Molecular analysis identifies key differences in lungs of cystic fibrosis patients
A team of researchers from UCLA, Cedars-Sinai and the Cystic FibrosisFoundation has developed a first-of-its-kind molecular catalog of cells in healthy lungs and the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis.The catalog,described today in the journal Nature Medicine, reveals new subtypes of cells and illustrates how the disease changes the cellular makeup of the airways. The findings could help scientists in their search for specific cell types that represent prime targets for genetic and cell therapies for cystic fibrosis.“This new research has provided us with valuable insights into the cellular makeup of both heal...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 7, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Health provides medical care for unaccompanied migrant children
When the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced it would open an emergency-intake site in Long Beach for unaccompanied migrant children, UCLA Health officials sprang into action.Within 24 hours, they built a pediatric clinic, urgent-care facility and COVID-19 isolation unit inside the Long Beach Convention Center. They set up medical examination rooms, brought in X-ray machines and laboratory and pharmaceutical supplies, established secure computer networks to transmit health information and staffed the site with UCLA Health medical professionals — at least 30 at any given time, from pediatricians, fa...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 6, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Even fractures in arm, wrist increase risk for future breaks in postmenopausal women
Current guidelines for managing osteoporosis specifically call out hip or spine fractures for increasing the risk for subsequent bone breaks. But anew UCLA-led study suggests that fractures in the arm, wrist, leg and other parts of the body should also set off alarm bells.A fracture, no matter the location, indicates a general tendency to break a bone in the future at a different location, said Dr. Carolyn Crandall, the study ’s lead author and a professor of medicine at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.“Current clinical guidelines have only been emphasizing hip and spine fractures, but our findings c...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 5, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How to craft the vaccine message for the undecided
More than 140 million Americans have gotten the COVID-19 vaccine. Health care and government leaders hope that tens of millions more will do so.One key to getting that many needles in that many arms may turn on the messaging used to persuade people that getting the vaccine is the right thing to do. As the country seeks to turn the page on the pandemic, two UCLA professors who specialize in the impact of messaging efforts — Hal Hershfield and Keith Holyoak — have identified opportunities and challenges on the road to herd immunity.In March of 2020, the World Health Organization declared the spread of the novel c...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 4, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA team discovers how to restrict growth, spread of head and neck cancers
Researchers from the  UCLA School of Dentistry have discovered a key molecule that allows cancer stem cells to bypass the body’s natural immune defenses, spurring the growth and spread of head and neck squamous cell cancers. Their study, conducted in mice, also demonstrates that inhibiting this molecule derails cancer progression and helps e liminate these stem cells.  Published today in the journal Cell Stem Cell, the findings could help pave the way for more effective targeted treatments for this highly invasive type of cancer, which is characterized by frequent resistance to therapies, rapid metasta...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 3, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

As optimism returns, a reminder that life after COVID-19 will be stressful for many
Life during the COVID-19 pandemic has been uniquely stressful for parents with children at home. For some parents, schools welcoming children back for in-person instruction — even for limited schedules in many cases — has provided a long-awaited measure of relief and cause for optimism.ButBridget Callaghan, a  UCLA assistant professor of psychology, said adjusting to life after COVID-19 could be stressful for many.“Parents should be patient and not expect everything to go back to how it was before,” Callaghan said. “Post–COVID-19 will be an adjustment. ”A few months after the ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 3, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Nearly $500 million a year in Medicare costs goes to 7 services with no net health benefits
FINDINGSA UCLA-led study shows that physicians frequently order preventive medical services for adult Medicare beneficiaries that are considered unnecessary and of “low value” by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force — at a cost of $478 million per year.The researchers analyzed national survey data over a 10-year period, looking specifically at seven preventive services given a “D” rating by the task force, and discovered that these services were ordered more than 31 million times annually.BACKGROUNDThe U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, an independent panel appointed by the Department of ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 29, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Breaking down barriers to care for metastatic breast cancer patients
Drawing on a series of studies and interviews with patients and caregivers, UCLA researchers from theUCLA Center for Health Policy Research and the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have published recommendations for California policymakers and patient advocates aimed at improving care and outcomes for women with metastatic breast cancer.More than 30,000women in California are diagnosed each year with this cancer, which has spread from the breast to other parts of the body. Survival rates are low, and patients often face significant hurdles to care — particularly in the areas of health insurance, cli...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 28, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Medical school professor elected to National Academy of Sciences
Kenneth Lange, Rosenfeld Professor of Computational Genetics in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, has been elected as a member of the National Academy of Sciences, in recognition of his distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.Lange, who is also a  professor in the departments of human genetics and statistics, has written four advanced textbooks and published more than 200 scientific papers in the areas of genetic epidemiology, population genetics, membrane physiology, demography, oncology, medical imaging, stochastic processes and optimiz ation theory. Many of his landmark p...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 27, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Professor in the medical school elected to the National Academy of Sciences
Kenneth Lange, Rosenfeld Professor of Computational Genetics in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, has been elected as a member of the National Academy of Sciences, in recognition of his distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.Lange, who is also a  professor in the departments of human genetics and statistics, has written four advanced textbooks and published more than 200 scientific papers in the areas of genetic epidemiology, population genetics, membrane physiology, demography, oncology, medical imaging, stochastic processes and optimiz ation theory. Many of his landmark p...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 26, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Stem cell therapy promotes recovery from stroke and dementia in mice
A one-time injection of an experimental stem cell therapy can repair brain damage and improve memory function in mice with conditions that replicate human strokes and dementia,a new UCLA study finds.Dementia can arise from multiple conditions, and it is characterized by an array of symptoms including problems with memory, attention, communication and physical coordination. The two most common causes of dementia are Alzheimer ’s disease and white matter strokes — small strokes that accumulate in the connecting areas of the brain.“It’s a vicious cycle: The two leading causes of dementia are almos...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 22, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Proportion of Black physicians in U.S. has changed little in 120 years, UCLA research finds
A new UCLA study finds that the proportion of physicians who are Black in the U.S. has increased by only 4 percentage points over the past 120 years, and that the share of doctors who are Black men remains unchanged since 1940.The research also spotlights a significant income gap between white and Black male physicians — a disparity, the researcher writes, that could reflect a combination of pay discrimination and unequal access for physicians to pursue careers in more lucrative specialties.The paper is published today in  the peer-reviewed Journal of General Internal Medicine.“These findings demonstrate h...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 20, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Patients of women doctors more likely to be vaccinated against the flu
New UCLA research suggests that elderly patients of female physicians are more likely than those of male physicians in the same outpatient practice to be vaccinated against the flu.This trend holds for all racial and ethnic groups studied and could provide insight into improving vaccination rates for influenza, COVID-19 and other illnesses,according to the research letter, which is published in the peer-reviewed JAMA Internal Medicine.Prior studies have shown that female physicianstend tospend more time with their patients, said study author Dr. Dan Ly, anassistant professor in the division of general internal medicine and...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 14, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Thomas Carmichael elected to the Association of American Physicians
Dr. S. Thomas Carmichael has been elected to the Association of American Physicians, an honor society recognizing exemplary physician-scientists who contribute to clinical medicine through the pursuit of basic science. The newly elected members for 2021 were recognized at the association ’s annual meeting, which was held virtually April 8–10.Carmichael, UCLA ’s Frances Stark Professor of Neurology, is the chair of theneurology department in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and co-director of theEli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA.In his research, ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 9, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Thomas Carmichael elected to Association of American Physicians
Dr. S. Thomas Carmichael has been elected to the Association of American Physicians, an honor society recognizing exemplary physician-scientists who contribute to clinical medicine through the pursuit of basic science. The newly elected members for 2021 were recognized at the association ’s annual meeting, which was held virtually April 8–10.Carmichael, UCLA ’s Frances Stark Professor of Neurology, is the chair of theneurology department in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and co-director of theEli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA.In his research, ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 9, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

In memoriam: Steven Wallace, 63, renowned expert in public health equity and beloved mentor
Steven Wallace, an internationally renowned scholar on aging in communities of color and immigrant health and health policy, has died. He was 63.Among his important research and community-based projects with the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, Wallace developed new approaches to assessing the economic security of older people through the California Elder Economic Security Standard Index, a tool that measures the actual cost of basic necessities for older adults, which was adopted into law in California and was used by the World Health Organization in its 2020 Decade of Healthy Aging report and will be used in Calif...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 9, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Now rescinded, Trump-era ‘public charge’ policy may still harm immigrants’ health
The Trump administration ’s expansion of the “public charge” rule — a move that sought to disqualify immigrants who used social programs like Medicaid from obtaining legal residency in the U.S. — led to widespread disenrollment from these programs and left scores of children in California without access to health care in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.  What ’s more, say the authors of anew report from theUCLA Latino Policy and Politics Initiative, the fear and confusion that the now-rescinded Trump-era policy sowed in the state will likely have a chilling long-term effect,...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 7, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Tracking how COVID-19 is changing life expectancy
As a demographer — someone who studies how human populations grow and change — UCLA professor of sociology Patrick Heuveline typically spends time each year traveling around the world, talking to people about their hopes for their families and their dreams for the future.“Demography is obviously all about numbers — but at its core, it’s about people’s lives,” he said.A big part of understanding demographics is understanding mortality, which is why in 2020 Heuveline ’s research took on a grim new reality. He began tracking worldwide COVID-19 deaths and interpreting what those ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 2, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Researchers devise more efficient, enduring CAR gene therapy to combat HIV
FINDINGSA UCLA research team has shown that using a truncated form of the CD4 molecule as part of a gene therapy to combat HIV yielded superiorand longer-lastingresults in mouse models than previous similar therapies using the CD4 molecule.This new approach to CAR T gene therapy — a type of immunotherapy that involves genetically engineering the body ’s own blood-forming stem cells to create HIV-fighting T cells— has the potential to not only destroy HIV-infected cells but to create “memory cells” that could provide lifelong protection from infection with the virus that causes AIDS.BACKGROUNDC...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 1, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Low-calorie diet and mild exercise improve survival for young people with leukemia
In some cancers, including leukemia in children and adolescents, obesity can negatively affect survival outcomes. Obese young people with leukemia are 50% more likely to relapse after treatment than their lean counterparts.Now,a study led by researchers at UCLA and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles has shown that a combination of modest dietary changes and exercise can dramatically improve survival outcomes for those with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common childhood cancer.The researchers found that patients who reduced their calorie intake by 10% or more and adopted a moderate exercise program imm...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 1, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UC group launches clinical trial using CRISPR to correct sickle cell disease gene defect
Scientists at UCLA, UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley have received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval to jointly launch an early phase, first-in-human clinical trial of a CRISPR gene correction therapy in patients with sickle cell disease using the patients ’ own blood-forming stem cells.The trial will combine CRISPR technology developed at the Innovative Genomics Institute — a UC Berkeley–UCSF initiative founded by Berkeley’s Nobel Prize–winning scientist Jennifer Doudna — with UCLA’s expertise in genetic analysis and cell manufacturing, and the decades-long expertise at U...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 30, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Pediatrician provides a voice for youth traumatized by family separation
Growing up in Brentwood,Dr. Elizabeth Barnert was raised to be acutely aware of two versions of Los Angeles — one of privilege and one of social injustice.Her psychiatrist father instilled in his daughter a love of science and big-picture thinking. Her mother, who fled Castro ’s Cuba alone at 15, worked as a social worker counseling troubled high-school students, many of them first-generation Americans who butted heads with their immigrant parents over issues like cultural identity and gangs.“My father took me to the library every Saturday and taught me the importance of life-long learning,” said Ba...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 29, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA to lead CDC-funded study on effectiveness of vaccines among health workers
The  David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA has received a $4.9 million grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to study the effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines among health care workers.The yearlong project,Preventing Emerging Infections through Vaccine Effectiveness Testing, or PREVENT,  will be conducted with the University of Iowa ’s Carver College of Medicine and will enroll 10,000 health care personnel at 16 academic medical centers across the county, including Olive View–UCLA Medical Center in Sylmar, California. Researchers will study both vaccinated and non-vaccina...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 29, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA researchers digitize massive collection of folk medicine
A project more than 40 years in the making,the Archive of Healing is one of the largest databases of medicinal folklore from around the world. UCLA Professor David Shorter has launched an interactive, searchable website featuring hundreds of thousands of entries that span more than 200 years, and draws from seven continents, six university archives, 3,200 published sources, and both first and second-hand information from folkloric field notes.The entries address a broad range of health-related topics including everything from midwifery and menopause to common colds and flus. The site aims to preserve Indigenous knowledge a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 25, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA researchers receive $6 million from NIH to explore new pancreatic cancer therapies
A team of researchers from theUCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center has been awarded two research grants totaling $6 million from the National Institutes of Health to identify new ways to treat pancreatic cancer.Pancreatic cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States, accounting for more than 47,000 deaths annually. Only 1 in 10 people diagnosed with this particularly aggressive disease live beyond five years, and most therapies — including conventional chemotherapies, targeted therapies and immunotherapies — are unsuccessful in treating it.“Pancreatic cancer is on...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 25, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

The facts you should know about the Johnson & Johnson vaccine
The array of vaccines available to reduce exposure to COVID-19 has grown, with an important new addition approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The Johnson& Johnson vaccine, approved for emergency use on Feb. 27, differs from the vaccines developed by Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna in important ways, though all three are considered highly effective and safe.First, the Johnson& Johnson vaccine is administered in just a single dose, while the other vaccines require that two doses be administered several weeks apart. That means with Johnson& Johnson, recipients are done and considered immune two weeks aft...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 24, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Potential COVID-19 treatment identified in UCLA-led lab study
This study identified a new potential therapy that could help the global fight against COVID-19 and support populations that have been disproportionately affected by this deadly disease.”Drugs are categorized as small molecules when their individual molecules are tiny enough that they can penetrate to where they are needed. The researchers screened 430 drugs from among the approximately 200,000 compounds in CNSI ’sMolecular Screening Shared Resource libraries. They identified 34  that demonstrated at least some ability to halt the coronavirus, and eight that did so at relatively lower doses, before zeroing...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 24, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Deactivating cancer cell gene boosts immunotherapy for head and neck cancers
By targeting an enzyme that plays a key role in head and neck cancer cells, researchers from theUCLA School of Dentistry were able to significantly slow the growth and spread of tumors in mice and enhance the effectiveness of an immunotherapy to which these types of cancers often become resistant.Their findings,  published online in the journal Molecular Cell, could help researchers develop more refined approaches to combatting highly invasive head and neck squamous cell cancers, which primarily affect the mouth, nose and throat.Immunotherapy, which is used as a clinical treatment for various cancers, harnesses t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 23, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Babies prefer baby talk, whether they ’re learning one language or two
This study is one of the first published by theManyBabies Consortium, a multi-lab group of researchers. Byers-Heinlein believes the unusual international, multilingual collaboration creates a model for future studies that include a similar breadth of languages and cultures.“We can really make progress in understanding bilingualism, and especially the variability of bilingualism, thanks to our access to all these different communities,” she said.As the research continues, parents can babble to their babies in one language or two, and rest easy knowing they won ’t cause any confusion. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 23, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA leaders share plans for expanding campus operations
With COVID-19 vaccinations increasing and the number of cases in Los Angeles County declining, UCLA officials on March 18 offered plans for a more robust return to on-campus operations.UCLA administrative leaders and faculty members hosted avirtual town hall for faculty and staff, addressing plans for the spring quarter that starts March 29 and projections for a “substantial” return to in-person education in fall 2021. The changes are spurred in part by Los Angeles County entering the less restrictive red tier of protocols on March 15. Michael Beck, administrative vice chancellor and co-chair of UCLA’s CO...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 20, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Amid COVID, potentially avoidable hospitalizations for other conditions fell far more for whites than Blacks
During the first six months of the pandemic, as people attempted to stay away from hospitals caring for those sick with COVID-19, potentially avoidable hospitalizations for non-COVID-19 –related conditions fell far more among white patients than Black patients, according to a new study that looked at admissions to UCLA Health hospitals.The findings indicate that the COVID-19 crisis has exacerbated existing racial health care disparities and suggest that during the pandemic, African Americans may have had worse access than whites to outpatient care that could have helped prevent deterioration of their non –COVID...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 19, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Chemical cocktail creates new avenues for muscle stem cell therapies
A UCLA-led research team has identified a chemical cocktail that enables the production of large numbers of muscle stem cells, which can self-renew and give rise to all types of skeletal muscle cells.The advance could lead to the development of stem cell-based therapies for muscle loss or damage due to injury, age or disease.The research was published in Nature Biomedical Engineering.Muscle stem cells are responsible for muscle growth, repair and regeneration following injury throughout a person ’s life. In fully grown adults, muscle stem cells are quiescent — they remain inactive until they are called to respo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 18, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

In women, higher body fat may protect against heart disease death, study shows
FINDINGSA new UCLA study shows that while men and women who have high muscle mass are less likely to die from heart disease, it also appears that women who have higher levels of body fat — regardless of their muscle mass — have a greater degree of protection than women with less fat.The researchers analyzed national health survey data collected over a 15-year period and found that heart disease –related death in women with high muscle mass and high body fat was 42% lower than in a comparison group of women with low muscle mass and low body fat. However, women who had high muscle mass and low body fat did ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 16, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA forms collaboration with Yuyu Pharma to develop drug for stroke recovery
UCLA has formed a research collaboration with South Korea-based Yuyu Pharma to develop drugs that could help people recover after a stroke.Yuyu will develop drug candidates and UCLA researchers will conduct preclinical trials that could lead to further development of new compounds.Leading the research for UCLA are Istvan Mody, a distinguished professor of neurology; Varghese John, a professor of neurology and the principal investigator at theDrug Discovery Lab at UCLA; and Dr. S. Thomas Carmichael, chair of the UCLA department of neurology.There is currently no medical therapy that promotes recovery in the brain after it h...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 16, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Tweens and TV: UCLA ’s 50-year survey reveals the values kids learn from popular shows
How important is fame? What about self-acceptance? Benevolence? The messages children between the ages of 8 and 12 glean from TV play a significant role in their development, influencing attitudes and behaviors as they grow into their teenage years and beyond, UCLA psychologists say.Now, a new report byUCLA ’s Center for Scholars and Storytellers assesses the values emphasized by television programs popular with tweens over each decade from 1967 to 2017, charting how 16 values have waxed and waned in importance during that 50-year span.  Among the key findings is that fame, after nearly 40 years of ranking ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 15, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

COVID-19 patient thanks UCLA medical team that saved her life
Blanca Lopez, 47, walked slowly through the gleaming lobby ofRonald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, her brown eyes huge over her mask. Her teenage son, Criztiaan, pointed out landmarks where he used to wait for physicians ’ updates on his mother’s condition during her COVID-19 hospitalization.None of it looked familiar.Outside a dozen health care workers huddled in the January night air after a 12-hour shift. Despite the late hour, the mood was festive. The doctors, nurses and therapists chattered with excitement, their masked faces animated in the warm glow of the courtyard ’s illuminated fountains.When Lope...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 12, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Lin Zhan named dean of the UCLA School of Nursing
Lin Zhan, currently dean of the University of Memphis Loewenberg College of Nursing and an expert on health equity for the vulnerable, will be the new dean of the UCLA School of Nursing, effective Aug. 1.Zhan is the chief academic officer for the college ’s programs on two campuses in Memphis and Jackson, Tennessee. Prior to her appointment at the University of Memphis in 2010, Zhan served as professor and dean of the School of Nursing at Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, leading the school’s programs on three campuses in Bo ston and Worcester, Massachusetts, and Manchester, New Hampshire.&...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 12, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Group led by UCLA professor awarded $8.8 million for HIV intervention using mobile app
A team of researchers co-led byUCLA Fielding School of Public Health epidemiology professor Matthew Mimiaga has received an $8.8  million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to conduct a nationwide study aimed at reducing the spread of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, among young transgender women through the use of a mobile app.The app, LifeSkills Mobile, allows high-risk women who are unable to participate in face-to-face interventions due to geographic and socioeconomic barriers to easily access comprehensive HIV prevention information and strategies through their mobile devices. Th...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 10, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA multilingual COVID-19 website offers vaccine information in more than a dozen languages
TheTranslateCovid.org informational site operated by UCLA recently launched a robust vaccine FAQ section, which to date has information in 17  languages including Spanish, Armenian, Chinese, French, Hindi, Hmong, Japanese, Lai, Thai, Vietnamese and more. UCLA ’s Asian American Studies Center and Fielding School of Public Health created the site in May 2020 and have been updating it regularly as new information about the virus and pandemic emerges. During the past few months, they’ve been publishing vital information on the COVID-19 vaccines.Asian American studies center staff also plan to add at least...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 9, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA-led study reveals ‘hidden costs’ of being Black in the U.S.
A woman grips her purse tightly as you approach. A store manager follows you because you look “suspicious.” You enter a high-end restaurant, and the staff assume you’re applying for a job. You’re called on in work meetings only when they're talking about diversity.  The indignities and humiliations Black men — even those who have “made it” — regularly endure have long been seen as part and parcel of life in the United States among the Black community, a sort of “Black tax” that takes a heavy toll on physical and mental health.Now, a new UCLA-led study reveals...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 8, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Health receives $5 million for home visit program
UCLA Health has received a $5 million gift to support a program that offers personalized health care for people with complex medical needs who have difficulty traveling to clinics.In recognition of the gift, the service has been renamed the UCLA Eugene and Maxine Rosenfeld Medical Home Visit Program.“I am grateful for the Rosenfelds’ generous gift to support a vital program essential to our mission — providing safe, high-quality, compassionate care to patients,” said Johnese Spisso, president of UCLA Health and CEO of the UCLA Hospital System.Since its founding in 2016, the program has served more t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 5, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Mythbusting: You cannot get COVID-19 from the vaccines … and other truths
With the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announcing emergency use authorization for the Johnson& Johnson single-dose COVID-19 vaccine, UCLA Health experts are continuing to share medically sound, evidence-based information about the safety and effectiveness of all of the vaccines.Here we dispel some common myths that have cropped up.Myth 1: I can get COVID-19 from the vaccinesNot true. You cannot get COVID-19 from the vaccines.None of the vaccines contain the live virus that causes COVID-19. All of the vaccines increase your body ’s immune response by spurring it to make antibodies that block the SARS-CoV-2 vir...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 4, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study unravels antibiotic resistance in MRSA ‘superbug’ infections
FINDINGSResearchers applied a new approach pioneered at UCLA to predict whichmethicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA,infections willfail to respond toantibiotic treatment. By focusing on epigenetics — changes to gene expression that can’t be detected by standard DNA sequencing — the study examined how the immune system recognizes dangerous superbugs and works with antibiotics to clear them.BACKGROUNDThe Staphylococcus aureus bacterium can  live harmlessly on a person’s skin and in their nose, occasionally causing mild infections that can be treated with standard antibiotics. When i...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 3, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Ownership ’s hidden rules: Q & A with ‘Mine!’ co-author James Salzman
In the new book“Mine!: How the Hidden Rules of Ownership Control Our Lives” (Doubleday), UCLA School of Law professor James Salzman reveals the hidden rules that govern who owns what — from the reclining space behind airline seats to HBO passwords for streaming shows. Salzman is the Donald Bren Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law at UCLA Law, a faculty member of theEmmett Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, and one of the country ’s leading scholars of environmental law. His co-author is Michael Heller, the Lawrence A. Wien Professor of Real Estate Law at Columbia Law School.&l...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 3, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How immigration policies can harm health: Study sheds light on ‘public charge’ rule
Immigration policies like the Trump-era expansion of the “public charge” rule that made it harder for immigrants on public assistance to obtain legal residency can have a chilling effect on the health and well-being of immigrant communities in California, according to astudy released today by theUCLA Center for Health Policy Research.The study, based on data from  the center ’s 2019 California Health Interview Survey, shows  that 1 in 4 low-income immigrant adults in the state  have  avoided accessing public assistance like health, food or housing programs at some point for fear o...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 2, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA forms research collaboration with Yuyu Pharma to advance MS treatment
Through a new collaboration with a South Korean pharmaceutical company, UCLA scientists will participate in the process to develop a new drug to treat multiple sclerosis.UCLA and Yuyu Pharma will evaluate the efficacy and safety of drugs that have the potential to treat the debilitating disease.The collaboration was facilitated by theUCLA Technology Development Group, which manages UCLA ’s intellectual property and spearheads partnerships with private industry to commercialize UCLA research.“We are excited that Yuyu Pharma chose UCLA as its first academic institution partner in the U.S.,” said Amir Naiber...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 1, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Back to class: How to talk to children about returning to school
For all the excitement about elementary schools reopening in Los Angeles County, children are facing some anxieties as well.There are the typical first-day jitters,  such as: Will I make new friends? What will my teacher be like? There are also new, pandemic-specific concerns: Will my friends recognize me with my mask on? Are we still allowed to play at recess? Is it really safe to go back to school?The most important thing parents and caregivers can do to prepare children for the transition from Zoom school to in-person learning is to have open conversations about what to expect, saidpsychologist and child traum...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 26, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA ’s Asian American Studies Center shares $1.4 million in state funding to address COVID-19
The UCLA Asian American Studies Center and the Stop AAPI Hate coalition have received $1.4 million in funding from California to support community programs and ongoing research that address the impact of COVID-19 on Asian American and Pacific Islander communities, including new research and analysis into hate incidents.The funds also will support theStop Asian American Pacific Islander Hate website and theCOVID-19 Multilingual Resources website, which was developed by faculty from the Asian American Studies Center and the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.“COVID-19 has had devastating and disparate impacts on man...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 24, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Older people often incorrectly assume medicines don ’t have potential side effects
FINDINGSOlder people correctly ascertained basic information such as dosage and duration of use for more than 70% of the medications they were prescribed, regardless of whether their physician explained it during an office visit. But when physicians failed to verbally provide information about potential side effects, people incorrectly assumed that about 55% of their prescribed medications had none. And even when physicians did discuss possible side effects, their patients incorrectly assumed there were no side effects for 22% of the medications.BACKGROUNDThere is a shortage of data about how well people understand basic i...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 24, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Reddit shows people with kidney stones have been less likely to seek treatment during pandemic
FINDINGSAccording to an examination of posts on Reddit, the pandemic has had a significant effect on the management of kidney stone disease. Researchers from the department of urology at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA used computational analysis and other techniques to explore unfiltered discussions related to kidney stones in real time on the website ’s discussion forums.The investigators found that patients ’ decision-making about how and when to seek treatment for kidney stones was driven by logistical barriers and patients’ reluctance to risk exposure to COVID-19 in health care facilities....
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 23, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news