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UCLA leading $20 million effort to reduce HIV among youth
A UCLA-led team of researchers has received a $20 million grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to provide services for adolescents and young adults who have HIV or are at risk for HIV infection, and to study how well those services work.Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus, director of the Global Center for Children and Families at UCLA ’sSemel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, will lead the five-year project, working with teams at Columbia University, the Friends Research Institute, Nova Southeastern University, Tulane University, UC San Francisco  and Wake Forest University,...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 26, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA researchers find brain differences between people with genetic risk for schizophrenia, autism
A UCLA study characterizes, for the first time, brain differences between people with a specific genetic risk for schizophrenia and those at risk for autism, and the findings could help explain the biological underpinnings of these neuropsychiatric disorders.Theresearch, published May 23 in the Journal of Neuroscience, sheds light on how an excess, or absence, of genetic material on a particular chromosome affects neural development.“Notably, the opposing anatomical patterns we observed were most prominent in brain regions important for social functioning,” said Carrie Bearden, lead author of the study and a pr...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 25, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists develop test to identify best treatment for gonorrhea
FINDINGSResearchers from UCLA have developed a laboratory test that helps physicians determine which people with gonorrhea may be more treatable with an antibiotic that has not been recommended since 2007 because of concerns that the resistance to the drug was growing.BACKGROUNDGonorrhea has developed increasing resistance to all current antibiotics. Due to the spread of multi-drug resistant gonorrhea, health authorities have declared it one of the top-three urgent threats to public health.Ciprofloxacin was used to combat the sexually transmitted infection until 2007, when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sto...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 23, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Specialist in organ transplantation appointed inaugural Paul I. Terasaki Chair in Surgery
UCLADr. Jerzy Kupiec-WeglinskiDr. Jerzy Kupiec-Weglinski has been appointed the inaugural Paul I. Terasaki Chair in Surgery at UCLA. Kupiec-Weglinski is a professor of surgery, pathology and laboratory medicine. He is the  vice chairman of basic science research in the department of surgery and director of the Dumont-UCLA Transplantation Research Laboratories in the division of liver and pancreas transplantation.His career in experimental organ transplantation spans more than  35 years. After graduating from medical school in Warsaw and obtaining his Ph.D. in the Polish Academy of Sciences, Kupiec-Wegli...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 19, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study shows differences in brain activity between men and women who are obese
FINDINGSA new study of obese people suggests that changes in their brains ’ reward regions make them more prone to overeating, and that women and men exhibit different brain activity related to overeating.Researchers from UCLA found that women who are obese showed more prominent changes in the reward system related to dopamine responsiveness, suggesting that emotion-related and compulsive eating play a larger role in their overeating. Men who are obese showed a different pattern of brain remodeling in sensorimotor regions, a sign that their eating behavior is affected by a greater awareness of gut sensations and visc...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 18, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study suggests link between imbalanced gut microbiome and systemic sclerosis
This study is the first to examine gastrointestinal bacterial composition in two independent groups of people with systemic sclerosis. Systemic sclerosis, also known as scleroderma, is an autoimmune disease affecting the body ’s connective tissue. It is characterized by a hardening and scarring of skin and can progress to inflammation and scarring in the organs such as kidneys, heart, lungs and gastrointestinal tract. Previous UCLA-led research  detailed a link between the disease and the imbalance in the gut microbiome and suggested that this imbalance contributed to scleroderma’s symptoms.METHODThe ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 12, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

David Geffen, UCLA leaders dedicate new medical school home
Entertainment executive and philanthropist David Geffen joined UCLA leaders on May 11 to dedicate Geffen Hall, the new home of medical education at UCLA.With UCLA Chancellor Gene Block and Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences Dr. John Mazziotta, Geffen  snipped a ribbon in the building’s central courtyard as medical students, faculty and invited guests applauded.The facility — in use since January — leverages multi-media technology and promotes interdisciplinary collaboration to advance medical education. Geffen Hall’s teaching labs, lecture auditorium and exam rooms are easily adapted to differ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 12, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA student volunteers break through loneliness of patients with dementia
UCLA freshman Max Goodman looks forward every week to visiting with people who gather in a bungalow at Sunset Canyon Recreation Center, even though they ’re not in his age group and have no connection to his current studies or campus life.They are a small group of seniors who are dealing with a cruel fate — early dementia due toAlzheimer ’s, mild cognitive impairment and other forms of dementia that cast a dark shadow over a life and leave people adrift, cut off from many  opportunities for social interaction.   Goodman is one of 19 UCLA student volunteers who break through this barrier of ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study of worms reveals ‘selfish genes’ that encode a toxin – and its antidote
FINDINGSA UCLA study has found that a common strain of  Caenorhabditis elegans — a type of roundworm frequently used in laboratory research on neural development — has a pair of genes that encode both a poison and its antidote. The new research also revealed that if worms with the two genes mate with wild strains of C. elegans that don’t have b oth genes, their offspring who don’t inherit the antidote can’t protect themselves from the toxin — which is produced by mother worms — and die while they are still embryos.The pair of genes represents one of the clearest exam...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Battery-free implantable medical device draws energy directly from human body
Researchers from UCLA and the University of Connecticut have designed a new biofriendly energy storage system called a biological supercapacitor, which operates using charged particles, or ions, from fluids in the human body. The device is harmless to the body ’s biological systems, and it could lead to longer-lasting cardiac pacemakers and other implantable medical devices.The UCLA team was led by Richard Kaner, a distinguished professor of chemistry and biochemistry, and of materials science and engineering, and the Connecticut researchers were led by James Rusling, a professor of chemistry and cell biology. Apaper...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Hospital's celebration raises $2.35M for pediatric research and care
UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital's fifth annualKaleidoscope celebration raised $2.35 million to benefit children's health and UCLA's pediatric research.About 750 guests attended the event, "Light: A Celebration of Discovery and Innovation," on May 6 in Culver City.Over the past five years, the benefit events have  raised more than $10 million for UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital andUCLA Children's Discovery and Innovation Institute. The gifts have led to advancements in treatment and care for pediatric patients around the world, and provided support for high-priority clinical programs and multidisciplinar...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 10, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Tai chi relieves insomnia in breast cancer survivors
UCLA Health If you ’ve ever had insomnia, you know worrying about sleep makes it even harder to fall asleep. For the 30 percent of breast cancer survivors who have insomnia, sleepless nights can lead to depression, fatigue and a heightened risk of disease.Now, new UCLA research shows that tai chi, a form of slow-moving meditation, is just as effective as cognitive behavioral therapy, which has been considered the “gold standard” treatment, with both showing enduring benefits over one year.The results, published today in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, show that tai chi promotes robust improvements ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 10, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Mapping reveals reactions differ in male and female brains during cardiovascular activity
UCLAPaul MaceyA region of the brain that helps to manage body functions including stress, heart rate and blood pressure reacts differently between men and women when presented with certain stimuli, according to a new study from the UCLA School of Nursing.The findings suggest that cardiovascular diseases also may manifest differently in women and men, which ultimately could affect how they should be diagnosed and treated.The study, led by Paul Macey, associate professor of nursing, ispublished in  the journal Biology of Sex Differences. In the study, functional MRI, or fMRI, scans were done on volunteers while the...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 10, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Researchers have a better understanding of how advanced melanoma resists immunotherapy
FINDINGSA new study by scientists at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center could be a significant step toward understanding how certain cases of advanced melanoma shield themselves from pembrolizumab, the FDA-approved treatment that harnesses the immune system to attack the disease.The researchers, led by UCLA ’s Dr. Antoni Ribas, studied how melanoma cancer cells react to the interferon gamma pathway, which guides cell signaling and can affect the way cancer cells react to pembrolizumab. The team then discovered and mapped out the molecules involved in the signaling pathway. The findings lay the ground work f...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 10, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA psychology graduate student wins UC Grad Slam competition
University of CaliforniaLeslie Rith-Najarian examined how different marketing techniques influenced men and women to use her mental wellness tool. A UCLA psychology student claimed the Grad Slam championship, explaining in three crisp and engaging minutes how her research into depression and anxiety led to development of an online tool to help college students cope with stress.Leslie Rith-Najarian won the systemwide trophy — known as the Slammy — after edging out lightning-paced presentations on everything from building a tabletop particle accelerator to understanding how brain chemistry helps parents love...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 9, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Breast-feeding plays important role in ‘seeding’ infant microbiome with beneficial bacteria
Mothers protect their babies and teach them habits to stay healthy and safe as they grow. A new UCLA-led study shows that beneficial bacteria from mothers do much the same thing.The study found that 30 percent of the beneficial bacteria in a baby ’s intestinal tract come directly from mother’s milk, and an additional 10 percent comes from skin on the mother’s breast. What’s more, babies who breast-feed even after they begin eating solid food continue reaping the benefits of a breast milk diet — a growing population of beneficial ba cteria associated with better health.After birth, beneficial b...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 8, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study shows association between gut microbes and brain structure in people with irritable bowel syndrome
FINDINGSA new study by researchers at UCLA has revealed two key findings for people with irritable bowel syndrome about the relationship between the microorganisms that live in the gut and the brain.For people with IBS research shows for the first time that there is an association between the gut microbiota and the brain regions involved in the processing of sensory information from their bodies. The results suggest that signals generated by the brain can influence the composition of microbes residing in the intestine and that the chemicals in the gut can shape the human brain ’s structure.Additionally, the researche...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 5, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Mammalian photoreceptors use sunlight to rapidly regenerate visual pigments
FINDINGSMammals see when light reflected from an object strikes a visual pigment in the eye, which sends a signal to the brain and simultaneously consumes the light-sensitive pigment in retinal photoreceptor cells. In theory, this could present a problem because mammals cannot see if the light-sensitive pigments are depleted. But now UCLA researchers have learned why that never happens. They observed that in bright light mammals rapidly recycle spent pigments, ensuring that photoreceptors retain levels of light-sensitive pigments sufficient for uninterrupted sight.  BACKGROUNDWhen stimulated, the light-sensitive pigme...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 4, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

FDA-approved drug for most common form of liver cancer was tested in clinical trials led by UCLA
A drug to treat the most common form of liver cancer was approved by the FDA on April 27. UCLA ’s Dr. Richard Finn led the clinical studies that led to the approval of the medication, regorafenib, and UCLA was the leader of the U.S. arm of the research, which involved 21 other sites in the U.S., Europe and Asia.The drug is used to treat hepatocellular carcinoma, which accounts for three-quarters of the cases of liver cancer in the U.S. and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In trials, regorafenib significantly improved survival rates after standard treatments failed.“When liver canc...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 4, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Genetic finding may allow doctors to predict newborn health during pregnancy
FINDINGSUCLA scientists have discovered specific genetic changes in the placentas of women who gave birth to growth-restricted infants. These changes appear to sabotage the ability of the placenta to grow blood vessels and adequately nourish the fetus, interfering with the infant ’s growth in the womb.BACKGROUNDUp to 10 percent of pregnancies worldwide are affected by intrauterine growth restriction, which means a baby weighed less than 90 percent of babies at the same gestational age. The condition increases the risk of a wide range of serious health problems, but the cause remains poorly understood.METHODThe team c...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 2, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Dean of David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA discusses her top priorities
Dr. Kelsey Martin, the new dean of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, didn ’t set out to become a physician. Driven by her interest in human behavior, she studied English and American language and literature as an undergraduate at Harvard. It wasn’t until she wasa Peace Corps volunteer in Central Africathat her passion for medicine was ignited. There, she organized an outreach program and wrote grants to fund measles vaccinations, which led to a dramatic reduction in the number of those sickened in the village where she worked. It was a profound turning point, one that led her to medical school, in a ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 2, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Dean of UCLA's Geffen School of Medicine discusses her top priorities
Dr. Kelsey Martin, the new dean of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, didn ’t set out to become a physician. Driven by her interest in human behavior, she studied English and American language and literature as an undergraduate at Harvard. It wasn’t until she wasa Peace Corps volunteer in Central Africathat her passion for medicine was ignited. There, she organized an outreach program and wrote grants to fund measles vaccinations, which led to a dramatic reduction in the number of those sickened in the village where she worked. It was a profound turning point, one that led her to medical school, in a ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 2, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Jules Stein Building reopens after $65M renovation to expand vision-science campus
TheUCLA Stein Eye Institute marked its 50th anniversary and the reopening of the Jules Stein Building, recently renovated to create a  state-of-the-art facility to advance UCLA’s work in the field of ophthalmology.“Today, the institute really is a vision-science campus,” Chancellor Gene Block said at the April 20 anniversary ceremony celebrating the grand reopening of the Jules Stein Building. “It’s an interconnected community with the new Jules Stein Building, the Doris Stein Building, and the Edie& Lew Wasserman Building. ”The expanded facilities enable UCLA to broaden re...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 2, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Quality of care for peripheral artery disease is low
This study is a “call to action” to identify and implement effective physician-targeted and patient-targeted strategies aimed at improving quality of care. These strategies should take advantage of recent advances in behavior change, including leveraging an individual’s social support network to help them mak e lifestyle changes, and providing physicians with feedback about the quality of care they provide to patients with peripheral artery disease.AUTHORSJoseph Ladapo of UCLA and Jeffrey Berger of New York University.JOURNALThe studyis published online by the Journal of the American College of Cardi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 1, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Combination therapy could provide new treatment option for ovarian cancer
Researchers have been trying to understand why up to 85 percent of women experience recurrence of high-grade serous ovarian cancer — the most common subtype of ovarian cancer — after standard treatment with the chemotherapy drug carboplatin.Preclinical research from Dr. Sanaz Memarzadeh, who is a member of the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA, has potentially solved this mystery and pinpointed a combination therapy that may be effective for up to 50 percent of women with ovarian cancer.Memarzadeh ’s research, published in the journal Preci...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 1, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome often experience delays in returning to work
FINDINGSForty-four percent of people who held jobs before contracting a condition called acute respiratory distress syndrome were jobless one year after they were discharged from the hospital, costing them an average of about $27,000 in earnings. After one year, fewer of them had private health insurance (30 percent, down from 44 percent) and more of them were enrolled in Medicare and Medicaid (49 percent versus 33 percent). There was little change in the number of jobless survivors who were uninsured.The study found that the people who experienced the longest delays in returning to work tended to be older and non-white, a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 28, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Federal budget would win, but the most vulnerable and poor would lose, under capped Medicaid funding scenarios
The Trump administration ’s intent to reform Medicaid includes financing changes that would save hundreds of billions in federal dollars over time, but at the expense of cutting significant health care benefits to tens of millions of the program’s most vulnerable recipients — the disabled, children and elderly America ns, according to a new report from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.None of three “capped” financing systems — block grants, capped allotments and per capita caps — discussed in previous health proposals guarantees benefits for those who quali...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 26, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Electrical engineer puts sweat tech to the test
UCLASam Emaminejad has been working on a wearable sensor that can extract sweat by applying an electrical current to the skin and then analyzing its molecular components, such as chloride ions and glucose, to detect certain diseases.Sam Emaminejad, assistant professor of electrical engineering at UCLA, has demonstrated that a wearable biosensor can be used in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis, diabetes and other diseases by measuring molecules present in an individual's sweat.Hedeveloped the biosensor with colleagueswhile he was a joint postdoctoral researcher at Stanford Medicine and UC Berkeley. Currently, he is completin...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 24, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

As Affordable Care Act increased health insurance coverage, volunteering rose
One of the indirect societal benefits of the Affordable Care Act has been increased levels of volunteerism, especially among lower-income populations, a study from UCLA ’sCalifornia Center for Population Research suggests.Researchers found that instances of self-reported volunteerism increased markedly among people in low-income groups who lived in states that enacted the Affordable Care Act ’s Medicaid expansion.Thestudy, published in  Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World, focused on low-income individuals younger than 65. This is the group most affected by the Medicaid expansion, which provi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 21, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Opioid addiction raises mortality rate for those getting care in medical offices, hospitals
People who are addicted to opioids and receiving their medical care in a general health care setting were more than 10 times as likely to die during a four-year period than people without substance abuse problems, UCLA researchers have found. The new study, published in the  Journal of Addiction Medicine, suggests that health care systems should have better infrastructure and training for primary care physicians to diagnose and treat opioid use disorder, a condition that includes addiction to both prescription and illicit opioids.UCLAYih-Ing HserThe study, led by Yih-Ing Hser, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sc...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 21, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

What exactly does ‘healthy’ mean when it comes to food?
Anyone who's ever walked into a grocery store has seen the various health claims on food items calling certain products "healthy." But what exactly does “healthy” mean — and can you rely on it?The Food and Drug Administration is trying to find out. The federal agencyrecently began a public process to redefine how the word "healthy" can be used on food products. It's an issue that would change how companies can label foods and how consumers perceive them.  To help unravel the meaning of the term "healthy," UCLA Health writer Ryan Hatoum spoke with Dana Hunnes, senior diet...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 21, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study overturns seminal research about the developing nervous system
FINDINGSNew research by scientists at theEli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA overturns a long-standing paradigm about how axons — thread-like projections that connect cells in the nervous system — grow during embryonic development. The findings of the study, led by Samantha Butler, associate professor of neurobiology, could help scientists replicate or control the way axons grow, which may be applicable for diseases that affect the nervous system, such as diabetes, as well as injuries that sever nerves.BACKGROUNDAs an embryo grows, neurons — the cells i...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 20, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Breast cancer survivors who receive tailored health plans are more likely to get recommended care
Doctors who care for low-income women who have survived breast cancer are more likely to implement recommended follow-up care if the patients receive counseling and a care plan that is tailored for them, according to a UCLA-led study.“The results are very exciting as they clearly demonstrate that the combination of a survivorship care plan with counseling can empower low-income women as they transition from breast cancer patient to breast cancer survivor,” said Dr. Patricia Ganz, director of Prevention and Control Research a t the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and a co-author of the study.The customi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 20, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Students may forget relevant information in order to protect their own psyches
“What’s too painful to remember/ We simply choose to forget.” – Barbra Streisand, “The Way We Were”UCLA-led research has found that students in a college mathematics course experienced a phenomenon similar to repression, the psychological process in which people forget emotional or traumatic events to protect themselves.In a studypublished online by the Journal of Educational Psychology, the researchers found that the students who forgot the most content from the class were those who reported a high level of stress during the course. But, paradoxically, the study also found that the...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 19, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Large-scale screenings for diabetic retinopathy boost exam rates, reduce wait times
FINDINGSUCLA researchers found that offering an eye exam for people with diabetes in a primary care setting in addition to eye clinics — where the exam is usually performed — dramatically reduced the length of time people had to wait for the exam and increased the number of people who underwent screenings.The exam, teleretinal diabetic retinopathy screening, identifies people at risk for a disorder called diabetic retinopathy, which affects more than 5.3 million people in the U.S. and can cause blindness if untreated. Among those who were screened, wait times for the exam decreased to 17 days from 158 before th...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 18, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Periodic check-ups key to baby boomer health and longevity
For somebaby boomers, getting ready for a routine visit with their doctor is like training for a marathon.  Some patients want to be in the best shape possible before stepping on that scale and getting those lab results. Others are so anxious about their vital stats being below par that they consider postponing or even canceling their examinations, doctors report.According to theU.S. Census Bureau, the term “baby boomers” refers to the 71 million people born between 1946 and 1964. The first boomers began hitting age 65 at the rate of 10,000 per day in 2011.Now finding themselves in the age range ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 15, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Patient makes dramatic recovery from amputation to transplanted hand
In October 2016, Jonathan Koch, a 51-year-old entertainment executive from Los Angeles, underwent a 17-hour procedure to replace the hand he lost to a mysterious, life-threatening illness. Six  months after surgery by the UCLA hand transplant team and countless hours of physical therapy, Koch continues to make remarkable strides in his recovery.Already, he has used his new hand to hold a jump rope, dribble a basketball, unscrew a bottle top  and swing a tennis racquet.His remarkable story about the illness that nearly took his life and the rare transplant procedure that helped him recover is chronicled by wr...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA researchers seek juvenile justice alternatives for children under 12
AlthoughLaura Abrams andDr. Elizabeth Barnert come from opposite ends of the UCLA campus, their work in their respective academic professions meets at the intersection of health and juvenile justice.A recent University of Californiastudy led by Abrams, professor of social welfare in the  UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, and Barnert, an assistant professor of pediatrics in the  David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, offers a powerful rationale for shielding children 11 years old and younger from prosecution and incarceration in the state ’s juvenile justice system.“Children in the juvenile justi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

For adults with autism, learning social skills – and finding love
A new book by a UCLA professor addresses a situation most of us have endured at some point in our lives — social awkwardness. Perhaps it was first-date angst, or a party where everybody seems to know everybody else, except you. Or a work conference you’ve come to late where everybody is already chatting away.For most of us it ’s a brief, uncomfortable moment that passes. For adults with autism, it’s an enduring part of their lives. That’s the group Elizabeth Laugeson, a UCLA assistant clinical professor of psychiatry, aims to help. Laugeson is the co-founder and developer of the UCLA PEERS Cli...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Conscious sedation is a safe alternative to general anesthesia for heart valve procedure
FINDINGSUCLA scientists have found that conscious sedation — a type of anesthesia in which patients remain awake but are sleepy and pain-free — is a safe and viable option to general anesthesia for people undergoing a minimally invasive heart procedure called transcatheter aortic valve replacement.In the study, patients who underwent conscious sedation had a similar rate of adverse events to those who underwent anesthesia, but those who were given conscious sedation had shorter stays in the intensive care unit (30 versus 96 hours for those with general anesthesia) and shorter hospital stays (4.9 days versus 10....
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Patients at hospital-based primary clinics are more likely to get unnecessary tests and services
People with back pain, headaches and upper respiratory infections are more likely to receive tests and services of little diagnostic or therapeutic value — so-called low-value care — when they visit primary care clinics at hospitals rather than at community-based primary care clinics.A national study led by researchers at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and Harvard Medical School found that the key factor driving the disparity appears to be the location of the clinic, rather than whether the clinic is owned by a hospital or a physician. In fact, aside from referring patients to specialists slightly m...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 10, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Younger generations forced to take on caregiving role turn to UCLA ‘boot camp’ for guidance
More than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer ’s disease, and according to theAlzheimer ’s Association, that number is expected to nearly triple in the next three decades as the baby boomer generation ages. As the need for caregivers grows, younger family members are finding themselves in a role which they often are ill-prepared to handle. In fact, about one-quarter of caregivers are now under the age of 34, according to AARP and theNational Alliance for Caregiving's 2015 caregiving report.“Caregiving has become more diverse and will continue to be. In terms of gender, we have more male caregive...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 10, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

In memoriam: Dr. Arnold Scheibel helped shape UCLA's neuroscience community
Arnold “Arne” Scheibel, a renowned neuroanatomist whose passion for teaching and for understanding the workings of the human brain inspired generations of students and helped shape the neuroscience community at UCLA, died Monday, April 3, in Oakland, California. He was 94.Scheibel, an emeritus distinguished professor of neurobiology and psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences, taught medical students, graduate students and undergraduates about the structure of the brain as a member of UCLA's Department of Neurobiology. “He was passionate about the nervous system, and he spent his life uncovering its mysteri...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 7, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Confusing food labels are about to get a lot simpler
Pop quiz: What ’s the difference between “best by,” “sell by” or “expires on”?If you ’re not sure, you aren’t alone. Americans toss out $165 billion worth of food each year, often out of safety concerns fueled by confusion about the meaning of the more than 10 different date labels used on packages.Grocery manufacturers and retailers are finally taking pity. Recently, the Food Marketing Institute and Grocery Manufacturers Associationannounced they would voluntarily streamline date labels and begin using two standard phrases: “best if used by” for quality and...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 7, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

April 20: Inaugural UCLA cannibis research symposium
UCLA is hosting its first-ever cannabis research symposium April 20, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Neuroscience Research Building Auditorium.With the recent passage of Proposition 64, the Adult Use of Marijuana Act, California became the largest U.S. market for legal marijuana. Moreover, 20% of the U.S population now has access to legal recreational cannabis, 60% has access to legal medical cannabis, and over 90% has access to some form of legal cannabis product. Despite this unprecedented access to legal cannabis, research about the risks and therapeutic potential of marijuana is lacking.The symposium, sponsored by the UC...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 5, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA researchers discover a new cause of high plasma triglycerides
People with hypertriglyceridemia often are told to change their diet and lose weight. But a high-fat diet isn ’t necessarily the cause for everyone with the condition.UCLA researchers have discovered a subset of people with hypertriglyceridemia whose bodies produce autoantibodies — immune-response molecules that attack their own proteins — causing high levels of triglycerides in the blood.Hypertriglyceridemia, which can increase risk of both cardiovascular disease and pancreatitis, is often caused by or exacerbated by uncontrolled diabetes or obesity. High plasma triglyceride levels can also be caused by ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 5, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Daughter, father celebrate 50-year milestone of kidney transplant at UCLA
Denice Lombard and her father, Ted, made history in 1967 by becoming one of the first father-daughter duos to survive kidney transplant surgery in the United States.Today, 50 years later, they both are thriving and are marking the anniversary of Denice ’s transplant surgery at UCLA to urge more people to consider becoming organ donors.“I am so very thankful to my dad for giving me the gift of life, not once, but twice,” said Denice, 62, who lives near Washington, D.C. “If you want living proof that kidney donors and their recipients can lead full, happy, healthy lives, just look at us.”For the...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 4, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Artificial thymus developed at UCLA can produce cancer-fighting T cells from blood stem cells
UCLA researchers have created a new system to produce human T cells, the white blood cells that fight against disease-causing intruders in the body. The system could be utilized to engineer T cells to find and attack cancer cells, which means it could be an important step toward generating a readily available supply of T cells for treating many different types of cancer.The preclinical study, published in the journal Nature Methods, was led by senior authors Dr. Gay Crooks, a professor of pathology and laboratory medicine and of pediatrics and co-director of theEli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 3, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Dentistry researcher receives a $2.5M grant to validate liquid biopsy test for lung cancer
In an effort to move the needle forward to improve cancer detection techniques, the National Cancer Institute awarded $2.5 million over a period of five years to principal investigator,Dr. David Wong,  a professor of oral biology and associate dean for research at the UCLA School of Dentistry. The grant will support a clinical trial to validate the research team’s liquid biopsy test, a rapidly emerging technology, with the goal to have it become a certified service at UCLA and beyond.For this project, the dental school is partnering with the UCLA Department of Pathology and Lab Medicine, led by Dr. Scott Binder,...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 30, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Despite ongoing meningitis outbreak, vaccinations low among gay men, study shows
Despite a yearlong outbreak of invasive meningococcal disease in Southern California primarily affecting gay and bisexual men, less than 27 percent of men who have sex with men in Los Angeles County have been vaccinated for meningitis.The findings released today by the California HIV/AIDS Policy Research Center in collaboration with the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, the Los Angeles LGBT Center and AIDS Project Los Angeles Health call for more education about the disease and more places offering immunization throughout Southern California at venues where gay and bisexual men socialize.More than 500 men were intervie...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 30, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news