Statins associated with improvement of rare lung disease
This study suggests that oral statin therapy may be a new approach for patients with autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.AUTHORSThe study ’s co-senior authors are Dr. Elizabeth Tarling of UCLA and Dr. Bruce Trapnell of Children’s Hospital Medical Center of Cincinnati, Ohio. Other authors are listed in the journal article.JOURNALThe study was  published in the journal Nature Communications. FUNDINGThe National Institutes of Health funded the research.Learn more about the  cardiovascular research theme at UCLA.  (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 17, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Health hospitals again rank No. 1 in Los Angeles, No. 7 nationally
UCLA Health hospitals in Westwood and Santa Monica ranked No. 1 in Los Angeles, No. 2 in California and No. 7 nationally in the annual U.S. News& World Report assessment released today.It ’s the 29th consecutive year that U.S. News has placed UCLA Health on its honor roll, a distinction reserved for only 20 hospitals in the nation that deliver high-quality care across a range of specialties, procedures and conditions.“UCLA Health is proud to once again be recognized for comprehensive excellence in patient care,” said Johnese Spisso, president of UCLA Health and CEO of the UCLA Hospital Syste...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 14, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Methyl marks on RNA discovered to be key to brain cell connections
FINDINGSMethyl chemical groups dot lengths of DNA, helping to control when certain genes are accessible by a cell. In new research, UCLA scientists have shown that at the connections between brain cells — which often are located far from the central control centers of the cells — methyl groups also dot chains of RNA. This methyl markup of RNA molecules is likely key to brain cells’ ability to quickly send signals to other cells and react to changing stimuli in a fraction of a second.BACKGROUNDTo dictate the biology of any cell, DNA in the cell ’s nucleus must be translated into corresponding strands...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 9, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Race and research: How public health experts can reduce racial bias in their work
How can public health researchers address racism? That ’s the focus of a supplement to the latest issue of the journal Ethnicity& Disease, for which UCLA professor Chandra Ford served as a guest editor.“Race is a social construct and not a biological attribute, but scientists continue to design studies that reinforce the notion that race and ethnicity are causes of health outcomes,” said Ford, an associate professor of community health sciences and the founding director of theCenter for the Study of Racism, Social Justice& Health at theUCLA Fielding School of Public Health.The journal supplement i...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 9, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Mini-horse charms patients, families and staff
Cleve Wong/UCLA HealthBlue Moon, the mini-horse, visits with the development staff at UCLA Health. She lives in Malibu, has the biggest blue eyes and loves posing for selfies.But this superstar is no Hollywood actress. Blue Moon is an attention-grabbing, 28-inch-tall miniature horse that is specially trained to bring comfort to patients and their families.Blue Moon was recently a special guest of thePeople-Animal Connection, UCLA Health ’s canine animal-assisted therapy program. It was the first time in the program’s 24-year history that any animal other than a dog has visited the hospital.“We wanted...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 9, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Mom still matters, UCLA psychologists report
If you ’re a parent who feels your college-age children would choose their friends over you, a new UCLA psychology study has a reassuring message: You’re probably underestimating their loyalty to you.The psychologists demonstrated for the first time that when forced to make a decision that benefits either a parent or a close friend, young adults are more likely to choose the parent.“Our study suggests mom still matters,” said Jennifer Silvers, a UCLA assistant professor of psychology and senior author of the study,which is published online today in the journal Psychological Science. “Parents c...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA awarded $9.3 million to help provide prostate cancer treatment in the community
Members of the  UCLA urology department have received $9.3 million of funding from the state of California to help combat the financial burden of cancer treatment for men diagnosed with prostate cancer, one of the most common cancers in American men.During the next three years, the award will directly support the 17-year-oldIMPACT program, which stands for Improving Access, Counseling and Treatment for Californians with prostate cancer.Dr. Mark Litwin, professor of urology in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and his team have led the efforts of the state-funded program that provides free, high-qu...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Neuroscientist identifies biomarker for traumatic brain injury
A new UCLA study in rats shows that levels of a molecule called LPA rise quickly in several sites of the brain after traumatic brain injury, or TBI, suggesting a possible route to development of a diagnostic blood test for humans.The findings are consistent with previous research detecting higher concentrations of LPA in the blood after a brain injury, as well as in cerebrospinal fluid following spinal-cord injury. Because traumatic brain injury can produce a variety of symptoms, it can be difficult for doctors to accurately evaluate the severity of the trauma or predict the duration of the injury.The American Journal of P...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Health joins nationwide clinical trial for acute myeloid leukemia
UCLA Health has joined an important national clinical trial that uses genetic testing to match people who have acute myeloid leukemia, or AML, with new therapies. UCLA ’s hospital system is the first in California to offer people the opportunity to participate.The Beat AML Master Trial will evaluate a precision-based medicine approach to treating the disease; it will allow people with the disease to have immediate access to new treatments that are currently in development without having to try more traditional approaches first. The approach could streamline a patient ’s course of treatment and, ultimately, save...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA bioengineers show magnetic gel ’s use to ease pain
UCLA bioengineers have demonstrated that a gel-like material containing tiny magnetic particles could be used to manage chronic pain from disease or injury. Broadly, the study demonstrates the promising use of biomechanical forces  that push and pull on cells to treat disease.“Much of mainstream modern medicine centers on using pharmaceuticals to make chemical or molecular changes inside the body to treat disease,” said Dino Di Carlo, UCLA professor of bioengineering and the principal investigator of the study. “However, recent breakthroughs in the control of force s at small scales have opened up a ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 7, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Health systems in low- and middle-income countries not prepared to diagnose and treat common diseases
Cardiovascular diseases, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes are among the leading causes of death worldwide. A new UCLA study has found that Bangladesh, Haiti, Malawi, Nepal and Tanzania each has fewer than five health facilities that can provide the full suite of supplies and equipment, trained staff and medication that are needed to properly diagnose and treat all three diseases.“These five countries, paralleling global trends, are seeing an increase in the number of people with these noncommunicable diseases,” said the lead author, Corrina Moucheraud, assistant professor of health policy and managemen...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Invasive crayfish lead to more mosquitoes and risk of disease in Southern California
Invasive red swamp crayfish are a serious problem in the Santa Monica Mountains and other parts of Southern California. They devastate native wildlife, including threatened species such as the California red-legged frog, throwing off the natural balance of ecosystems.They also pose a threat to people, according toa new paper in the journal Conservation Biology. The study is based on field research in the Santa Monica Mountains and lab experiments at UCLA  La Kretz Center for California Conservation Science.Mosquitos are notorious vectors that spread diseases such as malaria, Zika and West Nile virus. In the mountains,...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA neurosurgeon ’s accurate diagnosis restored teen’s vision
UCLA Health Rhianna Wilson spent her senior year of high school in and out of four San Diego hospitals, seeking relief for her vision loss, leg pain and excruciating  headaches.At 18, she was diagnosed with Ehler-Danlos Syndrome, a rare genetic disorder marked by overly stretchy connective tissue. In Rhianna ’s case, the disorder revealed itself in double-jointedness that led to four shoulder dislocations.An MRI showed that Wilson had a small slippage of her brain into her spinal column, called a Chiari malformation. The lower part of Wilson ’s brain drooped exactly five millimeters below her skull, p...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 3, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Hookah smoking raises cardiovascular risk comparable to traditional cigarette smoking, study finds
This study is believed to be the first to investigate the effects of hookah smoking on stiffening of the arteries. Studies have shown that as cigarette use continues to decline, hookah smoking is rising, especially among youth and particularly among college students.“We know that flavored tobacco products are frequently the first kind of tobacco product used by youth,” Rezk-Hanna said. “One of the major issues with hookah is the fact that the tobacco is flavored with fruit, candy and alcohol flavors, making hookah the most popular flavored tobacco produc t among this audience.”According to the ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 2, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA researcher uses virtual reality to understand how animals perceive space
UCLA Health Nobody thinks much about how to navigate from the sofa to refrigerator. Memorizing sensory cues along the way, like the sight of the dining room table or a kitchen countertop, requires no conscious effort. You may not realize it, but your brain is processing data faster than any super computer, rapidly constructing a mental map based on sensory inputs as you move through your house.  When healthy, we don ’t appreciate this gift. However, spatial memory is one of the first functions to deteriorate in several neurological conditions including epilepsy and Alzheimer’s disease. That is why UCL...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 2, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA researchers discover how the body regenerates blood vessel lining
Normal wear and tear damages the blood vessel lining, which is called the endothelial lining. The body, however, has the ability to initiate molecular activity that regenerates and repairs this damage. Now, researchers at the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have for the first time followed this regeneration in progress and identified the genes and proteins responsible for spurring it. Their findings could eventually lead to novel methods to repair more severe blood vessel damage, including damage that can result from placing stents — metal or plast ic mes...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 2, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How nature helps empower people going through cancer treatment
Carol Mason was on the edge — strung out between depression and high anxiety. She had recently received news that the chemotherapy and its accompanying nausea, vomiting and intense fatigue she had been enduring for months to treat her metastatic breast cancer wasn’t working. Her latest scan had revealed new lesions on her bones and liver.Mason, 70, needed some way to quiet her mind and her fears, and marshal her energy for the road ahead. She was open to anything that would give her a vacation from her current nightmare. That ’s when she heard about a new approach to traditional mindfulness training. Mind...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 1, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Drugs for heart failure are still under-prescribed, years after initial study
UCLADr. Gregg FonarowFINDINGSA UCLA-led study found that many people with heart failure do not receive the medications recommended for them under guidelines set by the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association and Heart Failure Society of America.The research also found that doctors frequently prescribe medications at doses lower than those recommended by the guidelines, especially for older people, those with kidney disease, those with worsening symptoms or those who were recently hospitalized for heart failure. Further study is needed to determine why people in those four groups specifically were prescri...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 31, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Free sunscreen offered at Santa Monica and Malibu beaches this summer
UCLA Health, sunscreen companyBrightGuard and the nonprofit organizationIMPACT Melanoma last week unveiled the first of dozens of new sun-safety stations that will dispense free sunscreen to the public at Los Angeles-area beaches.Robert Hernandez/UCLA HealthAlumnus Sinjin Smith and Dr. Jennifer HsiaoUCLA alumnus Sinjin Smith, whose legendary beach volleyball career spanned more than 25 years, joined the kickoff and spoke about the importance of sun protection.The campaign is an effort to help people have access to sunscreen and protect themselves against skin cancer, a condition that affects one in five Americans...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 30, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Ability to identify genuine laughter transcends culture, UCLA-led study finds
People across cultures and continents are largely able to tell the difference between a fake laugh and a real one, according to a new study by UCLA communication researcher Greg Bryant.For almost a decade, Bryant, a professor of communication in theUCLA College, has studied the nature of laughter — and what it reveals about the evolution of human communication and cooperation.His latest study, published in Psychological Science, builds ona 2014 study he led indicating that people can discern when a laugh is genuine.Working with the knowledge that laughter is a powerful and universal human “play signal” th...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 26, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New initiatives expand community benefits of L.A. County Parks ’ innovative nighttime programs
A Los Angeles County Parks and Recreation program called Parks After Dark provides a safe space for the community during evening hours. According to a report by the  UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, new initiatives added to the program in 2017, its eighth year, paid notable dividends.The UCLA report found that the expanded services not only saved the county money, but also provided residents with easier ways to access mental health services, as well as valuable gang intervention and other activities for youth and young adults in at-risk neighborhoods.► Read a brief summary of the reportThe report found that P...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 25, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Endurance athlete hopes new heart valve technology will keep him active
An avid triathlete and marathon runner, Gil Solomon was concerned when an echocardiogram test done in 2014 showed that he had a congenital defect in his heart called bicuspid aortic valve disease. His aortic valve only had two cusps, or leaflets, that opened and closed to regulate blood flow instead of the normal three. The defect causes the valve to narrow, which strains the heart and reduces or blocks blood flow from the heart to the body. The same defect may also weaken the walls of the aorta, the main artery from the heart, which can lead to a tear.Many people, like Solomon, are unaware they have the condition until it...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 25, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA biologist works to create a new field, merging the sciences and architecture
How do spaces affect us, and animals? UCLA biologist Noa Pinter-Wollman had the idea that we can learn from the way animals use space, and, with several colleagues from the U.S., England and France, she is launching an effort to create a new field of study. Her goals are ambitious.Does she hope her research will lead to better homes, better offices and better communities?“Of course,” said Pinter-Wollman, an expert on ants, spiders and how environments influence collective behavior. “Who doesn’t? I want to know how collective behaviors emerge; what causes them, and how they can be improved.”It ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 24, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Grant from L.A. Care funds scholarships for 4 UCLA medical students
Thanks to a $1.3 million grant from L.A. Care Health Plan, four medical students have received full scholarships to attend theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.L.A. Care, the largest publicly operated health plan in the country, is an independent agency created by the state of California to provide health coverage to low-income residents of Los Angeles County. A shortage of primary care physicians is threatening the county ’s so-called safety net — the health care facilities that serve the uninsured, Medi-Cal members and other vulnerable populations.The new UCLA scholarships are part of a larger L.A. Care...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 23, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Mental health of young adults with lesbian parents is same as their peers
Comparing relationships, educational/job performance, and behavioral, emotional and mental health problems, researchers from the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law found that 25-year-olds raised by lesbian parents do as well on multiple measures of psychological health as other adults.The findings are contained in the latest edition of the ongoing U.S. National Longitudinal Lesbian Family Study, which in its 32nd year is the longest-running prospective study on sexual minority parent families. This is the first NLLFS report based on data collected when the offspring were legal adults.“When I began this study in...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 21, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

An aerial, as opposed to ground-level, view of time
Do today and yesterday and tomorrow loom large in your thinking, with the more distant past and future barely visible on the horizon? That ’s not unusual in today’s time-pressed world — and it seems a recipe for angst.Suppose, instead, you looked down on your life, or at least your calendar, from high overhead; and all your days, future and past, were equally visible and real to you, sort of like the sketches above. Might feelings of anxiety and guilt — and other negativity — recede, as you glimpsed a broader view of all you’ve done and all you’ll have time for going forward?That &...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 19, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA faculty voice: Providing support for those mourning a death by suicide
UCLALekeisha A. SumnerLekeisha A. Sumner is an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at UCLA. Thisop-ed appeared in The Conversation.Recent headlines of celebrities and their loved ones who have died by suicide — Kate Spade, Anthony Bourdain, and Tina Turner’s son Craig Turner — have made thisleading cause of death a topic of mainstream conversations. Globally, suicide accounts formore deaths than homicide and war combined. Annually, an estimated 48 million people experience grief to suicide loss worldwide. As rates in the United States increase, it is likely that many...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 18, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Military personnel show brain changes similar to those in retired football players suspected to have CTE
This study was supported by the Fran and Ray Stark Foundation Fund for Alzheimer ’s Disease Research; the Parlow-Solomon and Plot Professorships; Bob and Marion Wilson; the Ahmanson Foundation; the National Institutes of Health; and the Department of Energy.The FDDNP tracer is intellectual property owned by UCLA and licensed to TauMark LLC. Barrio, Huang, Omalu, Satyamurthy and Small are co-inventors of the marker. Barrio, Fitzsimmons, Huang, Satyamurthy and Small have a financial interest in TauMark. Other disclosures are listed in the study. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 17, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA led the nation in organ transplants in 2017
Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center led the nation in the number of solid organ transplants performed in 2017, with 641 procedures that included kidney, pancreas, lung, heart and intestine transplants, according to statistics from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network.UCLA recorded 363 kidney transplants in 2017, making it the year ’s top kidney transplant center.Other medical centers with a high number of solid organ transplants in 2017 were UC San Francisco; Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri; and the University of Wisconsin ’s University Hospital in Ma...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 17, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Researchers discover natural product that could lead to new class of commercial herbicide
A garden can be a competitive environment. Plants and unseen microorganisms in the soil all need precious space to grow. And to gain that space, a microbe might produce and use chemicals that kill its plant competitors. But the microbe also needs immunity from its own poisons.By looking for that protective shield in microorganisms, specifically the genes that can make it, a team of UCLA engineers and scientists discovered a new and potentially highly effective type of weed killer. This finding could lead to the first new class of commercial herbicides in more than 30 years, an important outcome as weeds continue to develop...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Longtime UCLA supporters endow third faculty chair at Stein Eye Institute
TheUCLA Stein Eye Institute has received $1 million from Joan and Jerome Snyder to establish an endowed faculty chair in the department of ophthalmology. The Snyders’ gift will advance teaching and research in vision science.  The Snyders have supported Stein Eye for nearly 40 years, and they previously endowed two other faculty chairs. One, established in 2008, was designated for the director of the ophthalmology residency training program and is currently held by Dr. Stacy Pineles, an associate professor whose research interests include pediatric ophthalmology and specifically the effects of pediatri...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA researchers discover gene that controls bone-to-fat ratio in bone marrow
This study also suggests that regular physical exercise might help to maintain bone health and prevent skeletal aging, as well as provide other health benefits.Wang holds the Dr. No-Hee Park Endowed Chair in Dentistry, funded by the Shapiro Family Charitable Foundation, and is a member of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center.Additional authors are Lihong Huo, Peng Deng, John Szymanski, Jiong Li and Dr. Christine Hong, all from the UCLA School of Dentistry; Yunsong Liu from Peking University School of Stomatology; Xianghang Luo from The Second Xiangya Hospital of Central Sout...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 12, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Surgery allows young woman paralyzed in fall 10 years ago to walk again
At 16, Yadira Perdomo of Bogot á, Colombia, was often taunted by other students at her high school for her small-town accent and her taste in music. When her mother asked her if she’d like to change schools, she replied that she was determined to stick it out and finish the year.But the bullying escalated. One day at school, a group of students lured Perdomo near a window on the third floor — and then pushed her out.In that instant, everything changed. The impact from the fall left Perdomo with fractured vertebra in the lower back and the loss of all sensation in her legs. She could no longer walk or con...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 11, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Antibody identifier could speed development of therapies for cancer, other diseases
A research team led by a UCLA bioengineer has developed a model to predict the extent to which new laboratory-designed antibodies will be able to combat specific human diseases. This is the first time that a comprehensive model has accounted for the many ways that antibodies communicate with other parts of the immune system and could speed up research and development of new therapies for cancer, infectious diseases and autoimmune disorders.Antibodies are proteins in the blood that are an important part of the immune system. These “Y”-shaped molecules find and neutralize unwanted and potentially dangerous pathog...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 9, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Parents who had severe stresses, trauma in childhood more likely to have kids with behavioral health problems
A new study finds that severe childhood trauma and stresses early in parents ’ lives are linked to higher rates of behavioral health problems in their own children.The types of childhood hardships included divorce or separation of parents, death of or estrangement from a parent, emotional, physical or sexual abuse, witnessing violence in the home, exposure to substance abuse in the household or parental mental illness.“Previous research has looked at childhood trauma as a risk factor for later physical and mental health problems in adulthood, but this is the first research to show that the long-term behavioral ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 9, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Climate change is making it harder for couples to conceive
According to research by UCLA environmental economist Alan Barreca, hot weather reduces chances of getting pregnant — and the problem is expected to get worse because of global warming.After noticing that August and September — nine months after the coldest part of the year — are two of the busiest months for births in the U.S., Barreca, a member of theUCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, pored through 80 years of U.S. birth data, looking for trends.Reported  in the journal Demography,the study found that high temperatures have a significant negative effect on fertility and birth rat...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 5, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Family travels 7,500 miles to save son ’s life with treatment developed at UCLA
When he was born in September 2015, Hussein El Kerdi looked like a healthy baby boy. No one knew that his immune cells lacked an important enzyme. But the absence of that enzyme would profoundly change the El Kerdi family ’s life, sending them on a journey from their small hometown in Lebanon to UCLA. Their one goal: to save Hussein’s life.When Hussein was three months old, a physician in Beirut diagnosed Hussein with a life-threatening immune disorder called adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency, also known as ADA-SCID or bubble baby disease.The disorder is caused by a genetic mutation...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 28, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Change in brain cells linked to opiate addiction, narcolepsy
This study was supported by grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Medical Research Service of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 27, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Curing a deadly childhood disease, sharing her love of science, and a sleek ’68 Corvette drive this biochemist
Spend a brief amount of time with biochemist Rachelle Crosbie-Watson and you ’ll quickly realize that “drive” is one of her favorite words.With equal enthusiasm, she ’ll describe studying “the small molecules that drive life,” and her 1968 convertible Corvette being “a blast to drive.” The symmetry is hard to miss: Crosbie-Watson drives a classic muscle car to UCLA, where she studies the biochemical reactions that drive muscle cell functions. Her lab is hotly pursuing new drugs that one day may halt the progression of a deadly childhood muscle-wasting disease, allowing k...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 26, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA researchers develop synthetic T cells that mimic form, function of human version
This study was funded by the National Institute for Dental and Craniofacial Research. The authors report no commercial conflicts of interest. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 26, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Excellence of UCLA Mattel Children ’s Hospital reflected in pediatric care rankings
The broad excellence ofUCLA Mattel Children ’s Hospital is recognized in the annual Best Children ’s Hospital rankingspublished today by U.S. News& World Report.Two pediatric specialties —nephrology andorthopaedics— placed in the top 20 nationally, and six others earned spots in the top 50: neurology/neurosurgery,gastroenterology,cancer,urology,cardiology andneonatology.“These rankings reflect both the outstanding care that UCLA provides to children with a wide range of conditions and UCLA’s national standing in pediatric care,” said Dr. Sherin Devaskar, physician-in-chief...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 26, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA global health program aims to boost neurological care in South Africa
When it came to getting the best treatment for his parents ’ neurologic illnesses, Sam Miller and his family experienced frustration finding the right doctors in their home country of South Africa.Miller ’s mother, Brenda, developed multiple sclerosis in her late 20s, and his father, Winston, was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in his 60s.Over the four decades of his mother ’s illness before her death in 2008, the increasingly acute shortage of neurologists in South Africa made the top specialists there much sought-after and overworked. They had little time to talk through treatment options, much...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 26, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA receives $9.5 million grant to study link between substance use and HIV transmission
Researchers at theUCLA Fielding School of Public Health have received a five-year,  $9.5 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to continue research on possible connections between substance abuse and HIV infection. The new phase of the study began this month; it continues work that started in 2013 with a $7 million grant from NIDA. Approximately two-thirds of new HIV infections in the U.S. occur among Latino and African-American men who have sex with men; and studies show that drug abuse is linked with poor adherence to HIV medication and prevention therapies.The grant will enable researchers to...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 22, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA will advance children ’s health with latest gift from Shapiro family
The  David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA has received $2.257 million from Ralph, Shirley, Peter and Alison Shapiro to support four endowed chairs in the department of pediatrics.The chairs will help UCLA recruit and retain faculty in pediatrics who are focused on enhancing quality of life for children with cerebral palsy, autism, and other developmental and behavioral challenges. The gift bolsters support for an endowed chair the Shapiros established earlier, and it will create three new additional term chairs that will benefit faculty for five-year terms.The original Shapiro Family Term Chair in Developmenta...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 22, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA names winner of 2018 Switzer Prize
Dr. David Sabatini, an MIT biologist and associate director of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, will be the 2018 recipient of the Switzer Prize awarded by the  David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Sabatini ’s pioneering discoveries of mechanisms that regulate cell growth are propelling research into potential treatments for cancer and other diseases.As a graduate student at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Sabatini identified the central protein, mTOR,  that turns cell growth on and off. At the Whitehead Institute and MIT, his laboratory ’s research&...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Two UCLA chemists selected as 2018 Pew scholars
UCLA chemistry professors Hosea Nelson and Jose Rodriguez have been selected among 22  Pew scholars in the biomedical sciences for 2018. The honor provides funding to outstanding young researchers whose work is relevant to the advancement of human health. The scholars, who were selected from 184 nominations, will receive four-year, $300,000 grants to advance their explorations of biological mechanisms underpinning human h ealth and disease.UCLA and UC San Diego each has two 2018 Pew scholars in the biomedical sciences; no other university has more than one.“These scientists have shown the boldness and creat...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 14, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

What does it mean to be moved by love?
Researchers from UCLA and the University of Oslo have documented a complex but universally felt emotion they call kama muta — a Sanskrit term that means “moved by love.”For the past five years they have documented the physical sensations people report when they feel kama muta, and what kind of events, images and experiences bring it about.Forthe research, which was published in the journal Emotion, the authors studied 3,543 participants in 19 countries on five continents. Their observations suggest that kama muta is a distinct positive social emotion evoked by experiencing or observing a sudden intensific...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 14, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Treating intestine with ‘good’ cholesterol compound inhibits lung tumor growth in mice
FINDINGSA compound that mimics the main protein in high-density lipoprotein (HDL, or “good”) cholesterol significantly reduced the number of tumors in the lungs of mice, reports a team of UCLA researchers. The findings help explain the connection between HDL cholesterol and reduced cancer risk, and suggest that a similar compound may be an effective therapy in humans.BACKGROUNDPrevious research, both in lab animals and humans, had suggested that higher HDL cholesterol levels were linked to reduced cancer risk. The team ’s earlier work had found that small peptide “mimetics,” or mimics, of...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Helping senior citizens connect with tech
UCLA sophomore Aleena Sorfazian was looking forward to her first day at Tech Help for U. But she wasn ’t a student; she was one of 20 volunteers who would be teaching older people how to better use their iPhones, iPads, laptops and other devices, as part of a community outreach program created in partnership with UCLA Health.The senior citizens waiting at UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica on this Saturday morning were also eager for their sessions to begin as each would receive 45 minutes of individual instruction with a student/tutor prepared to answer their technology questions and coach them as they practiced thei...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Kidney Transplant Program leads the nation in numbers — and vision
All kidneys are pink. The human beings in which they ’re housed can have various skin colors, attend various places of worship, have various political affiliations and live in various parts of the country. But their kidneys? They are all, quite simply, pink.No one knows this better than transplant professionals, including kidney transplant doctors, who have transformed the field of organ donation over the past few decades — not to mention the nation’s acceptance of it. In 2017, physicians in the United States performed almost 20,000 kidney transplants, according to data from the U.S. Department of He...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 11, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news