David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA names winner of 2018 Switzer Prize
Dr. David Sabatini, an MIT biologist and associate director of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, will be the 2018 recipient of the Switzer Prize awarded by the  David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Sabatini ’s pioneering discoveries of mechanisms that regulate cell growth are propelling research into potential treatments for cancer and other diseases.As a graduate student at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Sabatini identified the central protein, mTOR,  that turns cell growth on and off. At the Whitehead Institute and MIT, his laboratory ’s research&...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Two UCLA chemists selected as 2018 Pew scholars
UCLA chemistry professors Hosea Nelson and Jose Rodriguez have been selected among 22  Pew scholars in the biomedical sciences for 2018. The honor provides funding to outstanding young researchers whose work is relevant to the advancement of human health. The scholars, who were selected from 184 nominations, will receive four-year, $300,000 grants to advance their explorations of biological mechanisms underpinning human h ealth and disease.UCLA and UC San Diego each has two 2018 Pew scholars in the biomedical sciences; no other university has more than one.“These scientists have shown the boldness and creat...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 14, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

What does it mean to be moved by love?
Researchers from UCLA and the University of Oslo have documented a complex but universally felt emotion they call kama muta — a Sanskrit term that means “moved by love.”For the past five years they have documented the physical sensations people report when they feel kama muta, and what kind of events, images and experiences bring it about.Forthe research, which was published in the journal Emotion, the authors studied 3,543 participants in 19 countries on five continents. Their observations suggest that kama muta is a distinct positive social emotion evoked by experiencing or observing a sudden intensific...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 14, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Treating intestine with ‘good’ cholesterol compound inhibits lung tumor growth in mice
FINDINGSA compound that mimics the main protein in high-density lipoprotein (HDL, or “good”) cholesterol significantly reduced the number of tumors in the lungs of mice, reports a team of UCLA researchers. The findings help explain the connection between HDL cholesterol and reduced cancer risk, and suggest that a similar compound may be an effective therapy in humans.BACKGROUNDPrevious research, both in lab animals and humans, had suggested that higher HDL cholesterol levels were linked to reduced cancer risk. The team ’s earlier work had found that small peptide “mimetics,” or mimics, of...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Helping senior citizens connect with tech
UCLA sophomore Aleena Sorfazian was looking forward to her first day at Tech Help for U. But she wasn ’t a student; she was one of 20 volunteers who would be teaching older people how to better use their iPhones, iPads, laptops and other devices, as part of a community outreach program created in partnership with UCLA Health.The senior citizens waiting at UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica on this Saturday morning were also eager for their sessions to begin as each would receive 45 minutes of individual instruction with a student/tutor prepared to answer their technology questions and coach them as they practiced thei...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Kidney Transplant Program leads the nation in numbers — and vision
All kidneys are pink. The human beings in which they ’re housed can have various skin colors, attend various places of worship, have various political affiliations and live in various parts of the country. But their kidneys? They are all, quite simply, pink.No one knows this better than transplant professionals, including kidney transplant doctors, who have transformed the field of organ donation over the past few decades — not to mention the nation’s acceptance of it. In 2017, physicians in the United States performed almost 20,000 kidney transplants, according to data from the U.S. Department of He...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 11, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Health is named among the best places to work by two publications
UCLARonald Reagan UCLA Medical CenterUCLA Health has been named among the best places to work by two publications specializing in business/leadership and health care, respectively: Forbes and Becker ’s Healthcare.The  Forbes ranking for 2018 lists UCLA Health as one of America’s Best Midsize Employers. The ranking is based on an independent survey of more than 30,000 U.S. employees working for companies of at least 1,000 employees. The Forbes ranking, 43 in the nation among all industries, highlights the pride that UCLA Hea lth employees have in their institution.The Becker ’s Healthcare listing...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 7, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Health physicians stand out in Los Angeles magazine ’s ‘Top Doctors’ list
More than 150 UCLA Health physicians have beennamed among the region ’s best in Los Angeles magazine ’s first list of Los Angeles’ “top doctors.”The results were based on a peer-to-peer survey of practicing physicians throughout Los Angeles County, who were asked to identify the doctors they consider to be at the top of their game.“The idea is to tap into the wisdom of professionals who know medicine and know the people working within it,” the magazine explained in an accompanying editorial.“Our physicians exemplify — every day — UCLA Health’s mission o...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 7, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Latest Gates Foundation grants will advance research on educational inclusion and global immunization
Two grants totaling nearly $2.3 million from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation will support UCLA research on education in the U.S. and public health in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.A three-year award of $1.5 million will help Jane Margolis and Jean Ryoo, researchers at theUCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, discover which teaching practices and social supports are most effective in engaging high school students from underrepresented groups in computer science education.UCLAJane MargolisExtending the research scope of a recent National Science Foundation grant, the Gates Foundation ’...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists see inner workings of enzyme telomerase, which plays key roles in aging, cancer
Cancer, aging-related diseases and other illnesses are closely tied to an important enzyme called “telomerase.” UCLA researchersreport in the journal  Cell the deepest scientific understanding yet of this once-mysterious enzyme, whose catalytic core — where most of its activity occurs — can now be seen in near atomic resolution.“We’re now seeing not just the face of the clock, we’re seeing how the components inside interact to make it work,” said Juli Feigon, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry in the UCLA College and a senior author of the study. “At ea...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Renowned surgeon tells UCLA medical graduates, ‘All lives are of equal worth’
 Some 200 UCLA medical students received their diplomas Friday, June 1, in Dickson Court at the 64th  annual Hippocratic oath ceremony for the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. The keynote speaker, Dr. Atul Gawande, is  a practicing surgeon at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, staff writer for The New Yorker and author of four New York Times bestsellers, including “Being Mortal,” about how doctors handle death. Addressing the graduates and their families, he drew on his early experience as a reside nt caring for a prisoner.“Graduates, you are about to ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 5, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Health and Lakers host CPR Palooza
 More than 700 children and adults from around Los Angeles learned how they can help cardiac arrest victims at the first-ever CPR Palooza held at theUCLA Health Training Center, Home of the Los Angeles Lakers, in El Segundo on June 2.  The free  training was hosted by UCLA Health and the Lakers, and taught by instructors from the American Heart Association. The goal was to help people know what to do if they are near someone who suddenly collapses from a cardiac arrest. “I think it’s important for everyone in the family to know something about what to do in an emergency situation,&...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 5, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Personalized vaccine may increase long-term survival in people with deadliest form of brain cancer
An international study led by UCLA researchers has found that a personalized vaccine may help people with glioblastoma, the deadliest form of brain cancer, live longer. The vaccine, known as DCVax-L, uses a person ’s own white blood cells to help activate the immune system to fight cancer.Nearly 30 percent of people in the ongoing trial have survived for at least three years after they enrolled in the study. Currently, the average life expectancy for people diagnosed with glioblastoma is 15 to 17 months, and less than 5 percent of people who receive standard treatment survive more than five years after they are diagn...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 5, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Researchers discover how colon cancer mutates to escape the immune system
This study was funded by the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, the National Institutes of Health, the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center, the Ressler Family Foundation, the Samuel Family Foundation, the Garcia-Corsini Family Fund, the Project P Fund, the Friends of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Bennett Family Foundation, the Entertainment Industry Foundation through the National Colorectal Cancer Research Alliance, the Stand Up to Cancer (SU2C) Colorectal Cancer Dream Team Translational Research Grant, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the Tower Cancer Research Foundation, the Hope Foundation, the ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 5, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Despite risk of breast cancer, few men undergo genetic tests, study finds
Cancer is one of the leading causes of death among Americans. At least 10 percent of cancers are caused by inherited mutations in genes such as BRCA1 and BRCA2. Parents with the cancer gene mutation have a 50 percent chance of passing it on to a son or daughter. It ’s well-known that women with BRCA are at a very high risk for breast and ovarian cancer. Less known is the fact that men with these mutations also are at risk of breast cancer and other cancers.Astudy published in April in JAMA Oncology finds that few men are screened for these genetic mutations — and the researchers strongly suggest that they be sc...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 31, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA celebrates 3 medical graduates who overcame extraordinary odds to be called ‘doctor’
Some 200 students in the Class of 2018 will receive their medical diplomas on June 1 during the Hippocratic Oath Ceremony for theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.Earning an M.D. requires unwavering focus and the stamina to survive grueling hours and demanding classes. It ’s a tough journey for any student, but the following graduates overcame additional hurdles to achieve their dream of becoming a doctor. Each of them is enrolled in UCLA’sPRIME, a five-year program whose goal is to develop medical leaders dedicated to improving the lives of underserved patients. The program requires medical graduates to ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 28, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Gut bacteria play critical role in anti-seizure effects of ketogenic diet, UCLA scientists report
This study inspires us to study whether similar roles for gut microbes are seen in people that are on the ketogenic diet,” Vuong said.“The implications for health and disease are promising, but much more research needs to be done to test whether discoveries in mice also apply to humans,” said Hsiao, who is also an assistant professor of medicine in theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.On behalf of the Regents of the University of California, the UCLA Technology Development Group has filed a patent on Hsiao ’s technology that mimics the ketogenic diet to provide seizure protection. It has exclu...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 24, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

California children are drinking less soda but are getting more calories from sugary sports and energy products
Children and teenagers in California are filling up on sports and energy drinks that contain similar amounts of sweeteners and pose the same health risks as soda, according to a new  study by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.“There should be a warning label on flavored water, sports and energy drinks that says, ‘We may seem like a healthy choice, but we’re loaded with sugar, too,’” said Joelle Wolstein, research scientist at the center and lead author of the study. “People seem unaware that these drinks have the same or even higher amounts of added sweetener...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 24, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

App helps new and deaf parents know when and why their baby is crying
This study is unique because it brings the lab to the participant instead of the participant to the lab,” Anderson says. “It’s open to anyone willing to download the Chatterbaby app on their iPhone or Android devices, record five seconds of their baby’s cries, then upload it to the databa se.”This research was supported by NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Science, the UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute, the Autism Center for Excellence, the Semel Institute at UCLA and the Burroughs Wellcome Fund.Journalists: B-roll, sound bites, web elements, high-resolution still...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 23, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

App helps hearing-impaired parents know when and why their baby is crying
This study is unique because it brings the lab to the participant instead of the participant to the lab,” Anderson says. “It’s open to anyone willing to download the Chatterbaby app on their iPhone or Android devices, record five seconds of their baby’s cries, then upload it to the databa se.”This research was supported by NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Science, the UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute, the Autism Center for Excellence, the Semel Institute at UCLA and the Burroughs Wellcome Fund.Journalists: B-roll, sound bites, web elements, high-resolution still...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 22, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study predicts most people with earliest Alzheimer ’s signs won’t develop dementia associated with the disease
During the past decade, researchers have identified new ways to detect the earliest biological signs of Alzheimer ’s disease. These early signs, which are detected by biomarkers, may be present before a person starts to exhibit physical symptoms. What biomarker screening doesn’t reveal, however, is how likely it is that a person who tests positive will eventually develop the dementia associated with Alzheim er’s disease.That ’s where the new predictions from researchers at theUCLA Fielding School of Public Health may be helpful. In a paper published by Alzheimer ’s& Dementia: The Journal o...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 22, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Biomaterial developed at UCLA helps regrow brain tissue after stroke in mice
A new stroke-healing gel created by UCLA researchers helped regrow neurons and blood vessels in mice whose brains had been damaged by strokes.The finding is reported May 21 in Nature Materials.“We tested this in laboratory mice to determine if it would repair the brain and lead to recovery in a model of stroke,” said Dr. S. Thomas Carmichael, professor of neurology at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. “The study indicated that new brain tissue can be regenerated in what was previously just an inactive brain scar after stroke.”The results suggest that such an approach could some day be used...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 22, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New guidelines may slightly increase reliability, accuracy of melanoma diagnoses
The BMJScan (at two resolutions) of a category 3 melanoma in situ.FINDINGSIn a new study, researchers have developed updated guidelines for classifying a serious form of skin cancer called invasive melanoma. The American Joint Committee on Cancer, an organization that provides information on “cancer staging,” or the severity of individual cases of cancer, recently updated its guidelines for melanoma. The researchers found that when pathologists used the new guidelines for cases of early stage invasive melanoma, they agreed with an expert-defined diagnosis 10 percent more often.METHODIn the study, researchers re...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 18, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Social connections may prevent HIV infection among black men who have sex with men
FINDINGSUCLA-led research suggests that receiving support from friends and acquaintances can help prevent black men who have sex with men from becoming infected with HIV.BACKGROUNDBlack men who have sex with men have disproportionately high rates of HIV infection. While social connections are known to influence the behaviors that influence people ’s risk for HIV, little is known about whether they affect the risk for becoming infected with HIV.METHODThe researchers analyzed data from a 2009 –11 study that examined a multifaceted intervention for black men who have sex with men in six U.S. cities. They analyzed ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Lab-confirmed prenatal exposure to Zika is linked to cardiac defects in infants
In this study, researchers performed echocardiograms in infants with laboratory confirmation of in utero exposure to Zika to investigate a potential link between prenatal Zika exposure and congenital heart defects.METHODThe researchers performed cardiac echocardiograms in infants born in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from November 2015 to January 2017. All infants were infected with the Zika virus during their mothers ’ pregnancy, as confirmed by laboratory tests.IMPACTWomen infected by Zika during pregnancy were 10 times more likely than the general population to give birth to infants with major cardiac defects. The resea...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA biologists ‘transfer’ a memory
UCLA biologists report they have transferred a memory from one marine snail to another, creating an artificial memory, by injecting RNA from one to another. This research could lead to new ways to lessen the trauma of painful memories with RNA and to restore lost memories.“I think in the not-too-distant future, we could potentially use RNA to ameliorate the effects of Alzheimer’s disease or post-traumatic stress disorder,” said David Glanzman, senior author of the study and a UCLA professor of integrative biology and physiology and of neurobiology. The team’sresearch is published May 14 in eNeuro, t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 15, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA engineer develops 3D printer that can create complex biological tissues
A UCLA bioengineer has developed a technique that uses a specially adapted 3D printer to build therapeutic biomaterials from multiple materials. The advance could be a step toward on-demand printing of complex artificial tissues for use in transplants and other surgeries.“Tissues are wonderfully complex structures, so to engineer artificial versions of them that function properly, we have to recreate their complexity,” said Ali Khademhosseini, who led the study and is UCLA’s Levi James Knight, Jr., Professor of Engineering at theUCLA Samueli School of Engineering. “Our new approach offers ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 14, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Geriatrics receives $13.6 million to evaluate approaches to dementia care
There are an estimated 5.5 million Americans living with Alzheimer ’s disease, the most common type of dementia. As that number grows over the next few decades, health care organizations will need to develop better ways to serve people with dementia and the family members who care for them.Various approaches have been taken to manage the care of those with dementia, but there is not a consensus on which ones are the most effective. To help address this issue, the UCLA Division of Geriatrics has received a five-year, $13.6 million award from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to compare care delivered th...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 14, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

First description of mEAK-7 gene could suggest path toward therapies for cancer, other diseases
For years, researchers have known that a gene called EAK-7 plays an important role in determining how long worms will live. But it remained unclear whether the gene had a counterpart in humans and – if it did – how that human version would work.Now, researchers led by UCLA ’sDr. Paul Krebsbach are the first to characterize the mechanism of the human equivalent, which they call mammalian EAK-7, or mEAK-7.Krebsbach, dean of theUCLA School of Dentistry and a professor of periodontics, led a team that found mEAK-7 regulates the molecular process, or “metabolic pathway,” that dictates cell growth a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 14, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA faculty voice: A hangover pill? Tests on drunk mice show promise
UCLAYunfeng LuYunfeng Lu is a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering in the UCLA Samueli School of Engineerg.  Thiscolumn appeared in the Conversation.“Civilization begins with distillation,” said William Faulkner, a writer and drinker. Although ourthirst for alcohol dates back to the Stone Age, nobody has figured out a good way to deal with the ensuing hangover after getting drunk.As a chemical engineering professor and wine enthusiast, I felt I needed to find a solution. As frivolous as this project may sound, it has serious implications. Between 8 and10 percent of emergency room visits in Am...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 11, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study identifies receptor that may be targeted to repair the heart after heart attack, cardiac arrest
This study, published in April in the journal Anesthesiology, confirmed the presence of the receptor in rodent hearts, which are similar in composition to human hearts.UCLA HealthDr. Soban Umar“This study clues us in to how we might be able to better help patients heal when they experience heart conditions,” said Dr. Soban Umar, first author of the study and an assistant professor in residence in the  department of anesthesiology and perioperative medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. “For the first time, we’re finding a particular receptor in the heart th...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 11, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA-led research finds vaccines against anthrax, plague and tularemia are effective in mice
Anthrax, plague and tularemia are three potent agents terrorists would be likely to use in an attack, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Each is highly and quickly lethal to humans. But there are no licensed vaccines for tularemia and plague, and although there is an anthrax vaccine, it requires a burdensome immunization schedule and has severe side effects.Now, a UCLA-led group of researchers may have found a solution that, if found to be safe and effective in humans, could protect people from all three bacteria. The team used molecular engineering to develop vaccines against each that use a comm...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 10, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Creating a compelling character to aid Latinas with depression and anxiety
For years, MarySue Heilemann, an associate professor at the UCLA School of Nursing, has worked with Latinas dealing with depression and anxiety, looking for ways to connect them to effective treatment.  Then, she met media scholarHenry Jenkins at a UCLA/USC symposium. His groundbreaking insight into digital storytelling in the 21st  century showed her that an audience can take an active role in a story when it unfolds across multiple platforms and formats, including television shows, blogs and videos accessible on smartphones, laptops and other devices. This phenomenon is known as “transmedia storytelling.&...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 9, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Researchers discover cellular messengers communicate with bacteria in the mouth
This study establishes that there is a clear channel of communication between RNA messengers and bacteria in our mouth,” said Wong, who holds the Felix and Mildred Yip Endowed Chair in Dentistry. “Furthermore, we have shown that these messengers may play an important role in mediating interac tions between bacteria and their host.”Another significant study finding was the majority of tRNA bacteria sequences that show high sequence similarity with salivary tsRNAs came from antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. This observation could lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms behind the growth ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 9, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA researchers discover cellular messengers communicate with bacteria in the mouth
This study establishes that there is a clear channel of communication between RNA messengers and bacteria in our mouth,” said Wong, who holds the Felix and Mildred Yip Endowed Chair in Dentistry. “Furthermore, we have shown that these messengers may play an important role in mediating interac tions between bacteria and their host.”Another significant study finding was the majority of tRNA bacteria sequences that show high sequence similarity with salivary tsRNAs came from antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. This observation could lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms behind the growth ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 7, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How a small molecule halts the spread of a toxic protein associated with Alzheimer ’s progression
Alzheimer ’s disease destroys brain cells in part by promoting the formation of insoluble clumps that contain a protein called tau. Not only are these “tau aggregates” toxic for the cells that harbor them, but they also invade and destroy neighboring brain cells, or neurons, which speeds the cognitive d ecline associated with the Alzheimer’s.For those reasons, Alzheimer ’s researchers have been intensely interested in therapies aimed at either preventing tau aggregation or blocking its spread.Now, researchers at theUCLA School of Nursing and the department of neurology at theDavid Geffen Schoo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 3, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Two UCLA professors elected to the National Academy of Sciences for 2018
Two UCLA professors, Utpal Banerjee and Andrea Bertozzi, were elected to the National Academy of Sciences today in recognition of their “distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.”Membership in the academy is one of the highest honors that a U.S. scientist can receive. Its members have included Albert Einstein, Robert Oppenheimer, Thomas Edison, Orville Wright and Alexander Graham Bell. The academy announced the election of 84 new members and 21 foreign associates.Banerjee is the Irving and Jean Stone Endowed Professor of Life Sciences and a distinguished professor in the departme...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 2, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists identify 2 hormones that burn fat faster, prevent and reverse diabetes in mice
FINDINGSUCLA geneticists have created a technique to hunt for hormones that influence how organs and tissues communicate with each other. The method enabled them to find naturally occurring molecules that play major roles in Type 2 diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease.In particular, they discovered:Two hormones called “notum” and “lipocalin-5” that speed up the body’s ability to burn fat.Lipocalin-5 protected mice from developing diabetes — or cured the disease after they developed it.Lipocalin-5 also enhanced muscle tissue ’s ability to metabolize and absorb dietary nutrie...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 1, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

3 Wishes Project brings dignity to dying patients
After nearly two  months in the hospital, there was nothing more that medical science could do to save Adam. The young man lay dying in the intensive care unit connected to the steadily beeping and whirring monitors and life-support machines.He loved the outdoors, particularly sunsets, and his wife, Sandy, wished he didn ’t have to die inside the sterile white walls of his hospital room. Wanting to pay tribute to what he enjoyed, she asked the staff, “Was there a way Adam didn’t have to spend his last moments in an ICU room surrounded by machines?”Yes, thanks to a new pilot research project in ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 1, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study suggests older surgeons produce lower mortality rates in emergency procedures
FINDINGSResearchers from UCLA and several other institutions found surgeries performed by older surgeons — age 50 and up — have lower patient mortality rates than those performed by younger surgeons, and that patient mortality rates do not differ significantly based on whether the surgeon is male or female.Broken down by age group and adjusting for various patient characteristics, mortality rates were 6.6 percent for surgeons aged 40 and younger, 6.5 percent for those 40 to 49 years old, 6.4 percent for surgeons aged 50 to 59 years, and 6.3 percent for surgeons age 60 and older.The study also showed that when c...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 26, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Noninvasive spinal stimulation method enables paralyzed people to regain use of hands, study finds
paylessimages/iStockphotoMore than 1.2 million Americans are living with paralysis from spinal cord injuries, which results in loss of the ability to perform such tasks as opening a water bottle.The ability to perform simple daily tasks can make a big difference in people ’s lives, especially for those with spinal cord injuries. A UCLA-led team of scientists reports that six people with severe spinal cord injuries — three of them completely paralyzed — have regained use of their hands and fingers for the first time in years after undergoing a nonsurgical, nonin vasive spinal stimulation procedure the rese...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 25, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA research may explain some causes of infertility and miscarriage
A new study in the journal Nature Cell Biology has uncovered information about a key stage that human embryonic cells must pass through just before an embryo implants. The research, led by UCLA biologist Amander Clark, could help explain certain causes of infertility and spontaneous miscarriage.Infertility affects around 10 percent of the U.S. population, and roughly 15 to 20 percent of all pregnancies in the U.S. end in miscarriage. In many cases, the causes of infertility and miscarriage are unknown.A team led by Clark, a UCLA professor of molecular cell and developmental biology and member of the  Eli and Edythe Br...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 25, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Doctors prescribe opioids at high rates to those at increased overdose risk, but trends improving, study finds
The number of first-time prescriptions for opioid drugs has not risen since about 2010, according to UCLA researchers. However, patients taking a class of drug known to increase the risk for overdoses were likelier to receive a first-time opioid prescription — a combination that could be linked to the current surge in opioid-related deaths.People with chronic pain are often prescribed a class of medications called “benzodiazepines” to treat anxiety, panic attacks and other mental conditions that can be brought on by the stress of coping with their pain. But these people also are likelier to receive new op...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 24, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Crop choices: How price supports can contribute to healthier diets
When it comes to pegging the blame for the obesity crisis, farm subsidies are a popular target. Subsidies, the argument goes, encourage farmers to grow less-healthy foods — corn, turned into corn syrup, is the common culprit here — and fewer unsubsidized fruits and vegetables.Not everyone agrees. Experts caution that cheap corn isn't the only cause of poor nutrition and that other factors, like technology, are responsible for the low cost of field crops. Still, it's reasonable to ask: How can subsidies be used to make healthier food options more available?One answer: by making sure that subsidies take into acco...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 20, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA study reports nearly 1 in 3 California kids have a sugary drink daily
This study shows that children are still drinking too much sugar. In order to keep our kids healthy and our chronic disease rates and costs from skyrocketing, we need to reverse this trend,” said Flojaune Cofer, state policy director atPublic Health Advocates,  a California-based nonprofit dedicated to addressing policy solutions to emerging health issues. “The problem is especially severe among low-income communities, heightening the need for local and state policymakers to redouble efforts to protect these communities.”According toprevious research by Babey, one in three young adults in California ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 19, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Two UCLA professors elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences
UCLA professor-in-residence of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences Philippe Bourgois and UCLA professor of economics Rosa Matzkin are among 213 individuals from a wide range of disciplines and professions to be elected as members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2018.Founded in 1780, the academy honors exceptional scholars, leaders, artists and innovators and engages them in sharing knowledge and addressing challenges facing the world.Bourgois is also director of the Center for Social Medicine and Humanities within the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior and a professor in the departments o...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 19, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Researchers link sedentary behavior to thinning in brain region critical for memory
This study does not prove that too much sitting causes thinner brain structures, but instead that more hours spent sitting are associated with thinner regions, researchers said. In addition, the researchers focused on the hours spent sitting, but did not ask participants if they took breaks during this time.The researchers next hope to follow a group of people for a longer duration to determine if sitting causes the thinning and what role gender, race and weight might play in brain health related to sitting.IMPACTMedial temporal lobe thinning can be a precursor to cognitive decline and dementia in middle-aged and older adu...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA study produces clearest images to date of HSV-1, the virus that causes cold sores
UCLA researchers have produced the clearest 3-D images to date of the virus that causes cold sores, herpes simplex virus type 1, or HSV-1. The images enabled them to map the virus ’ structure and offered new insights into how HSV-1 works.A report on the research was published online by the journal Science.The scientists used cryo electron microscopy, or cryoEM, to obtain the first atomic model of the virus particle, which is made up of more than 3,000 protein molecules comprising tens of millions of atoms.“We’ve known that HSV-1 can hide inside the nucleus of the nerve cell and establish life-long latent ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Inhibiting metabolism found to be effective in treating aggressive form of lung cancer
FINDINGSResearchers from UCLA and Long Beach Memorial Medical Center have found that two targeted therapies could be more effective if used in combination to treat squamous cell carcinomas of the lung. The two drugs, MLN128 and CB-839, individually target the metabolism of key nutrients glucose and glutamine, respectively, prohibiting the cancer from switching metabolic gears between glucose (a simple sugar) and glutamine (an amino acid) to tap vital sources of energy. This switch enables the cancer cells to adapt their metabolism and evade treatments.BACKGROUNDNon-small cell lung cancer makes up about 85 percent of all lu...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

‘Scaffolding’ method allows biochemists to see proteins in remarkable detail
UCLA biochemists have achieved a first in biology: viewing at near-atomic detail the smallest protein ever seen by the technique whose development won its creators the 2017 Nobel Prize in chemistry. That technique, called cryo-electron microscopy, enables scientists to see large biomolecules, such as viruses, in extraordinary detail.Until now, this method has not worked with the thousands of much smaller proteins, which can cause diseases if defective, that are inside cells. A team led by Todd Yeates, a UCLA professor of  chemistry and biochemistry, reports results that hold the promise of using cryo-electron microsco...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 12, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news