Janssen Provides Update on Phase 3 ACIS Study in Patients with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Treated with ERLEADA ® (apalutamide) and ZYTIGA® (abiraterone acetate) Plus Prednisone Combination
RARITAN, N.J., April 19, 2021 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today that regulatory submissions based on the Phase 3 ACIS study, which evaluated the combination of ERLEADA® (apalutamide) and ZYTIGA® (abiraterone acetate) plus prednisone in patients with chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), will not be pursued. As presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s Genitourinary (ASCO GU) Cancers Symposium in February 2021, the ACIS study met its primary endpoint of radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS); ho...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - April 19, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Trends of acute drug and chemical toxicities in adults and adolescents in Tehran, Iran between 2012 and 2018: a retrospective chart review - Hadeiy SK, Parhizgar P, Hassanian-Moghaddam H, Zamani N, Khoshkar A, Kolahi AA, Amirabadizadeh A, Rezaei O.
Poisoning is among the top three common causes of suicidal deaths in Iran. We aimed to evaluate the epidemiologic trend of poisoning and its mortality rate in the largest tertiary toxicology referral center in Iran between 2012 and 2018. A total of 84,242 ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 19, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Sustainable chemical synthesis with platinum
(University of Tokyo) Researchers used platinum and aluminum compounds to create a catalyst which enables certain chemical reactions to occur more efficiently than ever before. The catalyst could significantly reduce energy usage in various industrial and pharmaceutical processes. It also allows for a wider range of sustainable sources to feed the processes, which could reduce the demand for fossil fuels required by them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

To forget or to do not forget?
(Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences) Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a form of progressive dementia interfering with daily living. It is caused by the decline in the number of brain cells resulting in the deterioration of our mental abilities. One of the main reasons for the worsening brain cells condition and even the brain shrinkage are molecules having a specific structure calledβ-amyloids. They are peptides that tend to agglomerate around the nerve cells, becoming toxic and damage them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Biomarker for COVID-19 risk
(Flinders University) Varying severity of COVID-19 symptoms in patients is reflected by levels of a chemical biomarker in their body which scientists say could be used to better manage treatments and other interventions, including vaccinations. In a new paper in International Journal of Infectious Diseases, medical experts in Italy and Australia examined levels of a chemical called serum amyloid A (SAA), a protein synthesised in the liver which can spike up to 1,000-fold within the first 24-48 hours of an infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 18, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Amid high demand for Remdesivir, 3 lakh vials to be produced daily within two weeks: Mansukh Mandaviya
Union Chemical and Fertilizer Minister Mansukh Mandaviya told ANI that within two weeks, 3 lakh vials of Remdesivir will be supplied to the open market daily and currently 1.5 lakh vials were being supplied to the market daily from today. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - April 18, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Man hurls Molotov cocktail, chemical at officers after running red light in Brooklyn
(Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Chemical, Flaming Molotov Cocktail Thrown At NYPD Officers During Traffic Stops In Brooklyn
(Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NYPD officers hit with Molotov cocktail and liquid chemical in face, police say
A motorist hurled a Molotov cocktail at New York City police officers Saturday morning and doused another with a chemical liquid in the... (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study sheds light on ten reasons why the coronavirus is airborne
Therefore, public health measures that fail to treat the virus as predominantly airborne leave people unprotected and allow the virus to spread, according to six experts from the UK, USA and Canada, including Jose-Luis Jimenez, a chemist at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) and the University of Colorado Boulder. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - April 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pharma companies cut remdesivir injection prices on govt intervention: NPPA
Minister of State for Chemicals and Fertilisers Mansukh Mandaviya held meetings with drug manufacturers and other stakeholders on April 12 and 13 in which decisions were taken to increase production and reduce prices of remdesivir. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - April 17, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Capitol riot defendant will plead guilty, cooperate with government
Schaffer, who was seen on camera deploying chemical spray at officers, will admit to obstructing Congress' effort to certify the 2020... (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Unexpected Ways Climate Change is Reshaping College Education
In 2018, Scott McAulay had a “Wizard of Oz moment.” He was a final-year architecture student at the University of Strathclyde in Scotland when the U.N. published a report warning that the world had 12 years to transform society to avoid catastrophic, irreversible climate change. Buildings, the report said, account for 20% of energy-related global greenhouse-gas emissions, and the architecture and construction sectors needed to rapidly overhaul their practices. Sitting in classes, McAulay had a sinking feeling: his professors, the wizards behind the curtain, had no magical solution. “We’re talking ab...
Source: TIME: Science - April 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent Tags: Uncategorized climate change feature Londontime Magazine TIME 2030 Source Type: news

Lawsuits piling in against Syngenta over paraquat weedkiller, which causes Parkinson's Disease
(Natural News) Attorneys representing numerous plaintiffs in multiple lawsuits filed against Swiss chemical giant Syngenta have asked a U.S. judicial panel to consolidate all of them, which suggests there are many more on the way. At issue is the company’s weedkiller chemical paraquat, which was determined to cause Parkinson’s Disease. Plaintiffs say the noxious concoction... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ACS Spring 2021 press conference schedule
(American Chemical Society) Press conferences will be held Monday, April 5, through Friday, April 16, 2021. Below is the schedule, which will be updated as needed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 16, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers develop microscopic theory of polymer gel
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Russian scientists have proposed a theory of phase transformation in polymer gels. It explains the mechanisms of the dramatic reduction in volume of zwitterionic hydrogels when they are cooled. The results are published in the journal Chemical Communications (ChemComm). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists Report Creating the First Embryo With Human and Non-Human Primate Cells
In a ground-breaking experiment, researchers have successfully created the first human-monkey chimera. The work, published in the journal Cell, describes the the first embryo containing both human and monkey cells that was cultured for 20 days. Led by Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, the study represents the culmination of decades of work in understanding early embryo development in non-human species, which Belmonte hopes will now apply to humans. But it is bound to raise serious ethical questions about the implications of combining human cells with those from a different species (even if it is a closely related one), and the...
Source: TIME: Health - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

AP sources: Tool behind crackdown on opioids could expire
The Biden administration has been slow-walking the extension of a legislative order that would keep in place a sweeping tool that’s helped federal agents crack down on drugs chemically similar to fentanyl (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

JJ, AstraZeneca Covid-19 jabs both contain aborted human fetal tissue
(Natural News) Some leaders in the Roman Catholic Church are warning their laity not to be injected with experimental Wuhan coronavirus (Covid-19) chemicals from Johnson & Johnson (J&J) or AstraZeneca because the jabs contain ingredients derived from aborted human babies. Archbishop Allen H. Vigneron and a coalition of six other Catholic leaders across the state... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Plastics could see a second life as biodegradable surfactants
(DOE/Ames Laboratory) Scientists at the Institute for Cooperative Upcycling of Plastics (iCOUP), an Energy Frontier Research Center led by Ames Laboratory, have discovered a chemical process that provides biodegradable, valuable chemicals, which are used as surfactants and detergents in a range of applications, from discarded plastics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 15, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ten reasons why the coronavirus is airborne
(University of Colorado at Boulder) There is consistent, strong evidence that the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19, is predominantly transmitted through the air, according to a new assessment published today in the medical journal Lancet. Therefore, public health measures that fail to treat the virus as predominantly airborne leave people unprotected and allow the virus to spread, according to six experts from the UK, USA and Canada, including Jose-Luis Jimenez, chemist at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) and University of Colorado Boulder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 15, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Thirdhand smoke exposure linked to fabric type, heat, and humidity
(University of California - Riverside) Thirdhand smoke is created when exhaled smoke and smoke emanating from the tip of burning cigarettes settles on surfaces such as clothing, hair, furniture, and cars. A team led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found chemicals in THS get extracted more readily from household fabrics in a humid environment than in a dry one. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An intercrypt subpopulation of goblet cells is essential for colonic mucus barrier function
In this study, however, we delineated their specific gene and protein expression profiles and identified several distinct goblet cell populations that form two differentiation trajectories. One distinct subtype, the intercrypt goblet cells (icGCs), located at the colonic luminal surface, produced mucus with properties that differed from the mucus secreted by crypt-residing goblet cells. Mice with defective icGCs had increased sensitivity to chemically induced colitis and manifested spontaneous colitis with age. Furthermore, alterations in mucus and reduced numbers of icGCs were observed in patients with both active and rem...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nyström, E. E. L., Martinez-Abad, B., Arike, L., Birchenough, G. M. H., Nonnecke, E. B., Castillo, P. A., Svensson, F., Bevins, C. L., Hansson, G. C., Johansson, M. E. V. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

One-step purification and desalination
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Lavine, M. S. Tags: Chemistry, Engineering twis Source Type: news

Ion-capture electrodialysis using multifunctional adsorptive membranes
We report a series of robust, selective, and tunable adsorptive membranes that feature porous aromatic framework nanoparticles embedded within ion exchange polymers and demonstrate their use in an efficient, one-step separation strategy termed ion-capture electrodialysis. This process uses electrodialysis configurations with adsorptive membranes to simultaneously desalinate complex water sources and capture diverse target solutes with negligible capture of competing ions. Our methods are applicable to the development of efficient and selective multifunctional separations that use adsorptive membranes. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Uliana, A. A., Bui, N. T., Kamcev, J., Taylor, M. K., Urban, J. J., Long, J. R. Tags: Chemistry, Engineering reports Source Type: news

Ancient pottery reveals the first evidence for honey hunting in prehistoric West Africa
A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, with colleagues from Goethe University, Frankfurt, has found the first evidence for ancient honey hunting, locked inside pottery fragments from prehistoric West Africa, dating back some 3,500 years ago. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - April 14, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Chemistry; Press Release Source Type: news

DDT exposure in grandmothers linked to obesity, earlier periods in granddaughters
(Public Health Institute) In the first study showing health effects from a toxic environmental chemical over three generations of people, researchers from the Public Health Institute's Child Health and Development Studies (CHDS) program found that young women today may face increased health risks linked to breast cancer due to their grandmothers' exposure to the banned pesticide DDT. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 14, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Picosecond electron transfer in peptides can help energy technologies
(University of California - Riverside) An international team of researchers led by UC Riverside has observed picosecond charge transfer mediated by hydrogen bonds in peptides. A picosecond is one trillionth of a second. As short-chain analogs of proteins, crucially important building blocks of living organisms, peptides are chains of chemically linked amino acids. The discovery shows the role of hydrogen bonds in electron transfer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 14, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

SARS-CoV-2 alters lung cell metabolism, shows IIT Kharagpur research model
“Our work involved measuring how the tens of thousands or more complex chemical reactions change when biological cells are intruded on by an uninvited guest like SARS-CoV-2, which would help improve our understanding of diseases,” said Piyush Nanda, B Tech-M Tech Dual Degree, Biotechnology, 2020 . (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - April 14, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Toxic chemicals from plastic waste are migrating into food and harming soil, warn experts
(Natural News) The global rate of plastic production is projected to double, if not triple, over the next few decades. Researchers warn that this could mean more plastic waste polluting the environment, as well as more chemicals from minuscule and broken-down plastic debris – better known as microplastics – migrating into food. Confronting the issue of plastic pollution,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Chemical modification of RNA could play key role in polycystic kidney disease
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) A chemical modification of RNA that can be influenced by diet appears to play a key role in polycystic kidney disease, an inherited disorder that is the fourth leading cause of kidney failure in the US, UT Southwestern researchers report in a new study. The findings, published online today in Cell Metabolism, suggest new ways to treat this incurable condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Psychedelic experience may not be required for psilocybin's antidepressant-like benefits
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researchers have shown that psilocybin--the active chemical in " magic mushrooms " -- still works its antidepressant-like actions, at least in mice, even when the psychedelic experience is blocked. The new findings suggest that psychedelic drugs work in multiple ways in the brain and it may be possible to deliver the fast-acting antidepressant therapeutic benefit without requiring daylong guided therapy sessions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The global chemical weapons watchdog has "reasonable grounds to believe" that Syria's air force dropped a chlorine bomb on a residential...
The global chemical weapons watchdog has "reasonable grounds to believe" that Syria's air force dropped a chlorine bomb on a residential... (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Everyday Chemicals Are Linked to Declines in Human Fertility Everyday Chemicals Are Linked to Declines in Human Fertility
Chemicals that pervade our modern world are contributing to a decades-long decline in fertility and could pose health risks even into future generations, writes a New York epidemiologist in a new book.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Urology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Urology Headlines - April 12, 2021 Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Urology News Source Type: news

Chemical poisoning is more common than you think: BPA levels in humans "dramatically underestimated," warn scientists
(Natural News) The amount of toxic chemicals that scientists say we are exposed to is incredibly alarming, but it turns out those scary figures that have long been reported are actually wrong – and the real numbers are even higher. This is according to a study published in the journal The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Animal testing suspended at Spanish lab after ‘gratuitous cruelty’ footage
Madrid regional government says it has suspended all activity at Vivotecnia after inspection found ‘signs of animal mistreatment’Regional officials in Spain have temporarily halted all activity at an animal testing facility after the publication of undercover footage that appears to show animals being taunted, smacked, tossed around and cut into with no or inadequate anaesthesia.Since 2000, Madrid-based contract research organisation Vivotecnia has carried out experiments on animals ranging from monkeys to mini pigs and rabbits for the biopharmaceutical, chemical, cosmetic, tobacco and food industries. The faci...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ashifa Kassam in Madrid and Natalie Grover Tags: Animal experimentation Animal welfare Animals World news Spain Europe Environment Science European Union Source Type: news

Lighting the way to folding next-level origami
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Synthetic biologists from the National Institute of Chemistry in Ljubljana, Slovenia in collaboration with structural biologists from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Hamburg, Germany explored ways to fold artificial proteins into diverse shapes like origamis. They constructed diamond-shaped protein cages, and managed to transform them to different shapes. Similar technology exists for DNA, but origami proteins could have more applications, e.g. in making new materials, delivering drugs and vaccines, and more. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 12, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chemists at St. Petersburg University create renewable plant-based polymers
(St. Petersburg State University) Researchers at the Laboratory of Cluster Catalysis at St Petersburg University have synthesised polymers from biomass. The synthesised polymers may well be used for primary and secondary recycling. During secondary recycling, the polymer-based products can be converted into the primary compounds. This may be further followed by polymerisation. These polymers can be recycled at moderate temperatures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 12, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Road salts and other human sources are threatening world's freshwater supplies
(University of Maryland) When winter storms threaten to make travel dangerous, people often turn to salt to melt snow and ice. Road salt is an important tool for safety, but a new study in Biogeochemistry led by Sujay Kaushal of the University of Maryland warns that introducing salt into the environment--for de-icing roads, fertilizing farmland or other purposes--releases toxic chemical cocktails that create a serious and growing global threat to our freshwater supply and human health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What Are Toxin-Mediated Diseases?
Discussion A poison is a generic term for “a substance with an inherent property that tends to destroy life or impair health.” A toxin is more specific and is “any poison produced by an organism, characterized by antigenicity in certain animals and high molecular weight, and including the bacterial toxins that are the causative agents of tetanus, diphtheria, etc., and such plant and animal toxins as ricin and snake venom.” A toxin does not include those substances that are made synthetically produced. Venom is also a toxin that is used by animals and insects for predation or defense which can cause ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 12, 2021 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Florida is throwing the "tea in the harbor" by denying vaccine passports and nullifying all the plandemic tyranny rules of the Marxist DC Democrats
(Natural News) Just say no to chemical violence and medical violence. Don’t be coerced into getting the Chinese Flu vaccines that contain experimental mRNA technology when the whole vaccine industry in this country has already dished out over $4 billion in damages to its victims, dead and alive. If you believe the vaccine industry is... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why are there still so few black scientists in the UK?
There have been many reports but little action: UK university science departments need to do more to fix their serious diversity problem‘Not built for minorities to succeed’: black scientists on academia’s race problemThe Nobel laureate poet Sir Derek Walcott once said that the English language is nobody ’s special property: “It is the property of the imagination.” Much the same could be said for science. It should be said. Except this isn’t quite so. Not yet.Data on who is doing science has recently been released by the Royal Society, the UK ’s premier scientific academy, us...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Aarathi Prasad Tags: Science Technology Black Lives Matter movement Royal Society Higher education Physics Chemistry Source Type: news

‘Not built for minorities to succeed’: black scientists on academia’s race problem
Three senior academics in medicine, chemistry and physics share their experiences and thoughts on how to improve underrepresentationWhy are there still so few black scientists in the UK?Dr Yolanda Ohene, 29, is abiophysicist at the University of Manchester. After an undergraduate degree in physics at Imperial College London she went on to research at masters level and co-foundedMinorities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics), before starting her PhD at UCL.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Aarathi Prasad Tags: Race Science Medical research Chemistry Physics Higher education Source Type: news

Intermittent fasting found to boost heart health, lower diabetes risk
(Natural News) A recent study revealed that intermittent fasting can help with heart health, improve blood chemistry and reduce the risk of diabetes. The study, published in Nutrition Research, looked at the benefits of time-restricted feeding – in particular, the 16:8 intermittent fasting method – in healthy college men. “What we are doing is time-restricted feeding. It... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Back off, bugs: Sweet potato cultivars use a specific odor to warn other plants of herbivores
(Natural News) A variety of sweet potato emits a specific odor that not only deters incoming pests – it also alerts neighboring plants of its kind to the presence of a threat. That’s according to researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology (MPICE) in Germany and National Taiwan University, who examined a sweet potato cultivar... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Survival 101: How to protect yourself against chemical weapons without survival gear
(Natural News) Multiple countries around the world still have stockpiles of chemical weapons. Some, like Syria and North Korea, have stockpiles that they haven’t declared to international regulatory bodies. This means that the possibility of you getting yourself stuck in a chemical weapons attack is more likely than you think. If you have the proper... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Declining Sperm Count Tied to Chemicals in the Environment Declining Sperm Count Tied to Chemicals in the Environment
Chemicals that pervade our modern world are contributing to a decades-long decline in fertility and could pose health risks even into future generations, writes a New York epidemiologist in a new book.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Urology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Urology Headlines - April 9, 2021 Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Urology News Source Type: news

Visceral fat: Olives contain monounsaturated fat which helps to get rid of belly fat
VISCERAL fat loss will always come down to diet and exercise. Under the scope of diet, one which is rich in the right kinds of fat could help to target this type of fat. Whilst carbohydrates increase fat deposits around the middle, monounsaturated fats help to counteract this by depositing chemicals breaking down fat from the belly area. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Risk to anaesthetists from chemical linked to Parkinson ’s disease | Letter
Trichloroethylene was used as a general anaesthetic agent, and chronic exposure over a career could have led to Parkinson ’sWe have received reports that anaesthetists exposed to trichloroethylene (TCE) may develop Parkinson ’s disease (Rates of Parkinson ’s disease are exploding. A common chemical may be to blame, 7 April). TCE was used as a general anaesthetic agent from the 1940s to the early 80s (when it was known by its tradename Trilene). If so, the presumption is that it would be chronic exposure over the course of a career that would present the greatest risk, and there has been no suggestion that...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Parkinson's disease Health Medical research Science Society Doctors Neuroscience Source Type: news

Undercover footage shows ‘gratuitous cruelty’ at Spanish animal testing facility
Campaigners call for the closure of the Madrid research firm, after whistleblower video allegedly captures unacceptable treatmentUndercover footage of “gratuitous cruelty and abuse” allegedly taken in an animal testing facility in Spain – which has previously secured funding from the EU and Spanish authorities for projects – has been published, amid calls for the centre’s closure.Madrid-based contract research organisation Vivotecnia conducts experiments on a range of animals including monkeys, dogs, mini pigs, rats, mice and rabbits for the biopharmaceutical, chemical, cosmetic, tobacco and f...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Natalie Grover and Ashifa Kassam Tags: Animal experimentation Animal welfare Environment Spain European Union Science World news Animals Source Type: news