Can a Polymer Help Reduce Deaths from Sepsis?
Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in hospitals, and incidences are on the rise, according to the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS). Two independent cohort studies published in JAMA found that sepsis contributed to 1 in every 2 to 3 deaths.1 Harshu Musunuri wants to help prevent such deaths. Majoring in Chemical Engineering at Stanford, the 18-year-old student is developing a synthetic (polymer) material that could act as both a diagnostic and a therapeutic agent for the bacterial toxins involved in the infections associated with sepsis. She has just won the first Pion...
Source: MDDI - January 19, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: R & D Source Type: news

A Newly Developed Nanosensor Quickly Detects Disease
A new enzyme biomarker test, developed by Researchers at the Institute for Global Food Security at Queen’s University Belfast, has the potential to indicate diseases and bacterial contamination. The nanosensor test can detect enzyme markers of disease known as proteases in humans, animals, and food products. Proteases are a necessary component for microorganism growth and are responsible for the progression of many diseases. Are you ready for MD&M West? Join us from Feb. 5 - Feb. 7 for medtech's premiere event in Anaheim, CA.   Current methods of protease detection ...
Source: MDDI - January 18, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: IVD Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Flossing could increase exposure to toxic chemicals
According to a recent study, flossing is just one common behavior that could put people at risk of exposure to certain chemicals linked to disease. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dentistry Source Type: news

Bioengineering & Translational Medicine honors biotech pioneers Langer and Peppas
(Wiley) Bioengineering& Translational Medicine (BioTM), published by Wiley on behalf of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) and its Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), has released a tribute issue dedicated to research inspired by Robert Langer and Nicholas Peppas -- two biotechnology luminaries whose game-changing contributions to drug delivery and biomaterials have made those fields integral elements of modern chemical engineering research and education. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Enhanced NMR reveals chemical structures in a fraction of the time
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT researchers have developed a way to dramatically enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), a technique used to study the structure and composition of many kinds of molecules, including proteins linked to Alzheimer's and other diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Exposure to chemicals during pregnancy is not associated with an increase in blood pressure
(Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)) New study analyses the health impact of exposure to 21 non-persistent chemicals among pregnant women (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Teenage Diver Finds Tons Of Golf Balls Rotting Off California
Alex Weber discovered more than 50,000 balls in the ocean near coastal California golf courses. When golf balls degrade, as these were doing, they release plastic particles and toxic chemicals. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christopher Joyce Source Type: news

6 High-Protein Foods That Are Healthier Than Beef
Americans are obsessed with protein. It’s touted as the cornerstone of any healthy diet, since it helps people feel full and builds muscle. But most Americans eat too much protein every day, according to federal estimates—and they’re going especially overboard with animal proteins, namely red meat. It’s becoming clear how big a problem excessive red-meat consumption can be for health. Research has found associations between diets heavy in red and processed meats and many chronic diseases, including Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Red meat comes with high amounts of saturated fat, and proc...
Source: TIME: Health - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Autism begins during pregnancy, may be caused by mercury in dental amalgam and Thimerosal in flu shots, warns science paper
(Natural News) The scientific community has been raising safety concerns about mercury-based products for years, but the use of this toxic chemical persists despite their dire warnings. What’s more alarming is that this hazardous compound is deliberately injected into the human body by way of vaccination. Thimerosal, a mercury-based preservative added to flu vaccine vials, has... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Three Injured in Explosion, Fire at French University
PARIS (AP) — A strong explosion and fire hit a science building undergoing repairs at the University of Lyon on Thursday, injuring three people slightly, French officials said. The area was evacuated after the explosion on the roof of the building Thursday morning, and the regional fire service said the blaze was under control soon afterward. Images posted on social networks showed huge plumes of black smoke and flickering flames rising above the campus in the Lyon suburb of Villeurbanne. The university said multiple explosions were heard and that they were "caused by renovation work." The town of Villeurba...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 17, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: International News News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Three Injured in Explosion, Fire at French University
PARIS (AP) — A strong explosion and fire hit a science building undergoing repairs at the University of Lyon on Thursday, injuring three people slightly, French officials said. The area was evacuated after the explosion on the roof of the building Thursday morning, and the regional fire service said the blaze was under control soon afterward. Images posted on social networks showed huge plumes of black smoke and flickering flames rising above the campus in the Lyon suburb of Villeurbanne. The university said multiple explosions were heard and that they were "caused by renovation work." The town of Villeurba...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 17, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: International News News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

St Andrews find may be oldest surviving wall chart of periodic table
Chart appears to date from 1885, and was found under lecture hall during clean-outA crumbling roll of canvas-backed paper discovered underneath a lecture theatre in Scotland may be the world ’s oldest surviving periodic table chart, experts have said.The chart was found during a clean-out at the University of St Andrews in 2014 and appears to date from 1885 – 16 years after the Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev published his method of showing the relationships between the elements in 1869.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Periodic table University of St Andrews Scotland Chemistry UK news Science Education Higher education Source Type: news

Why vaping is so dangerous for teens
Most of what we know about nicotine addiction in teens, we know from cigarettes. But experts say the technology and chemistry of vaping might pose an entirely different threat. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The search for the "next" euphoric non-fentanil novel synthetic opioids on the illicit drugs market: current status and horizon scanning - Sharma KK, Hales TG, Rao VJ, NicDaeid N, McKenzie C.
PURPOSE: A detailed review on the chemistry and pharmacology of non-fentanil novel synthetic opioid receptor agonists, particularly N-substituted benzamides and acetamides (known colloquially as U-drugs) and 4-aminocyclohexanols, developed at the Up... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Blister fluid could help diagnose burn severity
(American Chemical Society) Severe burns can leave physical and psychological scars, especially in children. When a burn patient enters the clinic, doctors use factors such as the depth and size of the burn, as well as the time required for skin healing--or re-epithelialization--to determine the best course of treatment. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research have found another, possibly more accurate way to classify burn severity: analyzing proteins in blister fluid. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Erucic acid
(BfR Federal Institute for Risk Assessment) Erucic acid occurs in vegetable oils and fats. It is a natural component of plant seeds of the Brassicaceae family (crucifers such as rape and mustard). Chemically, it is a long-chain, simple, unsaturated omega-9 fatty acid. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Coming soon: A blood test for Alzheimer's disease?
(American Chemical Society) People with symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD), such as cognitive difficulties, behavior changes and mood swings, may wait months or even years to get a definitive diagnosis. That's because doctors lack a simple, accurate and inexpensive test for it. But according to an article in Chemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers are getting much closer to developing the elusive blood test for AD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Models of life
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Friedrich Simmel und Aurore Dupin, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), have for the first time created artificial cell assemblies that can communicate with each other. The cells, separated by fatty membranes, exchange small chemical signaling molecules to trigger more complex reactions, such as the production of RNA and other proteins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Recognition for biotechnology influencer
(University of Delaware) As the director of NIIMBL, the National Institute for Innovation in Manufacturing Biopharmaceuticals, Kelvin Lee is a changemaker in the biomanufacturing industry. He will received the 2019 Marvin J. Johnson Award in Microbial& Biochemical Technology from the American Chemical Society's Division of Biochemical Technology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

National Health Security Strategy 2019-2022
Source: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services] (HHS ASPR). Published: 2019. This 24-page National Health Security Strategy (NHSS) provides a vision for strengthening the nation ’s ability to prevent, detect, assess, prepare for, mitigate, respond to, and recover from 21st century health security threats. Its objectives are to prepare, mobilize, and coordinate a whole-of-government approach in the event of a public health emergency, disaster, or attack; protect the nation from the health effects of emerging and pandemic infectious diseases and ch...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Methods for Investigating Chemical/Biological Weapons Use : State of the Art Report
Source: U.S. Department of Defense (DOD). Published: 10/2018. This 108-page report focuses on technologies and methods regarding the investigation of alleged chemical and/or biological weapons use as it pertains to the Department of Defense ’s mission to protect U.S. forces and the homeland from chemical and biological weapons of mass destruction (WMD). It highlights recent, cutting-edge research in this field that will be essential for warfighter protection and sustainment in the next five to 10 years. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows Mexican marigold can be used as a natural herbicide
(Natural News) Chemical herbicides often cause more harm than good, especially since they can pollute farm soil and water sources. These substances can also be harmful to the health of the people who handle them. To address this concern, a team of researchers conducted a study to determine if Mexican marigolds (Tagetes erecta L.) can... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fracking gas wells linked to migraines, fatigue and chronic nasal problems... are people being mass poisoned by airborne chemicals?
(Natural News) Hydraulic fracturing – more commonly known as fracking – causes much more damage than just the unwanted noise it creates; it may pose a real threat to public safety, a study revealed. Living in areas where fracking activities take place may increase the risk of migraines, severe fatigue and chronic nasal and sinus conditions,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prediction of higher-selectivity catalysts by computer-driven workflow and machine learning
Catalyst design in asymmetric reaction development has traditionally been driven by empiricism, wherein experimentalists attempt to qualitatively recognize structural patterns to improve selectivity. Machine learning algorithms and chemoinformatics can potentially accelerate this process by recognizing otherwise inscrutable patterns in large datasets. Herein we report a computationally guided workflow for chiral catalyst selection using chemoinformatics at every stage of development. Robust molecular descriptors that are agnostic to the catalyst scaffold allow for selection of a universal training set on the basis of steri...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Zahrt, A. F., Henle, J. J., Rose, B. T., Wang, Y., Darrow, W. T., Denmark, S. E. Tags: Chemistry, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Concise total syntheses of (-)-jorunnamycin A and (-)-jorumycin enabled by asymmetric catalysis
The bis-tetrahydroisoquinoline (bis-THIQ) natural products have been studied intensively over the past four decades for their exceptionally potent anticancer activity, in addition to strong Gram-positive and Gram-negative antibiotic character. Synthetic strategies toward these complex polycyclic compounds have relied heavily on electrophilic aromatic chemistry, such as the Pictet–Spengler reaction, that mimics their biosynthetic pathways. Herein, we report an approach to two bis-THIQ natural products, jorunnamycin A and jorumycin, that instead harnesses the power of modern transition-metal catalysis for the three maj...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Welin, E. R., Ngamnithiporn, A., Klatte, M., Lapointe, G., Pototschnig, G. M., McDermott, M. S. J., Conklin, D., Gilmore, C. D., Tadross, P. M., Haley, C. K., Negoro, K., Glibstrup, E., Grünanger, C. U., Allan, K. M., Virgil, S. C., Slamon, D. J., Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Observation of magnetically tunable Feshbach resonances in ultracold 23Na40K + 40K collisions
Resonances in ultracold collisions involving heavy molecules are difficult to simulate theoretically and have proven challenging to detect. Here we report the observation of magnetically tunable Feshbach resonances in ultracold collisions between potassium-40 (40K) atoms and sodium-23–potassium-40 (23Na40K) molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We prepare the atoms and molecules in various hyperfine levels of their ground states and observe the loss of molecules as a function of the magnetic field. The atom-molecule Feshbach resonances are identified by observing an enhancement of the loss. We have observed 11...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Yang, H., Zhang, D.-C., Liu, L., Liu, Y.-X., Nan, J., Zhao, B., Pan, J.-W. Tags: Chemistry, Physics reports Source Type: news

Luminescence and reactivity of a charge-transfer excited iron complex with nanosecond lifetime
In this study, we show that octahedral coordination of iron(III) by two mono-anionic facial tris-carbene ligands can markedly suppress such deactivation. The resulting complex [Fe(phtmeimb)2]+, where phtmeimb is {phenyl[tris(3-methylimidazol-1-ylidene)]borate}–, exhibits strong, visible, room temperature photoluminescence with a 2.0-nanosecond lifetime and 2% quantum yield via spin-allowed transition from a doublet ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (2LMCT) state to the doublet ground state. Reductive and oxidative electron-transfer reactions were observed for the 2LMCT state of [Fe(phtmeimb)2]+ in bimolecular quenching...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Kjaer, K. S., Kaul, N., Prakash, O., Chabera, P., Rosemann, N. W., Honarfar, A., Gordivska, O., Fredin, L. A., Bergquist, K.-E., Häggström, L., Ericsson, T., Lindh, L., Yartsev, A., Styring, S., Huang, P., Uhlig, J., Bendix, J., Strand, D. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Brief get-togethers between NaK and K
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry, Physics twis Source Type: news

Journey to jorumycin
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Orange-glowing iron at room temperature
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Predicting catalyst selectivity
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Synthetic innovation in drug development
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Iron hits the mark
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Young, E. R., Oldacre, A. Tags: Chemistry perspective Source Type: news

The importance of synthetic chemistry in the pharmaceutical industry
Innovations in synthetic chemistry have enabled the discovery of many breakthrough therapies that have improved human health over the past century. In the face of increasing challenges in the pharmaceutical sector, continued innovation in chemistry is required to drive the discovery of the next wave of medicines. Novel synthetic methods not only unlock access to previously unattainable chemical matter, but also inspire new concepts as to how we design and build chemical matter. We identify some of the most important recent advances in synthetic chemistry as well as opportunities at the interface with partner disciplines th...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Campos, K. R., Coleman, P. J., Alvarez, J. C., Dreher, S. D., Garbaccio, R. M., Terrett, N. K., Tillyer, R. D., Truppo, M. D., Parmee, E. R. Tags: Chemistry, Online Only review Source Type: news

The effect of composition and morphological features on the striation of .22LR ammunition - Manzalini V, Frisia M, Casolari M, Causin V.
In this paper, the effect of the chemical composition of.22LR bullets was studied and correlated to the extent and quality of the markings left after shooting them with the same gun. Scanning electron microscopy and optical comparator microscopy equipped w... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Violence and Weapons Issues Source Type: news

Advice on assistance and protection provided by the Scientific Advisory Board of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons: Part 1. On medical care and treatment of injuries from blister and nerve agents - Timperley CM, Forman JE, Abdollahi M, Al-Amri AS, Baulig A, Benachour D, Borrett V, Cari ño FA, Geist M, Gonzalez D, Kane W, Kovarik Z, Martínez-Álvarez R, Fusaro Mourão NM, Neffe S, Raza SK, Rubaylo V, Suárez AG, Takeuchi K, Tang C, Trifirò F, van Straten FM, Vanninen PS, Vucinić S, Zaitsev V, Zafar-Uz-Zaman M, Zina MS, Holen S.
The Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) has provided advice on assistance and protection in relation to the Chemical Weapons Convention. In this, the first of three sequential papers describing... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Two moms are suing EPA after their sons died from inhaling a toxic chemical while doing housework
Lauren Atkins and Wendy Hartley filed a lawsuit on Monday against the Environmental Protection Agency after their sons, Joshua and Kevin, died from being exposed to methalyne chloride. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Evidence suggests glyphosate standards are failing to protect the public
(Natural News) Current standards for glyphosate use may not be effectively protecting the general public against the chemical’s adverse health effects, a team of health experts suggest. Despite there being more than 1,500 clinical studies done on the effects of glyphosate exposure in the last decade, there is still a severe lack of a systematic... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Certain Dental Flosses Raise Body Levels of Toxic Chemicals Certain Dental Flosses Raise Body Levels of Toxic Chemicals
Flossing teeth with Oral-B Glide and similar brands could inadvertently increase exposure to PFAS chemicals, a number of which have been linked to cancer and thyroid disease, a US study indicates.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Is Black Pepper Healthy? Here ’s What the Science Says
Like salt, black pepper sits on almost every kitchen table or countertop in America. But while whole books have been written about sodium consumption and human health, black pepper and its compounds have garnered little attention from experts. But pepper probably deserves more scrutiny. Some research has linked black pepper marinades to the elimination of heterocyclic amines, or HCAs, which are the cancer-causing chemicals that form when meat is charred or cooked at high temperatures. A group at Kansas State University found that mixing one gram of fine black pepper with 100 grams of ground beef—which works out to ab...
Source: TIME: Health - January 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Paper receipts commonly contain endocrine disruptors
Research, published inEnvironmental Research, suggests that paper receipts commonly contain the endocrine disrupting chemical bisphenol A.Metro (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - January 16, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Top 5 additives and drugs BANNED from the food supply in Europe and Russia, but approved by the FDA for Americans to eat
(Natural News) In America, there’s basically only one industry that would prosper from everyone being healthy, and that’s the organic food industry. About a century ago, all food in America was naturally organic because farmers and corporations weren’t using chemical pesticides on the crops, and they weren’t juicing up livestock with drugs. All of that... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The science is pouring in: You're probably eating Roundup herbicide in "excessive" levels
(Natural News) How much Roundup have you consumed this week? This question might sound like a joke, but the amount of the toxic weed killer that people consume unwittingly is certainly no laughing matter. Most people have no idea just how widely used this chemical is. Now that Monsanto has genetically engineered crops to stand... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Novel material converts infrared light into visible light, opening new routes for photodynamic therapy and drug development
(Columbia University) Columbia University scientists, in collaboration with researchers from Harvard, have succeeded in developing a chemical process to absorb infrared light and re-emit it as visible energy, allowing innocuous radiation to penetrate living tissue and other materials without the damage caused by high-intensity light exposure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Novel materials convert visible into infrared light, opening up new routes for photodynamic therapy and drug development
(Columbia University) Columbia and Harvard scientists have developed a novel chemical process to convert infrared energy into visible light, allowing innocuous radiation to penetrate living tissue and other materials without the damage caused by high-intensity light exposure. The discovery could advance numerous fields, including clinical applications for photodynamic therapy and drug development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Just like flipping a switch -- in only half a picosecond
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have discovered spin flips happen in one half of one trillionth of a second, or half a picosecond in the course of a chemical reaction. To understand how fast it is -- watches count in seconds, sporting games are timed in 10ths of a second, and light travels just under 12 inches in one-billionth of a second. Spin flips are faster. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Jellyfish map could be the future to protecting UK waters and fish
(University of Southampton) A University of Southampton research team has developed a map of chemicals found in Jellyfish caught across 1 million square-kilometres of UK waters. The same chemicals are found in other marine animals such as birds and fish.These findings can support conservation efforts by helping track an animals movements and also be used as a tool to detect food fraud by identifying where seafood products were sourced from. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 16, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How manganese produces a parkinsonian syndrome
(CNRS) Using X-ray fluorescence at synchrotrons DESY and ESRF, researchers in the Centre d'Etudes Nucl é aires de Bordeaux Gradignan (CNRS/Universit é de Bordeaux) have demonstrated the consequences of a mutation responsible for a hereditary parkinsonian syndrome: accumulated manganese in the cells appears to disturb protein transport. This work, carried out with colleagues at the University of Texas at Austin (USA), was published in ACS Chemical Neuroscience on January 16, 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 16, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The influence of endocrine disruptors on the male and female thyroid
(Universit é libre de Bruxelles) The new European collaborative project SCREENED aims to develop three-dimensional (3D) cell-based in vitro tests to better characterize the effects of endocrine disruptors on thyroid functions. This method will overcome the limitations of existing tests, being more sensitive, at low doses of exposure to chemicals, and enabling the prediction of their toxicity on human health in a sex-specific manner. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCLA researcher uses big data to help optimize cancer treatment
UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center Treating cancer is incredibly complex and there is no one-size-fits-all solution. But, there is something that can help physicians create treatments customized for individuals: big data.There ’s an abundance of information being gathered in the health care sector including genome sequencing, tissue imaging, electronic health records and personal health trackers.As director of cancer data science for the  UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Paul Boutros and the other researchers in his laboratory are using big data to help optimize treatment for people, fur...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 16, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news