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Medical News Today: How to safely flush your eye
If chemicals come into contact with the eye, it is essential to flush them out immediately. In this article, we describe how to flush the eyes using clean water or a solution. We also explain what to do if an object becomes lodged in the eye. Learn how to remove irritants and prevent further damage here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Eye Health / Blindness Source Type: news

Veterans push lawmakers to legalize hemp products
Hemp is derived from the cannabis plant, but does not contain THC, the chemical that makes you high (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - April 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Portable Test Helps Identify Refugees at Risk of Outbreaks
WASHINGTON (AP) — Call it a lab in a box: Researchers created a device about the size of a toaster that can test a drop of blood to tell, in about half an hour, who's immune to certain infections and who's not. The goal is to find groups of people at risk of outbreaks, especially in impoverished and remote parts of the world, in time to save lives. Wednesday, Canadian researchers reported their novel tool worked pretty well at identifying people vulnerable to measles and rubella in a refugee camp in Kenya. "We're very excited about the potential for this technology," said epidemiologist Aimee Summers of the...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - April 26, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lauren Neergaard, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Portable Test Helps Identify Refugees at Risk of Outbreaks
WASHINGTON (AP) — Call it a lab in a box: Researchers created a device about the size of a toaster that can test a drop of blood to tell, in about half an hour, who's immune to certain infections and who's not. The goal is to find groups of people at risk of outbreaks, especially in impoverished and remote parts of the world, in time to save lives. Wednesday, Canadian researchers reported their novel tool worked pretty well at identifying people vulnerable to measles and rubella in a refugee camp in Kenya. "We're very excited about the potential for this technology," said epidemiologist Aimee Summers of the...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - April 26, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lauren Neergaard, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Nearly 80% of hair products for black women contain cancer chemicals
Researchers from the Silent Spring Institute,  Massachusetts, found that up to 78 percent of hair relaxers contain hormone-disrupting chemicals, known as parabens. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nearly 80% of hair products aimed at black women contain chemicals linked to cancer
Researchers from the Silent Spring Institute,  Massachusetts, found that up to 78 percent of hair relaxers contain hormone-disrupting chemicals, known as parabens. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Epidemiological findings of major chemical attacks in the Syrian war are consistent with civilian targeting: a short report - Rodriguez-Llanes JM, Guha-Sapir D, Schl üter BS, Hicks MH.
Evidence of use of toxic gas chemical weapons in the Syrian war has been reported by governmental and non-governmental international organizations since the war started in March 2011. To date, the profiles of victims of the largest chemical attacks in Syri... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Eating out is expensive for your health as well as your pocketbook: It increases your exposure to dangerous chemicals
(Natural News) There really is no doubt about it: Sometimes eating out just feels like a necessary indulgence. With the hectic pace of modern life, at times the idea of cooking dinner can feel like an insurmountable obstacle. Stopping at the drive thru on the way home or taking the family out to dinner might... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Novel glutamine antagonist prodrugs to be developed as anticancer therapies
(Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Czech Academy of Sciences (IOCB Prague)) An international science team at IOCB Prague and Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, USA) has prepared and tested new substances for cancer treatment that are effective through stopping the metabolism of glutamine. The team's promising results attracted investors supporting the development of these new drugs in the amount of $40.5 million. Further preclinical development and clinical testing will be led by spin-off company Dracen Pharmaceuticals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 26, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

FY 2019 Budget Health and Human Services Biodefense Activities
U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Appropriations. 04/18/2018 This two-hour, 26-minute Congressional hearing discusses the state of the nation's preparedness for 21st century health security threats, including biological incidents, and the Department of Health and Human Services'plans for FY 2018 and beyond. Witnesses discuss the research response of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to potential attacks with chemical and radiological/nuclear agents, as well as biological threats, including emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases; and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's role in biodefense, ...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Are you losing your hair? Common chemicals could be to blame; try natural ingredients instead
(Natural News) Our hair is the crown we never take off. It tells a lot about us — our health, hygienic practices, etc. Sometimes, however, that supposed crowning glory turns dull and limp. The strands break and fall out, and we’re faced with an embarrassing problem: hair loss. Your shampoo may be the culprit. That... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

DIY antibacterial spray for your workout equipment
(Natural News) No one likes working out on gross and smelly yoga mats, but most cleaning products contain toxic chemicals that can harm you and the environment. To keep your workout gear clean and fresh without resorting to harmful chemicals, try making a DIY antibacterial spray. (h/t to Blog.PaleoHacks.com) With this toxin-free spray, you won’t... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

3D printer creates sensors on hand to detect chemicals, charge devices
Researchers have developed a new use for low-cost 3D printers: hand sensors to detect chemical or biological agents, or even charge electronic devices with cells. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How 3D printed cells on the skin could enable wound healing
Researchers at the University of Minnesota are 3D printing electronics and cells directly on the skin that could create new methods for wound healing and enable biological agent detection. The Minnesota researchers used a customized, low-cost 3D printer to print electronics on a human hand. They’ve also successfully printed biological cells on a sin wound of a mouse. The researchers suggest that the new technique could create new medical treatments for wound healing and graft treatments. “We are excited about the potential of this new 3D-printing technology using a portable, lightweight printer costing les...
Source: Mass Device - April 25, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Research & Development Wound Care 3D printing MedTech University of Minnesota Source Type: news

Sunlight reduces effectiveness of dispersants used to clean up oil spills
A new study shows that sunlight transforms oil spills on the ocean surface more quickly and significantly than previously thought, limiting the effectiveness of chemical dispersants that break up floating oil. A research team funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) found that sunlight chemically alters crude oil floating on the sea surface within days or hours. The team reported that sunlight changes oil into ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=245099&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - April 25, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Energy from lasers? Chemists create a new form of CO2 that can be used as an alternative energy source
(Natural News) What if you could turn carbon dioxide (CO2) – a common air pollutant produced by burning fossil fuel – into an alternative source of energy? Austrian researchers have reported creating a new form of CO2 with the use of lasers, according to an article on ScienceDaily. Chemists have long dreamed of converting CO2 in... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Generic drug manufacturers see new opportunities ahead
(American Chemical Society) Declining prices and a saturated market could spell doom-and-gloom for the generic pharmaceutical industry, but some in the business are turning lemons into lemonade, seeing opportunities instead. According to an article in Chemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, these companies are putting their special expertise in chemistry to work. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 25, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New natural gas catalyst would boost clean transportation
(University of Houston) The shale gas boom has renewed the idea of using inexpensive, domestically produced natural gas as a transportation fuel. The US Department of Energy has chosen a team led by a chemical engineer from the University of Houston for a $2 million project to develop a catalyst that can capture harmful methane emissions from natural gas engines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 25, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers 3-D print electronics and cells directly on skin
(University of Minnesota) In a groundbreaking new study, researchers at the University of Minnesota used a customized, low-cost 3-D printer to print electronics on a real hand for the first time. The technology could be used by soldiers on the battlefield to print temporary sensors on their bodies to detect chemical or biological agents or solar cells to charge essential electronics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research identifies easier way to predict how chemical compounds will interact
(University of Kent) New research has revealed that simple, commercially available computer programmes could be used to design next generation drug-delivery systems by predicting more easily how different chemical compounds interact. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rabies trick could help treat Parkinson's disease
(American Chemical Society) The rabies virus wreaks havoc on the brain, triggering psychosis and death. To get where it needs to go, the virus must first trick the nervous system and cross the blood brain barrier -- a process that makes it of interest in drug design. Now, scientists report in ACS Nano a way to exploit the rabies virus machinery to deliver a Parkinson's disease medication directly to the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hair products for Black women contain mix of hazardous ingredients
(Silent Spring Institute) A new report shows that black women are potentially exposed to dozens of hazardous chemicals through the hair products they use. This is the first study to measure concentrations of endocrine disrupting chemicals in a variety of hair products marketed at black women. The findings could help researchers understand why black women have higher exposures to hazardous chemicals than other groups and how these elevated exposures contribute to health disparities in the US population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 25, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Sunlight works against oil clean-up efforts
(American Chemical Society) Oil spills, whether minor leaks or major environmental disasters, are bound to happen. Chemical dispersants are one of the tools that can help mitigate the impact of such spills, but they become less effective as oil weathers in the environment. Now, one group reports in Environmental Science& Technology Letters that sunlight has a much greater impact than previously thought on the effectiveness of these dispersants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 25, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sunlight reduces effectiveness of dispersants used in oil spills
(Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) Two new studies have shown that sunlight transforms oil spills on the ocean surface more significantly and quickly than previously thought. The phenomenon considerably limits the effectiveness of chemical dispersants, which are designed to break up floating oil and reduce the amount of oil that reaches coastlines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 25, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nanowires could make lithium ion batteries safer
(American Chemical Society) From cell phones and laptops to electric vehicles, lithium-ion batteries are the power source that fuels everyday life. But in recent years, they have also drawn attention for catching fire. In an effort to develop a safer battery, scientists report in the ACS journal Nano Letters that the addition of nanowires can not only enhance the battery's fire-resistant capabilities, but also its other properties. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

As tellurium demands rise, so do contamination concerns
(American Chemical Society) As technology advances, demands for tellurium, a rare element, are on the rise. Some forms of tellurium are toxic, so as the element finds applications in solar panels, rubber production, electronics and more, researchers are becoming concerned about possible environmental contamination. Now, one group reports in ACS' Environmental Science& Technology that by studying lake sediments they can construct a history of tellurium as it was deposited in the environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cheaper and easier way found to make plastic semiconductors
(University of Waterloo) Cheap, flexible and sustainable plastic semiconductors will soon be a reality thanks to a breakthrough by chemists at the University of Waterloo. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 25, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Common household chemicals: 13 toxins you should remove
(Natural News) You might think of air pollution as an exclusively outdoor problem, but indoor air pollutants are now an even bigger threat to your health. There are 13 sources of toxic chemicals found in your house that account for much of this pollution, according to a GreenMedInfo article, so replacing them will go a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Exposure to "safe" levels of BPA during pregnancy found to alter brain development, behavior
(Natural News) A new study provides an explanation for how exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) during pregnancy can affect brain development and behavior of the unborn child later in life, even at levels lower than the regulated “safe” human exposure level. BPA is a widely used chemical in a variety of plastic products, such as water... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Light effectively relieves chronic pain in study with mice
Scientists have developed a light-sensitive chemical that provides chronic neuropathic pain relief from touch, based on a study of mice. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Another addictions expansion coming at Mount St. Mary's
Despite a 50 percent increase in beds this January, the Lewiston hospital's inpatient chemical dependency program remains at 95 percent capacity with a waiting list. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 24, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tracey Drury Source Type: news

Uranus Smells Terrible. There, We Said it
Let’s stop pretending, shall we? Because really, we’re not fooling anyone. Uranus is funny. It was funny when you were twelve, and it’s funny now. It was certainly funny when I was a boy and went to a space-themed summer camp where all the bunks were named after planets and Uranus happened to be where we stored the sports equipment, meaning that every now and then a counselor would say, “Somebody put those bats in Uranus,” and then would have to walk over and put them there himself because we were too busy falling over one another laughing. And it was absolutely funny in 1986 when the Voyager ...
Source: TIME: Science - April 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Do I Have to Lose Me to Love You?
As codependents we lose ourselves in relationships, unaware that losing our Self is the greatest despair. When the relationship inevitably ends, it’s devastating because we are lost. We lack autonomy because that task wasn’t completed by adulthood. Often there are power struggles, characterized by repeated, unresolved arguments, either about a single recurring issue or numerous trivial things. Many of them boil down to the question of who has control, whose needs will be met, or how intimate they will be. Intimacy problems are a common symptom of codependency. Avoidance of intimacy, and the vulnerabil...
Source: Psych Central - April 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Codependence Narcissism Personality Relationships & Love Self-Esteem Autonomy Boundaries Closeness Codependency Denial dependent personality Emotional Abuse Guilt Identity Independence Intimacy Manipulation Resent Source Type: news

Who needs a lab when you can just SNIFF sarin gas? Check out the latest hilarious junk science used to justify the bombing of Syria
(Natural News) Fake news ringleader CNN has once again become the laughingstock of the internet following the release of a ridiculously staged segment featuring CNN reporter Arwa Damon, who’s seen catching a whiff of a child’s backpack while claiming that she can still smell the remnants of the alleged chemical weapons attack that supposedly took... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Artificial leaf as mini-factory for medicine
Using sunlight for sustainable and cheap production of, for example, medicines. The 'mini-factory' in the form of a leaf that chemical engineers from Eindhoven University of Technology presented in 2016 showed that it is possible. Now the researchers have come with an improved version: their 'mini-factory' is now able to keep production at the same level, irrespective of the variation in sunlight due to cloudiness or time of the day. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - April 24, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Scientists Say Uranus Really Does Smell Like Rotten Eggs. Here ’s Why
Scientists have determined that the atmosphere above the planet Uranus is full of a gas that makes the distant planet smell like rotten eggs. A new study, published Monday in the journal Nature Astronomy, established the chemical composition of Uranus’ upper cloud deck for the first time. Using an instrument called the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrometer (NIFS) at the Gemini North telescope in Hawaii, researchers determined that Uranus’ cloud cover is composed of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas, which is what gives rotten eggs their distinctive, noxious scent. “If an unfortunate human were ever to descen...
Source: TIME: Science - April 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Eli Meixler Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight space Source Type: news

Brain activity linked to stress changes chemical codes
(University of California - San Diego) UC San Diego scientists have identified light-induced electrical activity as the brain mechanism controlling chemical code switching in relation to stress. While investigating neurotransmitter switching in rats, the researchers found that specific brain neurons were responsible, with possible implications for chemical imbalances in the brain underlying mental illness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Artificial leaf as mini-factory for medicine
(Eindhoven University of Technology) Using sunlight for sustainable and cheap production of, for example, medicines. The 'mini-factory' in the form of a leaf that chemical engineers from Eindhoven University of Technology presented in 2016 showed that it is possible. Now the researchers have come with an improved version: their 'mini-factory' is now able to keep production at the same level, irrespective of the variation in sunlight due to cloudiness or time of the day. As a result, this boosts the average yield by about 20 percent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Managing chronic pain with light
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Scientists from EMBL Rome have identified the population of nerve cells in the skin that are responsible for sensitivity to gentle touch, and which cause severe pain in neuropathic pain patients. The team developed a light-sensitive chemical that selectively binds to this type of nerve cell. By first injecting the affected skin area with the chemical and then illuminating it with near-infrared light, the targeted cells retract from the skin's surface, leading to pain relief. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Having “fiddle fingers” is a good thing: Research shows busy hands alter your brain’s chemistry, making you happier
(Natural News) Many people say, “the eyes have it”, but some researchers insist that “the hands have it”, instead.  That’s because our hands hold the key to our happiness. Kelly Lambert, a neuroscientist at the University of Richmond says “our brains reward us for getting a grip on the world.” She explains that we change... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Diet Soda, Sweeteners Can Still Cause Diabetes, Study Finds
CBS Local – Although many people think diet soda is a healthier option than other sugary drinks, a new study has found that having beverages using artificial sweeteners can still lead to diabetes and obesity. Researchers from the Medical College of Wisconsin say a study of rats has revealed that artificial sweeteners, commonly used in zero-calorie sodas, actually did as much harm to the body as a high-sugar diet. “We also observed that replacing these sugars with non-caloric artificial sweeteners leads to negative changes in fat and energy metabolism,” lead researcher Brian Hoffmann sa...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News artificial sweeteners Chris Melore Diabetes Diet Soda Local TV Source Type: news

Risk analysis of French chemical industry - Dakkoune A, Verni ères-Hassimi L, Leveneur S, Lefebvre D, Estel L.
Accidental events in chemical industry can cause damages to human health, environment and economy. To prevent such events in industries, it is essential to identify and analyze the past events. To the best of our knowledge, such an analysis has not been do... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Chemical weapons are intentionally deployed against the most vulnerable groups of people - Gee P.
The ongoing chemical attacks in the Syrian conflict are shocking. Chemical weapons are considered indiscriminate, affecting both military and civilian targets. From a toxicology point of view, this is untrue. In a gas attack poison … Langua... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Poisoned wine: regulation, chemical analyses, and Spanish-French trade in the 1930s - Suay-Matallana I, Guillem-Llobat X.
This paper describes the resources, scientific spaces, and experts involved in the study of a mass poisoning caused by the drinking of arsenic-contaminated wine exported from Spain to France in 1932. Local and international periodicals record the poisoning... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Nerve agents: what they are, how they work, how to counter them - Costanzi S, Machado JH, Mitchell M.
Nerve agents are organophosphorus chemical warfare agents that exert their action through the irreversible inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, with a consequent overstimulation of cholinergic transmission followed by its shutdown. Beyond warfare, they have... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Poisoning Source Type: news

Fibromyalgia: Five easy exercises to treat the condition
FIBROMYALGIA symptoms include widespread pain, poor sleep quality and fatigue. The exact cause of the condition is unknown, but experiencing a stressful event, sleep problems and chemical imbalances may be factors. Sufferers can treat their symptoms through trying these exercises. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Securing the atmosphere: New device being developed to detect airborne chemical warfare agents in real-time
(Natural News) If chemical warfare were to be unleashed into the atmosphere, how would we know it was there? Would we only find out after it was too late? University of Central Florida researchers are hoping that their new laser technique could one day be used to alert communities of chemical or biological attacks. Photonics... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fibromyalgia: Five best exercises to fight the condition in women
FIBROMYALGIA causes widespread pain, poor sleep quality and fatigue. The exact cause of the condition is unknown, but experiencing a stressful event, sleep problems and chemical imbalances may be factors. Sufferers can treat the symptoms through trying these exercises. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

People who follow the Paleo diet should consume more fish to truly eat like a caveman, study finds
(Natural News) Researchers at Lund University in Sweden uncovered what cave dwellers ate in southern Scandinavia during the Paleolithic period. In their study, they found that a large part of the Stone Age people’s diet was composed of fish. The researchers – who are osteologists, in particular – combined chemical analyses of human bones from more... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gulf Residents Deserve The Full Truth About Oil Cleanup Chemicals
Eight years later, scientists are confirming the lasting impact of the BP oil spill -- and what may have made it worse. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 20, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news