UCLA awarded $25 million to advance HIV research for women and children
The National Institutes of Health has awarded $25 million to the UCLA branch of the International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials Network, known as IMPAACT, to continue developing innovative strategies to end HIV among these vulnerable populations.The funding will go to UCLA ’s laboratory, enabling its researchers to work with the network’s operations center, as well as statistical and data management center. The center aims to advance the network’s research, which has already led to effective therapies for women, children and adolescents with HIV, and influenced the standard of care fo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 1, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Gene therapy gives man with sickle cell disease the chance for a better future
For Evie Junior, living with sickle cell disease has been like running a marathon.“But it’s a marathon where as you keep going, the trail gets rockier and then you lose your shoes,” the 27-year-old said. “It gets harder as you get older. Things start to fail and all you can think about is how much worse it’s going to get down the road.”In sickle cell disease, a genetic mutation causes the blood-forming stem cells — which give rise to all blood and immune cells — to produce hard, sickle-shaped red blood cells. These misshapen cells die early, leaving an insufficient numbe...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 30, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study shows link between economic, social, environmental factors and oral health
More than 1 in 4 adults in California report having poor oral health, but that figure rises to roughly 1 in 2 for the state ’s lowest-income residents and drops to 1 in 5 for those with the highest incomes, according to a UCLApolicy brief that looks at the role economic, social and environmental factors play in oral health.The research, conducted by the  UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, highlights significant differences in residents ’ oral health across income, education, employment, immigration status and other categories, revealing the crucial influence of social determinants and illustrating tha...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 30, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Mothers ’ stress may lead to preterm births, faster aging in children
This study is among the first to point out that, yes, it does matter.“It may even be more influential than prenatal health because some of what is put in motion before conception may be hard to stop during pregnancy,” she added. “For example, a mother with dysregulated immune function due to stress may be at risk when she becomes pregnant. The abundance of stre ss for low-income parents is potent and potentially high risk for them and their children.”These findings, Dunkel Schetter said, support the case for devoting more resources to programs for preconception health and well-being.Both studies wer...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 30, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Cold plasma can kill coronavirus on common surfaces in seconds
UCLA engineers and scientists have demonstrated that treatments with near-room-temperature, cold atmospheric plasma can kill the coronavirus present on a variety of surfaces in as little as 30 seconds.Their study, which was published in the journal Physics of Fluids, marks the first time cold plasma has been shown to effectively and quickly disinfect surfaces contaminated with the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19.  The novel coronavirus can remain infectious for tens of hours on surfaces.“This is a really exciting result, showing the potential of cold atmospheric plasma as a safe and effective way to fight ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 24, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

37 UCLA scientists among world ’s most influential researchers
Editor ’s note: This story was changed on Nov. 24 to 37 UCLA scholars, after learning that Clarivate incorrectly identified a professor’s affiliation with their previous institution.Thirty-seven UCLA scholars have been named as the world ’s most influential scientific researchers.Clarivate released its annual list of the most highly cited researchers, which includes dozens of UCLA scientists across various disciplines. The list is compiled by the Institute for Scientific Information at Clarivate using data based on scholarly publication counts and citation indexes. The selected researchers wrote publicati...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 23, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

36 UCLA scientists among world ’s most influential researchers
Thirty-six UCLA scholars have been named as the world ’s most influential scientific researchers.Clarivate released its annual list of the most highly cited researchers, which includes dozens of UCLA scientists across various disciplines. The list is compiled by the Institute for Scientific Information at Clarivate using data based on scholarly publication counts and citation indexes. The selected researchers wrote publications that ranked in the top 1% by citations in their field for that year, according to the Web of Science citation index.TheUCLA Samueli School of Engineering hadeight faculty members named among t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 23, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Gift of $1 million will help UCLA support young patients and their families
UCLA has received $1 million from Ken and Linda Suslow to continue providing critical supportive services for children, their families and other patients.Half of the gift will support the work of the  Chase Child Life Program at UCLA Mattel Children ’s Hospital, while the other half will establish the Suslow Family Patient Emergency Assistance Fund at UCLA.Launched in 1968, the Chase Child Life Program serves as a national model for helping young patients and their families cope with the stress and anxiety of hospital stays and medical procedures. Program specialists tailor therapeutic activities &mdas...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 23, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New wound-healing gel helps regenerate skin, prevent scarring
UCLA researchers and colleagues have developed a wound-healing biomaterial for cuts, burns and other injuries that could significantly reduce scar formation and result in healthier, stronger skin.The team, including scientists from Duke University and other institutions, reports inNature Materials that their new hydrogel triggered an immune response in mice that accelerated healing, induced tissue regeneration and resulted in skin that was more resilient to reinjury.The advance builds onUCLA ’s previous development of wound-healing gels made of injectable microporous annealed particles, or MAPs. MAP gels, when applie...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 20, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA receives $6.4 million to fund cannabis research
UCLA has received seven grants totaling $6.4 million from the California Bureau of Cannabis Control. The awards will fund studies on topics ranging from the toxicity of inhaled and second-hand  cannabis smoke to employment conditions in California’s cannabis industry.The  grants were awarded to faculty from theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, theUCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs and several research centers.“The grants exemplify the breadth of cannabis research being conducted at UCLA,” said Ziva Cooper, director of theUCLA Cannabis Research Initiative an...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 19, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA model ID ’s areas that should have priority for vaccine, other COVID-19 help
To help slow the spread of COVID-19 and save lives, UCLA public health and urban planning experts have developed a predictive model that pinpoints which populations in which neighborhoods of Los Angeles County are most at risk of becoming infected.The researchers hope the new model, which can be applied to other counties and jurisdictions as well,will assist decision makers, public health officials and scientists in effectively and equitably implementing vaccine distribution, testing, closures and reopenings, and other virus-mitigation measures.The model maps Los Angeles County neighborhood by neighborhood, based on four i...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 18, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study reveals how smoking worsens COVID-19 infection in the airways
UCLA researchers using a model of airway tissue created from human stem cells have pinpointed how smoking cigarettes causes more severe infection by SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in the airways of the lungs.The study, led by scientists at the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA andpublished in Cell Stem Cell, will help researchers  better understand COVID-19 risks for smokers and could inform the development of new therapeutic strategies to help reduce smokers’ chances of developing severe disease.Cigarette smoking is one of the most common...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 18, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Report calls for easier access to data on American Indians ’ and Alaska Natives’ health
A new  policy brief by theUCLA Center for Health Policy Research points out the need for easier access to health data on the nearly 6 million American Indians and Alaska Natives living in the United States.The report ’s authors write that the lack of clear data and the challenges in accessing it make it difficult for researchers and policymakers to understand the health challenges faced by American Indians and Alaska Natives. The study is particularly timely because, according to the Centers for Disease Contro l and Prevention, American Indians and Alaska Natives have COVID-19 infection rates that are 3 1/2...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 17, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study identifies patients with lung cancer most likely to respond to immunotherapy
Scientists are beginning to unravel one of the biggest challenges with immunotherapy: why some people with cancer respond to the treatment, while others may not respond at all.In a new study, researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center found patients with a particular type of human leukocyte antigen (HLA), a protein scaffold involved in presenting pieces of proteins described as peptides to the immune system, were particularly likely to benefit from immunotherapy. This research explained a surprising finding seen among patients in the clinic.The data, published in Nature Cancer, focused on a type of HLA cal...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 16, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA-led research proposes strategies to control pandemic with fewer restrictions on the economy
An international team led by UCLA Fielding School of Public Health researchers has developed and tested two strategies for sustaining economic activity during the COVID-19 pandemic. If used together and followed closely, they write, the approaches could reduce transmission of the coronavirus by an amount comparable to that of a strict lockdown, while also maintaining economic activity.The team, made up of researchers from nine institutions and led byDr. Akihiro Nishi, a UCLA assistant professor of epidemiology, put forward two concepts that Nishi describes as rationing time and rationing capacity.“Although lockdown a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 11, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA to join pilot program for California ’s COVID-19 exposure notification tool
A new program that uses smartphone technology to help identify COVID-19 cases and subsequently alert people to possible exposure to the virus will soon be available to the UCLA community.CA COVID Notify, which is managed by the state of California and uses the Exposure Notifications System jointly created by Google and Apple, permits a user who tests positive for COVID-19 to quickly and anonymously notify close contacts that they may have been exposed to the virus, thus allowing them to seek medical attention and reduce risk to others. Notifications are sent only to people who have opted in to CA COVID Notify.The CA COVID...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 6, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study finds involuntary psychiatric detentions on the rise
The rate at which Americans are held against their will and forced to undergo mental health evaluations and even state-ordered confinement — lasting anywhere from a few days to years — has risen sharply over the past decade, according to a new study by researchers at theUCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs.The analysis,published online today in the journal Psychiatric Services, shows that in the nearly half of U.S. states for which data was available, involuntary psychiatric detentions outpaced population growth by a rate 3 to 1 on average in recent years.The study is the most comprehensive compilation of data ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 3, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Election stress can hurt your heart
Election stress is in full effect, and it can take a heavy toll on our heart health. Stressful situations produce a surge of hormones in our bodies that can elevate our blood pressure and heart rate and speed up our breathing.“This reaction is the normal way the body prepares to deal with a stressful situation,” said Dr. Megan Kamath, a cardiologist at UCLA Health. “However, these symptoms should not be ignored, as stress ineven a healthy person can cause significant damage to one ’s health.”In terms of triggering stress or exacerbating preexisting heart conditions, the election is on par with...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 2, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA researchers create millions of diverse T cells from a single blood stem cell
Researchers at the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have developed a way to make mouse thymus organoids  that can be grown in the lab, each one about 2 millimeters in size.The advance will enable them to follow the precise path by which T cells — critical players in the immune system — are formed from blood stem cells inside the thymus, a small gland in the middle of the chest.In 2017, UCLA ’sDr. Gay Crooks and her colleaguesdevelopeda lab-grown human thymus organoid— a cluster of cells that mimics the thymus. Using the organoid, her...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 30, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Dentistry ’s Philip Trask finds wealth in giving back
Philip Trask has been a butcher ’s apprentice, an artilleryman, a telephone lineman and, at one point, a juvenile gang member. But it’s as an instructor and mentor at the UCLA School of Dentistry that the longtime pediatric dentist found a true calling, one that has complemented his years of service to the wider Los Angeles co mmunity.“UCLA is my happy place,” says Trask, 79, who this year celebrates a full half-century of preparing the university’s budding dentists for the profession. “The essence of pediatric dentistry is to teach. Giving the gift of knowledge is one of the only gifts ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 29, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Whether Californians vote may hinge on race, ethnicity, UCLA health survey finds
Ballots have been rolling in ahead of Election Day, but a big question remains: How many people will ultimately vote?  According to data from the latestCalifornia Health Interview Survey, or CHIS, an estimated 2.8 million eligible Californians never vote in national, state or local elections, and 7.7 million only vote sometimes — which could potentially leave more than 10 million ballots uncast. The findings on voter participation and other demographic and health-related topics are part of the  UCLA Center for Health Policy Research ’s annual CHIS data release, which takes place online&...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 29, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

In memoriam: Helene Brown, 91, ‘political oncologist’ who campaigned for cancer research, prevention
Helene Brown, a UCLA alumna  and member of UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center who was a trailblazing advocate for cancer research and public education about the disease, died Oct. 4 at her home in Los Angeles. She was 91.Brown began serving as director of community applications of research at the Jonsson Cancer Center in 1982, following several decades of activism in cancer prevention and early detection. During her tenure at UCLA, she was the recipient of numerous awards for her leadership in addressing cervical and breast cancer issues in the political arena.Although she had no formal medical training,...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 27, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA researchers study genetics ’ role in COVID-19 susceptibility, severity
“One of the most troubling things about COVID-19 is that we have a limited ability to predict how sick a specific individual will get,” said Dr. Daniel Geschwind.Geschwind is the MacDonald Distinguished Professor in Human Genetics at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and a member of theEli and Edythe Broad Center of  Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA. And he ’s part of a team of UCLA scientists conducting research to learn why certain people get sick from the virus that causes COVID-19 — and why others don’t.Millions of people around the world have been infecte...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 26, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How a Twitter hashtag provides insights for doctors and support for people with breast cancer
A UCLA-led review of nine years of social media posts with the hashtag #BCSM suggests that Twitter can be a useful resource  not only for patients, but also for physicians and researchers.The hashtag — an initialism for “breast cancer social media” — first appeared on Twitter in 2011. Created by two cancer survivors, it was used to curate a weekly informational chat for people with breast cancer. Dr. Deanna Attai became one of the group’s moderators a few weeks later.“We physicians have a lot to learn from the online patient communities,” said Attai, an assistant clinical prof...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 22, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Birthrates, marriage, gender roles will change dramatically in post-pandemic world, scientists predict
COVID-19 and America ’s response to it are likely to profoundly affect our families, work lives, relationships and gender roles for years, say12 prominent scientists and authors who analyzed 90 research studies and used their expertiseto evaluate our reaction to the pandemic andpredict its aftermath.The group, which included several UCLA researchers, foresees enduring psychologicalfallout from thecrisis, even amongthose who haven ’t been infected. Their predictions and insights,published Oct. 22 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, include:Planned pregnancies will decrease in a d...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 22, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Antiretroviral therapy can ’t completely stop accelerated cell aging seen in HIV
FINDINGSUntreated HIV infection is linked with epigenetic changes that suggest rapid aging.A new study by UCLA researchers showsthat antiretroviral  therapy given over two years was unable to completely restore age-appropriate epigenetic patterns, leaving patients more susceptible to aging-related illnesses. BACKGROUNDThis is the first longitudinal study conducted to investigate the  contribution of HIV-infection, versus treatment, on the acceleration of aging epigenetics — external factors that affectthe function of genes— in this population of adults.METHODThe researchers extracted DNA fro...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 22, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists identify compound that stimulates muscle cells in mice
UCLA researchers have identified a compound that can reproduce the effect of exercise in muscle cells in mice. Thefindings are published in the journal Cell Reports Medicine.Normally, muscles get stronger as they are used, thanks to a series of chemical signals inside muscle cells. The newly identified compound activates those signals, which suggests that compounds like it could eventually be used to treat people with limb girdle muscular dystrophy, a form of adolescent-onset muscular dystrophy.When muscles aren ’t worked regularly, they gradually atrophy. (The phenomenon is familiar to anyone who’s had a cast ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 21, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Voting in person: Is it safe?
In-person voting for the 2020 elections has now begun in several states, and while casting ballots by mail has been the big story of this coronavirus-influenced election season, the long lines and hours-long wait times at many polling stations make it clear that plenty of Americans still plan to show up and vote the old-fashioned way.For information and advice about safety at polling places, we turned toDr. Annabelle de St. Maurice, UCLA Health ’sco-chief infection-prevention officer and an assistant professor in the division of infectious diseases at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. An expert on epidemio...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 21, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA physician-scientist elected to National Academy of Medicine
Dr. Antoni Ribas, a world-renowned physician –scientist and professor of medicine at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, has been named to the National Academy of Medicine, one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine.New members are elected by their peers, and selection to the academy honors individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and commitment to service and have made major contributions to the advancement of the medical sciences, health care and public health.The academy recognized Ribas for defining the mechanistic basis of how patients respond to or devel...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 19, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Virus-mimicking drug helps immune system target cunning cancer cells
This study helps us understand the interdependence between interferon signaling and antigen presentation, which gives us important insights into how tumor cells are recognized by the immune system,” said the study’s senior author, Dr. Antoni Ribas, a professor of medicine at the Geffen School of Medicine and director of the tumor immunology program at the Jonsson Cancer Center. “New strategies to promote antigen presentation to make tumors more visible to the immune system will allow immunotherapy to be effective for even more tumor types.”The findings also highlight the potential of other promising...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 14, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Enhanced common blood test could predict adverse outcomes in pregnancy, study suggests
FINDINGSA blood test commonly used to detect fetal genetic abnormalities can be modified to help predict complications associated with pregnancy before any symptoms develop, according to UCLA researchers and colleagues.Theirpreliminary study isthe first to link certain cell-free nucleic acids — genetic material shed from the placenta into the mother’s blood —to adverse outcomes in pregnancy, including ischemic placental disease and gestational diabetes,and to show that analyzing blood for such cell-free DNA signaturescould potentially predict these serious complications.The researchers found that during t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 13, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA draws record $1.4 billion in research funding
UCLA attracted record support for its wide-ranging research in the 2019 –20 fiscal year, receiving $1.427 billion in research funding.2020 is the third consecutive year that the university has topped its previous best. Research support has grown by 38% since 2015. UCLA now ranks sixth among all universities in total research expenditures.“This is a tribute to the great work being done across disciplines at UCLA,” said Roger Wakimoto, vice chancellor for research. “These funds help bring about major breakthroughs in medical science, advance knowledge in numerous other disciplines, strengthen our teac...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 12, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Antibiotics may be a good choice for some, but not all, patients with appendicitis
, according to results from a large trial that was co-led by UCLA ’s Dr. David Talan.“When we compared the outcomes of people treated with antibiotics alone or surgery to remove the appendix, we found that people receiving either treatment felt well at 30 days,” said Talan, co-principal investigator of the study and a professor of emergency medicine and medicine/infectious disea ses at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.“In terms of overall health status, antibiotics were no worse than surgery and allowed most people to avoid an operation in the short term.”Thefindings are published in...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 8, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Health scientists pioneer faster, cheaper COVID-19 testing
Scientists at  UCLA Health will soon be using a new coronavirus testing technology capable of assessing thousands of individual samples for COVID-19 simultaneously and producing accurate results in 12 to 24 hours.The SwabSeq testing platform, developed collaboratively byUCLA researchers and a UCLA-founded startup, is quicker and less expensive than the widely used polymerase chain reaction method, which requires extracting RNA from samples and can take days to process, the scientists said.“This is a technological breakthrough that will dramatically increase the amount of COVID-19 testing while reducing the ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 8, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Answering the call to serve: UCLA Health ’s humanitarian aid to Beirut takes off
Thousands of masks, face shields and safety goggles. Hundreds of bottles of hand sanitizer and soap, syringes, sutures, gloves and burn dressings. Dozens of procedure gowns and tourniquet kits. Four EMT gurneys. Two AESOP robotic surgical arm units. Two arthroscopic carts. Two Site Rite mobile ultrasound machines and one diagnostic ultrasound machine. These are just some of the items found in the 13 pallets of medical supplies and personal protective equipment UCLA Health recently shipped to Beirut, Lebanon, to aid those still in need two months after a tragic explosion devastated the city.“The fact that we are sendi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 7, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA to lead statewide coalition to address COVID-19 ’s impact on communities at risk
A coalition of 11 academic institutions and their community partners across California has received a $4.1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health for a statewide community-engaged approach to addressing COVID-19 among populations that have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic.Investigators at UCLA will lead the coalition — called the COVID-19 California Alliance, or STOP COVID-19 CA — which is part of the NIH’s broader Community Engagement Alliance Against COVID-19 Disparities. The partnership is a joint effort among five University of California medical campuses, two additional ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 5, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Number of Californians with mental health distress sharply increased from 2014 to 2018
From 2014 to 2018, the number of California adults who reported that they had experienced serious psychological distress in any given year increased by 42%, according to aUCLA Center for Health Policy Research policy briefpublished today.The finding is based on research in theCalifornia Health Interview Survey, which each year gathers data from more than 20,000 respondents. Based on the surveys, UCLA researchers project that nearly 2.2 million Californians experienced serious psychological distress in 2014, and that the figure steadily increased through 2018, when, according to their projections, 3.2 million experienced su...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 1, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA researchers ’ efforts to combat melanoma gets $13M boost from NIH
UCLA researchers have received a $13 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to find new ways to overcome melanoma resistance to some of the most promising targeted therapies and immunotherapies.There have been significant advancements in the past decade using targeted therapies and immunotherapies for treating people withadvanced forms of this deadliest type of skin cancer, but the treatments still only work in some people. Tumors can — and oftendo— become resistant to these drugs.“While these therapies have transformed the way people with melanoma are treated, only about 40% to 50% of peopl...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 28, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

ACA reduced out-of-pocket health costs for families with kids, but they still need help
FINDINGSThe percentage of low- and middle-income families with children that had burdensome out-of-pockethealth care costs fell following the 2014 implementation of thehealthinsurancemarketplaces and Medicaidexpansion provisions of the Affordable Care Act,known widelyas Obamacare, according to a new study by Lauren Wisk, an assistant professor at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and colleagues.Before the ACA, the study shows,35.6% of the lowest-income families experienced burdensome costs, but this fell to 23.7% post-ACA. For low-income families,the proportion fell from 24.6% to 17.3%, and for middle-income fam...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 28, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Guts and brains: How microbes in a mother ’s intestines affect fetal neurodevelopment
During pregnancy in mice, the billions of bacteria and other microbes that live in a mother ’s intestines regulate key metabolites, small molecules that are important for healthy fetal brain development,UCLA biologists report Sept. 23 in the journal Nature.While the maternal gut microbiota has been associated with abnormalities in the brain function and behavior of offspring — often in response to factors like infection, a high-fat diet or stress during pregnancy — scientists had not known until now whether it influenced brain development during critical prenatal periods and in the absence of such environ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 23, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New study pinpoints how the brain ’s inner clock measures seconds
FINDINGSUCLA neuroscientistsstudying how the brain measures time in secondsintroduced mice to two different scents. The mice learned that one odor predicted the arrival of a sweet liquid reward after three seconds, while the other predicted the reward after six seconds.The mice started licking the spout earlier in anticipation of the reward after they sniffed the first scent than when they smelled the second.While the mice responded to the two stimuli, researchers observed activity intwo regions of their brains: the striatum and the premotor cortex,which provides input to the striatum. They found that while both regions en...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 23, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

As nation mourns Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a look at advances in pancreatic cancer treatment
Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who served on the Supreme Court since 1993, died of pancreatic cancer Sept. 18.Ginsburg battled cancer several times throughout her life. She was treated for colon cancer in 1999, underwent surgery for pancreatic cancer in 2009 and had cancerous lesions removed from her lung in 2018. Ginsburg received chemotherapy for a recurrence of pancreatic cancer in 2019.Pancreatic cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. A 6-inch-long gland in the abdomen, the pancreas makes digestive enzymes and hormones, such as insulin, that control blood sugar.No screening test exists fo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 21, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

‘Best’ hospitals should be required to deliver tobacco treatment
AUCLA-led report published today in the  Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine exposes what the authors call a weakness in the high-profile “Best Hospitals Honor Roll” published annually by U.S. News& World Report.The data used to compile the rankings are collected from multiple sources, including outcomes reported to the Joint Commission, an accreditation agency. Every three years, hospitals are required to complete a comprehensive review by the Joint Commission to earn or maintain accreditation. None of the top 20 hospitals in the 2020 –21 U.S. News rankings re...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 21, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA-led team of scientists discovers why we need sleep
Prolonged sleep deprivation can lead to severe health problems in humans and other animals. But why is sleep so vital to our health? A UCLA-led team of scientists has made a major advance in answering  this question and has shown for the first time that a dramatic change in the purpose of sleep occurs at the age of about 2-and-a-half.Before that age, the brain grows very rapidly. During REM sleep, when vivid dreams occur, the young brain is busy building and strengthening synapses — the structures that connect neurons to one another and allow them to communicate.“Don’t wake babies up during REM sleep...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 18, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Are people who vote healthier than those who don ’t?
A new policy brief by the  UCLA Center for Health Policy Researchshows that California adults who in are good health with little psychological distress are more likely to consistently vote in local, state and national elections than those with physical or psychological health issues.The brief, which usesdata from the center ’s 2017 and 2018 California Health Interview Survey,also provides evidence that state residents who vote tend to live in more advantaged communities than those who don ’t. The authors note that these disparities in voting may make it less likely that the needs of less healthy and m...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 17, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How do you know if the wildfires are making you sick?
The wildfires raging throughout California and Oregon have caused great concern about air quality and the safety of being outdoors. And dealing with the public health implications of the fires is further complicated by the COVID-19 pandemic.  Dr. Reza Ronaghi, a pulmonologist at the  David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, explains how wildfires affect air quality and what precautions people can take during the pandemic to limit exposure to smoke and other fire-generated toxins in the air.How do you know if the wildfires are making you sick?If you are healthy, minimal exposure to wildfires – such as experi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 16, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

COVID-19 may have been in L.A. as early as last December, UCLA-led study suggests
This study was supported by the UCLA Department of Medicine. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 10, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Dashboard reveals COVID-19 ’s impact on Californians’ jobs, mental health
With more than 13,000 deaths and more than 712,000 confirmed cases in California alone, the COVID-19 pandemic has already had profound and lasting effects on the nation ’s most populous state.Now, UCLA ’sCalifornia Health Interview Survey haspublished preliminary data from its 2020 survey, shedding new light on the pandemic ’s effects on employment and home life in California. The figures provide further confirmation that the state’s vulnerable groups are among those being hardest hit by the crisis.The California Health Interview Survey is conducted annually by theUCLA Center for Health Policy Resea...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 10, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Kids, take it from Elmo (and UCLA) – brushing can be fun!
“It’s time to brush, it’s time to brush, it’s time to brush!”In a new video, the Sesame Street character Elmo sings a refrain that ’ll likely be familiar to any parent who has ever encouraged their little angels to brush their teeth.The two-minute music video is the result of a partnership between a UCLA-led consortium calledMore LA Smiles and Sesame Street in Communities. “Elmo’s Toothy Dance,” which debuts on YouTube today, is intended to make toothbrushing fun for kids while also including important pointers on proper brushing technique.It ’s the fifth installm...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 8, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Kids, take it from Elmo (and UCLA): Brushing can be fun!
“It’s time to brush, it’s time to brush, it’s time to brush!”In a new video, the Sesame Street character Elmo sings a refrain that ’ll likely be familiar to any parent who has ever encouraged their little angels to brush their teeth.The two-minute music video is the result of a partnership between a UCLA-led consortium calledMore LA Smiles and Sesame Street in Communities. “Elmo’s Toothy Dance,” which debuts on YouTube today, is intended to make toothbrushing fun for kids while also including important pointers on proper brushing technique.It ’s the fifth installm...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 8, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news