Janssen Announces U.S. FDA Approval of CABENUVA (rilpivirine and cabotegravir), the First Long-Acting Regimen for the Treatment of HIV
TITUSVILLE, N.J., January 21, 2021 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved CABENUVA (consisting of Janssen’s rilpivirine and ViiV Healthcare’s cabotegravir), the first and only once-monthly, long-acting regimen for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in adults. The novel regimen was co-developed as part of a collaboration with ViiV Healthcare and builds on Janssen’s 25-year commitment to make HIV history. In the U.S., ViiV Healthcare is the marketing authorization holde...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - January 22, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

The road to future zero emissions demands a new form of ammonia production
(Aarhus University) Ammonia is one of the most important chemicals manufactured globally today and has lately been envisaged as an opportunity to reduce carbon footprint for a range of industries. Its production however, is currently far from sustainable and carbon-free. A new innovative research project, bridging knowledge from all over the world, aims to change that by finding new ways of producing green ammonia. The project has received a generous grant by Horizon 2020. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Iridium-catalyzed Z-retentive asymmetric allylic substitution reactions
Z-Olefins are challenging synthetic targets owing to their relative thermodynamic instability. Transition metal–catalyzed asymmetric allylic substitution reactions are well known for installing stereocenters adjacent to branched or E-linear olefins. However, analogous reactions for the synthesis of optically active Z-olefin products are rare. Here we report iridium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic substitution reactions that retain Z-olefin geometries while establishing an adjacent quaternary stereocenter. The formation of transient anti--allyl-iridium intermediates and their capture by external nucleophiles before isome...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 21, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jiang, R., Ding, L., Zheng, C., You, S.-L. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Unraveling CO adsorption on model single-atom catalysts
We present an in-depth study of copper1, silver1, gold1, nickel1, palladium1, platinum1, rhodium1, and iridium1 species on Fe3O4(001), a model support in which all metals occupy the same twofold-coordinated adsorption site upon deposition at room temperature. Surface science techniques revealed that CO adsorption strength at single metal sites differs from the respective metal surfaces and supported clusters. Charge transfer into the support modifies the d-states of the metal atom and the strength of the metal–CO bond. These effects could strengthen the bond (as for Ag1–CO) or weaken it (as for Ni1–CO), b...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 21, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Hulva, J., Meier, M., Bliem, R., Jakub, Z., Kraushofer, F., Schmid, M., Diebold, U., Franchini, C., Parkinson, G. S. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Keeping Z-olefins intact with iridium
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 21, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Modeling single-atom reactivity
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 21, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Szuromi, P. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Racing against unwanted isomerization
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 21, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Malcolmson, S. J. Tags: Chemistry perspective Source Type: news

Smoking Marijuana Ups Toxic Chemical Levels in Blood, Urine
However, levels of smoke - related chemicals lower compared with those seen with tobacco smoking (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - January 20, 2021 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

Smoking Marijuana Ups Toxic Chemical Levels in Blood, Urine
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20, 2021 -- People who smoke marijuana have several smoke-related toxic chemicals in their blood and urine, but at lower levels than those who smoke tobacco, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in EClinicalMedicine. David... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 20, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New antifungal compound from ant farms
(American Chemical Society) Attine ants are farmers, and they grow fungus as food.Pseudonocardia andStreptomyces bacteria are their farmhands, producing metabolites that protect the crop from pathogens. Surprisingly, these metabolites lack common structural features across bacteria from different geographic locations, even though the ants share a common ancestor. Now, researchers report inACS Central Science they have identified the first shared antifungal compound among many of these bacteria across Brazil. The compound could someday have medical applications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 20, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An anode-free zinc battery that could someday store renewable energy
(American Chemical Society) Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, could help decrease the world's reliance on fossil fuels. But first, power companies need a safe, cost-effective way to store the energy for later use. Massive lithium-ion batteries can do the job, but they suffer from safety issues and limited lithium availability. Now, researchers reporting in ACS'Nano Letters have made a prototype of an anode-free, zinc-based battery that uses low-cost, naturally abundant materials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Intoxicating chemicals in catnip and silver vine protect felines from mosquito bites
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Rubbing against catnip and silver vine transfers plant chemicals that researchers have now shown protect cats from mosquitoes. The results also demonstrate that engaging with nepetalactol, which the study identified as the most potent of many intoxicating iridoid compounds found in silver vine, activates the opioid reward system in both domesticated felines (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

COVID-19 model reveals key role for innate immunity in controlling viral load
(American Chemical Society) Since SARS-CoV-2 was identified in December 2019, researchers have worked feverishly to study the novel coronavirus. Although much knowledge has been gained, scientists still have a lot to learn about how SARS-CoV-2 interacts with the human body, and how the immune system fights it. Now, researchers reporting inACS Pharmacology& Translational Science have developed a mathematical model of SARS-CoV-2 infection that reveals a key role for the innate immune system in controlling viral load. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 20, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Ultra-small nanomedicines which stably deliver oligonucleotides to refractory cancers
(Innovation Center of NanoMedicine) Ultra-small nanomedicines with a size of ca. 18 nm were fabricated by dynamic ion-pairing between Y-shaped block copolymers and oligonucleotide drugs. Chemically modified and double-stranded oligonucleotides dramatically enhanced the stability of the ultra-small nanomedicines in the bloodstream. The size allows for high permeability in cancer tissues by slipping through the cracks in tumor vasculatures and stromal tissues. Clinical trials and preclinical studies using the developed ultra-small nanomedicines are proceeding for refractory cancer therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 19, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Decoding breast milk to make better baby formula (video)
(American Chemical Society) What makes breast milk so good for babies? In this episode of Reactions, our host, Sam, chats with chemist Steven Townsend, Ph.D., who's trying to figure out which sugar molecules in breast milk make it so unique and difficult to mimic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 19, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ineos gives Oxford £100m to set up antibiotic research institute
Chemicals company makes largest donation for science in university’s history (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - January 19, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Startup Spotlight: Pure Organiks' mission is more than skin deep
Chemical engineer Ayana Swanson created her all-natural product line after spending years struggling with eczema and harsh prescription creams. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 18, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Michelle Caffrey Source Type: news

Synthesis of potent antibiotic follows unusual chemical pathway
(Penn State) Images of a protein involved in creating a potent antibiotic reveal the unusual first steps of the antibiotic's synthesis. The improved understanding of the chemistry behind this process, detailed in a new study led by Penn State chemists, could allow researchers to adapt this and similar compounds for use in human medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 18, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lasers & molecular tethers create perfectly patterned platforms for tissue engineering
(University of Washington) Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a technique to modify naturally occurring biological polymers with protein-based biochemical messages that affect cell behavior. Their approach, published the week of Jan. 18, 2021 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, uses a near-infrared laser to trigger chemical adhesion of protein messages to a scaffold made from biological polymers such as collagen, a connective tissue found throughout our bodies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 18, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

James Harden makes NBA history in dazzling Nets debut, showcases immediate chemistry with Kevin Durant
Harden was spectacular on Friday, posting a triple double while consistently prioritizing his teammates' involvement (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prostate cancer warning: Bisphenol A found on receipts could be increasing your risk
PROSTATE cancer warning: More and more cases of men being diagnosed with the deadly disease are taking place in the UK. Could a chemical in receipts be the cause of the sudden surge in recent years? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - January 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prevalence and treatment of retrograde peri-implantitis: a retrospective cohort study covering a 20-year period
ConclusionsRPI was successfully treated with surgical curettage and bone substitute application and all implants are still in place after a mean follow-up of 8.83  ± 5.34 years.Clinical relevanceBacteria from teeth with failed endodontic treatment or residual lesions might be reactivated by drilling for implant osteotomy, with subsequent colonization of the implant apex and possible failure before prosthetic loading. Therefore, it might be recommended to take a periapical x-ray at implant placement and after 6 –8 weeks in order to intercept RPI before prostheses delivery. (Source: Dental Technology Blog)
Source: Dental Technology Blog - January 16, 2021 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Antimicrobial compound in seaweed can be used to develop self-cleaning surfaces, new research finds
(Natural News) Seaweed is known for being the best dietary source of iodine and for providing many other health benefits. But according to researchers at Unilever, seaweed can also be used to develop self-cleaning surfaces. After more than a decade of studying the chemical components of seaweed, Unilever announced on Jan. 5 that it has developed a new technology that... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bee die-offs in Nebraska traced to pesticide-using ethanol plant
(Natural News) Honey bees in Nebraska have been dropping dead due to an ethanol plant that generates enormous heaps of smelly waste containing unsafe levels of pesticides. AltEn, a recycling plant based in the town of Mead, has been using pesticide-coated grains to produce ethanol, a chemical used to make biofuel. As a result, the company has been churning out... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NTSB Says Vehicle Battery Fires Pose Risks to 1st Responders
By TOM KRISHER AP Auto Writer DETROIT (AP) — Electric vehicle fires pose safety risks to first responders and guidelines from manufacturers about how to deal with them have been inadequate, according to U.S. investigators. There are also gaps in industry safety standards and research on high-voltage lithium-ion battery fires, especially in high-speed, severe crashes, the National Transportation Safety Board said Wednesday. The agency, which has no enforcement powers and can only make recommendations, called for manufacturers to write vehicle-specific response guides for fighting battery fires and limiting ch...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Operations Rescue & Vehicle Extrication Fire National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Source Type: news

NTSB Says Vehicle Battery Fires Pose Risks to 1st Responders
By TOM KRISHER AP Auto Writer DETROIT (AP) — Electric vehicle fires pose safety risks to first responders and guidelines from manufacturers about how to deal with them have been inadequate, according to U.S. investigators. There are also gaps in industry safety standards and research on high-voltage lithium-ion battery fires, especially in high-speed, severe crashes, the National Transportation Safety Board said Wednesday. The agency, which has no enforcement powers and can only make recommendations, called for manufacturers to write vehicle-specific response guides for fighting battery fires and limiting ch...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Operations Rescue & Vehicle Extrication Fire National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Source Type: news

NTSB Says Vehicle Battery Fires Pose Risks to 1st Responders
By TOM KRISHER AP Auto Writer DETROIT (AP) — Electric vehicle fires pose safety risks to first responders and guidelines from manufacturers about how to deal with them have been inadequate, according to U.S. investigators. There are also gaps in industry safety standards and research on high-voltage lithium-ion battery fires, especially in high-speed, severe crashes, the National Transportation Safety Board said Wednesday. The agency, which has no enforcement powers and can only make recommendations, called for manufacturers to write vehicle-specific response guides for fighting battery fires and limiting ch...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Operations Rescue & Vehicle Extrication Fire National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Source Type: news

NTSB Says Vehicle Battery Fires Pose Risks to 1st Responders
By TOM KRISHER AP Auto Writer DETROIT (AP) — Electric vehicle fires pose safety risks to first responders and guidelines from manufacturers about how to deal with them have been inadequate, according to U.S. investigators. There are also gaps in industry safety standards and research on high-voltage lithium-ion battery fires, especially in high-speed, severe crashes, the National Transportation Safety Board said Wednesday. The agency, which has no enforcement powers and can only make recommendations, called for manufacturers to write vehicle-specific response guides for fighting battery fires and limiting ch...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Operations Rescue & Vehicle Extrication Fire National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Source Type: news

NTSB Says Vehicle Battery Fires Pose Risks to 1st Responders
By TOM KRISHER AP Auto Writer DETROIT (AP) — Electric vehicle fires pose safety risks to first responders and guidelines from manufacturers about how to deal with them have been inadequate, according to U.S. investigators. There are also gaps in industry safety standards and research on high-voltage lithium-ion battery fires, especially in high-speed, severe crashes, the National Transportation Safety Board said Wednesday. The agency, which has no enforcement powers and can only make recommendations, called for manufacturers to write vehicle-specific response guides for fighting battery fires and limiting ch...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Operations Rescue & Vehicle Extrication Fire National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Source Type: news

NTSB Says Vehicle Battery Fires Pose Risks to 1st Responders
By TOM KRISHER AP Auto Writer DETROIT (AP) — Electric vehicle fires pose safety risks to first responders and guidelines from manufacturers about how to deal with them have been inadequate, according to U.S. investigators. There are also gaps in industry safety standards and research on high-voltage lithium-ion battery fires, especially in high-speed, severe crashes, the National Transportation Safety Board said Wednesday. The agency, which has no enforcement powers and can only make recommendations, called for manufacturers to write vehicle-specific response guides for fighting battery fires and limiting ch...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Operations Rescue & Vehicle Extrication Fire National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Source Type: news

Research breaks new ground in understanding how a molecular motor generates force
(University of Massachusetts Amherst) A team of biophysicists set out to tackle the long-standing question about the nature of force generation by myosin, the molecular motor responsible for muscle contraction. The key question they addressed - one of the most controversial topics in the field - was: how does myosin convert chemical energy, in the form of ATP, into mechanical work? The answer revealed new details into how myosin, the engine of muscle and related motor proteins, transduces energy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 14, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Covid-19: High Street chemists start vaccinations in England
Six chemists have been chosen initially, with 200 more offering vaccinations in the next fortnight. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - January 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Chemical that makes chilli peppers spicy boosts solar panel cells
Solar cells treated with capsaicin, the compound that makes chilli peppers spicy to taste, are more efficient at converting solar energy (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Comment on "Boosted molecular mobility during common chemical reactions"
The apparent "boosted mobility" observed by Wang et al. (Reports, 31 July 2020, p. 537) is the result of a known artifact. When signal intensities are changing during a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion measurement for reasons other than diffusion, the use of monotonically increasing gradient amplitudes produces erroneous diffusion coefficients. We show that no boosted molecular mobility is observed when shuffled gradient amplitudes are applied. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Günther, J.-P., Fillbrook, L. L., MacDonald, T. S. C., Majer, G., Price, W. S., Fischer, P., Beves, J. E. Tags: t-comment Source Type: news

Response to Comment on "Boosted molecular mobility during common chemical reactions"
Günther et al. report that their control experiment using randomized magnetic field gradient sequences disagreed with findings we had reported using linear gradients. However, we show that measurements in our laboratory are consistent using both methods. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Wang, H., Park, M., Dong, R., Kim, J., Cho, Y.-K., Tlusty, T., Granick, S. Tags: t-comment Source Type: news

Driving energetically unfavorable dehydrogenation dynamics with plasmonics
Nanoparticle surface structure and geometry generally dictate where chemical transformations occur, with higher chemical activity at sites with lower activation energies. Here, we show how optical excitation of plasmons enables spatially modified phase transformations, activating otherwise energetically unfavorable sites. We have designed a crossed-bar Au-PdHx antenna-reactor system that localizes electromagnetic enhancement away from the innately reactive PdHx nanorod tips. Using optically coupled in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy, we track the dehydrogenation of individual antenna-reactor pairs with ...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sytwu, K., Vadai, M., Hayee, F., Angell, D. K., Dai, A., Dixon, J., Dionne, J. A. Tags: Materials Science, Physics reports Source Type: news

Controlled hydroxylations of diterpenoids allow for plant chemical defense without autotoxicity
Many plant specialized metabolites function in herbivore defense, and abrogating particular steps in their biosynthetic pathways frequently causes autotoxicity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying their defense and autotoxicity remain unclear. Here, we show that silencing two cytochrome P450s involved in diterpene biosynthesis in the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata causes severe autotoxicity symptoms that result from the inhibition of sphingolipid biosynthesis by noncontrolled hydroxylated diterpene derivatives. Moreover, the diterpenes’ defensive function is achieved by inhibiting herbivore sphingolipid bi...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Li, J., Halitschke, R., Li, D., Paetz, C., Su, H., Heiling, S., Xu, S., Baldwin, I. T. Tags: Botany, Ecology r-articles Source Type: news

Weaker skin barrier leads to faster uptake of chemicals
(Karolinska Institutet) The ability of our skin to protect us from chemicals is something we inherit. Some people are less well-protected which could imply an increased risk of being afflicted by skin disease or cancer. A new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden that has been published in Environmental Health Perspectives shows how the rate of uptake of common chemicals is faster in people with a genetically weakened skin barrier. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 13, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The meat of the matter: Environmental dissemination of beef cattle agrochemicals
(Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry) A recent Point of Reference article, " The meat of the matter: Environmental dissemination of beef cattle agrochemicals, " published inEnvironmental Toxicology and Chemistry, points at synthetic chemical cocktails being emitted from cattle feed yards into the environment and how they can impact our ecosystem and our health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 13, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Copper-indium oxide: A faster and cooler way to reduce our carbon footprint
(Waseda University) Emergent e-fuel technologies often employ the reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) reaction to convert atmospheric CO2 to CO. While efficient, this reaction requires high temperatures and complex gas separation for high performance. However, for the first time in the world, scientists from Japan have now demonstrated record-high CO2 conversion rates at relatively low temperatures in a modified chemical-looping version of RWGS using a novel copper-indium oxide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 13, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Spilling the beans on coffee's true identity
(American Chemical Society) People worldwide want their coffee to be both satisfying and reasonably priced. To meet these standards, roasters typically use a blend of two types of beans, arabica and robusta. But, some use more of the cheaper robusta than they acknowledge, as the bean composition is difficult to determine after roasting. Now, researchers reporting in ACS'Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have developed a new way to assess exactly what's in that cup of joe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 13, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Compound from medicinal herb kills brain-eating amoebae in lab studies
(American Chemical Society) Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a deadly disease caused by the " brain-eating amoeba " Naegleria fowleri, is becoming more common in some areas of the world, and it has no effective treatment. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Chemical Neuroscience have found that a compound isolated from the leaves of a traditional medicinal plant, Inula viscosa or " false yellowhead, " kills the amoebae by causing them to commit cell suicide in lab studies, which could lead to new treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A look ahead at the year in chemistry
(American Chemical Society) After a tumultuous 2020, the chemistry world is wondering what 2021 has in store for the field. To help guide chemists through the coming year,Chemical& Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, is highlighting key business and policy issues that will impact the chemistry enterprise in the U.S. and around the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Superheroes, foods and apps bring a modern twist to the periodic table
(American Chemical Society) Many students, especially non-science majors, dread chemistry. The first lesson in an introductory chemistry course typically deals with how to interpret the periodic table of elements, but its complexity can be overwhelming to students with little or no previous exposure. Now, researchers reporting in ACS'Journal of Chemical Education introduce an innovative way to make learning about the elements much more approachable -- by using " pseudo " periodic tables filled with superheroes, foods and apps. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In new Skoltech research, 'e-nose' and computer vision help cook the perfect chicken
(Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech)) Skoltech researchers have found a way to use chemical sensors and computer vision to determine when grilled chicken is cooked just right. These tools can help restaurants monitor and automate cooking processes in their kitchens, and perhaps one day even end up in your 'smart' oven. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 13, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UK nuclear spacecraft could halve time of journey to Mars
Rolls-Royce and UK Space Agency hope to ‘revolutionise space travel’ with deal to build nuclear propulsion enginesBritish spacecraft could travel to Mars in half the time it now takes by using nuclear propulsion engines built by Rolls-Royce under a new deal with the UK Space Agency.The aerospace company hopes nuclear-powered engines could help astronauts make it to Mars in three to four months, twice as fast as the most powerful chemical engines, and unlock deeper space exploration in the decades to come.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jillian Ambrose Tags: Rolls-Royce Space Nuclear power Manufacturing sector Business Science UK news Source Type: news

OXGENE introduces SLIM platform for discovery of antibodies against membrane proteins
Novel self-labelling mammalian display method for identifying antibodies against membrane proteins in their native configurationPaper published in Journal of Biological Chemistry demonstrates... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - January 12, 2021 Category: Science Tags: The Scientist The Marketplace Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins scientist develops method to find toxic chemicals in drinking water
(Johns Hopkins University) Most consumers of drinking water in the United States know that chemicals are used in the treatment processes to ensure the water is safe to drink. But they might not know that the use of some of these chemicals, such as chlorine, can also lead to the formation of unregulated toxic byproducts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A case report on occupational acute dimethylsulfate poisoning - Wang SS, Li M, Wang WW.
Dimethyl sulfate is a colorless, oily liquid with a slight onion odor. It is commonly used as a methylating agent in the chemical industry and has a strong irritating and corrosive effect on mucous membranes and skin. The dismantling of production equipmen... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Occupational Issues Source Type: news

Counteracting poisoning with chemical warfare nerve agents - Hrvat NM, Kovarik Z.
Phosphylation of the pivotal enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by nerve agents (NAs) leads to irreversible inhibition of the enzyme and accumulation of neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which induces cholinergic crisis, that is, overstimulation of muscari... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news