane  antigen PET imaging, or PSMA PET, the technique uses positron emission tomography in conjunction with a PET-sensitive drug that is highly effective in detecting prostate cancer throughout the body so that it can be better and mor...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 1, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA awarded $25 million to advance HIV research for women and children
The National Institutes of Health has awarded $25 million to the UCLA branch of the International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials Network, known as IMPAACT, to continue developing innovative strategies to end HIV among these vulnerable populations.The funding will go to UCLA ’s laboratory, enabling its researchers to work with the network’s operations center, as well as statistical and data management center. The center aims to advance the network’s research, which has already led to effective therapies for women, children and adolescents with HIV, and influenced the standard of care fo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 1, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Gene therapy gives man with sickle cell disease the chance for a better future
For Evie Junior, living with sickle cell disease has been like running a marathon.“But it’s a marathon where as you keep going, the trail gets rockier and then you lose your shoes,” the 27-year-old said. “It gets harder as you get older. Things start to fail and all you can think about is how much worse it’s going to get down the road.”In sickle cell disease, a genetic mutation causes the blood-forming stem cells — which give rise to all blood and immune cells — to produce hard, sickle-shaped red blood cells. These misshapen cells die early, leaving an insufficient numbe...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 30, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study shows link between economic, social, environmental factors and oral health
More than 1 in 4 adults in California report having poor oral health, but that figure rises to roughly 1 in 2 for the state ’s lowest-income residents and drops to 1 in 5 for those with the highest incomes, according to a UCLApolicy brief that looks at the role economic, social and environmental factors play in oral health.The research, conducted by the  UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, highlights significant differences in residents ’ oral health across income, education, employment, immigration status and other categories, revealing the crucial influence of social determinants and illustrating tha...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 30, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Mothers ’ stress may lead to preterm births, faster aging in children
This study is among the first to point out that, yes, it does matter.“It may even be more influential than prenatal health because some of what is put in motion before conception may be hard to stop during pregnancy,” she added. “For example, a mother with dysregulated immune function due to stress may be at risk when she becomes pregnant. The abundance of stre ss for low-income parents is potent and potentially high risk for them and their children.”These findings, Dunkel Schetter said, support the case for devoting more resources to programs for preconception health and well-being.Both studies wer...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 30, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Cold plasma can kill coronavirus on common surfaces in seconds
UCLA engineers and scientists have demonstrated that treatments with near-room-temperature, cold atmospheric plasma can kill the coronavirus present on a variety of surfaces in as little as 30 seconds.Their study, which was published in the journal Physics of Fluids, marks the first time cold plasma has been shown to effectively and quickly disinfect surfaces contaminated with the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19.  The novel coronavirus can remain infectious for tens of hours on surfaces.“This is a really exciting result, showing the potential of cold atmospheric plasma as a safe and effective way to fight ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 24, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

38 UCLA scientists among world ’s most influential researchers
This article was updated on Nov. 24 and again on Dec. 3 because Clarivate had incorrectly identified two of the researchers’ academic affiliations.Thirty-eight UCLA scholars have been named among the world ’s most influential scientific researchers.Clarivate released its annual list of the most highly cited researchers, which includes dozens of UCLA scientists across various disciplines. The list is compiled by the Institute for Scientific Information at Clarivate using data based on scholarly publication counts and citation indexes. The selected researchers wrote publications that ranked in the top 1% by citat...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 23, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

37 UCLA scientists among world ’s most influential researchers
Editor ’s note: This story was changed on Nov. 24 to 37 UCLA scholars, after learning that Clarivate incorrectly identified a professor’s affiliation with their previous institution.Thirty-seven UCLA scholars have been named as the world ’s most influential scientific researchers.Clarivate released its annual list of the most highly cited researchers, which includes dozens of UCLA scientists across various disciplines. The list is compiled by the Institute for Scientific Information at Clarivate using data based on scholarly publication counts and citation indexes. The selected researchers wrote publicati...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 23, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

36 UCLA scientists among world ’s most influential researchers
Thirty-six UCLA scholars have been named as the world ’s most influential scientific researchers.Clarivate released its annual list of the most highly cited researchers, which includes dozens of UCLA scientists across various disciplines. The list is compiled by the Institute for Scientific Information at Clarivate using data based on scholarly publication counts and citation indexes. The selected researchers wrote publications that ranked in the top 1% by citations in their field for that year, according to the Web of Science citation index.TheUCLA Samueli School of Engineering hadeight faculty members named among t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 23, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Gift of $1 million will help UCLA support young patients and their families
UCLA has received $1 million from Ken and Linda Suslow to continue providing critical supportive services for children, their families and other patients.Half of the gift will support the work of the  Chase Child Life Program at UCLA Mattel Children ’s Hospital, while the other half will establish the Suslow Family Patient Emergency Assistance Fund at UCLA.Launched in 1968, the Chase Child Life Program serves as a national model for helping young patients and their families cope with the stress and anxiety of hospital stays and medical procedures. Program specialists tailor therapeutic activities &mdas...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 23, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New wound-healing gel helps regenerate skin, prevent scarring
UCLA researchers and colleagues have developed a wound-healing biomaterial for cuts, burns and other injuries that could significantly reduce scar formation and result in healthier, stronger skin.The team, including scientists from Duke University and other institutions, reports inNature Materials that their new hydrogel triggered an immune response in mice that accelerated healing, induced tissue regeneration and resulted in skin that was more resilient to reinjury.The advance builds onUCLA ’s previous development of wound-healing gels made of injectable microporous annealed particles, or MAPs. MAP gels, when applie...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 20, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA receives $6.4 million to fund cannabis research
UCLA has received seven grants totaling $6.4 million from the California Bureau of Cannabis Control. The awards will fund studies on topics ranging from the toxicity of inhaled and second-hand  cannabis smoke to employment conditions in California’s cannabis industry.The  grants were awarded to faculty from theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, theUCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs and several research centers.“The grants exemplify the breadth of cannabis research being conducted at UCLA,” said Ziva Cooper, director of theUCLA Cannabis Research Initiative an...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 19, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA model ID ’s areas that should have priority for vaccine, other COVID-19 help
To help slow the spread of COVID-19 and save lives, UCLA public health and urban planning experts have developed a predictive model that pinpoints which populations in which neighborhoods of Los Angeles County are most at risk of becoming infected.The researchers hope the new model, which can be applied to other counties and jurisdictions as well,will assist decision makers, public health officials and scientists in effectively and equitably implementing vaccine distribution, testing, closures and reopenings, and other virus-mitigation measures.The model maps Los Angeles County neighborhood by neighborhood, based on four i...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 18, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study reveals how smoking worsens COVID-19 infection in the airways
UCLA researchers using a model of airway tissue created from human stem cells have pinpointed how smoking cigarettes causes more severe infection by SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in the airways of the lungs.The study, led by scientists at the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA andpublished in Cell Stem Cell, will help researchers  better understand COVID-19 risks for smokers and could inform the development of new therapeutic strategies to help reduce smokers’ chances of developing severe disease.Cigarette smoking is one of the most common...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 18, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news