More than 1 in 5 Californians did not follow restrictions on group gatherings
More than 1 in 5 California adults said they “never” or only “sometimes” followed state guidelines restricting group gatherings during the COVID-19 pandemic.  That ’s among the early findings from the 2021 California Health Interview Survey, published by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.The  2021 CHIS COVID-19 Preliminary Estimates Dashboard uses survey data collected during March and April, including responses to questions about how frequently people wore face coverings and washed their hands, and whether respondents practiced physical distancing or gathered with peop...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 22, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Mental health needs might not be met among California ’s Latino and Asian communities
A pair of new UCLA studies suggest that mental health needs for some ethnic communities may be going unmet in part because people in those groups don ’t see themselves as needing care — despite the fact that they are reporting in surveys that they are experiencing symptoms of mental health distress.The studies, by theUCLA Center for Health Policy Research, are based on data from the center ’s ownCalifornia Health Interview Surveys from 2015 to 2019.As part of the surveys, researchers asked Californians whether they had experienced symptoms of depression, anxiety or other mental health challenges. Separate...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 22, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Four UCLA research centers receive grants from California 100
In recognition of their expertise, UCLA researchers representing four research centers — spanning public health to urban planning to transportation — have been named recipients of financial awards from a new statewide initiative aimed at envisioning and shaping the long-term success of California.TheUCLA Center for Health Policy Research will use its award, along with technical assistance from the Institute for the Future, to evaluate current facts, origins and future trends health and wellness will play in California ’s next century. The center’s research will be led byNinez Ponce, director of the ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 19, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

RNA modification may protect against liver disease, explain liver fat differences between sexes
FINDINGSA chemical modification that occurs in some RNA molecules as they carry genetic instructions from DNA to cells ’ protein-making machinery may offer protection against non-alcoholic fatty liver, a condition that results from a build-up of fat in the liver and can lead to advanced liver disease, according to a new study by UCLA researchers.The study, conducted in mice, also suggests that this modification — known as m6A, in which a methyl group attaches to an RNA chain — may occurat a different ratein femalesthan it does inmales, potentially explaining why females tend to have higher fat content in ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 19, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

University of California to require all employees and students to get vaccinated against COVID-19
The University of California Office of the President issueda universitywide policy today requiring all UC students, trainees, personnel and all others who work, live and/or learn in any UC locations or otherwise participate in person in university programs to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 at least 14 days prior to the first day of instruction for the fall term. This is subject to certain medical exemptions and accommodations based on disability or religious belief, and deferrals are available for those who are pregnant.This means UCLA faculty, staff and students working, living and/or learning on UCLA property will ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 16, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA-led team awarded more than $5 million for HIV prevention projects
A team of researchers co-led byMatthew Mimiaga has received more than $5.2 million in grants from the National Institutes of Health to develop and test HIV interventions in the United States and Brazil.The projects, funded by three separate NIH grants, aim at reducing the spread of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, through the use of antiretroviral medications for HIV primary, or PrEP, and secondary, or ART, prevention among sexual and gender minority groups.“Antiretroviral medications are highly effective at reducing HIV acquisition and transmission, but its efficacy is highly dependent on uptake and excellent adhere...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 15, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Tool helps predict who will respond best to targeted prostate cancer therapy
A new prognostic tool developed by researchers from theUCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and five other institutionshelps predict which men with advanced metastatic prostate cancer will respond favorably to a novel targeted therapy.The tool,described in a study published today in Lancet Oncology, analyzesa wide spectrum of imaging and clinical data and is intended to assist physicians considering treating patients with Lutetium-177 prostate-specific membrane antigen, or LuPSMA.LuPSMA, which binds to PSMA proteins and delivers targeted radiation to prostate cancer tissue, offers a new option to men with PSMA-positive...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 12, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Tool helps predicts who will respond best to targeted prostate cancer therapy
A new prognostic tool developed by researchers from theUCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and five other institutionshelps predict which men with advanced metastatic prostate cancer will respond favorably to a novel targeted therapy.The tool,described in a study published today in Lancet Oncology, analyzesa wide spectrum of imaging and clinical data and is intended to assist physicians considering treating patients with Lutetium-177 prostate-specific membrane antigen, or LuPSMA.LuPSMA, which binds to PSMA proteins and delivers targeted radiation to prostate cancer tissue, offers a new option to men with PSMA-positive...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 9, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Thomas Rando named director of UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center
Dr. Thomas Rando, a renowned neurologist and stem cell biologist, has been named director of the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of  Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA.Rando, who was chosen after an international search, is currently a professor of neurology and neurological sciences at the medical school at Stanford University, where he also serves as director of the Glenn Center for the Biology of Aging and deputy director of the Stanford Center on Longevity. In addition, he is chief of neurology at the  Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System.His appointment is effective Oct. 1.&ldquo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 7, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA team awarded almost $3 million for safe K-12 return-to-school effort
A team of researchers co-led by UCLA professors  Moira Inkelas andDr. Mitch Wong has received almost $3 million in grants from the U.S. National Institutes of Health to use evidence-based research to inform policy makers of the safest ways to return to schools in vulnerable and underserved communities.UCLA ’s is one of is one of 15 teams that have received an award through institute’s initiative to help underserved populations safely return to schools through rapid diagnostic testing, NIH officials said.“The goal of our research is to reduce disparities in returning to in-person learning for tho...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 7, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Women who vape are more likely to have low-birthweight babies, study shows
Women who use electronic cigarettes during pregnancy are 33% more likely than those who don ’t to give birth to low-birthweight infants, according to a new study by a team of researchers from UCLA and other institutions.Low-birthweight babies — those weighing less than 5.5 pounds — often require specialized medical care and are at greater risk of early-life complications and long-lasting health issues, saidAnnette Regan,the study ’s corresponding authorand an adjunct assistant professor of epidemiology at theUCLA Fielding School of Public Health.Findings from the study, which also involved researche...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 7, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Conservatives ’ sensitivity to pandemic threat suppressed by distrust of science, media
Researchers studying the intersection of politics and psychology have long documented a link between threat sensitivity and social conservatism: People who are more socially conservative tend to react more strongly to threats. Conversely, those who are more socially liberal tend to be less sensitive to threats, viewing the world as a generally safe place and embracing change to explore new possibilities.These findings have held across a variety of events, but during the pandemic, U.S. polls show that Democrats, who tend to be more liberal, have generally been more concerned about the COVID-19 threat than Republicans, who t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 30, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

In memoriam: Dr. Gerald S. Levey, 84, oversaw building of Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center
Dr. Gerald Levey, who led the transformation of UCLA ’s hospitals and medical school into a world-class academic health system, died at home of Parkinson’s disease on June 25. He was 84. Levey served the campus as vice chancellor of medical sciences and dean of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA from 1994 to 2010. During his tenure, Levey amassed an extraordinarily long list of achievements, crowned by the construction of the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center and the sealing of a $200 million gift to the UCLA School of Medicine by entertainment executive David Geffen.  “It&rsq...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 30, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Differences in human, mouse brain cells have important implications for disease research
FINDINGSA UCLA-led study comparing brain cells known as astrocytes in humans and mice found that mouse astrocytes are more resilient to oxidative stress, a damaging imbalance that is a mechanism behind many neurological disorders. A lack of oxygen triggers molecular repair mechanisms in these mouse astrocytes but not in human astrocytes. In contrast, inflammation activates immune-response genes in human astrocytes but not mouse astrocytes.BACKGROUNDAlthough the mouse is a ubiquitous laboratory model used in research for neurological diseases, results from studies in mice are not always applicable to humans. In fact, more t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 25, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA study reveals how immune cells can be trained to fight infections
This study shows how collaborations between researchers in the UCLA College and David Geffen School of Medicine can produce innovative and impactful science that benefits human health,” Hoffmann said.The study ’s co-lead author is Sho Ohta, an assistant professor at the University of Tokyo and a former postdoctoral scholar in Hoffmann’s UCLA laboratory. Other co-authors are UCLA M.D.–Ph.D. student Katherine Sheu; Roberto Spreafico, a former postdoctoral scholar in Hoffmann’s laboratory; Adewunmi A delaja, who earned his Ph.D. in Hoffmann’s laboratory and is now working toward his M.D. at...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 24, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

People who have had COVID-19 may require only single dose of two-dose vaccines
People who have previously been infected with COVID-19 may need only one dose of the two-dose mRNA vaccines to achieve maximum protection against the virus, a new UCLA study suggests. But all vaccinated individuals, whether previously infected or not, will likely require booster shots moving forward because antibodies created through both vaccines and natural infection wane at the same relatively rapid rate, the authors say.In astudy published today in the peer-reviewed journal ACS Nano, the researchers report that a previous COVID-19 infection effectively serves as the first “dose” of a two-dose vaccine, with ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 24, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Report identifies barriers to accessing dental care for low-income Californians
Apolicy brief by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research identifies three of the most important factors that have led to disparities in Californians ’ access to dental care. There are fewer dentists per capita in some parts of the state.About 79% of the state ’s dentists did not provide care for low-income patients who rely on Medi-Cal.Only 8% of the state ’s dentists are Latino or Black, compared with 60% of the state’s low-income adult population overall.The authors also note that a shortage of dentists is looming: Some 23% of dentists are 60 years old or older and nearing retirement age, ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 21, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Medication may help heavy-drinking smokers improve their health
This study confirms that medications can play a role, Ray said, but she noted that it can be challenging for patients to take more than one prescribed medication.“Varenicline alone is doing a great job, and this trial indicates that there is not much room for naltrexone to make a difference,” Ray said. “But even medications like varenicline have their limitations. Medication is only part of the solution. There remains much research to be done on addict ions and how to treat them.”Ray says that those who wish to quit smoking and reduce drinking may consider talking to their doctor about the possibili...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 15, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

‘You clipped your wings to let us fly’
When Gabriela  López underwent open-heart surgery at age 12, no one prepared her for the agonizing pain she would suffer afterward. Once she awoke from anesthesia, she was terrified to see a thick tube protruding from her chest and to feel staples under her skin.None of her surgeons had explained the procedure in Spanish to her parents, who had immigrated from Mexico City. L ópez, who was born in the U.S., often served as her parents’ translator.That experience propelled L ópez, now 31, to pursue a career in medicine. The new graduate of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 10, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Drug commonly used as antidepressant helps fight cancer in mice
A class of drug called monoamine oxidase inhibitors is commonly prescribed to treat depression; the medications work by boosting levels of serotonin, the brain ’s “happiness hormone.”A new study by UCLA researchers suggests that those drugs, commonly known as MAOIs, might have another health benefit: helping the immune system attack cancer. Their findings are reported in two papers, which are published in the journals Science Immunology and Nature Communications.“MAOIs had not been linked to the immune system’s response to cancer before,” saidLili Yang, senior author of the study and a m...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 10, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Research aims for best ways to treat COVID-19 at home
While more than 125 million Americans have received full doses of the COVID-19 vaccine, thousands of people in the U.S. are being diagnosed each day with the disease. Reports of severe illnesses, hospitalizations and deaths continue, more than a year after the pandemic began.While researchers around the world have properly prioritized vaccine development and life-saving treatments, less attention has been paid to the experiences of people with COVID-19 who are not hospitalized.Of the 33 million Americans who have tested positive for COVID-19, the vast majority have been instructed to quarantine and recover at home. And hal...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 27, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Overdose deaths up 42% in 2020; largest increases among Black and Latino communities
FINDINGSBased on cases handled by emergency medical services, the number of people in the U.S. who died due to drug overdoses was 42% higher in 2020 than the average number of overdose deaths in 2018 and 2019.According to a study by researchers from UCLA, Northeastern University and the University of Utah, the largest increases were among Black Americans (50.3%) and Latinos (49.7%). Spikes were also most pronounced in low-income neighborhoods (46.4%) and in the five states — Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon and Washington — that border the Pacific Ocean (63.8%).BACKGROUNDPublic health authorities had expected...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 27, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA analysis reveals need to break down COVID-19 data for ethnic subgroups
According toa new UCLA report, COVID-19 case rates and death rates for Californians from Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander and Asian ethnic groups varied widely in 2020.But those variations were not readily apparent to the public because federal and state reports generally present COVID-19 data for all of those groups as a whole, rather than for each of the subgroups individually.The study, by theUCLA Center for Health Policy Research, suggests that breaking out the data for each of the racial and ethnic groups analyzed by the authors wouldenable public health officials and policymakers to identify the hardest-hit communit...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 26, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Health clinic helps mom heal after near-death birth experience
Marisa Peters, a 38-year-old mom of three, expected the delivery of her third child to be ordinary and uneventful, just like the births of her two other children. But right after her water broke at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center on Feb. 6, 2019, she became quickly aware that this delivery would be very different.The first sign was a high fever that escalated rapidly. Then she developed an infection and began experiencing full-body convulsions, which were followed by a painful singular contraction that lasted for one hour. During this time, the baby ’s heart rate dipped, but she was lucky to catch a small window of...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 26, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Can TV shows help teens navigate bullying, depression and other mental health issues?
This study provides much-needed evidence to advance the conversation about how a popular show can impact adolescent ment al health and the lessons to be drawn from it. Accurate information combined with compelling storytelling works well.”Co-authors of the report are Jordan Levinson, a UCLA graduate student in psychology; Laurel Felt, a senior fellow with the center; Elise Tsai, a UCLA research assistant; and Ellen Wartella, a professor of communication at Northwestern University.Melinda French Gates ’Pivotal Ventures and the University of Wisconsin–Madison’s Technology and Adolescent Mental We...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 25, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA eye surgeon saves photographer ’s vision and career
Spending his boyhood summers breaking mustangs on a ranch,Mark Sennet dreamed of becoming a cowboy. Instead, he achieved fame as a straight shooter of a different type.As a Time Life photographer for 30 years,  Sennet, snapped Hollywood’s most iconic faces: Alfred Hitchcock, Robin Williams, Barbra Streisand, Eddie Murphy, E.T., Cher and hundreds more. He captured Barack Obama’s inauguration and shot the Reagans’ life story.At Prince William ’s 2011 wedding, however, the Los Angeles resident realized he could no longer focus his right eye. He got by with auto-focus and an assistant, then sh...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 14, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Embracing diversity – one dental student at a time
For UCLA dental students, Isaiah “Izzy” Sampson and Ryan Davis, entering the dental field was in one word — perplexing.Growing up in several different states, Sampson never saw a Black person in his family ’s dentist’s office. Not the dentist, the hygienists or even the office staff. As he started thinking about applying to dental schools and attending pre-dental society meetings, he again found himself among the only people of color, let alone Black people.Even faced with that lack of diversity, Sampson still decided to apply to dental schools. He felt it was his calling to become a dentist a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 13, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA scientists decode the ‘language’ of immune cells
UCLA life scientists have identified six “words” that specific immune cells use to call up immune defense genes — an important step toward understanding the language the body uses to marshal responses to threats.In addition, they discovered that the incorrect use of two of these words can activate the wrong genes, resulting in the autoimmune disease known as Sj ögren’s syndrome. The research, conducted in mice,is published this week in the peer-reviewed journal Immunity (Cell Press).“Cells have evolved an immune response code, or language,” said senior author Alexander Hoffmann...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 12, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA report provides close look at state ’s Whole Person Care pilot health program
California in 2016 introduced its Whole Person Care program, a pilot project designed to integrate medical, behavioral health  and social services for Medi-Cal patients who frequently accessed health services, incurred disproportionately high costs and had poor health outcomes. With that program scheduled to end next year, theUCLA Center for Health Policy Research has published apolicy brief that presents a detailed overview of the initiative —one the authors say could help inform future efforts to address the needs of high-risk groups.  The brief highlights several key characteristics of Whole Pe...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 11, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Gene therapy offers potential cure to children born without an immune system
An experimental form of gene therapy developed by a team of researchers from UCLA and Great Ormond Street Hospital in London has successfully treated 48 of 50 children born with a rare and deadly inherited disorder that leaves them without an immune system.Severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency, or ADA-SCID, is caused by mutations in theADA gene that creates the enzyme adenosine deaminase, which is essential to a functioning immune system.For children with the condition, even day-to-day activities like going to school or playing with friends can lead to dangerous, life-threatening infections...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 11, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Molecular analysis identifies key differences in lungs of cystic fibrosis patients
A team of researchers from UCLA, Cedars-Sinai and the Cystic FibrosisFoundation has developed a first-of-its-kind molecular catalog of cells in healthy lungs and the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis.The catalog,described today in the journal Nature Medicine, reveals new subtypes of cells and illustrates how the disease changes the cellular makeup of the airways. The findings could help scientists in their search for specific cell types that represent prime targets for genetic and cell therapies for cystic fibrosis.“This new research has provided us with valuable insights into the cellular makeup of both heal...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 7, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Health provides medical care for unaccompanied migrant children
When the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced it would open an emergency-intake site in Long Beach for unaccompanied migrant children, UCLA Health officials sprang into action.Within 24 hours, they built a pediatric clinic, urgent-care facility and COVID-19 isolation unit inside the Long Beach Convention Center. They set up medical examination rooms, brought in X-ray machines and laboratory and pharmaceutical supplies, established secure computer networks to transmit health information and staffed the site with UCLA Health medical professionals — at least 30 at any given time, from pediatricians, fa...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 6, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Even fractures in arm, wrist increase risk for future breaks in postmenopausal women
Current guidelines for managing osteoporosis specifically call out hip or spine fractures for increasing the risk for subsequent bone breaks. But anew UCLA-led study suggests that fractures in the arm, wrist, leg and other parts of the body should also set off alarm bells.A fracture, no matter the location, indicates a general tendency to break a bone in the future at a different location, said Dr. Carolyn Crandall, the study ’s lead author and a professor of medicine at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.“Current clinical guidelines have only been emphasizing hip and spine fractures, but our findings c...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 5, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How to craft the vaccine message for the undecided
More than 140 million Americans have gotten the COVID-19 vaccine. Health care and government leaders hope that tens of millions more will do so.One key to getting that many needles in that many arms may turn on the messaging used to persuade people that getting the vaccine is the right thing to do. As the country seeks to turn the page on the pandemic, two UCLA professors who specialize in the impact of messaging efforts — Hal Hershfield and Keith Holyoak — have identified opportunities and challenges on the road to herd immunity.In March of 2020, the World Health Organization declared the spread of the novel c...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 4, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA team discovers how to restrict growth, spread of head and neck cancers
Researchers from the  UCLA School of Dentistry have discovered a key molecule that allows cancer stem cells to bypass the body’s natural immune defenses, spurring the growth and spread of head and neck squamous cell cancers. Their study, conducted in mice, also demonstrates that inhibiting this molecule derails cancer progression and helps e liminate these stem cells.  Published today in the journal Cell Stem Cell, the findings could help pave the way for more effective targeted treatments for this highly invasive type of cancer, which is characterized by frequent resistance to therapies, rapid metasta...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 3, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

As optimism returns, a reminder that life after COVID-19 will be stressful for many
Life during the COVID-19 pandemic has been uniquely stressful for parents with children at home. For some parents, schools welcoming children back for in-person instruction — even for limited schedules in many cases — has provided a long-awaited measure of relief and cause for optimism.ButBridget Callaghan, a  UCLA assistant professor of psychology, said adjusting to life after COVID-19 could be stressful for many.“Parents should be patient and not expect everything to go back to how it was before,” Callaghan said. “Post–COVID-19 will be an adjustment. ”A few months after the ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 3, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Nearly $500 million a year in Medicare costs goes to 7 services with no net health benefits
FINDINGSA UCLA-led study shows that physicians frequently order preventive medical services for adult Medicare beneficiaries that are considered unnecessary and of “low value” by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force — at a cost of $478 million per year.The researchers analyzed national survey data over a 10-year period, looking specifically at seven preventive services given a “D” rating by the task force, and discovered that these services were ordered more than 31 million times annually.BACKGROUNDThe U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, an independent panel appointed by the Department of ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 29, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Breaking down barriers to care for metastatic breast cancer patients
Drawing on a series of studies and interviews with patients and caregivers, UCLA researchers from theUCLA Center for Health Policy Research and the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have published recommendations for California policymakers and patient advocates aimed at improving care and outcomes for women with metastatic breast cancer.More than 30,000women in California are diagnosed each year with this cancer, which has spread from the breast to other parts of the body. Survival rates are low, and patients often face significant hurdles to care — particularly in the areas of health insurance, cli...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 28, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Medical school professor elected to National Academy of Sciences
Kenneth Lange, Rosenfeld Professor of Computational Genetics in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, has been elected as a member of the National Academy of Sciences, in recognition of his distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.Lange, who is also a  professor in the departments of human genetics and statistics, has written four advanced textbooks and published more than 200 scientific papers in the areas of genetic epidemiology, population genetics, membrane physiology, demography, oncology, medical imaging, stochastic processes and optimiz ation theory. Many of his landmark p...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 27, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Professor in the medical school elected to the National Academy of Sciences
Kenneth Lange, Rosenfeld Professor of Computational Genetics in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, has been elected as a member of the National Academy of Sciences, in recognition of his distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.Lange, who is also a  professor in the departments of human genetics and statistics, has written four advanced textbooks and published more than 200 scientific papers in the areas of genetic epidemiology, population genetics, membrane physiology, demography, oncology, medical imaging, stochastic processes and optimiz ation theory. Many of his landmark p...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 26, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Stem cell therapy promotes recovery from stroke and dementia in mice
A one-time injection of an experimental stem cell therapy can repair brain damage and improve memory function in mice with conditions that replicate human strokes and dementia,a new UCLA study finds.Dementia can arise from multiple conditions, and it is characterized by an array of symptoms including problems with memory, attention, communication and physical coordination. The two most common causes of dementia are Alzheimer ’s disease and white matter strokes — small strokes that accumulate in the connecting areas of the brain.“It’s a vicious cycle: The two leading causes of dementia are almos...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 22, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Proportion of Black physicians in U.S. has changed little in 120 years, UCLA research finds
A new UCLA study finds that the proportion of physicians who are Black in the U.S. has increased by only 4 percentage points over the past 120 years, and that the share of doctors who are Black men remains unchanged since 1940.The research also spotlights a significant income gap between white and Black male physicians — a disparity, the researcher writes, that could reflect a combination of pay discrimination and unequal access for physicians to pursue careers in more lucrative specialties.The paper is published today in  the peer-reviewed Journal of General Internal Medicine.“These findings demonstrate h...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 20, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Patients of women doctors more likely to be vaccinated against the flu
New UCLA research suggests that elderly patients of female physicians are more likely than those of male physicians in the same outpatient practice to be vaccinated against the flu.This trend holds for all racial and ethnic groups studied and could provide insight into improving vaccination rates for influenza, COVID-19 and other illnesses,according to the research letter, which is published in the peer-reviewed JAMA Internal Medicine.Prior studies have shown that female physicianstend tospend more time with their patients, said study author Dr. Dan Ly, anassistant professor in the division of general internal medicine and...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 14, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Thomas Carmichael elected to the Association of American Physicians
Dr. S. Thomas Carmichael has been elected to the Association of American Physicians, an honor society recognizing exemplary physician-scientists who contribute to clinical medicine through the pursuit of basic science. The newly elected members for 2021 were recognized at the association ’s annual meeting, which was held virtually April 8–10.Carmichael, UCLA ’s Frances Stark Professor of Neurology, is the chair of theneurology department in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and co-director of theEli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA.In his research, ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 9, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Thomas Carmichael elected to Association of American Physicians
Dr. S. Thomas Carmichael has been elected to the Association of American Physicians, an honor society recognizing exemplary physician-scientists who contribute to clinical medicine through the pursuit of basic science. The newly elected members for 2021 were recognized at the association ’s annual meeting, which was held virtually April 8–10.Carmichael, UCLA ’s Frances Stark Professor of Neurology, is the chair of theneurology department in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and co-director of theEli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA.In his research, ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 9, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

In memoriam: Steven Wallace, 63, renowned expert in public health equity and beloved mentor
Steven Wallace, an internationally renowned scholar on aging in communities of color and immigrant health and health policy, has died. He was 63.Among his important research and community-based projects with the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, Wallace developed new approaches to assessing the economic security of older people through the California Elder Economic Security Standard Index, a tool that measures the actual cost of basic necessities for older adults, which was adopted into law in California and was used by the World Health Organization in its 2020 Decade of Healthy Aging report and will be used in Calif...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 9, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Now rescinded, Trump-era ‘public charge’ policy may still harm immigrants’ health
The Trump administration ’s expansion of the “public charge” rule — a move that sought to disqualify immigrants who used social programs like Medicaid from obtaining legal residency in the U.S. — led to widespread disenrollment from these programs and left scores of children in California without access to health care in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.  What ’s more, say the authors of anew report from theUCLA Latino Policy and Politics Initiative, the fear and confusion that the now-rescinded Trump-era policy sowed in the state will likely have a chilling long-term effect,...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 7, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Tracking how COVID-19 is changing life expectancy
As a demographer — someone who studies how human populations grow and change — UCLA professor of sociology Patrick Heuveline typically spends time each year traveling around the world, talking to people about their hopes for their families and their dreams for the future.“Demography is obviously all about numbers — but at its core, it’s about people’s lives,” he said.A big part of understanding demographics is understanding mortality, which is why in 2020 Heuveline ’s research took on a grim new reality. He began tracking worldwide COVID-19 deaths and interpreting what those ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 2, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Researchers devise more efficient, enduring CAR gene therapy to combat HIV
FINDINGSA UCLA research team has shown that using a truncated form of the CD4 molecule as part of a gene therapy to combat HIV yielded superiorand longer-lastingresults in mouse models than previous similar therapies using the CD4 molecule.This new approach to CAR T gene therapy — a type of immunotherapy that involves genetically engineering the body ’s own blood-forming stem cells to create HIV-fighting T cells— has the potential to not only destroy HIV-infected cells but to create “memory cells” that could provide lifelong protection from infection with the virus that causes AIDS.BACKGROUNDC...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 1, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Low-calorie diet and mild exercise improve survival for young people with leukemia
In some cancers, including leukemia in children and adolescents, obesity can negatively affect survival outcomes. Obese young people with leukemia are 50% more likely to relapse after treatment than their lean counterparts.Now,a study led by researchers at UCLA and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles has shown that a combination of modest dietary changes and exercise can dramatically improve survival outcomes for those with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common childhood cancer.The researchers found that patients who reduced their calorie intake by 10% or more and adopted a moderate exercise program imm...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 1, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news