Assessing Hemocompatibility for Medical Devices in Contact with Circulating Blood
Many commonly used medical devices, such as catheters, cardiopulmonary bypass systems, and endovascular grafts, are intended to come in contact with circulating blood. Therefore, these devices require an assessment for hemocompatibility risks such as hemolysis and thrombosis prior to submitting to a regulatory agency for market approval. The testing required for the evaluation of these specific endpoints depends on the exposure type and duration of the specific medical device under focus, and the guidance is captured in Table 1 of ISO 10993-4 Biological evaluation of medical devices - Part 4: Selection of tests for interac...
Source: MDDI - February 20, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Helin R äägel Tags: Testing Source Type: news

New discovery has important implications for treating common eye disease
(Trinity College Dublin) Scientists from Trinity College Dublin have made an important discovery with implications for those living with a common, debilitating eye disease (age-related macular degeneration, AMD) that can cause blindness. They have discovered that the molecule TLR2, which recognises chemical patterns associated with infection in the body, also seems to play an important role in the development of retinal degeneration. When TLR2 is removed in model systems, a degree of protection is conferred. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A potential new weapon against deadly brain and soft tissue cancers
(University of Southern California) Researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering have designed a new drug cocktail that kills some types of brain and soft tissue cancers by tricking the cancer cells to behave as if they were starving for their favorite food -- glucose. The researchers' findings were recently published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry and may pave the way for targeted cancer treatments with greater efficacy and less harmful side effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows UV technology raises the standard in disinfecting ORs and medical equipment
(Northwell Health) Ultraviolet (UV) technology developed by the New York-based firm PurpleSun Inc. eliminates more than 96 percent of pathogens in operating rooms (ORs) and on medical equipment, compared to 38 percent using manual cleaning methods that rely on chemicals to disinfect surfaces, according to a study published this month in the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 20, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Newly found bacteria fights climate change, soil pollutants
(Cornell University) Cornell University researchers have found a new species of soil bacteria that is particularly adept at breaking down organic matter, including the cancer-causing chemicals that are released when coal, gas, oil and refuse are burned. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chemistry Through Biology: Translating Molecular Biology Technologies...
In this free webinar, the featured speaker, Peter C. Michels, PhD, Head of Global Fermentation, AMRI, will explore the key advances and critical hurdles for translating emerging molecular biology...(PRWeb February 20, 2020)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/chemistry_through_biology_translating_molecular_biology_technologies_into_practical_processes_for_api_production_upcoming_webinar_hosted_by_xtalks/prweb16922679.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - February 20, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

‘Germ Blaster’ Helping Fight Flu Season In Haverhill Schools
HAVERHILL (CBS) – With a four percent absence rate among students and staff, Haverhill Public Schools are combating flu season with their weapon of choice – a germ blaster. Disinfecting tablets are dropped into water and loaded into the spray gun. The germ blaster then shoots a chlorine-based mist, which sanitizes the surface. It’s only done when students aren’t in school – like vacation week. Senior custodian Tomas Tavera believes the tool is much more effective than typical cleaning practices. The germ blaster mist gets into spots that are tricky to clean (WBZ-TV) “The chemical will ge...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Flu Haverhill News Source Type: news

Biocatalytic synthesis of planar chiral macrocycles
We report a strategy for enantio- and atroposelective biocatalytic synthesis of planar chiral macrocycles. The macrocycles can be formed with high enantioselectivity from simple building blocks and are decorated with functionality that allows one to further modify the macrocycles with diverse structural features. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Gagnon, C., Godin, E., Minozzi, C., Sosoe, J., Pochet, C., Collins, S. K. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Enzymes lock in planar chirality
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Funk, M. A. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Etymology of the elements
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Pohl, N. Tags: Chemistry books Source Type: news

Common Plastics Chemicals Linked to Autism Traits in Young Boys
The study didn't identify a heightened risk for autism per se among boys, but rather a "small" increase in the chance for developing certain autism-related traits by age 3 or 4. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Babies Exposed To Cleaning Products May Have Increased Asthma Risk
BOSTON (CBS) – New parents often thoroughly clean their homes to reduce their baby’s exposure to germs, but new research suggests cleaning products could actually increase a child’s risk of asthma. Asthma is the most common chronic disease in childhood. A new study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal finds that babies under three months of age living in homes where cleaning products are frequently used were more likely to develop wheezing and asthma by age three. The greatest link was with air fresheners, dusting sprays, hand sanitizers, and oven cleaners. Researchers said babies spend m...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Asthma Parenting Source Type: news

Chemicals in cosmetics, other products linked to autism traits in boys
In utero exposure to the chemical phthalate has been linked with autistic traits in young boys, according to an analysis published Wednesday in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Look at Specialty Polymers for Surgical Robots
The surgical robot industry is developing specialized products for neurosurgery, spinal surgery and other medical procedures that require greater precision, flexibility, and control than is possible with conventional techniques. Today, more than 5,000 surgical robots are installed worldwide – and that market is expected to grow at a double-digit rate over the next few years. For the designers of surgical robots, this presents both challenges and opportunities. The healthcare industry has discovered the numerous advantages of robotic surgery. For example, surgeons can benefit from having a higher viewing a...
Source: MDDI - February 19, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Anna Maria Bertasa Tags: Materials Assembly and Automation Source Type: news

Common Plastics Chemicals Linked to Autism Traits in Young Boys
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 19, 2020 -- Young boys whose mothers were exposed to chemicals known as phthalates while pregnant may face an increased risk for developing behaviors associated with autism, a new study warns. Phthalates are chemicals found in many... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 19, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

One drug, many diseases
(American Chemical Society) It seems too good to be true: a single drug that could treat humanity's worst afflictions, including atherosclerosis, cancer, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and arthritis. All of these diseases have one thing in common -- they involve an inflammatory protein called NLRP3. Now, biotech start-ups and pharmaceutical companies are racing to develop drugs that inhibit the function of this protein, according to an article inChemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.   (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 19, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A new way to assess male fertility
(American Chemical Society) Current tests for male fertility include measuring the concentration and motility of spermatozoa. However, other characteristics of sperm, such as their ability to follow a chemical trail to the egg, can influence the likelihood of fertilization. Now, researchers reporting inAnalytical Chemistry have devised a quick and convenient microfluidic chip to assess this chemotactic response of spermatozoa, which could help provide a more complete picture of a man's fertility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CPRIT grant draws cell imaging specialist to Rice
(Rice University) The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas awards a $2 million grant to Rice University to recruit physical chemist Anna-Karin Gustavsson, who will study the dynamics and distributions of single molecules in living cells through her development of sophisticated imaging systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Weed-derived compounds in Serbian groundwater could contribute to endemic kidney disease
(American Chemical Society) People living in Balkan farming villages along the Danube River have long suffered from a unique type of kidney disease known as Balkan endemic nephropathy. Recently, scientists linked the disorder to compounds from a local weed that could be taken up into food crops from the soil. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' journalEnvironmental Science& Technology have discovered that contaminated groundwater could be another important source of human exposure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Keeping it simple -- Synthesizing useful organic compounds now made easier and cheaper
(Tokyo University of Science) Organic boronic acids are widely used as starting material in the synthesis of various useful chemicals. But, some organic boronic acids are unstable and lead to unwanted 'side reactions.' Thus, they need to be protected with a functional group, which needs to be removed afterwards. A research team from Tokyo University of Science recently uncovered how this unnecessary step (removal of the functional group) could be avoided--showing how to make this process much easier and cheaper. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UCLA researchers discover new compound that promotes lung health
A molecule identified by UCLA researchers helps maintain a healthy balance of cells in airway and lung tissue. If the compound, so far only studied in isolated human and mouse cells, has the same effect in people, it may lead to new drugs to treat or prevent lung cancer.“We think this could help us develop a new therapy that promotes airway health,” said Dr. Brigitte Gomperts, a UCLA professor of pediatrics and of pulmonary medicine, a member of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA, and lead author of the study. “This could not only inform the treatm...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 18, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

FDA Ensures Your Foods From Animals Are Safe
If you eat meat or drink milk, you want to know: Are the veterinary drugs used in food-producing animals entering your diet? And if they are, are the amounts safe for human consumption? Those are some of the concerns of FDA's Division of Residue Chemistry. (Source: FDA Consumer Health Information Updates)
Source: FDA Consumer Health Information Updates - February 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: FDA Source Type: news

AI Finds Connection Between Disease and Genes
Researchers from Linköping University are behind a new study that has used artificial intelligence to investigate whether it is possible to discover biological networks using deep learning, in which entities known as "artificial neural networks" are trained by experimental data. Since artificial neural networks are excellent at learning how to find patterns in enormous amounts of complex data, they are used in applications such as image recognition. However, this machine learning method has until now seldom been used in biological research. "We have for the first time used deep learning to find ...
Source: MDDI - February 18, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

Science shouldn't be for sale – we need reform to industry-funded studies to keep people safe | Carey Gillam
We must be able to trust the integrity of scientific research as we work to protect our families and our planetNot again. News out of Europe last weekrevealed that more than 20 scientific studies submitted to regulators to prove the safety of the popular weedkilling chemical glyphosate came from a large German laboratory that has been accused of fraud and other wrongdoing.The findings come amid global debate over whether or not glyphosate causes cancer and other health problems and if regulators and chemical companies proclaiming the chemical ’s safety actually have credible science on their side.Continue reading... ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Carey Gillam Tags: Europe World news Environment Monsanto Source Type: news

Chemical Pneumonia
(Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - February 18, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Think all BPA-free products are safe? Not so fast, scientists warn
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Using 'BPA-free' plastic products could be as harmful to human health -- including a developing brain -- as those products that contain the controversial chemical, suggest scientists in a new study led by the University of Missouri and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Green approach accelerates process optimization and retrieval of 'switchable' solvents
(North Carolina State University) Researchers have demonstrated a new, green technology for both accelerated screening and retrieving 'switchable' solvents used in green chemistry applications. The new approach makes the screening process hundreds of times faster and drastically accelerates the rate at which solvents can be retrieved from solution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Improving the electrical and mechanical properties of carbon-nanotube-based fibers
(Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology) University of Illinois researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology recently developed a technique that can be used to build carbon-nanotube-based fibers by creating chemical crosslinks. The technique improves the electrical and mechanical properties of these materials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 18, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Characterisation of gunshot residues from non-toxic ammunition and their persistence on the shooter's hands - Roman ò S, De-Giorgio F, D'Onofrio C, Gravina L, Abate S, Romolo FS.
The aim of this work was to characterise three non-toxic ammunition (NTA) from the GECO and Fiocchi brands, which are available in the Italian market. Characterisation was carried out by considering both the elemental chemical composition and morphology, u... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Violence and Weapons Issues Source Type: news

Vaping Causes DNA Changes Similar to Those in Cancer: Study
MONDAY, Feb. 17, 2020 -- People who vape have potentially cancer-causing changes in their DNA similar to those found in cigarette smokers, according to a new study. These chemical alterations -- called epigenetic changes -- can cause genes to... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 17, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Reconstructing the diet of fossil vertebrates
(Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology) Paleodietary studies of the fossil record are impeded by a lack of reliable and unequivocal tracers. Scientists from the MPI for Evolutionary Anthropology, the MPI for Chemistry and the Johannes Gutenberg University (JGU) in Mainz have now tested a new method, the isotope analysis of zinc isotopes from the tooth enamel of fossil mammals, and found it to be well suited to expand our knowledge about the diets of fossil humans and other Pleistocene mammals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 17, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

China battery recycler GEM to make disinfectants in virus epicenter
China's GEM Co Ltd, best known as a recycler of batteries for electric vehicles and producer of cobalt chemicals used in them, said on Sunday it had been given a four-month license to make disinfectant in coronavirus-hit Hubei province. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

The Week That Wasn't: Virus Cream, Commute Chemicals, Tracing Mumps The Week That Wasn't: Virus Cream, Commute Chemicals, Tracing Mumps
Three medical stories that we didn't cover, explained.Medscape (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - February 15, 2020 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care Article Source Type: news

Can HEPAs Filter Out Everything?
HEPA filters remove particulate matter from the air, but can they catch volatile chemicals and DNA? Download this poster from The Baker Company to find out! (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 14, 2020 Category: Science Tags: The Marketplace Source Type: news

Custom chemistry business expanding in Shelby County
A local custom chemistry business is expanding its presence in metro Birmingham. Therachem MediLab recently received incentives from the Chelsea City Council and Shelby County and now can move forward with developing a 4,000-square-foot facility on a 40,608-square-foot parcel of land at the Chelsea Business Park. It plans to break ground in August, with at least a year of cons truction. Therachem first opened its 6,600-square-foot facility at 100 Jade Park in 2018. The company also has a lab that… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 14, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tyler Patchen Source Type: news

Are you in love or just high on chemicals in your brain? Answer: Yes
Love starts with chemicals jumping between neurons in your brain -- so why do we think it's in our hearts? (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Leaking away essential resources isn't wasteful, actually helps cells grow
(University of Tokyo) Experts have been unable to explain why cells from bacteria to humans leak essential chemicals necessary for growth into their environment. New mathematical models reveal that leaking metabolites -- substances involved in the chemical processes to sustain life with production of complex molecules and energy -- may provide cells both selfish and selfless benefits. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 14, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Jones & Van Aken monitoring water quality for city of Fairfax
(George Mason University) R. Christian Jones, Professor/Director, Potomac Environmental Research and Education Center, Environmental Science and Policy, and Benoit Van Aken, Associate Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry, are conducting stream monitoring for the City of Fairfax. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 14, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Parabens Exposure in Pregnancy Tied to Girls' Weight Gain Parabens Exposure in Pregnancy Tied to Girls' Weight Gain
Mothers who use beauty products containing chemicals known as parabens during pregnancy may be more likely to have overweight daughters, a small study suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Predicting autism risk may begin with a drop of blood
(University of California - San Diego) A novel research study by UC San Diego researchers will determine whether testing stored blood drops, recorded at birth, for 1,000 different molecules and chemicals can help predict autism risk years before symptoms would likely appear. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New potential cause of Minamata mercury poisoning identified
(University of Saskatchewan) One of the world's most horrific environmental disasters--the 1950 and 60s mercury poisoning in Minamata, Japan--may have been caused by a previously unstudied form of mercury discharged directly from a chemical factory, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NSF selects 7 winners from its first-ever NSF 2026 Idea Machine prize competition
(National Science Foundation) The National Science Foundation (NSF) is partnering with the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) and United Kingdom Research and Innovation (UKRI) to unlock the mysteries of the chemical and biological processes occurring within our soil. The agencies will collaborate on 10 research projects that will enable American and British researchers to gain a better understanding of soil ecosystems that will continue to play a critical role in feeding the world and supporting life functions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

VCU researchers to develop next-generation, long-lasting batteries
(Virginia Commonwealth University) Virginia Commonwealth University researchers in the College of Engineering Department of Chemical and Life Science Engineering will receive a $2.5 million grant from the US Department of Energy to develop next-generation rechargeable batteries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

From petroleum to wood in the chemical industry: cost-efficient and more sustainable
(KU Leuven) An interdisciplinary team of bio-engineers and economists from KU Leuven has mapped out how wood could replace petroleum in the chemical industry. They not only looked at the technological requirements, but also whether that scenario would be financially viable. A shift from petroleum to wood would lead to a reduction in CO2 emissions, the researchers state in Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Polymers to the rescue! Saving cells from damaging ice
(University of Utah) Research published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society by University of Utah chemists Pavithra Naullage and Valeria Molinero provides the foundation to design efficient polymers that can prevent the growth of ice that damages cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Novel biotechnological route developed to obtain fine chemicals from agricultural waste
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Preliminary calculations show that the new biotechnological route can increase the value of sugarcane bagasse and wheat straw up to 5,000-fold and multiply the price of ferulic acid by a factor of up to 75 when these residues are converted into coniferol. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Study Shows That When it Comes to Pesticides and Kids, the EPA Has Looked the Other Way
It’s easy to lose count of all of the pesticides that are sprayed on crops in the U.S., and well-nigh impossible to know all of the names (dichloropropene and pyraclostrobin and spinetoram and on and on). But it’s not hard to guess who gets hit hardest by all of these chemicals: kids, whose brain, nervous and hormonal systems are still developing at the time of exposure. What’s more, a new pesticide introduced today will have fewer years to build up in the tissues of, say, a 50-year old, compared to a child who will accumulate a lifetime load of the stuff. That’s the biggest reason that, in 1996, C...
Source: TIME: Health - February 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Children's Health Environment Environmental Health Pesticides Source Type: news

New Study Shows That When it Comes to Pesticides and Kids, the EPA Has Looked the Other Way
It’s easy to lose count of all of the pesticides that are sprayed on crops in the U.S., and well-nigh impossible to know all of the names (dichloropropene and pyraclostrobin and spinetoram and on and on). But it’s not hard to guess who gets hit hardest by all of these chemicals: kids, whose brain, nervous and hormonal systems are still developing at the time of exposure. What’s more, a new pesticide introduced today will have fewer years to build up in the tissues of, say, a 50-year old, compared to a child who will accumulate a lifetime load of the stuff. That’s the biggest reason that, in 1996, C...
Source: TIME: Science - February 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Children's Health Environment Environmental Health Pesticides Source Type: news

Structural basis of second-generation HIV integrase inhibitor action and viral resistance
Although second-generation HIV integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are prescribed throughout the world, the mechanistic basis for the superiority of these drugs is poorly understood. We used single-particle cryo–electron microscopy to visualize the mode of action of the advanced INSTIs dolutegravir and bictegravir at near-atomic resolution. Glutamine-148->histidine (Q148H) and glycine-140->serine (G140S) amino acid substitutions in integrase that result in clinical INSTI failure perturb optimal magnesium ion coordination in the enzyme active site. The expanded chemical scaffolds of second-generation c...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Cook, N. J., Li, W., Berta, D., Badaoui, M., Ballandras-Colas, A., Nans, A., Kotecha, A., Rosta, E., Engelman, A. N., Cherepanov, P. Tags: Biochemistry, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Dry reforming of methane by stable Ni-Mo nanocatalysts on single-crystalline MgO
Large-scale carbon fixation requires high-volume chemicals production from carbon dioxide. Dry reforming of methane could provide an economically feasible route if coke- and sintering-resistant catalysts were developed. Here, we report a molybdenum-doped nickel nanocatalyst that is stabilized at the edges of a single-crystalline magnesium oxide (MgO) support and show quantitative production of synthesis gas from dry reforming of methane. The catalyst runs more than 850 hours of continuous operation under 60 liters per unit mass of catalyst per hour reactive gas flow with no detectable coking. Synchrotron studies also show ...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Song, Y., Ozdemir, E., Ramesh, S., Adishev, A., Subramanian, S., Harale, A., Albuali, M., Fadhel, B. A., Jamal, A., Moon, D., Choi, S. H., Yavuz, C. T. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science reports Source Type: news