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Study examines effects of stopping psychiatric medication
This study is novel because it asks questions about stopping to take medications from the consumer’s point of view.”Many industry-funded studies have asked patients why they stop taking their medications, but typically with a view to increase compliance, according to Cohen. By contrast, this study asks consumers what they experienced while coming off drugs, who helped them make and carry out their decision, and whether they were satisfied with their attempted or completed discontinuation.“Over 70 percent of our study sample had taken medication for more than a decade; however, these individuals reported h...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 19, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Less invasive treatment for blocked artery in the leg is safe, review finds
This study shows that the orbital atherectomy treatment can offer patients a safe and effective alternative to surgery.AUTHORSThe authors of the study are Dr. Michael Lee and Dr. Daniel Heikali of UCLA; Dr. Jihad Mustapha of Metro Health Hospital in Wyoming, Mich.; Dr. George Adams of Rex Healthcare in Raleigh, N.C.; and Dr. Ehtisham Mahmud of UC San Diego.JOURNALThis  study was published  by the peer-reviewed journal Vascular Medicine.FUNDINGThis research was funded Cardiovascular Systems Inc., the makers of the orbital atherectomy device.DISCLOSURES​Drs. Lee, Mustapha and Adams received funding from Cardiovas...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 19, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Genetic sequencing unravels rare disease mysteries
When Audrey Lapidus ’ 10-month old son, Calvin, didn’t reach normal milestones like rolling over or crawling, she knew something was wrong.“He was certainly different from our first child,” said Lapidus, of Los Angeles. “He had a lot of gastrointestinal issues and we were taking him to the doctor quite a bit.”Four specialists saw Calvin and batteries of tests proved inconclusive. Still, Lapidus persisted.“I was pushing for even more testing, and our geneticist at UCLA said, ‘If you can wait one more month, we’re going to be launching a brand new test called exome sequen...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 18, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Separating food facts from fiction
UCLA Broadcast Studio As a nutritional epidemiologist devoted to prevention, Karin Michels has spent much of her career studying how health can be optimized through a proper diet.“People think it all comes down to their genes, but there is so much we can control by not smoking or being overweight, eating right and exercising at least moderately,” says Michels, professor and chair of the epidemiology department in the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.What constitutes healthy eating? Michels, who frequently gives public talks on the topic, has found there are many widely held misconceptions that le...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Not all astrocytes in the brain are the same, study finds
From afar, the billions of stars in our galaxy look indistinguishable, just as the billions of star-shaped astrocytes in our brains appear the same as each other. But UCLA researchers have now revealed that astrocytes, a type of brain cell that supports and protects neurons, aren ’t all the same. While stars might be categorized by their size, age and heat, the supportive brain cells vary when it comes to shape, molecular machinery and functioning.The findings,published today in the journal  Neuron, should make it easier for researchers to study how astrocytes relate to disease, or to develop drugs that aim...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Electrical stimulation of brain may help people with schizophrenia learn to communicate better
FINDINGSUCLA researchers have found that people with schizophrenia were able to more accurately determine whether two auditory tones matched or differed, after receiving a type of electrical brain stimulation. Being able to distinguish tones is essential for verbal communication.BACKGROUNDPeople with schizophrenia have difficulty discriminating between tones of differing frequencies.  This is thought to impair their ability to interpret tone of voice, resulting in social difficulties. Transcranial direct current stimulation, or tDCS, is a non-invasive neural stimulation technique that passes a weak electrical current ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 12, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Memory of social interactions impaired in all phases of schizophrenia
FINDINGSPeople with schizophrenia have trouble remembering the details of social interactions in all phases of the illness, researchers report. However, in the early stages of schizophrenia, patients can remember more about these interactions if given hints about context. This finding suggests a potential strategy for memory training.BACKGROUNDEpisodic memory is the way we remember life events, big and small. What did I have for lunch? Where do I know that person from? It ’s key for social functioning: Poor episodic memory, a common feature of schizophrenia, limits the ability to form relationships with others.METHOD...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 12, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Changes in brain regions may explain why some prefer order and certainty, UCLA behavioral neuroscientists report
Why do some people prefer stable, predictable lives while others prefer frequent changes? Why do some people make rational decisions and others, impulsive and reckless ones? UCLA behavioral neuroscientists have identified changes in two brain regions that may hold answers to these questions.The research — reported by Alicia Izquierdo, UCLA associate professor of psychology and a member of UCLA’s Brain Research Institute, and her psychology graduate student, Alexandra Stolyarova —is published today in the open-access online science journal eLife.The new experiments, which involved studying t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 7, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Semel Institute ’s Mindful Music program plans 40 recitals for 2017–18
Mindful Music, a program developed by UCLA ’s Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, brings live performances to UCLA’s campus and health system, with concerts in courtyards and patient care areas.For the 2017 –18 academic year, the program is planning more than 40 recitals — with performances on piano, guitar, saxophone, string bass, flute and other instruments — at the Semel Institute, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center and UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica.Thomas NeerkenDalida Arakelian“There is so much talent all around us that I wanted to create a way to break the barri...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 3, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

These tips for healthier grilling can reduce risk for cancer
UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center Did you know that eating grilled meats can increase your risk for cancer?Just in time for the July 4 holiday, Catherine Carpenter, a professor of clinical nutrition and member  of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, explains how a few small adjustments to how you barbecue your steak, pork, fish and chicken can reduce your exposure to carcinogens. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 3, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA team performs emergency surgery to save mom and newborn baby
UCLA Health When mom-to-be Malisa was just a few weeks away from delivering her first child, she felt a sudden pain in her chest while at the movies with a friend.Her doctors ruled out any problems with the pregnancy but did learn she had a rare, life-threatening heart condition called an aortic dissection, a tear in the aorta located just above the aortic valve involving the arteries that take blood to the heart and brain. The condition often leads to sudden death, but with unusual luck she was able to survive.Once diagnosed, Malisa, who lives about 80 miles from Los Angeles, was airlifted to  Ronald Reagan UCLA...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 30, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Research suggests association between gut bacteria and emotion
FINDINGSResearchers have identified gut microbiota that interact with brain regions associated with mood and behavior.  This may be the first time that behavioral and neurobiological differences associated with microbial composition in healthy humans have been identified.BACKGROUNDBrain-gut-microbiota interactions may play an important role in human health and behavior. Previous research suggests that microbiota, a community of microorganisms in the gut, can influence behavior and emotion. Rodent models have demonstrated the effects of gut microbiota on emotional and social behaviors, such as anxiety and depression. T...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 29, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How safe is vaping?
On the heels of another damning statistic against tobacco — it kills more than 7 million people each year, the World Health Organizationsaid recently— come questions about whether vaping is a healthier substitute.The idea that they could be stems from the fact that e-cigarettes and other vaping devices can supply nicotine without tobacco or other additives and byproducts, like smoke, that are in a traditional cigarette. A2014 survey of 19,000 e-cigarette users found that 88 percent believed e-cigarettes were at least safer than regular cigarettes and 11 percent believed e-cigarettes were harmless. More rec...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 29, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Medicaid waiver program helped public hospitals improve care to California ’s most needy
A five-year Medicaid waiver program that infused billions of dollars into public hospitals prompted significant improvements in health care to California ’s neediest population — the poor and uninsured, according to an extensiveevaluation by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.Seventeen designated public hospitals participated in the $3.3 billion “pay-for-performance” experiment, including five University of California hospital systems and 12 county‐owned-and‐operated hospital systems. Collectively, these facilities serve more than 2 million patients every year, including most of the stat...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 28, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Mattel Children ’s Hospital recognized for overall excellence in pediatrics
UCLA Mattel Children ’s Hospital’s overall excellence in pediatric care is highlighted in a national assessment published online today.The annual Best Children ’s Hospitals rankings by U.S. News and World Report recognizes UCLA for quality in all 10 specialties it measures.The assessment of 187 hospitals relies on clinical data and reputation surveys of health care providers to identify the top 50 pediatrics  programs in the U.S. in each of the disciplines. UCLA Mattel Children ’s Hospital placed in all 10 specialties.Two UCLA pediatric programs ranked in the top 15 nationally —...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 28, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Integrated medical records can reduce disparities between blacks and whites in HIV care
This study was funded by grants from the Health Resources and Services Administration; the National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging; NIH/National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities; National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences; NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse; NIH/National Institute of Nursing Research; and the UCLA California Center for Population Research through support from the Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 27, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Mattel Children ’s Hospital and Miller Children’s & Women ’s Hospital plan strategic affiliation
Two leading children ’s hospitals —UCLA Mattel Children ’s Hospital, part of UCLA Health, and  Miller Children ’s& Women ’s Hospital Long Beach, part of  MemorialCare Health System— announced today their intent to form a strategic affiliation that brings together their academic, clinical and research expertise, and resources to enhance children’s health care services in Southern California.The two organizations, which share similar missions and values, plan to establish a wider geographic pediatric collaboration that strengthens and broadens their ability to offer the...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 22, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

HIV-positive women with cytomegalovirus likelier to pass virus that causes AIDS to infant
HIV-positive women with cytomegalovirus, or CMV, in their urine at the time of labor and delivery are more than five times likelier than HIV-positive women without CMV to transmit HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, to their infants, according to a UCLA-led study.The research also found that they are nearly 30 times likelier to transmit cytomegalovirus to their infants.Dr. Karin Nielsen, a professor of clinical pediatrics in the division of infectious diseases at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, is the senior author of the study, which was published today in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.“The findi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 22, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA neuroscientist offers game plan to better understand sports concussions
Hospital emergency rooms treat more than 170,000 children each year for sports-related traumatic brain injuries, including concussions, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.What do parents and coaches need to know about sports concussions in order to protect their kids and players?  A commentary byDr. Christopher Giza, director of the  UCLA Steve Tisch BrainSPORT program, about sports, concussions and neuroscience appears in the June 21 online edition of  Neuron. Here, Giza, a national leader in concussion research, offers a game plan for where concussion research is headed:Todd C...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 21, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

High-fat diet leads to same intestinal inflammation as a virus
FINDINGSA new study by scientists at UCLA found that when mice eat a high-fat diet, the cells in their small intestines respond the same way they do to a viral infection, turning up production of certain immune molecules and causing inflammation throughout the body. The scientists also found that feeding the mice tomatoes containing a protein similar to that in HDL, or “good cholesterol,” along with the generic cholesterol drug Ezetimibe, reversed the inflammation.The results could lead to new types of drugs, targeting the intestinal cells, to reduce people ’s risk of heart attacks and strokes, or to trea...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 21, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Rare genetic variants found to increase risk for Tourette syndrome
An international team led by researchers from UCLA and Massachusetts General Hospital has identified the first definitive genes associated with Tourette syndrome, giving scientists a long-sought foothold on the biology of the disease.The report in the June 21 issue of Neuron describes the discovery of rare mutations — either deletions or duplications of genetic material — in two neurodevelopmental genes, NRXN1 and CNTN6, in people with Tourette syndrome, a disorder characterized by multiple chronic, involuntary motor and vocal tics.“This is a first, key step in understanding the role of these genes in the...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 21, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UC consortium formed to speed up development of new drugs
For 12 years, UCLA researcher Dennis Slamon pursued a groundbreaking approach to treating breast cancer: Attack the disease genetically.The journey was long and filled with obstacles, but his persistence paid off.Slamon and colleagues conducted laboratory and clinical research that, in collaboration with biotechnology firm Genentech, helped lead to development of the breast cancer drug Herceptin.UCLA's Dennis Slamon with Harry Connick Jr., who played the professor of medicine in a 2008 television movie.The drug, which targets a specific genetic alteration found in about 25 percent of breast cancer patients, has saved thous...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 21, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Students of all races feel safer in ethnically diverse middle schools, UCLA researchers report
Middle school students from a range of racial and ethnic backgrounds feel safer, less lonely and less bullied if they attend schools that are more diverse, UCLA researchers report today in the journal Child Development.The study also found that students in diverse schools — those with multiple ethnic groups of relatively equal size — reported more tolerance and less prejudice toward students of other ethnicities and believe teachers treated all students more fairly and equally.Jaana Juvonen, a UCLA professor of psychology and the research ’s lead author, said the study is the first to show such a wide ran...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 20, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Immigrant doctors trained to help bridge major gaps in care
No one would argue that the United States has a significant shortage of primary care physicians, or that California ’s shortage is extreme. A “shortage” is defined by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services as fewer than one primary care physician for every 3,000 to 3,500 people, and according to the agency’s statistics, California has 607 federally designated shortage areas, impacting a populati on of some 6.7 million people.A program at UCLA aims to make a difference in those numbers by helping legal immigrants with physician training — that is, those who have already graduated from...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 20, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Social workers and medical students: ‘the ideal team’
Matthew Hing is a first-year medical student at UCLA, but on this April morning he ’s a visitor in a nondescript building on Lincoln Boulevard in Venice — the St. Joseph Center, home of the Chronically Homeless Intervention Program.Hing enters through a back door, weaving through a crowd of homeless people who gather each morning to take advantage of St. Joseph ’s services. This isn’t your typical med school classroom, but Hing believes the experience will be a vital part of his training — adding more educational insight to his medical school curriculum.Thanks to a partnership between the &nbs...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 19, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA names winner of Switzer Prize for research excellence
Dr. Huda Zoghbi, a neurologist whose work has revealed the molecular basis of neurological disorders, is the recipient of the 2017 Switzer Prize awarded by theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA for excellence in biological and biomedical sciences research.Zoghbi ’s lab at the Baylor College of Medicine identified a gene mutation that causes Rett syndrome, a severe genetic disorder that mostly affects girls. After a short period of apparently normal development, the disorder causes them to lose language and motor skills, typically by 18 months of age. The discovery paved the way for a genetic test to diagnose the...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 19, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study finds no gender difference in stress as a risk factor for coronary heart disease
This study was supported by the National Institutes of Health. The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 14, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Pregnancy problems not necessarily linked to Zika viral load or Dengue fever
FINDINGSUCLA-led researchers have found that Zika viral load and the degree of Zika symptoms during pregnancy were not necessarily associated with problems during pregnancy or fetal abnormalities at birth. They also found that the presence of antibodies to previously acquired dengue fever was not necessarily connected to abnormalities during pregnancy or at birth.BACKGROUNDCongenital Zika virus syndrome — a pattern of birth defects found among fetuses and babies infected with the virus — is a newly identified condition that occurs when women are infected during pregnancy. It is unknown to what degree the amount...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 14, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA doctors use magnetic stimulation to ‘rewire’ the brain for people with depression
Americans spend billions of dollars each year  on antidepressants, but the National Institutes of Health estimates that those medications work for only 60 percent to 70 percent of people who take them. In addition, the number of people with depression has increased 18 percent since 2005, according to the World Health Organization, which this year launched a global campaign encouraging people to seek treatment. The  Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA is one of a handful of hospitals and clinics nationwide that offer a treatment that works in a fundamentally different way tha...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Mice can ’t ‘tune out’ stimuli, mimicking sensory hypersensitivity in humans
This study ’s other authors are Daniel Cantu, Anubhuti Goel, Shilpa Mantri and William Zeiger, all of UCLA.The study was funded by a Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans and an NIH NINDS F30 Fellowship (NS093719); UCLA Neural Microcircuits training grant (T32-NS058280); a Eugene V. Cota-Robles Fellowship; the UCLA Medical Scientist Training Program (NIH NIGMS training grant GM08042; and a Developmental Disabilities Translational Research Program grant (20160969) from the John Merck Fund; a SFARI grant from the Simons Foundation (295438); and NIH NICHD grant (RO1 HD054453). (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 12, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA Dentistry to lead Medi-Cal project to expand preventive dental care for L.A. children
UCLA will lead a pilot program to expand preventive dental care for 500,000 Los Angeles children enrolled in Medi-Cal, California ’s Medicaid health care program.The UCLA-led project — the largest of 15 such programs recently approved by the state’s Department of Health Care Services — is part of the Medi-Cal 2020 Dental Transformation Initiative and will run through December 2020. According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, only about one-third of California ’s 6.1 million children and adolescents enrolled in Medi-Cal receive preventive dental care each year. Preventive ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 8, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New UCLA doctors embody the American dream
Some 200 UCLA medical students received their diplomas Friday, June 2, in Perloff Courtyard at  the Hippocratic Oath Ceremony for the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.Addressing a  sea of black-robed graduates, Dr. John Mazziotta, vice chancellor of the health sciences and CEO of UCLA Health, advised, “Remember that diseases are something you read about in a book or on a computer. But a patient is a human being in trouble. Reach out to each patient as an individual and mak e a difference in his or her life.”The UCLA medical student body is as ethnically diverse as Los Angeles, where 70 percent ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 8, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Balance and movement improved in animal model of Parkinson ’s disease
This study is the first to demonstrate CLR01’s effectiveness in a mammal, one of the last important steps before human clinical trials.The researchers are now working on optimizing the blood-brain barrier penetration of CLR01 and measuring all the pharmacological features necessary for applying to the Food and Drug Administration to begin the first human, clinical trials.AUTHORSBitan and Dr. Marie-Fran çoise Chesselet, the Charles H. Markham professor of neurology at UCLA, are the senior authors of the study. Franziska Richter, assistant professor at the University of Leipzig in Germany, is the first author.JO...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 7, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA medical school graduates embody the American Dream
Some 200 students will receive their diplomas on June 2 during the Hippocratic Oath Ceremony for the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Earning an M.D. requires grueling hours, demanding classes and unwavering focus. It ’s a tough journey for any student, but the following students either overcame the additional challenges of immigration and adaptation to life in the United States — or witnessed those challenges in their parents’ lives. For them, the American Dream is no longer just a hope; it’s a reality.Razmik Ghukasyan, 27, of North Hollywood,  grew up in war-torn, post-Soviet Arm...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 2, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Mice headed for space to test bone-building drug developed at UCLA
What do space travel, rodents and a bone-building protein all have in common? A team of UCLA scientists is bringing these three elements together to test an experimental drug that could one day result in a treatment for osteoporosis, which affects more than 200 million people worldwide.The drug could also potentially help those with bone damage or loss, a condition that afflicts people with traumatic bone injury, such as injured military service members, as well as astronauts  who lose bone density while in space.Led by Dr. Chia Soo and Dr. Kang Ting, who met and married while working on this project, as well as Dr. B...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 1, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How the Galapagos cormorant lost its ability to fly
The flightless Galapagos cormorant is one of a diverse array of animals that live on the Galapagos Islands, which piqued Charles Darwin ’s scientific curiosity in the 1830s. He hypothesized that altered evolutionary pressures may have contributed to the loss of the ability to fly in birds like the Galapagos cormorant.In a new study unraveling the cormorant ’s DNA, UCLA scientists discovered genetic changes that transpired during the past 2 million years and contributed to the bird’s inability to fly. Interestingly, when these same genes go awry in humans, they cause bone-development disorders called skele...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 1, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Two all-stars reveal secrets of success in business and basketball
If you want to grow, be willing to fail. That advice, from business executive Charlie Norris and Los Angeles Lakers legend Byron Scott, could be considered a mantra for anyone — except maybe neurosurgeons. Recently, that was precisely the audience.The two authors of  “Slam-Dunk Success: Leading from Every Position on Life ’s Court” spoke to capacity crowds in the Charles and Peggy Norris Global Conference Room of the Edie& Lew Wasserman Building at UCLA on May 17, delivering a synopsis of their new book on leadership.“We are extremely grateful to have Charlie and Byron in the neu...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 1, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

First David Geffen Medical Scholarship students at UCLA are graduating
After earning a master ’s degree in education and working as a public-school teacher in New York, Mariel Bailey decided to pursue a medical degree.That concerned her parents in Rhode Island, who were unable to help cover the costs. Bailey had her pick of top medical schools, including UCLA, UC San Francisco, Harvard and Stanford. An all-expenses-paid scholarship from theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA“essentially made the decision for me,” she said.“The scholarship was a godsend that provided the financial freedom to pursue my dream at an amazing program debt-free and without having to repay...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 1, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Escaping jet lag on your vacation getaway
Your long-awaited vacation is right around the corner. As the calendar days peel away and you compile your to-do  checklist, the issue of jet lag looms if your getaway involves crossing multiple time zones.“Anyone who has ever suffered jet lag knows firsthand that our bodies are persistent in how they keep track of time,” saysDr. Alon Avidan, director of theUCLA Sleep Disorders Center. “During jet lag, a rapid shift in the light-dark cycle temporarily disrupts one’s normal sleep-wake pattern, and our bodies become desynchronized.”UCLADr. Alon AvidanImagine that you have just arrived in At...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 31, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA leading $20 million effort to reduce HIV among youth
A UCLA-led team of researchers has received a $20 million grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to provide services for adolescents and young adults who have HIV or are at risk for HIV infection, and to study how well those services work.Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus, director of the Global Center for Children and Families at UCLA ’sSemel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, will lead the five-year project, working with teams at Columbia University, the Friends Research Institute, Nova Southeastern University, Tulane University, UC San Francisco  and Wake Forest University,...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 26, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA researchers find brain differences between people with genetic risk for schizophrenia, autism
A UCLA study characterizes, for the first time, brain differences between people with a specific genetic risk for schizophrenia and those at risk for autism, and the findings could help explain the biological underpinnings of these neuropsychiatric disorders.Theresearch, published May 23 in the Journal of Neuroscience, sheds light on how an excess, or absence, of genetic material on a particular chromosome affects neural development.“Notably, the opposing anatomical patterns we observed were most prominent in brain regions important for social functioning,” said Carrie Bearden, lead author of the study and a pr...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 25, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists develop test to identify best treatment for gonorrhea
FINDINGSResearchers from UCLA have developed a laboratory test that helps physicians determine which people with gonorrhea may be more treatable with an antibiotic that has not been recommended since 2007 because of concerns that the resistance to the drug was growing.BACKGROUNDGonorrhea has developed increasing resistance to all current antibiotics. Due to the spread of multi-drug resistant gonorrhea, health authorities have declared it one of the top-three urgent threats to public health.Ciprofloxacin was used to combat the sexually transmitted infection until 2007, when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sto...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 23, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Specialist in organ transplantation appointed inaugural Paul I. Terasaki Chair in Surgery
UCLADr. Jerzy Kupiec-WeglinskiDr. Jerzy Kupiec-Weglinski has been appointed the inaugural Paul I. Terasaki Chair in Surgery at UCLA. Kupiec-Weglinski is a professor of surgery, pathology and laboratory medicine. He is the  vice chairman of basic science research in the department of surgery and director of the Dumont-UCLA Transplantation Research Laboratories in the division of liver and pancreas transplantation.His career in experimental organ transplantation spans more than  35 years. After graduating from medical school in Warsaw and obtaining his Ph.D. in the Polish Academy of Sciences, Kupiec-Wegli...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 19, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study shows differences in brain activity between men and women who are obese
FINDINGSA new study of obese people suggests that changes in their brains ’ reward regions make them more prone to overeating, and that women and men exhibit different brain activity related to overeating.Researchers from UCLA found that women who are obese showed more prominent changes in the reward system related to dopamine responsiveness, suggesting that emotion-related and compulsive eating play a larger role in their overeating. Men who are obese showed a different pattern of brain remodeling in sensorimotor regions, a sign that their eating behavior is affected by a greater awareness of gut sensations and visc...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 18, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study suggests link between imbalanced gut microbiome and systemic sclerosis
This study is the first to examine gastrointestinal bacterial composition in two independent groups of people with systemic sclerosis. Systemic sclerosis, also known as scleroderma, is an autoimmune disease affecting the body ’s connective tissue. It is characterized by a hardening and scarring of skin and can progress to inflammation and scarring in the organs such as kidneys, heart, lungs and gastrointestinal tract. Previous UCLA-led research  detailed a link between the disease and the imbalance in the gut microbiome and suggested that this imbalance contributed to scleroderma’s symptoms.METHODThe ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 12, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

David Geffen, UCLA leaders dedicate new medical school home
Entertainment executive and philanthropist David Geffen joined UCLA leaders on May 11 to dedicate Geffen Hall, the new home of medical education at UCLA.With UCLA Chancellor Gene Block and Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences Dr. John Mazziotta, Geffen  snipped a ribbon in the building’s central courtyard as medical students, faculty and invited guests applauded.The facility — in use since January — leverages multi-media technology and promotes interdisciplinary collaboration to advance medical education. Geffen Hall’s teaching labs, lecture auditorium and exam rooms are easily adapted to differ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 12, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA student volunteers break through loneliness of patients with dementia
UCLA freshman Max Goodman looks forward every week to visiting with people who gather in a bungalow at Sunset Canyon Recreation Center, even though they ’re not in his age group and have no connection to his current studies or campus life.They are a small group of seniors who are dealing with a cruel fate — early dementia due toAlzheimer ’s, mild cognitive impairment and other forms of dementia that cast a dark shadow over a life and leave people adrift, cut off from many  opportunities for social interaction.   Goodman is one of 19 UCLA student volunteers who break through this barrier of ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study of worms reveals ‘selfish genes’ that encode a toxin – and its antidote
FINDINGSA UCLA study has found that a common strain of  Caenorhabditis elegans — a type of roundworm frequently used in laboratory research on neural development — has a pair of genes that encode both a poison and its antidote. The new research also revealed that if worms with the two genes mate with wild strains of C. elegans that don’t have b oth genes, their offspring who don’t inherit the antidote can’t protect themselves from the toxin — which is produced by mother worms — and die while they are still embryos.The pair of genes represents one of the clearest exam...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Battery-free implantable medical device draws energy directly from human body
Researchers from UCLA and the University of Connecticut have designed a new biofriendly energy storage system called a biological supercapacitor, which operates using charged particles, or ions, from fluids in the human body. The device is harmless to the body ’s biological systems, and it could lead to longer-lasting cardiac pacemakers and other implantable medical devices.The UCLA team was led by Richard Kaner, a distinguished professor of chemistry and biochemistry, and of materials science and engineering, and the Connecticut researchers were led by James Rusling, a professor of chemistry and cell biology. Apaper...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Hospital's celebration raises $2.35M for pediatric research and care
UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital's fifth annualKaleidoscope celebration raised $2.35 million to benefit children's health and UCLA's pediatric research.About 750 guests attended the event, "Light: A Celebration of Discovery and Innovation," on May 6 in Culver City.Over the past five years, the benefit events have  raised more than $10 million for UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital andUCLA Children's Discovery and Innovation Institute. The gifts have led to advancements in treatment and care for pediatric patients around the world, and provided support for high-priority clinical programs and multidisciplinar...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 10, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news