Medical students open the envelopes to their futures on Match Day
You could cut the tension with a scalpel inside UCLA ’s Geffen Hall and across town atCharles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science.It was Match Day 2019 and 150  David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA fourth-year students, along with 25 of their counterparts at Drew University, who were watching via simulcast, were about to learn which hospital has accepted them for residency, or advanced training in their chosen specialty.At precisely 9 a.m., the doctors-to-be poured outside and, surrounded by friends and families, nervously ripped open their acceptance envelopes. Screams and peals of laughter split the ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 16, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Using laughter as their guide, five-month-olds can distinguish friends from strangers
Even before we can speak, humans can glean useful information from the sound of laughter.A study by UCLA and New York University researchers found that infants as young as five months can differentiate laughter between friends and laughter between strangers. The results suggest that the ability to identify the nature of social relationships is instilled early in human infancy, possibly as part of what the scientists call an “affiliation detection system” that uses vocal cues.“If young infants are able to pick up social information from such brief clips of vocal behavior, it suggests a biologically evolved...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 14, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Kinkajous, porcupines and sloths, oh my!
The San Diego Zoo transported a menagerie of exotic animals — including a kinkajou, tamandua, porcupine and giant sloth — to entertain young patients and their families atUCLA Mattel Children ’s Hospital. The March 7 event kicked off the launch ofSan Diego Zoo Kids— a new closed-circuit TV channel that will allow sick children to watch wildlife without leaving their hospital rooms.“If our kids can’t go to the zoo, then the zoo can come to them,” said Karen Grimley, chief nursing executive for UCLA Health. “This initiative dovetails beautifully with our mission to provide...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 12, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Brain region plays key role in regulation of parenting behavior, study finds
This study establishes a previously unknown, essential role of the amygdala in regulating parenting behavior. These new findings in mice contribute to scientists ’ understanding of parenting and other social behaviors in humans.Dean IshidaWeizhe HongAUTHORSThe study ’s senior author is Weizhe Hong, an assistant professor of biological chemistry and of neurobiology in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. The first author is Patrick Chen, a postdoctoral fellow in the Hong lab. The other authors are Rongfeng Hu, Ye Emily Wu, Lin Pan, Shan Huang and Pau l Micevych, all of UCLA.JOURNALThe study&nbs...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 7, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study finds a lack of adequate hydration among the elderly
In this study, African-American participants had a salivary osmolality significantly lower than Caucasian participants, which would indicate less severe hydration problems, not more. Further research on hydration among African-Americans will be necessary to better understand these results.Other study colleagues include Michelle Devost, with the Los Angeles LGBT Center, and Karabi Nandy, with the University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth, both formerly at UCLA. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 6, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA-led study could point to ways to better control inflammation in autoimmune diseases
In autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis or lupus, the immune system goes into overdrive in response to people ’s own DNA being released from damaged cells — a reaction that can cause severe inflammation in the body.Until now, the molecular processes behind that immune response have not been fully understood by scientists, but a new UCLA-led study could help change that.Researchers at UCLA and three other institutions discovered that LL37 molecules, which are found in the immune system, play an important but unexpected role in revving up the body ’s self-defense response. The finding may bring scientists ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 5, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA ’s Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital earns prestigious Magnet designation for nursing excellence
The  Stewart and Lynda Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital at UCLA has attained Magnet recognition, the nation ’s highest honor for excellence in nursing.The hospital is one of the first psychiatric facilities to receive the prestigious designation, which is awarded by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. Only about 7 percent of all U.S. hospitals have achieved Magnet recognition.The Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital, a 74-bed acute psychiatric hospital, is a key part of UCLA Health and the major psychiatry teaching facility of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and  Ronald Reagan UCLA...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 28, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

An easy life hack to make weekends more refreshing
This article appeared in longer form in UCLA Anderson Review. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 28, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Researchers identify potential mechanism to control nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
FINDINGSIn a comprehensive, nine-year-long study in mice, researchers profiled more than 300 liver and plasma lipid species and more than 5,000 liver proteins. The combined data helped researchers to identify new mechanisms that control the metabolism of lipids (molecules that include fat) and to discover a protein that regulates lipids. They found that silencing one particular protein, called PSMD9, is a potential therapeutic strategy to reduce nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.BACKGROUNDNonalcoholic fatty liver disease is the buildup of excess fat in liver cells not caused by alcohol. The disease affects about 25 percent ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 28, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

When watching others in pain, women ’s brains show more empathy
It ’s a phrase many of us have uttered at one time or other: “I feel your pain.”However, the degree to which you actually feel another person ’s pain may depend on your sex. That was a key finding of a recent study by Leonardo Christov-Moore, a UCLA postdoctoral fellow in psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences, and Dr. Marco Iacoboni, director of the Neuromodulation Lab at theUCLA Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center, who studied the brain activity of people as they reacted to images of pain in others.Christov-Moore and Iacoboni, whoseresearch was published in the journal Brain Structure and Functi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 27, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Surgery for uncomplicated appendicitis in adults is effective and safe
This study demonstrates that surgery for uncomplicated appendicitis is very safe. As people contemplate their choices for managing appendicitis — antibiotics or surgery — these data can help ensure they make a fully informed choice. AUTHORSDr. Christopher Childers, Dr. Jill Dworsky, Dr. Melinda Maggard-Gibbons and Dr. Marcia Russell of UCLA. Russell is also with the Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System.JOURNALThe peer-reviewed journal Surgerypublished the study.FUNDINGThe Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality funded Childers. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 26, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Structure of fat-processing enzyme determined
FINDINGSAfter decades of work with no success, researchers have determined the high-resolution, three-dimensional structure for lipoprotein lipase, the enzyme that processes fats, or triglycerides, in the bloodstream and releases nutrients for vital tissues such as skeletal muscle and the heart. Triglycerides are the main source of fuel for most cells in the body.BACKGROUNDLipoprotein lipase is responsible for breaking down the triglycerides in lipoproteins, or fat-rich particles, in the bloodstream. In addition to releasing nutrients, or fatty acids, for important tissues, lipoprotein lipase plays a key role in generating...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 25, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Lab-grown mini tumors could help identify personalized treatments for people with rare cancers
UCLA scientists have developed a new method to quickly screen hundreds of drugs in order to identify treatments that can target specific tumors.The approach could help scientists understand how a person ’s tumor would respond to a certain drug or drug combination, and it could help guide treatment decisions for people with rare and hard-to-treat cancers. Apaper detailing the new technique was published in Communications Biology.“We always focus on how we need new and better drugs to treat cancer,” said Alice Soragni, the senior author of the study and a scientist at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Can...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 25, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

A missing gene makes a big difference in patients ’ recovery from mild stroke
More than 6 million Americans live with disabilities following a stroke. Even mild strokes can leave survivors with arm and leg weakness, poor muscle control and memory lapses that worsen with age. Now UCLA neuroscientists have found that patients born without a gene called CCR5 recover better from mild stroke than patients with the gene. The team partnered with Israeli researchers to study the missing gene ’s effect on brain function.Published Feb. 21 in the journal Cell,  the findings could lead to the first pill to reverse the physical and mental aftermath of mild stroke.“This is the first time tha...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 21, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists discover new type of immune cells that are essential for forming heart valves
UCLA researchers have identified for the first time the origin of an immune cell that plays a critical role in the formation of healthy heart valves. The findings could pave the way for new treatments for heart valve disorders, which can be caused by congenital defects, aging or disease.Their study, led by Dr. Atsushi “Austin” Nakano, a UCLA associate professor of molecular, cell and developmental biology and member of theEli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA, was published in the journal Developmental Cell.Building on previous research by Nakano, which showed that ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 21, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA ’s Johnese Spisso named one of top women leaders by Modern Healthcare magazine
Johnese Spisso, president of UCLA Health and CEO of UCLA Hospital System, was honored by Modern Healthcare as one of 2019 ’s Top 25 Women Leaders. The program recognizes leading female health care executives who are influencing policy and care delivery models across the country.“This is a remarkable honor, one I am pleased to share with so many inspiring women,” said Spisso, who is also associate vice chancellor of UCLA Health Sciences. “Closing the leadership gap, whether in health care or any area, is gaining momentum for women across our nation.”A nationally recognized academic health care ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 20, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA faculty voice: Adolescents have a fundamental need to contribute
Andrew Fuligni is a professor of psychiatry and psychology at UCLA. Thisarticle appeared in The Conversation.No longer children but not yet adults, adolescents need opportunities to learn and prepare for their entrance into the broader society. But, as schooling increasingly extends the adolescent period and teenagers get dismissed as supposedly selfish and irresponsible, has society forgotten an important developmental need of our youth?As a developmental scientist who focuses on adolescence, I reviewed dozens of studies and found that this age group has a fundamental need to contribute to others – to provide suppor...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 19, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Low-income undocumented adults are largely locked out of health care in California, study finds
Implementation of the Affordable Care Act cut in half the percentage of low-income, uninsured  Californians under age 65, from 23 percent in 2013 to 11 percent in 2016-17. But federal law bars undocumented residents from federally funded Medicaid health services and from purchasing health insurance on the ACA Marketplaces. This leaves them the largest group of uninsured people in Californi a, according to anew study by UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.The study reports that of the 2.2 million undocumented people living in the state, three in five are low income and of those, nine in 10 are uninsured. In com...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 19, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Sexually transmitted infections are on the rise. Here ’s what you need to know to protect yourself
UCLA Health Rates of sexually transmitted diseases have risen for the past four years to record highs in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ’slatest analysis. In California, the state health departmentfound that the number of people diagnosed with syphilis, gonorrhea or chlamydia in 2017 was 45 percent higher than five years prior.These sorts of statistics may spark a fear that there ’s little we can do to protect ourselves — but that’s not the full story.Dr. Leena Nathan, an obstetrician/gynecologist at UCLA Health-Westlake Village, consults with peo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 14, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Electrical activity early in fruit flies ’ brain development could shed light on how neurons wire the brain
FINDINGSNeurons somehow know which of their neighbors to connect with and which to avoid in the crowded environment of the central nervous system. But how?Using fruit flies, neuroscientists from theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA observed that neurons displayed periodic bursts of electrical activity early in brain development, when the larva is still developing. The coordinated activity appears to be internally driven — not triggered by something outside of the brain. The findings suggest that the signals could help neurons find each other to form networks and wire the developing brain.METHODThe scientists im...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 12, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Music therapy program at UCLA aims to help premature infants develop feeding skills
It ’s a Friday morning in January when Jana Gallus, 32, and Gregor Martynus, 35, peek their heads over their triplets’ set of bassinets in their Westwood apartment. Six-month-olds Ada, Kian and Nico are just waking up, kicking with excitement and beaming from ear to ear.It ’s a daily moment that Gallus and Martynus say doesn’t get old. The triplets have come a long way since July, when they were born early, at 31 weeks, with weights ranging from 2.5 to 4 pounds. For 52 days, the trio were cared for in the neonatal intensive care unit, or NICU, atUCLA Mattel Children ’s Hospital.As the UCLA tea...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 11, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

For recurrent glioblastoma, immunotherapy before surgery appears to help more than afterward
A UCLA-led study suggests that for people with recurrent glioblastoma, administering an immunotherapy drug before surgery is more effective than using the drug afterward.In recent years, immunotherapy drugs, which harness the body ’s immune system to destroy cancer cells, have been shown to be helpful in treating people with advanced or metastatic cancer. But the drugs have yet to show any benefit in helping people with glioblastoma, an aggressive and deadly form of brain cancer. On average, most people with recurrent gliob lastoma live for just six to nine months.The study, published today in Nature Medicine, was co...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 11, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Shorter course of radiation therapy effective in treating men with prostate cancer
A new UCLA-led study shows that men with low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer can safely undergo higher doses of radiation over a significantly shorter period of time and still have the same, successful outcomes as from a much longer course of treatment.This type of radiation, known as stereotactic body radiotherapy, is a form of external beam radiation therapy and reduces the duration of treatment from 45 days to four to five days. The approach has been in use since 2000, but has not yet been widely adopted because of concerns over how safe and effective this approach would be in the long term.“Most men with lo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 8, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Professor wonders what adults lose when they stop engaging in competitive play
UCLA Broadcast StudioJanet O ’Shea says there are lessons in competitive play that can be useful in other arenas. More than just an opportunity to break a sweat and maybe have some fun, competitive physical activity like sparring allows people to explore disagreement with respect, according to Janet  O’Shea, professor of dance at UCLA, who recentlywrote a book about the value of play. “If I’m trying trying to punch you and you’re trying to kick me in the head, we disagree on a pretty basic level. But we agree as to the terms of our interaction. At the end, we shake hands and most of ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 7, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How are immigrants changing our definition of health?
Are there cultural practices that immigrants bring that can improve our health systems and the health of all Californians? Yes, say experts, including medical anthropologist Marjorie Kagawa-Singer, a research professor and professor emerita in the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, and David Hayes-Bautista, director of the Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture in the David Geffen  School of Medicine at UCLA, if more is done to understand and deploy the advantages of cultural diversity.Kagawa-Singer and Hayes-Bautista joined journalist Claudia Kolker, author of “The Immigrant Advantage,” in ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 6, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA ’s Dennis Slamon awarded Sjöberg Prize for pioneering cancer research
Dr. Dennis Slamon, director of the Revlon/UCLA Women ’s Cancer Research Program, has been named a co-winner of the 2019 Sjöberg Prize by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and Sweden’s Sjöberg Foundation. Honored for his groundbreaking research that led to the development of successful targeted cancer therapies, Slamon shares the award with D r. Brian Druker of Oregon Health& Science University.The Sj öberg Prize has been awarded annually since 2016 to recognize outstanding cancer research. The honor carries a prize of $1 million — $100,000 as award money and $900,000 to fund future ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 5, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA receives $15.2 million bequest from estate of entertainer Garry Shandling
A bequest of $15.2 million from the estate of entertainer Garry Shandling will advance research in several fields at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.Shandling, the comedian, actor, director, writer  and producer who died in March 2016, earmarked the funds to benefit three units — the division of endocrinology, diabetes and hypertension; the division of infectious diseases; and the UCLA Agi Hirshberg Center for Pancreatic Diseases — as well as general medical research at the David Geffen S chool of Medicine, establishing a meaningful philanthropic legacy.His gift will establish and endow the Garr...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 5, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA-led team uncovers critical new clues about what goes awry in brains of people with autism
This study gives a new critical clue in understanding what has gone awry in the brains of autism patients.”More than 24 million people worldwide are estimated to have autism. In developed countries, about 1.5 percent of children have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder as of 2017. The disorder affects communication and behavior, and is marked by problems in social communication and social interaction, and repetitive behaviors.“We need to understand how a panoply of genetic and environmental factors converges to cause autism,” Geschwind said. “RNA editing is an important piece of the autism ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 30, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

“I was shocked and grateful,” UCLA nurse on winning national nurse of the year award
UCLA Health nurses have earned many notable achievements through the years.Now, another major accomplishment can be added to the list.   Melissa Reider-Demer, a nurse practitioner, was recently named nationalNurse of the Year by Press Ganey, a Boston-based health care organization that promotes clinical safety, patient experience and workforce engagement.In past years, UCLA nurses have been recognized for other awards, includingMagnet Status and the National Patient Safety Foundation and the DAISY FoundationTeam Award for Extraordinary Nurses.The Press Ganey award honors a nurse who demonstrates commitment to care inn...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 29, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

‘I was shocked and grateful,’ UCLA nurse on winning national nurse of the year award
UCLA Health nurses have earned many notable achievements through the years.Now, another major accomplishment can be added to the list. Melissa Reider-Demer, a nurse practitioner, was recently named nationalNurse of the Year by Press Ganey, a Boston-based health care organization that promotes clinical safety, patient experience and workforce engagement.In past years, UCLA nurses have been recognized for other awards, includingMagnet Status and the National Patient Safety Foundation and the DAISY FoundationTeam Award for Extraordinary Nurses.The Press Ganey award honors a nurse who demonstrates commitment to care innovation...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 29, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Fractures, head injuries common in e-scooter collisions, according to UCLA research
UCLA researchers have found that people involved in electric scooter accidents are sometimes injured badly enough — from fractures, dislocated joints and head injuries — to require treatment in an emergency department.The researchers examined data from 249 people who were treated at the emergency departments of UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica, and Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center between Sept. 1, 2017, and Aug. 31, 2018. The study found that about one-third of them arrived by ambulance, an indication of the severity of their injuries.West Los Angeles is the epicenter of the electric scooter phenomenon &mdash...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 26, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Increasing murder rate is erasing gains in life expectancy among Mexican men, UCLA research reports
This study confirms that homicide is so widespread that even when considering all causes of death, it stands out as a factor in slowing growth in men’s life expectancy.”Using cause-of-death data from the Mexican Institute of Statistics, the researchers found that life expectancy for men at age 15 increased by more than a year from 57.08 years in 1995 to 58.25 years in 2005. But from 2005 to 2015, they found, life expectancy only increased by about a half a year, from 58.25 years to 58.80 years.According to the study, the slower growth in life expectancy for the more recent decade was mainly due to an increase i...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 25, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Homicidios est án borrando las ganancias en la esperanza de vida entre los hombres mexicanos, según estudio de UCLA
La tasa de homicidios en M éxico aumentó tan drásticamente entre 2005 y 2015 que compensó parcialmente los aumentos esperados en la esperanza de vida entre los hombres,seg ún un nuevo estudio realizado por un investigador de salud p ública de la UCLA.“Es común ver informes de noticias sobre el costo que están cobrando los asesinatos relacionados con las drogas y las pandillas en México,” dijo Hiram Beltrán-Sánchez, coautor del estudio y profesor asociado de ciencias de la salud comunitaria en laUCLA Fielding School of Public Health. &l...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 24, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

When delayed gratification backfires
Much of life can seem like an endless cage match in which you ’re pitted against the forces of delayed gratification. Sticking to a diet or a gym regimen is hard when the payoff may not be seen or felt for months (or for decades, in a healthier later-life you), while tonight there’s tiramisu on the dessert menu and a Netflix binge awaiting if you park you rself on the couch.The difficulty of fighting the urge to consume in the here and now rather than wait is a well-trod area of research in academia.UCLA AndersonSuzanne ShuIn work that began with her Ph.D. thesis nearly 15 years ago, UCLA Anderson ’s...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 24, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Discovery of enhanced bone growth could lead to new treatments for osteoporosis
UCLA and UC San Francisco life scientists have discovered a dramatic pattern of bone growth in female mice — research that could potentially lead to stronger bone density in women and new treatments for osteoporosis in older women.The researchers found that blocking a particular set of signals from a small number of neurons in the brain causes female, but not male, mice to build super-strong bones and maintain them into old age. These neurons may play an important role in controlling women ’s bone density, the researchers said. Thestudy was published Jan. 11 in the journal  Nature Communications.“We ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 18, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA scientists create a renewable source of cancer-fighting T cells
A study by UCLA researchers is the first to demonstrate a technique for coaxing pluripotent stem cells — which can give rise to every cell type in the body and which can be grown indefinitely in the lab — into becoming mature T cells capable of killing tumor cells.The technique uses structures called artificial thymic organoids, which work by mimicking the environment of the thymus, the organ in which T cells develop from blood stem cells.T cells are cells of the immune system that fight infections, but also have the potential to eliminate cancer cells. The ability to create them from self-renewing pluripotent ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 17, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Young dad thanks blood donors who saved his life
As Tyler Bacon gripped the lectern in Carnesale Commons and scanned the crowd gazing at him expectantly, he struggled to hold back tears.The 39-year-old father of two from Thousand Oaks was finally meeting some of the more than two dozen people whose blood and platelet donations sustained his life during cancer treatment at  Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center.  “Because you showed up and donated, my parents still have a son,” Bacon said. “My children have a dad. My wife has a husband.”His voice quaking with emotion, he added, “All the gratitude in the world would not be enough to say ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 17, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Father of two thanks blood donors who saved his life
As Tyler Bacon gripped the lectern in Carnesale Commons and scanned the crowd gazing at him expectantly, he struggled to hold back tears.The 39-year-old father of two from Thousand Oaks was finally meeting some of the more than two dozen people whose blood and platelet donations sustained his life during cancer treatment at  Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center.  “Because you showed up and donated, my parents still have a son,” Bacon said. “My children have a dad. My wife has a husband.”His voice quaking with emotion, he added, “All the gratitude in the world would not be enough to say ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 16, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

California must build workforce to serve older adults ’ behavioral health needs, UCLA report says
By 2030, there will be 9 million adults over age 65 in California — up from 6 million now — according to an estimate by the state’s department of finance. Buta new study by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research finds that California ’s public mental health workforce is poorly prepared to address their mental health needs and provide treatment for substance abuse.The report ’s publication coincides with a meeting this week in San Diego of the California Behavioral Planning Council, which will discuss the workforce problem and a five-year workforce education and training plan. But...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 16, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA researcher uses big data to help optimize cancer treatment
UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center Treating cancer is incredibly complex and there is no one-size-fits-all solution. But, there is something that can help physicians create treatments customized for individuals: big data.There ’s an abundance of information being gathered in the health care sector including genome sequencing, tissue imaging, electronic health records and personal health trackers.As director of cancer data science for the  UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Paul Boutros and the other researchers in his laboratory are using big data to help optimize treatment for people, fur...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 16, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA researchers correct genetic mutation that causes IPEX, a life-threatening autoimmune syndrome
UCLA researchers led by Dr. Donald Kohn have created a method for modifying blood stem cells to reverse the genetic mutation that causes a life-threatening autoimmune syndrome called IPEX. The gene therapy, which was tested in mice, is similar to the technique Kohn has used to cure patients with another immune disease, severe combined immune deficiency, or SCID, also known as bubble baby disease.The workis described in a study published in the journal Cell Stem Cell.IPEX is caused by a mutation that prevents a gene called FoxP3 from making a protein needed for blood stem cells to produce immune cells called regulatory T ce...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 10, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA study shows tumors are not as addicted to glucose as previously thought
Scientists at the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered that squamous cell skin cancers do not require increased glucose to power their development and growth, contrary to a long-held belief about cancer metabolism.The findings could lead to a better understanding of the metabolic needs of many different types of cancer, and to the development of new cancer treatments.  The research, led by senior authors Heather Christofk and Bill Lowry,  was published in the journal Nature Communications.“These findings suggest that tumors are m...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 10, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA receives $5 million to expand geriatric care and training
Longtime UCLA supporters James and Carol Collins have donated $5 million to the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA to improve services and enhance well-being for older adults. The new Carol and James Collins Endowed Fund in Geriatric Medicine will enhance current programs and enable future investments in innovative research and education.The gift will support such programs as the  UCLA Alzheimer ’s and Dementia Care Program, which helps patients and their families address home safety, caregiver support and other needs; the Medical Home Visit Program; and  Generation Xchange, an intergenerational mentor...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 8, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Paramedics can safely evaluate psychiatric patients ’ medical condition in the field, study finds
FINDINGSEmergency medical personnel in Alameda County, California, use a screening process for determining whether to “medically clear” patients experiencing psychiatric emergencies before transporting them. They identify patients who are at low risk for medical emergencies and take them directly to a special psychiatric emergency service facility specifically designed for people experiencing psychiatric crises . The protocol used by Alameda County emergency medical staff is an alternative to standard protocols, in which all patients are transported to the nearest emergency department. During a five-year period...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 21, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study shows dementia care program delays nursing home admissions, cuts Medicare costs
This study aligns with similar studies of collaborative care models for other chronic diseases, such as heart failure,” Jennings said. “It underscores that we need to be thinking differently about how we provide care to persons with chronic illnesses, like dementia. This study shows the benef it of a collaborative care model, where nurse practitioners and physicians work together to provide comprehensive dementia care.” (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 21, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Experimental Alzheimer ’s drug improves memory in mice
FINDINGSAn experimental drug known as A03, which was previously developed to treat depression, increases the levels of the enzyme Sirtuin1, or SirT1, and improves memory in mice. The mice were genetically modified to have a protein called ApoE4, the most common genetic risk factor for Alzheimer ’s disease in humans that has been linked to some forms of the disease.BACKGROUNDMore than 10 percent of the general population has the ApoE4 gene variant, which increases the likelihood that they will develop Alzheimer ’s disease. About two in three people with Alzheimer’s have that variant. Previous research has ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 20, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

California teens who volunteer and engage in civic life are healthier, aim higher in education, study finds
High school teens in California who volunteer, take part in community aid groups, and join school or other clubs are healthier and more likely to aspire to attending college, according to a  study by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.The study found that regardless of race or family income, one in three teens have a high level of civic efficacy, defined as caring about issues, feeling connected to others who are engaged in civic activities and feeling as if they can make a difference. However, there is a significant gap by race and income between those who are interested in and those who engage in c...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 18, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Geffen School of Medicine presents award for excellence in basic science
Dr. David Sabatini, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology biologist and associate director of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research at MIT, was honored by the  David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA for pioneering discoveries of mechanisms that regulate cell growth, propelling research into potential treatments for cancer and other diseases. The medical school ’s dean, Dr. Kelsey Martin, presented Sabatini with the 2018  Switzer Prize on Dec. 13 before he delivered a high-energy lecture to a packed auditorium. Nearly 300 people attended, filling every seat and overflowing in...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 14, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists discover genetic ‘missing links’ underlying mechanism of psychiatric diseases
Since the completion of the groundbreaking Human Genome Project in 2003, researchers have discovered changes to hundreds of parts of DNA, called genetic variants, that are associated with autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia and other psychiatric diseases. Now, a new, large-scale study has linked many of those changes in DNA to their molecular effects in the brain, revealing for the first time mechanisms behind those diseases.In 10 studies published today in  Science and two related journals, UCLA researchers and collaborators from more than a dozen other institutions around the world provide a comprehensive data s...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 14, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study: 15 percent of babies exposed to Zika before birth had severe abnormalities in first 18 months of life
This study was supported by the National Institutes of Health ’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and National Eye Institute, the Thrasher Research Fund, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Grand Challenges Explorations, and grants from government agencies and other funders in Brazil. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 12, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news