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Grants awarded to pediatric cancer researcher at UCLA Mattel Children ’s Hospital
UCLA Mattel Children ’s Hospital has received two awards totaling $300,000 to fund research into treatments for various pediatric cancers: a $150,000 award from the Hyundai Hope On Wheels Foundation and a $150,000 award from Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation. The awards will support the work of Dr. Steven Jonas, clinical fellow in the division of pediatric hematology/oncology and trainee at the UCLA Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research. He is one of 40 recipients of the Hyundai Hope  on Wheels Young Investigator Grant, presented during September for National ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 26, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Why We Must Not Build Automated Weapons of War
Over 100 CEOs of artificial intelligence and robotics firms recently signed an open letter warning that their work could be repurposed to build lethal autonomous weapons — “killer robots.” They argued that to build such weapons would be to open a “Pandora’s Box.” This could forever alter war. Over 30 countries have or are developing armed drones, and with each successive generation, drones have more autonomy. Automation has long been used in weapons to help identify targets and maneuver missiles. But to date, humans have remained in control of deciding whether to use lethal force. Milita...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paul Scharre Tags: Uncategorized Artificial Intelligence robots The CEO Initiative Source Type: news

Opinion: Toxic Time Bombs
Decades of evidence point to the untoward health effects of endocrine disruptor exposures, yet little is being done to regulate the chemicals. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 25, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Opinion Source Type: news

Siemens Healthineers lands CE Mark for Atellica advanced diagnostics system
Siemens Healthineers (NYSE:SI) said today that its Atellica Solution won CE Mark and that the advanced diagnostic system is now available in Europe, the U.S., South America and Asia. The system consists of scalable immunoassay and chemistry analyzers, the company said, and can operate as a stand-alone system or connect to Aptio Automation. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Siemens Healthineers lands CE Mark for Atellica advanced diagnostics system appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - September 25, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Diagnostics Laboratory Instruments/Laboratory Supplies Regulatory/Compliance Siemens Source Type: news

Did Neil deGrasse Tyson Just Solve a Crucial Game of Thrones Mystery?
Warning: This post contains spoilers for season seven of Game of Thrones. Neil deGrasse Tyson is putting his scientific expertise to use solving one of the Internet’s most pressing questions: How was the undead Viserion able to bring down the Wall on Game of Thrones? The famed astrophysicist took to Twitter Sunday to drop some thermal physics knowledge on fans still wondering about the difference between regular and blue dragon fire following the climactic finale of Thrones‘ seventh season. “Intriguing Thermal Physics in #GameOfThrones,” he wrote. “Blue Dragon breath would be at least a factor...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Megan McCluskey Tags: Uncategorized celebrities game of thrones neil degrasse tyson Television TV twitter viral Source Type: news

With extra sugar, leaves get fat too
(DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory) Eat too much without exercising and you'll probably put on a few pounds. As it turns out, plant leaves do something similar. A new study shows that retaining sugars in plant leaves can make them get fat too. In plants, this extra fat accumulation could be a good thing. It could help turn plants into factories for making biofuels and other useful chemicals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Better pancakes through chemistry (video)
(American Chemical Society) Everyone seems to swear by a different pancake recipe. How can you griddle up the perfect pancakes for your Saturday morning breakfast? With chemistry, of course. Just in time for National Pancake Day, this video from Reactions will show you how to use chemistry to improve your flapjacks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'Green chemistry' for pharmaceuticals
An EU-funded project is exploring techniques to produce key ingredients required for pharmaceuticals through more efficient, cost-effective and environmentally friendly processes. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 25, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Italvacuum to Attend EXPOQUIMIA
Italvacuum has announced it is going to participate at EXPOQUIMIA, an international chemistry event. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - September 24, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Antidote saves victims of painkiller overdose
Currently, emergency medication must be given within eight hours of an overdose, as after this time, the build-up of damaging chemicals released by the liver becomes fatal. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Google Doodle Celebrates Renowned Organic Chemist Asima Chatterjee
Saturday’s Google Doodle paid homage to Asima Chatterjee, a renowned organic chemist from India. Saturday marks what would have been Chatterjee’s 100th birthday. The chemist died at the age of 89 in 2006. Chatterjee was the first woman to receive a Doctorate of Science in India and her work involved many breakthroughs in medicine. According to her Google Doodle page, her work contributed to the development of treatments for epilepsy, malaria and chemotherapy. Chatterjee was also given high honors in India. She received the Padma Bhushan, which is the third-highest award a civilian can receive in India. She was ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Marie Segarra Tags: Uncategorized Google onetime Source Type: news

Lehigh's Srinivas Rangarajan awarded ACS investigator grant
(Lehigh University) Srinivas Rangarajan, assistant professor in the department of chemical and biomolecular engineering, received a research grant from The American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund (ACS PRF) in September 2017. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Diving deeper to find answers to climate questions
EU-funded researchers are reconstructing how the chemical composition of the world's sea water evolved, using brachiopod shells. Their findings should advance understanding of recent changes to our climate. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 22, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Rural Uganda Gets a Health Worker Boost
September 21, 2017The sight of serene hills stretching into the horizon calmed my nerves as we snaked our way through steep and narrow dirt roads deep in Buhweju district, in South Western Uganda, 319 kilometers from the capital, Kampala.  Suddenly, it dawned on me why this district is considered “hard to reach” as I imagined what it would be like to traverse the same ground during a rainstorm or at night.It ’s here that I meet Janet Alupo, 20, an operating theatre assistant at Nsika Health Center IV who plans to take this same journey—plus an additional 332 kilometers—every three months ...
Source: IntraHealth International - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: lfreeze Source Type: news

How Poison Frogs Avoid Poisoning Themselves
Amphibians resist their own chemical defenses with amino acid modifications in the sequence for a target receptor. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 21, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News Source Type: news

Converting 30 Million Tons of Asbestos into Usable Chemicals
New details have emerged of a plan to remove 30 million tons of asbestos waste from the inactive 1,550-acre Eden-Lowell mine in Vermont. Solution: Move it to a proposed processing plant in Groveton, New Hampshire. The proposal is part of long-term cleanup plan that began in 2013, when officials with the Vermont Asbestos Group reached a settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Vermont state officials. Under the agreement, Vermont Asbestos Group (VAG) will pay past and future cleanup costs and maintain the site, including protecting the public from potential environmental asbestos exposure. The ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 21, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Tags: alternative uses of asbestos waste asbestos mine vermont asbestos runoff watersheds asbestos waste removal plan Belvidere Mountain Caledonian-Record Chrysotile asbestos converting asbestos into chemicals Eden-Lowell asbestos mine environ Source Type: news

Is Mother Nature fighting back? Chemical cloud that poisoned 200 may have been caused by algal bloom
(Natural News) Is Mother Nature fighting back against the abuses that have been heaped on her for decades? In the last week of August, beachgoers eager to enjoy the last of the summer in Birling Gap, East Sussex, U.K., were suddenly thrown into a state of panic when a strange mist, which some described as... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Antimicrobial chemicals in soap products found to permanently harm developing babies in utero
(Natural News) Triclocarban (TCC), the most common antibacterial chemical compound found in various personal care products such as soaps and lotions, can inadvertently be transferred from mother to child, inducing irreversible damage to the developing fetus. TCC was also noted to interfere with the lipid metabolism in the baby, which could potentially lead to growth... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Future plastics could be made out of sugar and carbon dioxide, making them harmless to the environment
(Natural News) The future looks brighter as researchers have discovered a way to create plastic that’s not harmful to nature. Scientists from the Centre of Sustainable Chemical Technologies (CSCT) at the University of Bath has successfully created a plastic material that doesn’t use highly toxic substances that could pose problems not only to the environment... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New scholarships worth EUR 417,000 awarded by Bayer Foundation to promote international talents
Highest amount for scholarships since program founding in 1923 / Support for study projects with a focus on science, agriculture, health and teacher training in biology and chemistry / Special programs for vocational careers in technology and health professions as well as for projects with a focus on Africa (Source: Bayer Company News)
Source: Bayer Company News - September 21, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Baltimore Ecosystem Study partners with Baltimore City Public Schools
(Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies) Through a $1.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation, the Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES) is partnering with Baltimore City Public Schools to transform the way that chemistry is taught in the city's high schools. The innovative approach draws on data gathered by BES to convey how chemistry shapes the local environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers parse ecosystems fueled by chemistry, not light
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Pennisi, E. Tags: Biochemistry, Ecology, Evolution, Oceanography In Depth Source Type: news

Titanium isotopic evidence for felsic crust and plate tectonics 3.5 billion years ago
Earth exhibits a dichotomy in elevation and chemical composition between the continents and ocean floor. Reconstructing when this dichotomy arose is important for understanding when plate tectonics started and how the supply of nutrients to the oceans changed through time. We measured the titanium isotopic composition of shales to constrain the chemical composition of the continental crust exposed to weathering and found that shales of all ages have a uniform isotopic composition. This can only be explained if the emerged crust was predominantly felsic (silica-rich) since 3.5 billion years ago, requiring an early initiatio...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Greber, N. D., Dauphas, N., Bekker, A., Ptacek, M. P., Bindeman, I. N., Hofmann, A. Tags: Geochemistry, Geophysics reports Source Type: news

Interacting amino acid replacements allow poison frogs to evolve epibatidine resistance
Animals that wield toxins face self-intoxication. Poison frogs have a diverse arsenal of defensive alkaloids that target the nervous system. Among them is epibatidine, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonist that is lethal at microgram doses. Epibatidine shares a highly conserved binding site with acetylcholine, making it difficult to evolve resistance yet maintain nAChR function. Electrophysiological assays of human and frog nAChR revealed that one amino acid replacement, which evolved three times in poison frogs, decreased epibatidine sensitivity but at a cost of acetylcholine sensitivity. However, receptor fu...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Tarvin, R. D., Borghese, C. M., Sachs, W., Santos, J. C., Lu, Y., OConnell, L. A., Cannatella, D. C., Harris, R. A., Zakon, H. H. Tags: Evolution r-articles Source Type: news

Poison frogs resist their own chemical defense
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Evolution twis Source Type: news

One e-cigarette with nicotine leads to adrenaline changes in nonsmokers ’ hearts
A new UCLA study has found that healthy nonsmokers experienced increased adrenaline levels in their hearts after one electronic cigarette with nicotine.Thefindings are published in  Journal of the American Heart Association,  the open access journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.Unlike cigarettes, e-cigarettes, also known as e-cigs, have no combustion or tobacco. Instead, these electronic, handheld devices deliver nicotine with flavoring and other chemicals in a vapor rather than smoke.“While e-cigarettes typically deliver fewer carcinogens than are found in the tar of tobacc...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 20, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Former Substitute Teacher Accused of Having Sex With High School Student
This article originally appeared on People.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized Crime Michigan onetime Source Type: news

Energy-efficient Green Buildings May Emit Hazardous Chemicals Energy-efficient Green Buildings May Emit Hazardous Chemicals
Newly renovated low-income housing units in Boston earned awards for green design and building but flunked indoor air-quality tests, a new study shows.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - September 20, 2017 Category: Pathology Tags: Public Health & Prevention News Source Type: news

Climate Change Is Already Making People Sicker
Climate change is a central issue at this year’s United Nations General Assembly (UNGA), with multiple high-level meetings on the issue happening amid several devastating natural disasters. Hurricane Irma recently swept through the Caribbean and into Florida, only to be quickly followed by Hurricane Maria. “Climate change casts a long shadow over the development efforts of our country,” said Darren Henfield, the minster of foreign affairs of the Bahamas, during a UNGA meeting on Hurricane Irma. “The implications of rising sea levels and atmospheric temperatures signal dire consequences for low-lying...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized climate change climate change health climate change health effects climate change trump climate change united nations global health UNGA United Nations General Assembly what is climate what is climate change Source Type: news

Researchers are Now Editing Genomes of Human Embryos
Researchers are finding ever more powerful ways to use the genome editing tool CRISPR. In the latest, a UK group used the technology to remove a critical gene needed for human development in order to learn more about the earliest steps of how embryos form. In a paper published in the journal Nature, Kathy Niakan, group leader from the Francis Crick Institute, and her colleagues snipped out one gene from the genome of a one-celled, just-fertilized human egg. CRISPR is the most precise genome-editing tool scientists have at their disposal, and it accurately spliced out the gene in 80% of the 41 embryos tested. Niakan focused...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized crispr crispr and human disease crispr and human embryos crispr diseases gene editing Genetics genome editing human embryogenesis in vitro fertilization is crispr safe IVF ivf crispr what is CRISPR Source Type: news

' Green' Buildings Could Still Be Emitting Hazardous Chemicals
The dangerous chemicals were coming from both inside the building and the consumer goods residents brought with them. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A review of chemical 'spot' tests: a presumptive illicit drug identification technique - Philp M, Fu S.
Chemical 'spot' tests are a presumptive illicit drug identification technique commonly used by law enforcement, border security personnel, and forensic laboratories. The simplicity, low cost and rapid results afforded by these tests make them particularly ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

EXTINCTION WARNING: Chemicals in food and personal care products making humanity infertile... may lead to population wipeout
(Natural News) If sperm counts continue to fall at the current pace, humans could become extinct, a new report revealed. A team of researchers from the Hebrew University-Hadassah Braun School of Public Health and Community Medicine and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai analyzed the results of 185 studies involving nearly 43,000 men... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Steering the immune defense against fungal pathogens
(Wiley) Fungal infections represent an increasing health crisis, especially for immune-deficient patients. American scientists now report in the journal Angewandte Chemie that specific help could be provided by small-molecule immunotherapeutics with novel mechanism of action. They developed small bifunctional molecules that simultaneously bind both chitin, a specific feature of the fungal cell wall and a molecule not found in humans, and naturally occurring human antibodies and redirect the human immune system to eliminate fungal pathogens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 20, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Smokers who quit have metabolite levels that resemble those of nonsmokers
(American Chemical Society) Even after years of smoking, the body has a remarkable ability to repair itself. Now in a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research, scientists report that certain metabolic changes occur soon after quitting, and these changes could help explain how some ill-effects of smoking might be reversible. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chemists speak out on sexual harassment in academia
(American Chemical Society) Sexual misconduct on college campuses is an age-old problem that continues to plague students and faculty, and is now the subject of renewed debate. It can traumatize those who are harassed, and change the course of people's careers. The cover article in Chemical& Engineering News, the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society, shares how sexual harassment has affected chemistry students and faculty, and what universities and scientific societies are doing about it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research provides clues to treat depression, autism and other neuropsychiatric disorders
(Florida Atlantic University) Alterations in a naturally occurring chemical in the brain called serotonin have been linked to a number of neuropsychiatric disorders including depression, anxiety and autism. A team of researchers is revealing critical insights into the mechanisms that can drive diminished serotonin signaling during development and in adulthood to provide new ways of treating several widespread neuropsychiatric disorders associated with perturbed serotonin signaling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bio-inspired approach to RNA delivery
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A team of MIT chemical engineers, inspired by the way that cells translate their own mRNA into proteins, has designed a synthetic delivery system that is four times more effective than delivering mRNA on its own. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ensuring broccoli sprouts retain their cancer-fighting compounds
(American Chemical Society) Raw broccoli sprouts, a rich source of potential cancer-fighting compounds, have become a popular health food in recent years. But conventional heat treatment used to kill bacteria on produce can reduce levels of the broccoli sprouts' helpful phytochemicals. Now researchers report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that high pressure processing could wipe out harmful bacteria while maintaining high concentrations of its health-promoting ingredients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cell phone data coupled with sewage testing show drug use patterns
(American Chemical Society) The drugs people inhale, inject or ingest ultimately end up in some form down the toilet. So scientists have started monitoring drug use through sewage-based epidemiology. But this approach hasn't taken into account the variation in number of people who add to wastewater in a given area at a given time. Now one team reports in ACS' Environmental Science& Technology a way to account for commutes and vacations: by tracking cell phone signals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Getting to the heart of the matter: Nanogels for heart attack patients
(American Chemical Society) Heart disease and heart-related illnesses are a leading cause of death around the world, but treatment options are limited. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano that encapsulating stem cells in a nanogel could help repair damage to the heart. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lipid vesicles replace blood in new bacteria test
(American Chemical Society) As schools around the U.S. start back up, so do trips to the doctor's office. But is that raw sore throat due to bacteria, which can be fought off with antibiotics, or a virus? Getting a definitive diagnosis of bacterial infections like Strep throat can take days. Now, one group reports in ACS Sensors that they have developed a new test that will provide results in just hours. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Evidence Would 'Inflame' Jury In Cancer Case, Company Says, Should Be Excluded
ASHEVILLE, N.C. - A company being sued for allegedly contaminating a North Carolina man's groundwater on Sept. 11 filed a brief in North Carolina federal court contending that the district court should exclude evidence regarding contamination on the east side of the company's former facility, evidence of the presence of chemicals other than benzene and evidence of alleged negligence because it would "inflame" the jury (Kent Stahle v. CTS Corporation, No. 14-48, W.D. N.C.). (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - September 20, 2017 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

Battery Company: Design Changes Caused Chemical Injury Explosion On Fracking Rig
OKLAHOMA CITY - A company that is the third-party defendant in a lawsuit brought by a man who alleges that he suffered chemical injuries from a lithium battery pack that exploded on a hydraulic fracturing rig filed a brief in Oklahoma federal court on Sept. 13, contending that the fracking company's motion for summary judgment should be denied because "at the very least" an issue of fact remains regarding whether the fracking company's design changes to the battery pack were a proximate cause of the explosion at issue (Jacob McGehee, et al. v. Southwest Electronic Energy Corporation, et al. and Southwest Electron...
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - September 20, 2017 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

Judge Says Chemical Injury Plaintiff Did Not Allege His Water Was Tainted
ALBANY, N.Y. - A federal judge in New York on Sept. 5 dismissed a chemical injury lawsuit on grounds that the plaintiff failed to allege that his injuries were caused by contamination to his personal water supply (James Donavan v. Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Corp., No. 16-294, N.D. N.Y.; 2017 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 143198). (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - September 20, 2017 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

LA exposed toxic fumes due to chemical leaks in soil
Exide Technologies near LA released harmful chemicals such as lead and benzene. More than 10,000 homes have been affected but city says it can only decontaminate 2,500 in the next two years. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Monsanto Manufactured Outrage At Chemical Cancer Classification It Expected
Three years ago this month Monsanto Co. executives realized they had a big problem on their hands. It was September 2014 (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Gulf spill oil dispersants associated with health symptoms in cleanup workers
Dispersants are a blend of chemical compounds used to break down oil slicks. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - September 19, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Toxic tattoo ink accumulates in lymph nodes, causing life-long cancer risk
(Natural News) Scientists now warn that colored tattoos can increase the risk of cancer. The pigmented dyes used by most tattoo parlors contain a controversial chemical known as titanium dioxide. This compound is added to tattoo ink to give certain colors. But while the chemical is efficient in exacting the correct shade desired, it is... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news