Aqueous Film Forming Foam New Jersey: 3M Co., Others Tainted Groundwater With Firefighting Chemicals
TRENTON, N.J. - The state of New Jersey on May 14 sued The 3M Co. and others, seeking damages for alleged damage to groundwater and other resources as a result of manufacturing and selling the firefighting chemical known as aqueous film forming foam (AFFF) (Gurbir S. Grewal, et al. v. The 3M Co., et al., No. LCV 2019847298, N.J. Super., Mercer Co.). (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - May 22, 2019 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

Scans reveal how pollution may alter anxious children's brain chemicals
Over 90 percent of the world's children live in highly-polluted areas, and University of Cincinnati brain scans revealed that those who do have greater anxiety and higher levels of a particular metabolite. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cannabis chemical CBD could 'save lives' of heroin addicts by reducing their cravings
Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York gave CBD to former heroin addicts in a study of 42 people, and found their cravings were up to three times lower. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Endocrine disruptors may affect fertility of future generations
Findings presented at, the European Congress of Endocrinology, suggest that exposure to common endocrine-disrupting chemicals may lead to fertility issues  through several generations. Medical Xpress (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - May 21, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Exposure to common environmental chemicals may increase obesity risk
Data, presented at the European Congress of Endocrinology in Lyon, suggests that phthalate exposure may correlate with increased markers of liver damage and obesity risk.Daily Mail (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - May 21, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

New ultra-fast imaging technology with high frame rate and frame number
(City University of Hong Kong) Acquiring images of ultrafast processes is a technology vitally needed for many cutting-edge physical, chemical, and biological studies. The latest research conducted by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) and Xi'an Jiaotong University has successfully developed a novel compressed ultrafast photographic technique, enabling both an ultra-high frame rate and a large frame number. Having overcome the existing limitations, the new technique offers an important tool for observing complex transient processes on the femtosecond (10-15second) timescale. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists use molecular tethers, chemical 'light sabers' for tissue engineering
(University of Washington) Researchers at the University of Washington unveiled a new strategy to keep proteins intact and functional in synthetic biomaterials for tissue engineering. Their approach modifies proteins at a specific point so that they can be chemically tethered to the scaffold using light. Since the tether can also be cut by laser light, this method can create evolving patterns of signal proteins throughout a biomaterial scaffold to grow tissues made up of different types of cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

3-million-year-old fossilized mouse reveals evolutionary secrets of color
(University of Manchester) This new study applied X-ray imaging to several 3-million-year-old fossils in order to untangle the story of key pigments in ancient animals and reveal how we might recognize the chemical signatures of specific red pigments in long extinct animals to determine how they evolved. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

In a first, researchers identify reddish coloring in an ancient fossil
(DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory) Researchers have for the first time detected chemical traces of red pigment in an ancient fossil -- an exceptionally well-preserved mouse, not unlike today's field mice, that roamed the fields of what is now the German village of Willershausen around 3 million years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Developing biosecurity tool to detect genetically engineered organisms in the wild
(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) If a genetically or synthetically engineered organism gets into the environment, how will we tell it apart from the millions of naturally occurring microorganisms? Recently, the US government and research scientists have identified a need for new tools that can detect engineered organisms that have been accidentally or intentionally released beyond the lab. With scientists from Raytheon and other universities, WPI chemical engineer Eric Young is helping develop a detection tool based on DNA signatures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ammonium fertilized early life on earth
(Syracuse University) A Syracuse University professor has demonstrated that ammonium -- an odiferous chemical compound, often used in fertilizer -- was a vital source of nitrogen for early life on Earth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chemicals in shampoo, toys and floorboards may raise our risk of obesity
A study by the University of Novi Sad in Serbia found people with higher levels of phthalates in their urine were more likely to be obese, diabetic or have dangerous amounts of fat in their bloodstream. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Toxic water: Scientists are concerned about the increasing number of dangerous chemicals in our environment
(Natural News) We live in a time where we have all manner of modern conveniences, but many of them are proving to come with a huge trade-off. For example, the substances that can help our fabrics resist stains and repel water and keep food from sticking to our pans are a godsend from a cleaning... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Earth's ozone hole rapidly shrinking following ban of ozone depleting chemicals
(Natural News) About three decades have passed since scientists made the devastating discovery that a massive hole had developed in the Earth’s ozone layer – the shield that protects us from the sun by absorbing most of its ultraviolet radiation – right over Antarctica. Recognizing the immensely dangerous potential of the situation, most of the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Essential oil of the sandarac tree shown to have antimicrobial properties
(Natural News) A study in the Journal of Essential Oil Research evaluated the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of essential oils of Tetraclinis articulata, commonly known as the sandarac tree. Researchers analyzed the essential oils of fresh and dried leaves of T. articulata by GC-FID and GC-MS, identifying 62 and 54 volatile compounds representing 88 percent and 98 percent of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Shocking Amount Of Plastic Is Burned Every Second: Report
Throwing plastic trash into open fires releases chemicals that are highly toxic to humans. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 20, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Prescription drugs in America are completely USELESS for long-term health "fixes"
(Natural News) When a medical doctor prescribes drugs for symptoms, those warning signs may “go away” for a short while, but the root of the problem always festers. That’s because nearly all medications are chemically concocted in a laboratory and then “assigned” to bad health symptoms, and are doing nothing more than sweeping the “dust”... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Could a broccoli sprout extract help treat schizophrenia?
A compound present in broccoli sprouts could change a chemical imbalance that characterizes the brains of people with schizophrenia. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Schizophrenia Source Type: news

7 Natural apple cider vinegar remedies for kidney stones
(Natural News) Your kidneys filter out waste from your bloodstream, but you can develop kidney stones when certain chemicals become concentrated enough in your urine to form crystals. If you’re looking for natural cures for painful kidney stones, there are some apple cider vinegar-based remedies that you can try. What are kidney stones? Kidney stones... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

PFAS Senate hearing, Birnbaum ’s expert scientific testimony
Linda Birnbaum told senators that chemicals known as PFAS persist in the environment and affect nearly every system in the human body. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - May 19, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Pool Chemical Injuries Led to & #126;13,500 ED Visits in 2015-2017
FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 -- Pool chemical injuries led to an estimated 13,508 U.S. emergency department visits during 2015 to 2017, and about one-third of these injuries occurred in children, according to research published in the May 17 issue of the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 17, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

How Some Generic Drugs Could Do More Harm Than Good
For the 16 years that Dr. Brian Westerberg, a Canadian surgeon, worked volunteer missions at the Mulago National Referral Hospital in Kampala, Uganda, scarcity was the norm. The patients usually exceeded the 1,500 allotted beds. Running water was once cut off when the debt-ridden hospital was unable to pay its bills. On some of his early trips, Westerberg even brought over drugs from Canada in order to treat patients. But as low-cost generics made in India and China became widely available through Uganda’s government and international aid agencies in the early 2000s, it seemed at first like the supply issue had been ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine Eban Tags: Uncategorized generic drugs medication medicine Source Type: news

Metals influence C-peptide hormone related to insulin
(University of California - Davis) Metals such as zinc, copper and chromium bind to and influence a peptide involved in insulin production, according to new work from chemists at UC Davis. The research is part of a new field of 'metalloendocrinology' that takes a detailed look at the role of metals in biological processes in the body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘Smart’ insulin could prevent hypoglycemia during diabetes treatment
UCLA bioengineers and their colleagues have developed a new type of insulin that could help prevent hypoglycemia in people who use the drug to manage diabetes.The treatment is being evaluated for potential clinical trials and, if successful, could change diabetes care. Thestudy   was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Insulin is a hormone naturally produced in the pancreas. It helps the body regulate glucose, which is consumed through food and provides the body with energy.Diabetes occurs when a person ’s body does not naturally produce insulin (Type 1 diabetes), or does not efficie...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 17, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

VA hospital evacuated due to 'unknown chemical odor' that wa urine sample dropped off by a veteran
The behavioral health center at the Hampton VA Medical Center in Virginia was evacuated on Wednesday due to a 'pungent' smell that turned out to be coming from a urine sample. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Organohalogen Flame Retardants Cannot Be Assessed for Hazards as a Single Class, But Can Be Assessed in
A new National Academies report offers guidance to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) on how to conduct a hazard assessment of nonpolymeric, additive organohalogen flame retardants (OFRs), which are used in some consumer products. OFRs cannot be treated as a single class for hazard assessment, the report says, but they can be divided into subclasses based on chemical structure, physical and chemical properties, and predicted biologic activity. The report identifies 14 subclasses that CPSC can use to conduct a class-based hazard assessment of OFRs. Such an approach is likely to be more efficient and less costly t...
Source: News from the National Academies - May 16, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Pool Chemicals Harm Thousands Every Summer
THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 -- Swimming pools are one of the great joys of summer, but U.S. health officials warn that the chemicals that keep the water pristine can land you in the ER. Between 2008 and 2017, there were more than 4,500 pool... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 16, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

The media has turned against Monsanto, and Bayer is now facing a "snowball effect" of new lawsuits from victims of Roundup (glyphosate) exposure
(Natural News) With the acquisition of Monsanto by Bayer, a German corporation linked to the Third Reich and the chemical murder of Jews during the Holocaust, the U.S. media has now turned against Monsanto. The $2 billion jury award against Monsanto that was just handed down by a California jury has been widely reported by... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Living With Cancer: Sleeping With Cancer
Ten years after diagnosis, could I finally dispense with chemical sleeping aids? (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SUSAN GUBAR Tags: Sleep Insomnia Ambien (Drug) Marijuana Cancer Melatonin (Hormone) Source Type: news

How do plants communicate with each other? (video)
(American Chemical Society) Spring is in the air! It's time to mow the lawn and breathe in the smell of freshly cut grass. But this pleasant springtime scent may actually be a chemical cry for help. In the latest Reactions episode, we explain how plants communicate, their chemical response to being damaged and how bugs play a part: [Link TC]. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 16, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Improving carbon-capturing with metal-organic frameworks
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) EPFL chemical engineers have designed an easy method to achieve commercially attractive carbon-capturing with metal-organic frameworks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 16, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

University of Virginia chemist IDs possible addiction-free pain reliever
(University of Virginia) Pain medication addiction is a major problem in the United States. UVA's Ken Hsu is seeking ways to treat pain and control inflammation without dangerous side effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 16, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Illumina Files a 2nd Patent Lawsuit Against BGI
Illumina is filing yet another patent lawsuit against one of BGI Group’s subsidiaries, BGI Europe A/S. The San Diego-based company has filed the suit in the Martime & Commercial High Court of Denmark. Illumina is alleging that BGI’s sequencing products including the BGISeq-500, MGISeq-2000, and related chemistry reagents, infringe EP 3 002 289 B1. Illumina said this patent covers its sequencing-by-synthesis chemistry. The complaint also alleges that BGI’s use of the MGISEQ mark infringes Illumina’s registered EU Trademark No. 8972127 for the MISEQ ...
Source: MDDI - May 16, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Business Source Type: news

Curbing the costs of chemical manufacturing
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Caille, S. Tags: Chemistry perspective Source Type: news

Constrained sialic acid donors enable selective synthesis of {alpha}-glycosides
We present a robust method for the selective α-glycosidation of sialic acid using macrobicyclized sialic acid donors as synthetic equivalents of structurally constrained oxocarbenium ions to impart stereoselectivity. We demonstrate the power of our method by showcasing broad substrate scope and applicability in the preparation of diverse sialic acid–containing architectures. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Komura, N., Kato, K., Udagawa, T., Asano, S., Tanaka, H.-N., Imamura, A., Ishida, H., Kiso, M., Ando, H. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Hydrodealkenylative C(sp3)-C(sp2) bond fragmentation
Chemical synthesis typically relies on reactions that generate complexity through elaboration of simple starting materials. Less common are deconstructive strategies toward complexity—particularly those involving carbon-carbon bond scission. Here, we introduce one such transformation: the hydrodealkenylative cleavage of C(sp3)–C(sp2) bonds, conducted below room temperature, using ozone, an iron salt, and a hydrogen atom donor. These reactions are performed in nonanhydrous solvents and open to the air; reach completion within 30 minutes; and deliver their products in high yields, even on decagram scales. We have...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Smaligo, A. J., Swain, M., Quintana, J. C., Tan, M. F., Kim, D. A., Kwon, O. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Conformationally supple glucose monomers enable synthesis of the smallest cyclodextrins
In this study, we present methods to chemically synthesize both CD3 and CD4. The main factor in the successful synthesis is the creation of a glucopyranose ring conformationally counterbalanced between equatorial- and axial-rich forms. This suppleness is imparted by a bridge between O-3 and O-6 of glucose, which enables the generation of desirable, albeit deformed, conformers when synthesizing the cyclic trimer and tetramer. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ikuta, D., Hirata, Y., Wakamori, S., Shimada, H., Tomabechi, Y., Kawasaki, Y., Ikeuchi, K., Hagimori, T., Matsumoto, S., Yamada, H. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Visualizing superexchange interactions
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Szuromi, P. Tags: Chemistry, Physics twis Source Type: news

Sweet spot for making oligosaccharides
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Funk, M. A. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Excising an olefin
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Probing and imaging spin interactions with a magnetic single-molecule sensor
Magnetic single atoms and molecules are receiving intensifying research focus because of their potential as the smallest possible memory, spintronic, and qubit elements. Scanning probe microscopes used to study these systems have benefited greatly from new techniques that use molecule-functionalized tips to enhance spatial and spectroscopic resolutions and enable new sensing capabilities. We demonstrate a microscopy technique that uses a magnetic molecule, Ni(cyclopentadienyl)2, adsorbed at the apex of a scanning probe tip, to sense exchange interactions with another molecule adsorbed on a Ag(110) surface in a continuously...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Czap, G., Wagner, P. J., Xue, F., Gu, L., Li, J., Yao, J., Wu, R., Ho, W. Tags: Chemistry, Physics reports Source Type: news

Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals Affect Reproductive Health Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals Affect Reproductive Health
Obstetricians need to be aware of the effects of common chemicals on reproductive health so they can counsel patients and be advocates for more regulation to protect patients and their families.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health News Source Type: news

CBSA given new powers to seize chemicals used to make illegal opioids
Canada's border officials now have new powers to seize chemicals used to make illegal opioids. The federal government tweaked the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act to allow certain law enforcement agencies to stop what's known as precursor chemicals from being brought into Canada and used to make deadly fentanyl and amphetamines. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - May 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Politics Source Type: news

Are Onions and Garlic Healthy? Here ’s What Experts Say
Garlic and onions are staples for many home cooks. But do these plants actually add any health benefits to your dishes? Or are they purely for flavor? People who try to eat colorful fruits and vegetables in order to get a wide range of vitamins and minerals may think that pale foods like onions and garlic don’t offer many nutrients. But although they may not look like nutritional powerhouses, experts say they are. Onions of all colors (including white) are good sources of vitamin C, vitamin B6, potassium and folate, while garlic is rich in vitamin C, vitamin B6, thiamin, potassium, calcium, phosphorous, copper and ma...
Source: TIME: Health - May 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Majority Of Sunscreens Tested Would Flunk Proposed FDA Safety Tests, Report Says
(CNN) — Nearly two-thirds of all sunscreens evaluated by the Environmental Working Group would not pass safety tests proposed by the US Food and Drug Administration, the consumer advocacy group announced Wednesday. The group released its analysis as part of its 2019 Guide to Sunscreens, a yearly report on sunscreen safety that the nonprofit began in 2006. The group said it analyzed the ingredients and performance of more than 1,300 products with sun protection factor, or SPF; 750 of those are marketed as beach and sport sunscreens. The analysis involves only a fraction of the sunscreen products sold in the United Sta...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Sunscreen Source Type: news

NAE Elects President, Foreign Secretary, and Four Councillors
The National Academy of Engineering has elected John L. Anderson, president emeritus and distinguished professor of chemical engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology, to serve a six-year term as the NAE's president. Anderson succeeds C. D. Mote, Jr., who has served one term as president. Elected to serve a four-year term as the NAE's foreign secretary is James M. Tien, distinguished professor and dean emeritus at University of Miami. The Academy also elected four members to its governing Council. All terms begin July 1, 2019. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - May 15, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

BOMBSHELL: Bayer discovers "black ops" division run by Monsanto, shuts it down, initiates internal investigation as law enforcement prepares criminal charges against the chemical giant
(Natural News) For over a decade, Monsanto has been engaged in building and maintaining “hit lists” of journalists, lawmakers and regulators to be taken out if they opposed the evil agenda of GMOs and toxic glyphosate weed killer chemicals that now inundate the world food supply. Any influential person who opposed the Monsanto agenda was... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

China unlikely to curb fentanyl exports in short-term
(RAND Corporation) China has pledged to crack down on the illicit export of the synthetic opioid fentanyl to the US, but a new analysis finds that may be difficult given the way that China regulates its larger drug and chemical industries. The finding are part of a new report that outlines how illicit drug polices across Asia are changing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SHINE and IOCB Prague enter Lu-177 process license agreement
(Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Czech Academy of Sciences (IOCB Prague)) SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc. and IOCB Prague have entered into an intellectual property license agreement providing SHINE with a global, exclusive license to a novel method for separating rare earth elements. SHINE will use the innovation to produce lutetium-177 (Lu-177) for the treatment of cancer. The separation technique was developed by the team of Dr. Miloslav Pol á š ek, from IOCB Prague. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

When biodegradable plastic isn't
(American Chemical Society) The ubiquitous plastic bag is handy for transporting groceries and other items home from the store. However, this convenience takes a toll on the environment, with plastic debris littering land and waterways. Manufacturers offer biodegradable or compostable plastic bags, but in many cases, these claims have not been tested in natural environments. Now, researchers report in ACS' Environmental Science& Technology that the bags do not degrade in some environments any faster than regular polyethylene.   (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 15, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news