UCLA study shows inhibition of gene helps overcome resistance to immunotherapy
Cancer immunology drugs, which harness the body ’s immune system to better attack cancer cells, have significantly changed the face of cancer treatment. People with aggressive cancers are now living longer, healthier lives. Unfortunately, cancer immunology therapy only works in a subset of patients.Now, a new study from scientists at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center helps explain why some people with advanced cancer may not respond to one of the leading immunotherapies, PD-1 blockade, and how a new combination approach may help overcome resistance to the immunotherapy drug.TheUCLA study, published today i...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 9, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Taming chronic inflammation may reduce illness, save lives
Scientists from 22 institutions, including UCLA, are recommending early diagnosis, prevention and treatment of severe chronic inflammation to reduce the risk of chronic disease and death worldwide.The group of international experts, which also includes scientists from the National Institutes of Health, Stanford University, Harvard Medical School, Columbia University Medical Center and University College London, point to inflammation-related diseases as the cause of 50 percent of all deaths worldwide.Inflammation is a naturally occurring response by the body ’s immune system that helps fight illness and infection. Whe...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 5, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA launches new master ’s degree in genetic counseling in fall 2020
To meet the rising demand for specialists trained to guide patients facing complex genetic disorders, theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA is introducing a new master ’s of science degree ingenetic counseling.Housed within thedepartment of human genetics, the two-year program aims to broaden underserved populations ’ access to genomic medicine in Los Angeles, one of the most ethnically and racially diverse cities in the nation. A close alignment with the UCLA Institute for Precision Health and Institute for Society and Genetics will enhance cross-disciplinary training for students in the program. Gen...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 4, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Chronic opioid treatment may raise risk of post-traumatic stress disorder, study finds
While opioids are often prescribed to treat people with trauma-related pain, a new UCLA-led study suggests doctors should use caution before prescribing the drug to those they believe may experience severe stress in the future, in order to reduce the risk the patient will develop PTSD.In the study, researchers administered doses of the opioid morphine to a group of 22 mice for one week, then gave the mice relatively strong foot shocks. After the morphine wore off, the mice were given mild electric foot shocks. These mice showed a substantially longer “freezing response” than a second, control group of 24 mice t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 3, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Automated technique helps identify cancer cell metabolism inhibitors
This study was in part funded by the National Institutes of Health.   (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 2, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Many pregnancies are shorter as climate change causes more 90-degree days
A UCLA study suggests that climate change is causing many women to have shorter pregnancies than they would normally, which could pose risks for infant health and child development.According to research published today in Nature Climate Change, birth rates were 5% higher on days when the temperature exceeded 90 degrees Fahrenheit. And, perhaps more concerning, births on those days occurred up to two weeks earlier — and 6.1 days earlier on average — than they would have otherwise.“That’s enough to take somebody from what’s considered to be a pretty healthy pregnancy into a ‘we are somewha...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 2, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

David Geffen adds $46 million to landmark medical scholarships program
UCLA has received an additional $46 million gift from longtime supporter and legendary entertainment visionary David Geffen, a reinvestment that brings the amount of the David Geffen Medical Scholarship Fund to $146 million. The latest gift will enable 120 more students at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA to benefit from the fund, bringing the total number of students expected to receive awards to 414 over a 10-year period.The full-ride scholarships, consisting of full tuition and a living stipend, have helped UCLA attract a broader array of exceptional medical school candidates. The number of applications increa...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 2, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Researchers identify protein that governs human blood stem cell self-renewal
UCLA scientists have discovered a link between a protein and the ability of human blood stem cells to self-renew. In astudy published today in the journal Nature, the team reports that activating the protein causes blood stem cells to self-renew at least twelvefold in laboratory conditions.Multiplying blood stem cells in conditions outside the human body could greatly improve treatment options for blood cancers like leukemia and for many inherited blood diseases.Dr. Hanna Mikkola, a member of the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA and senior author of the study, h...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 27, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

A wealth of wellness knowledge, now delivered to your earbuds
A new UCLA-produced podcast is giving listeners new ways to think about the sometimes unexpected ways that health and wellness influence and affect everyday life. It even offers a unique peek into the backgrounds and outside interests of the UCLA experts being interviewed about their work.Hosted by Dr. Wendelin Slusser,the LiveWell podcast, in its first two episodes, presented interviews with UCLA faculty on topics as varied as why wecrave baked goods instead of fruits and veggies when we ’re stressed out, and theevolutionary benefit of music.In the third episode, which went online today, Dr. Jonathan Fielding,  ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 27, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Q & A: How to have a guilt-free holiday dinner
The holidays are a time of merriment, often centered on food. While the energy during the festive season is at a high, for health-conscious folks it can create unneeded stress around personal food consumption.Erin Morse, chief clinical dietitian at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, shares how to remove the guilt from eating delicious meals, and how holiday partygoers can honor their bodies, feelings and traditions through a practice called intuitive eating. Studies have found that intuitive eaters have a lower body mass index, or BMI, better cholesterol and triglyceride levels, take more pleasure in their eating, and ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 26, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Planning a trip abroad? Before you pack, check the air pollution levels
There are many things people research when planning a vacation or business trip abroad — such as the weather, how to get around a city and where to access free Wi-Fi. But one important piece of information that some people don’t look at is a city’s air pollution levels.A new study by researchers at UCLA shows that even a short-term visit to a severely polluted city can be detrimental to one ’s health. The study involved 26 non-smoking, healthy adults (with a mean age of 23.8 years) who traveled from Los Angeles to Beijing during the summers of 2014 and 2015 over a 10-week period. The study participa...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 25, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

More than 300 UCLA health care providers treat the homeless at Care Harbor free clinic
For Dr. Patrick Dowling, volunteering at the 2019Care Harbor free clinic for people who are uninsured or who lack access to health care is a sharp break from his norm of treating people at UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica.This atypical setting on the front lines of health care for the most vulnerable, sometimes results in unorthodox treatments.Dowling and other care givers at the annual clinic held at The Reef in downtown Los Angeles noticed that although the 60-year-old man they were treating said he had given himself insulin prior to his arrival at the clinic, his blood sugar level had fallen too low.Typically, physicia...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 21, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Geffen School of Medicine honors doctor for his groundbreaking research on immune response
In recognition of his groundbreaking work on the mechanisms underlying the cellular response to infection, Dr. Zhijian “James” Chen of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas has received the 2019 Switzer Prize awarded by the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.At the prize ceremony on the UCLA campus, during which Chen delivered a lecture about his research focused on the role of DNA in triggering immune defense and autoimmune diseases, the scientist said he was honored to receive the award and then joked that “to this day, I still don’t know who nominated me.”C...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 21, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Dozens of UCLA scientists rank among world ’s most-cited researchers
The 2019 list of the world ’s most influential scientific researchers includes 47 UCLA scholars.In its annual list, the Web of Science Group, which is a Clarivate Analytics company, names the most highly cited researchers — those whose work was most often referenced by other scientific research papers published from 2008 through 2018 in 21 fields across the sciences and social sciences.“The Highly Cited Researchers 2019 list from the Web of Science Group contributes to the identification of that small fraction of the researcher population that contributes disproportionately to extending the frontiers...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 20, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

$20 million fundraising effort will support efforts to improve treatment for lung disease
UCLA Health has launched a $20 million fundraising initiative to create a new center for advanced lung disease at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. To date, the initiative has secured $4.37 million for the Lung Health Research Accelerator Fund, including three gifts of $1 million each from Michael and Linda Keston, William Pierpoint, and Jeffrey and Robin Raich, and a total of $1.37 million from nine other donors.The fund will support the work of Dr. John Belperio and Dr. Joseph Lynch III in the medical school ’s division of pulmonary and critical care medicine. Belperio’s research is focused on ident...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 15, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

$20 million fundraising initiative will support efforts to improve treatment for lung disease
UCLA Health has launched a $20 million fundraising initiative to create a new center for advanced lung disease at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. To date, the initiative has secured $4.37 million for the Lung Health Research Accelerator Fund, including three gifts of $1 million each from Michael and Linda Keston, William Pierpoint, and Jeffrey and Robin Raich, and a total of $1.37 million from nine other donors.The fund will support the work of Dr. John Belperio and Dr. Joseph Lynch III in the medical school ’s division of pulmonary and critical care medicine. Belperio’s research is focused on ident...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 15, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Operation Mend cheered on at New York City Veterans Day Parade
As the 11 veterans who have been treated through the UCLA Health Operation Mend program began their 1.2-mile trek for the 100th New York City ’s Veteran’s Day parade, they took a moment to reflect. For many of them, the day was a powerful mark on their collective journey toward healing their wounds of war.Almost 100 people joined the Operation Mend contingent, including family members, supporters, staff, friends and other veterans as they walked by thousands of people lining Fifth Avenue cheering the veterans for their service, sacrifices and resilience. The 34th Commandant of the Marine Corps, retired Gen. &nb...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 14, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

$27 million grant will strengthen effort to increase biomedical workforce diversity
UCLA has received $27.2 million from the National Institutes of Health to spearhead the new phase of an initiative to enhance the diversity of the U.S. ’s biomedical workforce.The five-year grant funds the second and final phase of an NIH program called theDiversity Program Consortium: Enhancing the Diversity of the NIH-Funded Workforce. Launched in 2014, the multi-institution initiative is aimed at engaging students and early-career researchers in the biomedical and biobehavioral sciences who are from underrepresented backgrounds, and preparing them for success in the NIH-funded workforce.To date, more than 30,000 s...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 13, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Health partners with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar on health and wellness
UCLA legend and NBA Hall of Famer Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is teaming up with UCLA Health for a wide variety of new health and wellness initiatives designed to improve health and prevent disease.The partnership will be announced at the 2019 Leukemia and Lymphoma Society ’s Los Angeles Light the Night Walk, an event for which UCLA Health is the presenting sponsor.  The Los Angeles Laker superstar and UCLA Bruin basketball player is a survivor of chronic myeloid leukemia, or CML, which is a form of blood cancer. To honor his survivorship, Abdul-Jabbar has served as an ambassador and UCLA Health fundraising team ca...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 7, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Q & A: A drug-free option for treating ADHD in children
Deciding how to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children can be a difficult decision for parents. Stimulants, such as Adderall and Ritalin, are the most commonly prescribed ADHD treatments — and are considered to be the most effective.   But in April, the FDA approved the first device-based, non-drug therapy to treat ADHD in children. The FDA decision followed the completion of aUCLA study demonstrating the effectiveness and safety of a trigeminal nerve stimulation device that could be a new option for treating the disorder.The device tested in the study was developed using technology inve...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 5, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Man on a mission
During his last three years as an undergraduate, Cody Aros spent a lot of time asking strangers deeply personal questions.As a volunteer intake coordinator at a free clinic in Menlo Park, California, Aros ’ duties included asking the people seeking care about their interest in HIV testing. For a lot of people, asking strangers about their sexual histories would be a nightmare. But not Aros. With every interaction, he tried to create a safe space, in which people could share their histories and conc erns without fearing judgment.“There is an element of vulnerability in medicine that I found myself really drawn t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 4, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study reveals how brain injury can lead to post-traumatic stress disorder
Post-traumatic stress disorder in U.S. military members frequently follows a concussion-like brain injury. Until now, it has been unclear why. A UCLA team of psychologists and neurologists reports that a traumatic brain injury causes changes in a brain region called the amygdala; and the brain processes fear differently after such an injury.“Is one causing the other, and how does that occur?” asked senior author Michael Fanselow, who holds the Staglin Family Chair in Psychology at UCLA and is the director of UCLA’s Staglin Music Festival Center for Brain and Behavioral Health. “We’re learning....
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 4, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Mattel Children ’s Hospital helps kids trick-or-treat
Three-year-old Harmon Jones strutted in his “Black Panther” costume as he prowled the UCLA Mattel Children’s Hospital hallways and main lobby for treats. After watching a special magic show and playing some tunes led by music therapists, he wanted some Halloween candy.“My favorite part is the lollipops!” Harmon said. “I like to share them with my mommy and daddy!”For Heather and Shaw Jones, Harmon ’s parents, holidays bring some sense of the normal and community. Last summer, Harmon was diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare cancer that forms in soft tissue — specifica...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 1, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Many take anticoagulants and OTC supplements, which poses risk
FINDINGSNearly 98% percent of people prescribed direct-acting oral anticoagulants such as apixaban also used  over-the-counter products. Of those, 33% took at least one such product that, in combination with the anticoagulants, could cause dangerous internal bleeding. People taking these medications largely lacked knowledge of some potentially serious interactions.BACKGROUNDDirect-acting oral anticoagulants are the drug of choice for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation, which occurs most frequently in older patients. Apixaban is one of the most frequently prescribed. However, most people prescribed ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 1, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Three UCLA scientists receive grants totaling more than $18 million
Three researchers at the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have received awards totaling more than $18 million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the state’s stem cell agency. The recipients areDr. Sophie Deng, professor of ophthalmology at the UCLA Stein Eye Institute;  Yvonne Chen, a UCLA associate professor of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics; andDr. Caroline Kuo, a UCLA assistant clinical professor of pediatrics. The awards were announced at a CIRM meeting today.Deng ’s four-year, $10.3 million award ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 31, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

National Cancer Institute awards UCLA prostate cancer program an $8.7 million grant
The prostate cancer program at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and UCLA Health has been awarded an $8.7 million Specialized Program of Research Excellence, or SPORE, grant from the National Cancer Institute. The grant will support the development of new and innovative approaches for improving the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of prostate cancer.The  2019 designation recognizes UCLA’s prostate cancer program as one of the best in the country and marks the fourth time it will be receiving the five-year cycle of funding. The program is one of only eight current such programs and the only one ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 31, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Mitochondria ’s activity in lung tumors could predict response to treatment
FINDINGSResearchers at theUCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center andDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA have identified a new biomarker that could indicate how likely someone is to respond to treatment for lung cancer. In a test using mice, the scientists found that the level of activity of the mitochondria in lung tumor cells could potentially predict who would respond favorably to a type of drug called a complex I inhibitor, which targets mitochondrial function — and that the mitochondria activity could be tracked noninvasively using a PET scan.The study was the first to use a noninvasive imaging technique to...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 30, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Q & A: Air quality during and after wildfires
The wildfires raging throughout California — the Getty fire in Los Angeles and the Kincade fire in Northern California among the most recent ones — have caused great concern about air quality and the safety of being outdoors.The health risks aren ’t limited to those in close proximity to the fires. People also can be at risk in surrounding areas, even if smoke or ash isn’t visible, or when there’s no obvious smell of smoke.Dr. Eric Kleerup, a pulmonologist at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, explains how wildfires affect air quality and what precautions people can take to limit expo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 30, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Whether a fashion model or not, some body image concerns are universal
When researchers from UCLA and the Laureate Institute for Brain Research in Tulsa, Oklahoma, wanted to test an app they created to measure body image perception, they went to the body image experts — fashion models.Sixty-five female models signed to professional modeling agencies in London were asked to step off the runway and into a laboratory to help researchers study Somatomap, a mobile and desktop app designed to research body image and ultimately to help doctors treat patients with eating and body dysmorphic disorders.Forthe study, published in the journal JMIR Mental Health, researchers also recruited 38 women ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 29, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Health uninsurance rate in California remained low in 2018, survey finds
The percentage of Californians without health insurance remained stable and low in 2018, thanks to actions by state legislators, according to a policy brief produced by the  UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. The findings are unlike the rest of the nation, which saw an increase in the rate of uninsurance.The uninsured rate dropped nearly by half to 8.1% last year, compared with 15.5% in 2013, according to the brief. Insurance coverage is one of many topics covered in newly released data from the 2018  California Health Interview Survey.The 2018 edition of the survey, which includes responses from 23,195 chil...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 24, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

MRI may help doctors differentiate causes of memory loss
A UCLA-led study has found that MRI scans can help doctors distinguish whether a person ’s memory loss is being caused by Alzheimer’s disease or by traumatic brain injury.The study, which also involved researchers at Washington University in St. Louis, is important because it could help prevent doctors from misdiagnosing Alzheimer ’s disease — a diagnosis that can be devastating for patients and their families, and can prevent them from receiving appropriate treatment. (A 2016 study by researchers affiliated with the University of Toronto found that up to 21 percent of older adults with dementia may...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 24, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Two UCLA doctors named to National Academy of Medicine
Two UCLA professors, Dr. Denise Aberle and Dr. Carol Mangione, have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine, one of the highest honors in health and medicine.Aberle is a professor of radiology and bioengineering, and vice chair for research in the department of radiological sciences at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Mangione is the Barbara A. Levey& Gerald S. Levey  Professor of Medicine and Public Health and chief of the division of general internal medicine and health services research. They were among 100 new members announced Oct. 21 during the academy’s annual meeting in Washington...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 21, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Creatine powers T cells ’ fight against cancer
Creatine, the organic acid that is popularly taken as a supplement by athletes and bodybuilders, serves as a molecular battery for immune cells by storing and distributing energy to power their fight against cancer, according to new UCLA research.The study, conducted in mice and published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, is the first to show that creatine uptake is critical to the anti-tumor activities of CD8 T cells, also known as killer T cells, the foot soldiers of the immune system. The researchers also found that creatine supplementation can improve the efficacy of existing immunotherapies.“Because oral ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 18, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study focuses on repair and reversal of damage caused by Huntington ’s disease
A new study examining the role that star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes play in Huntington ’s disease has identified a potential strategy that may halt the disease and repair some of the damage it causes.Astrocytes interact with and support neurons, or nerve cells, and other brain cells. Although astrocytes outnumber neurons, little is known about how they interact with synapses, the junctions between neurons that enable them to communicate and convey messages to each other.The study, led by UCLA researchers and published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, found that Huntington ’s disease dama...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 17, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Antibody eradicates leukemia stem cells
The introduction of the drug imatinib in 2001 revolutionized the treatment of a type of cancer called chronic myelogenous leukemia. In more than 80% of people with CML who received the drug, the disease went into complete remission.However, in most people with chronic myelogenous leukemia, cancerous stem cells remain in the body for years after their cancer has gone into remission. If treatment with imatinib or another similar medication is stopped — and in some cases, even while treatment continues — the leukemia stem cells can cause cancer to recur.Now, in experiments in mice as well as isolated human cancer ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 15, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Cells ’ mitochondria work much like Tesla battery packs, study finds
For years, scientists assumed that mitochondria — the energy-generating centers of living cells — worked much like household batteries, generating energy from a chemical reaction inside a single chamber or cell. Now, UCLA researchers have shown that mitochondria are instead made up of many individual bioelectric units that generate energy in an array, similar to a Tesla electric car battery that packs thousands of battery cells to manage energy safely and provide fast access to very high current.“Nobody had looked at this before because we were so locked into this way of thinking; the assumption was that ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 15, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Expert second opinion improves reliability of melanoma diagnoses
Getting a reliable diagnosis of melanoma can be a significant challenge for pathologists. The diagnosis relies on a pathologist ’s visual assessment of biopsy material on microscopic slides, which can often be subjective. Now, UCLA researchers have found that obtaining a second opinion from pathologists who are board certified or have fellowship training in dermatopathology can help improve the accuracy and reliability of diagnosing melanoma, one of the deadliest and most aggressive forms of skin cancer.“A diagnosis is the building block on which all other medical treatment is based,” said Dr. Joann ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 12, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Q & A: Educating children about health risks of vaping
The number of teens who use electronic cigarettes, or vape, is at an all-time high, and there ’s growing concern that vaping can cause severe lung illness and injury, as well as an addiction to nicotine.Additionally, several deaths have been attributed to vaping-related illnesses, and that number continues to grow, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recent CDC data also shows that 1 in 4 high school students vape, and that e-cigarette use among middle school students is on the rise.UCLA pediatric pulmonologistDr. Eric Hamberger explains how vaping affects children ’s health, and how pa...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 8, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

California program is a good step toward coordinating care for high-needs patients, study finds
Anevaluation by UCLA researchers has found that a California program launched in 2016 has been a positive step toward providing better-coordinated health care for people insured by Medicaid.Initial findings from the ongoing analysis were published today by theUCLA Center for Health Policy Research. The researchers report that the state ’s Whole Person Care program has been successful on several fronts so far, including the sharing of patients’ medical, behavioral health and social services data, which should enable providers to better collaborate to treat so-called “high-needs” patients.That de...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 8, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Clues from DNA could help predict growth of prostate cancer
FINDINGSResearchers from the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and other institutions in the U.S., Canada, the United Kingdom and Singapore, have identified 1,178 biomarkers in men ’s genomes — the complete set of genetic material inherited from one’s parents — that predict how an individual person’s prostate cancer will grow.The finding suggests that predicting how a person ’s cancer will evolve may lie in their inherited DNA.BACKGROUNDThe researchers focused in part on a biological process called DNA methylation. DNA methylation is a natural process cells use to turn genes on or...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 7, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study confirms serious health problems, high trauma rates among unsheltered people in U.S.
A  report released today finds that physical and mental health care needs as well as abuse and traumatic experiences are major contributing factors to a loss of housing for unsheltered people, especially unsheltered women. A research team at the California Policy Lab analyzed survey responses from more than 64,000 single adults ages 25 and older who were experiencing sheltered or unsheltered homelessness in 15 states across the U.S. from 2015 through 2017.It is estimated that more than half a million people are homeless on a given night in the United States, nearly 200,000 of whom are unsheltered — sleeping...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 7, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Fat cells are used to deliver drug that suppresses tumor growth in mice
FINDINGSIn a study with mice, researchers at the  UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a new mechanism for delivering a drug that can help stop tumors from growing and keep cancer from recurring. The scientists found that they could reengineer adipocytes — fat cells that provide fatty acids with the energy needed for tumors to grow and spread — to reverse their r ole in tumor development and deliver cancer-fighting drugs directly to the area of the body immediately surrounding the tumor.BACKGROUNDAlthough there have been many improvements over the past decade in treatment technique...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 4, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Researchers identify molecular process that could accelerate recovery from nerve injuries
Twenty million Americans suffer from peripheral nerve injuries, which can be caused by traumas such as combat wounds and motorcycle crashes as well as medical disorders including diabetes. These injuries can have a devastating impact on quality of life, resulting in loss of sensation, motor function and long-lasting nerve pain. The body is capable of regenerating damaged nerves, but this process is slow and incomplete.Now, researchers at the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered a molecular process that controls the rate at which nerves grow both duri...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 2, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study identifies therapeutic target for high blood pressure in the lungs
This study was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the American Heart Association; and by the Foundation for Anesthesia Education and Research. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 1, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA to lead $25 million study of opioids in rural America
This study has the potential to expand access to life-saving treatments for opioid addiction in communities that have been significantly impacted by the opioid epidemic, and for new models of treatment to be sustainable even after the study is over,” Mooney said.Shirley Simson, a National Institute on Drug Abuse representative, said a “significant amount” of the $25 million grant, including $3.6 million for the first year of the study, will be directed to UCLA. The remainder of the grant will go to collaborating institutions.The study on text messaging will be led bySuzette Glasner, an associate prof...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 27, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Adopt-a-School program encourages student to pursue nursing degree at UCLA
Standing before the Factor Building at UCLA, Jessica Chavez has finally arrived. Though the 14 story brown building is unchanged, Chavez briefly sees herself 17 years younger, gaping at the same arching entrance.But soon Chavez shakes from these memories of being a 12-year-old girl from a poor neighborhood setting foot in a foreign world — like the campus in Westwood felt back then — and she walks through the doors as proud enrolled student at the UCLA School of Nursing.“Wow,” she said to herself.  “I’m really about to do this!”Seventeen summers earlier, Chavez first came to c...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 25, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Engineered killer T cells could provide long-lasting immunity against cancer
They ’ve been called the “special forces” of the immune system: invariant natural killer T cells. Although there are relatively few of them in the body, they are more powerful than many other immune cells.In experiments with mice, UCLA researchers have shown they can harness the power of iNKT cells to attack tumor cells and treat cancer.The new method, described in the journal Cell Stem Cell, suppressed the growth of multiple types of human tumors that had been transplanted into the animals.  “What’s really exciting is that we can give this treatment just once and it increases the number ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 23, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Cost, wait time influence choice of health care setting for minor illnesses
Out-of-pocket costs and wait times influence individuals ’ choice of health care setting for minor illnesses, according to a study by UC Irvine researchers affiliated with the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.The study, which surveyed over 5,000 UC Irvine employees, showed that people choose to seek care in a variety of settings — urgent care centers, retail clinics and virtual visits — for their minor illnesses and injuries rather than just at emergency rooms or in primary care physicians’ offices. Their decisions also depend on out-of-pocket costs and wait times.Based on these resu...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 23, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Half of content in physicians ’ notes may be inaccurate, study finds
This study has some limitations. The study ’s observers tracked nine emergency department physicians at two institutions. Also, the observers, who were not physicians, may have missed some details that other doctors might have noticed, and may not have witnessed some interactions between doctors and their patients.IMPACTThe findings suggest a need to change how records are kept because electronic medical records are used to inform decisions about patient care and to generate bills, according to the study ’s authors. The changes to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ documentation and billing r...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 19, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

3D virtual reality models help yield better surgical outcomes
This study was for kidney cancer, but the benefits of using 3D models for surgical planning will translate to many other types of cancer operations, such as prostate, lung, liver and pancreas.”The study ’s other authors are Dr. David Thiel, Mayo Clinic, Florida; Dr. Eric Wallen, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Dr. Jennifer Linehan, John Wayne Cancer Institute, Providence Saint John’s Health Center, Santa Monica; Dr. Wesley White, University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville; Dr. Ketan Badani, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York; and Dr. James Porter, Swedish Urology Group, Se...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 18, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news