In memoriam: John Froines, 83, environmental health researcher and advocate
John Froines, a UCLA professor emeritus who was a leader in ensuring that research influences policies to protect the public ’s health and renowned as a member of the “Chicago 7,” has died from complications related to Parkinson’s disease. He was 83.Froines, who died on July 13, joined the UCLA School of Public Health (as it was known then) in 1981 in the division of environmental and occupational health sciences. He served as department chair for four years in the 1990s and director of the UCLA Center for Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences for 20 years, from 1989 to 2009.As a scientist and advocate, Fr...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 12, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

In memoriam: John Froines, environmental health researcher and advocate
John Froines, a UCLA professor emeritus who was a leader in ensuring that research influences policies to protect the public ’s health and renowned as a member of the “Chicago 7,” has died from complications related to Parkinson’s disease. He was 83.Froines, who died on July 13, joined the UCLA School of Public Health (as it was known then) in 1981 in the division of environmental and occupational health sciences. He served as department chair for four years in the 1990s and director of the UCLA Center for Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences for 20 years, from 1989 to 2009.As a scientist and advocate, Fr...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 12, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA brain researchers receive $4 million NIH grant to supercharge miniature microscope
The UCLA creators of a miniature microscope that can be mounted on the heads of lab animals to provide an invaluable view into the brain ’s inner workings have received a $4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop next-generation versions of their “miniscope. ” The four-year award, part of theNIH ’s BRAIN Initiative, will support the design, manufacturing and distribution of two types of new two-photonminiscopes that will allow scientists to peer much deeper into the brain than before. As they did with previous versions, the UCLA researchers will share detailed instructions on how others c...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 5, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

With $12 million in federal funding, UCLA to expand reach of its depression treatment
Key takeaways:Partnering with Los Angeles County connects UCLA expertise to where it ’s needed.East Los Angeles College program could be a model to further growth throughout California.Related research will address how to reduce stigma around mental health care in Latino communities.Based on a promising pilot program that screens for and treats depression in college students, researchers and faculty with UCLA ’s Depression Grand Challenge have received a five-year, $12 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to increase the reach of their efforts.The funding will enable the UCLA Depression Grand Chal...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 4, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Your monkeypox questions answered as vaccine access expands
Editor's note:This story was originally published July 25 onUCLA Health's Connect blog. It was  updated Aug. 2.As monkeypox spreads across the United States, there are now documented cases in Los Angeles County. As of July 25, there were 162 confirmed cases in Los Angeles County and at least 3,400 cases in the United States, prompting fears of another coronavirus-style outbreak.Monkeypox, however, is an entirely different virus. It is not a respiratory illness like COVID-19, notes  Dr. Omai Garner, director of clinical microbiology for UCLA Health.“It’s a different disease and it’s not the kind of thing that trans...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 3, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA awarded $11.5 million to improve organ, hand and face transplantation
The Dumont –UCLA Transplant Center has received two grants totaling $11.5 million from the federal government for research aimed at making donated organs last longer and helping transplant recipients live longer, healthier lives.The grant projects — one funded by the National Institutes of Health and the other by the Department of Defense — focus specifically on improving outcomes in liver transplantation and in hand and face transplantation.Both initiatives are led by Dr. Jerzy Kupiec-Weglinski, UCLA ’s Paul I. Terasaki Professor of Surgery and vice chair of basic research in the surgery department at theDavid Gef...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 29, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Founder of UCLA ’s liver transplant program reflects on 40 years of saving lives
Dr. Ronald Busuttil remembers the day he performed his first liver transplant at UCLA Health as if it were yesterday. It was mid-afternoon, and he was at his accountant ’s office doing his taxes when he received a phone call that a donor organ was available at St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank.In the early days of liver transplantation, there was a short window to recover an organ and transplant it successfully into a patient. He needed to be at St. Joseph no later than 6 p.m.Busuttil set out with two of his colleagues for the 17-mile drive. But first, they had an errand to run.“In those days, liver transplants were...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 27, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists confirm COVID tied to wildlife sales at Chinese market
An international team of researchers reports today that live animals sold at the Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market in Wuhan, China,  were the likely source of the COVID-19 pandemic that has claimed 6.4 million lives since it began nearly three years ago.“Rigorously combining all available evidence surrounding the emergence of SARS-CoV-2 clearly demonstrates that the virus jumped at least twice from animals to humans at the Huanan market,” saidDr. Marc Suchard, a UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of biostatistics. “Identifying multiple transmission events finally puts to rest a single origin from elsewher...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 26, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Zooming across the political divide
Key takeaways:Conservatives and liberals who spoke one-on-one over Zoom enjoyed the experience and had greater respect for each other ’s views than they anticipated.However, conversations were more heated when participants knew others who shared their political views were watching.Zoom can offer an effective way for people to converse civilly about politics away from social media.  Social psychologists at UCLA have done what seems impossible, at least on the internet: getting liberals and conservatives to have meaningful and congenial political discussions.The trick? They held these conversations over Zoom, the video co...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 20, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists develop blueprint for turning stem cells into sensory interneurons
Key takeaways:Just like the real thing.The stem cell –derived interneurons, which play a role in sensations like touch and pain, are indistinguishable from their real-life counterparts in the body.Tomorrow ’s therapies. In addition to potential treatments for injury-related sensation loss, the discovery could lead to new methods for screening drugs for chronic pain.Moving forward. While stem cells from mice were used in the research, scientists are now working to replicate the findings with human cells.Researchers at the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have develop...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 19, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Surfing with my surgeon
Getting patients back to doing the things they love after joint replacement surgery is what all UCLA orthopaedic surgeons strive for. Yet it ’s not every physician that makes a commitment to celebrate a patient’s recovery by joining him for dawn patrol. Meet  Dr. Adam Sassoon and his patient Robert Lombard.  Last year, when Lombard learned he needed two knee replacements, he was determined to find a surgeon who understood that his top priority was to be able to return to the sport that fulfilled him, body and soul — surfing. He found one in Sassoon, an orthopaedic surgeon specializing in knee and hip-replacement ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 14, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

The psychedelic Rx: Hallucinogens and mental health
For more than three decades, UCLA ’s Dr. Charles Grob has engaged in research that is guaranteed to make him a hit at cocktail parties, if not always among gatherings of traditional funders of scientific studies.“This was always an obscure, niche area,” Grob said of his scientific explorations of the therapeutic value of psilocybin, an active chemical in magic mushrooms; MDMA, the party drug better known as ecstasy or molly; and ayahuasca, the Amazonian plant hallucinogen employed as a religious sacrame nt by indigenous cultures for centuries. “For the most part, the field consisted of myself and a few friends. Wha...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 14, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Asian, Hispanic and Black Californians saw bigger drops in life expectancy than whites during COVID
This study demonstrates that the reduction in life expectancy continued from 2020 into 2021, despite the availability of vaccines for much of 2021.Life expectancy is not the average life span of individuals in a society but a hypothetical measure based solely on the mortality rates observed in a given year. It estimates how long a cohort of newborns could expect to live if it experienced the mortality rates of that specific year throughout their entire lifetimes. In the current study, life expectancy captures how much life was lost collectively within a population during the pandemic years, and it illustrates the dramatic ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 7, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

After facial feminization surgery, transgender people report better psychosocial health
Key takeaways:A positive step.Gender-affirming surgery is one of the most important procedures for patients with gender dysphoria, researchers say.Quality of life.People who had the surgery reported higher scores in 7 of 11 measures of psychosocial health than those awaiting the procedure.Expanding health coverage.Researchers hope the findings will encourage more U.S. health insurance plans to cover the surgery.A UCLA study offers the first evidence that transgender patients who receive gender-affirming facial feminization surgery reported better mental health after their procedures.Thestudy was published in the journal An...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 6, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Roe reactions: Faculty share insights on the ruling and the future of abortion rights
The Supreme Court ’s June 25 ruling in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization also overturned Roe v. Wade, putting an end to nearly five decades of constitutional protection for abortion in the U.S.That decision had an immediate and sweeping effect across the country, with 26 states banning or severely restricting abortions or preparing to do so. Meanwhile, millions, including those who no longer have access to the procedure, have been left pondering the future of reproductive rights in America and wondering whether similar constitutional protections may be in jeopardy.Over the past week, faculty members and scho...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 30, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news