Dragonfly larvae collected by citizen-scientists as sentinels for mercury bioaccumulation
(American Chemical Society) Various forms of mercury are released naturally by volcanoes and weathering of rocks and soil. Human activities, such as mining or burning fossil fuels, can also release the element into the environment, where aquatic microbes can convert it into the toxic form, methylmercury. Now, researchers reporting in ACS'Environmental Science& Technology have shown that dragonfly larvae, collected from national parks as part of a citizen-scientist engagement program, can serve as sentinels for mercury bioaccumulation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 22, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Antioxidant-rich powders from blueberry, persimmon waste could be good for gut microbiota
(American Chemical Society) Feeding the world's growing population in a sustainable way is no easy task. That's why scientists are exploring options for transforming fruit and vegetable byproducts -- such as peels or pulp discarded during processing -- into nutritious food ingredients and supplements. Now, researchers reporting in ACS'Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have shown that blueberry and persimmon waste can be made into antioxidant-rich powders that might have beneficial effects on gut microbiota. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 22, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists race to develop an effective COVID-19 vaccine
(American Chemical Society) With the global pandemic still in full swing, scientists are working to develop a vaccine in record time. While everyone wants an effective vaccine, they don't all agree on how to get there and what " effective " really means.Chemical& Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, spoke with researchers, doctors and business leaders to shed light on some of the challenges vaccine developers are facing.   (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Georgia State faculty get COVID-19 funding to develop coronavirus test tools
(Georgia State University) Georgia State University researchers have received a one-year, $200,000 rapid response grant from the National Science Foundation to develop a tool to detect the presence of SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing the COVID-19 pandemic.Technology being developed by chemistry professor Gangli Wang in collaboration with assistant biology professor Mukesh Kumar is anticipated to provide several benefits, including fast turnaround time and greatly decreased false negative outcomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cellular cleanup! Atg40 folds the endoplasmic reticulum to facilitate its autophagy
(Tokyo Institute of Technology) Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Institute of Microbial Chemistry investigated 'ER-phagy,' the degradation mechanism of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an important organelle with multiple biologically necessary functions like the synthesis of proteins and lipids. Degradation is critical for maintaining ER functions. Scientists found that the 'Atg40' protein not only marks ER parts to be degraded by autophagy, but also folds them for efficient degradation, contributing to our understanding of a critical process in cellular maintenance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 22, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Plastics and pesticides: Health impacts of synthetic chemicals in US products doubled in last 5 years, study finds
The proof is piling up: Many synthetic chemicals can harm your health and that of your children. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Everything you ever wanted to know about leech sex but were afraid to ask
(Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry) New research, published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, sheds light on the effects the synthetic estrogens commonly found in birth control pills have on leeches. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Smile: Atomic imaging finds root of tooth decay
(Cornell University) A collaboration between researchers from Cornell University, Northwestern University and University of Virginia combined complementary imaging techniques to explore the atomic structure of human enamel, exposing tiny chemical flaws in the fundamental building blocks of our teeth. The findings could help scientists prevent or possibly reverse tooth decay. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 21, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cells communicate by doing the 'wave'
(Kyoto University) A research team at Kyoto University reports on a novel method of cell communication relying on 'mechano-chemical' signals to control cell movement. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pathophysiological effects of sulfur mustard on skin and its current treatments: possible application of phytochemicals - Hassanpour M, Hajihassani F, Abdollahpourasl M, Cheraghi O, Aghamohamadzade N, Rahbargazi R, Nouri M, Pilehvar-Soltanahmadi Y, Zarghami N, Akbarzadeh A, Panahi Y, Sahebkar A.
BACKGROUND: Sulfur-(SM) and nitrogen (NM)-based mustards are mutagenic incapacitating compounds that are widely used in vesicating chemical warfare and cause toxicity in many organs especially skin. SM, as a potent vesicating agent, contributes to the dest... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Individual factors influencing risk perceptions of hazardous chemicals in China - Liu T, Zhang H, Li X, Zhang H.
In view of the public concern about the possible risks posed by hazardous chemicals in China, the study on risk perceptions offer an important opportunity to assess the public's awareness of the risks of hazardous chemicals as well as to predict the public... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

The Link Between Parkinson ’s Disease and Toxic Chemicals
A new book calls the increasing prominence of Parkinson ’s “a man-made pandemic.” (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jane E. Brody Tags: Parkinson ' s Disease Hazardous and Toxic Substances Pesticides Chemicals Water Pollution Smoking and Tobacco Source Type: news

Professors Sam Sia and Ken Shepard win $16.4M DARPA Grant
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Columbia Engineering researchers are leading a multi-institutional team to develop an " active " bandage with implanted components that, guided by a machine-learning framework to monitor and modulate the healing progression, will accelerate the recovery of the wound. The patch device will enable active sensing of the wound healing process through a wide range of sensors integrated into wound dressings for various physical and chemical indicators, including pH, temperature, oxygen level, moisture, mechanical, and electrical signals. (Source: EurekAler...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What silicone wristbands say about chemical exposure in Uruguayan children
(University at Buffalo) Researchers used silicone wristbands to examine the extent of chemical exposure among a small group of children in Montevideo, Uruguay. The 6- to 8-year-olds wore the bands for seven days. After analyzing the wristbands, researchers found an average of 13 pollutants in each one collected. Some of the wristbands showed exposure to DDT, a harmful pesticide that has been banned for use in many countries, including the U.S., since the 1970s. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Native bushland's fertility secret
(Flinders University) In hotter, dryer conditions with climate change, a secret agent for more sustainable agricultural production could lie in harvesting the diverse beneficial soil microbiome in native bushland settings, scientists say.New research from CSIRO, Flinders University and La Trobe University highlights the importance of soil biological health and further potential to use organic rather than chemical farm inputs for crop production. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Florida harmful algal blooms produce multiple toxins detrimental to human health
(Brain Chemistry Labs) In 2018, cyanobacteria from nutrient-rich waters in Lake Okeechobee were released down the Caloosahatchee river at the same time red tides were gathering along the Florida west coast, potentially exposing coastal residents to a mixture of toxins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nitrile compounds are cyanogenic intermediates, products, byproducts and waste products of agriculture, chemical and pharmaceutical industries and fossil fuels degradation. The enzymatic hydrolysis of nitriles to non-toxic carboxylic acids or amides plays
Conference abstracts (Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates)
Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates - July 17, 2020 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: MeganB Source Type: news

Quarantine coffee roasting competition: Game on (video)
(American Chemical Society) How hard could roasting beans at home really be? Sam and George go head-to-head in a coffee roasting competition to find out, and Candy Schibli, the founder and head roaster of Southeastern Coffee Roastery, provides expert advice: https://youtu.be/4Wey8GSglkw. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 17, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New technology promises to revolutionize nanomedicine
(Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and their colleagues from Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry and Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences have developed a breakthrough technology to resolve a key problem that has prevented the introduction of novel drugs into clinical practice for decades. The new solution prolongs blood circulation for virtually any nanomedicine, boosting its therapeutic efficiency. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A chemical tailor-made suit for Alzheimer's drugs
(University of G ö ttingen) Over 50 million people worldwide are affected by Alzheimer's disease and it is one of the greatest medical and social challenges of our time. Due to pathological changes in the brain, patients become increasingly forgetful and disoriented as the disease progresses. Alzheimer's is still considered incurable today. Researchers at the University of G ö ttingen and the Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology Leipzig-Halle describe a promising approach to treating Alzheimer's disease. The results were published in Biochemistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 17, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Early COVID-19 Vaccine Results Look ‘Really Encouraging,’ Says NIH Boss Dr. Francis Collins
This article is part of #TIME100Talks: Finding Hope, a special series featuring leaders across different fields encouraging action toward a better world. Want more? Sign up for access to more virtual events, including live conversations with influential newsmakers. (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - July 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Chris Wilson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 TIME100 Talks Source Type: news

$1.4 million SBIR grant fast-tracks antibody technology for pharmaceutical manufacturers
(Purdue University) Novilytic LLC, a company that secures lifesaving drugs and medical devices and is based in the Purdue Research Park West Lafayette, has been awarded a Phase II SBIR contract by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, one of the National Institutes of Health. The $1.4 million Phase II contract will allow Novilytic to continue the research, development and commercialization of its new instrument for process chemists and engineers who need to develop better process quality and control. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Giant piezoelectricity in oxide thin films with nanopillar structure
High-performance piezoelectric materials are critical components for electromechanical sensors and actuators. For more than 60 years, the main strategy for obtaining large piezoelectric response has been to construct multiphase boundaries, where nanoscale domains with local structural and polar heterogeneity are formed, by tuning complex chemical compositions. We used a different strategy to emulate such local heterogeneity by forming nanopillar regions in perovskite oxide thin films. We obtained a giant effective piezoelectric coefficient of ~1098 picometers per volt with a high Curie temperature of ~450°C. Our lead-f...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Liu, H., Wu, H., Ong, K. P., Yang, T., Yang, P., Das, P. K., Chi, X., Zhang, Y., Diao, C., Wong, W. K. A., Chew, E. P., Chen, Y. F., Tan, C. K. I., Rusydi, A., Breese, M. B. H., Singh, D. J., Chen, L.-Q., Pennycook, S. J., Yao, K. Tags: Physics, Applied, Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Liquid-liquid critical point of water
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Suleymanov, Y. Tags: Chemistry, Physics twis Source Type: news

An E-Z boron swivel
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Molecule-molecule forward scattering
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Suleymanov, Y. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

The amazing chemistry of three atoms
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Suleymanov, Y. Tags: twil Source Type: news

Second critical point in two realistic models of water
The hypothesis that water has a second critical point at deeply supercooled conditions was formulated to provide a thermodynamically consistent interpretation of numerous experimental observations. A large body of work has been devoted to verifying or falsifying this hypothesis, but no unambiguous experimental proof has yet been found. Here, we use histogram reweighting and large-system scattering calculations to investigate computationally two molecular models of water, TIP4P/2005 and TIP4P/Ice, widely regarded to be among the most accurate classical force fields for this substance. We show that both models have a metasta...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Debenedetti, P. G., Sciortino, F., Zerze, G. H. Tags: Chemistry, Physics reports Source Type: news

Boron-enabled geometric isomerization of alkenes via selective energy-transfer catalysis
Isomerization-based strategies to enable the stereodivergent construction of complex polyenes from geometrically defined alkene linchpins remain conspicuously underdeveloped. Mitigating the thermodynamic constraints inherent to isomerization is further frustrated by the considerations of atom efficiency in idealized low–molecular weight precursors. In this work, we report a general ambiphilic C3 scaffold that can be isomerized and bidirectionally extended. Predicated on highly efficient triplet energy transfer, the selective isomerization of β-borylacrylates is contingent on the participation of the boron p orbi...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Molloy, J. J., Schäfer, M., Wienhold, M., Morack, T., Daniliuc, C. G., Gilmour, R. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Molecular square dancing in CO-CO collisions
Knowledge of rotational energy transfer (RET) involving carbon monoxide (CO) molecules is crucial for the interpretation of astrophysical data. As of now, our nearly perfect understanding of atom-molecule scattering shows that RET usually occurs by only a simple "bump" between partners. To advance molecular dynamics to the next step in complexity, we studied molecule-molecule scattering in great detail for collision between two CO molecules. Using advanced imaging methods and quasi-classical and fully quantum theory, we found that a synchronous movement can occur during CO-CO collisions, whereby a bump is followe...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Sun, Z.-F., van Hemert, M. C., Loreau, J., van der Avoird, A., Suits, A. G., Parker, D. H. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

How Pooled Testing for Coronavirus Could Help Test More People in Less Time
As pandemic re-opening efforts show mixed success, across the U.S., there have been reports of long lines for COVID-19 testing, and shortages in some places. One solution could be pooled testing, a strategy that’s already been used in China, Germany, Israel and South Africa to test a large number of people in a short amount of time. The idea is to get more out of each COVID-19 test by skimming off a small amount of material from each person’s sample, combining them into a single ‘sample’ and running the test on that. If the sample is negative, then there’s a good chance that all of the people ...
Source: TIME: Health - July 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Drugs of abuse and their metabolites in river sediments: analysis, occurrence in four Spanish river basins and environmental risk assessment - L ópez-García E, Mastroianni N, Ponsà-Borau N, Barceló D, Postigo C, López de Alda M.
This study presents an analytical met... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Natural gas flaring poses pregnancy risks
Researchers from theUCLA Fielding School of Public Health and the University of Southern California have found that a high level of exposure to oil and gas “flaring” events — the burning off of excess natural gas at production sites — is associated with a 50% higher risk for preterm birth, compared with women who aren’t exposed to flaring.The researchers defined a high level of exposure as 10 or more nightly flare events within a distance of 5 kilometers (about 3 miles) of the woman ’s home.“Prior studies suggest living near oil and gas wells adversely affects birth outcomes, but n...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 15, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Exploring how a scorpion toxin might help treat heart attacks
(American Chemical Society) Scientists are discovering potential life-saving medicines from an unlikely source: the venom of creatures like snakes, spiders and scorpions. Scorpion venom, in particular, contains a peptide that has beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system of rats with high blood pressure. Now, researchers reporting in ACS'Journal of Proteome Research say they know a little more about how that happens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 15, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Coumarin compounds from oak barrels could contribute to bitter taste in wine and spirits
(American Chemical Society) Wine and spirits are complex mixtures of flavor and aroma compounds, some of which arise during aging in wooden barrels. Among other compounds, oak wood releases coumarins, but how they affect wine's sensory properties is unclear. Now, researchers reporting in ACS'Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have detected and measured six coumarins in oak wood, wine and spirits, showing that a combination of these compounds can produce a bitter taste. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 15, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New material mimics strength, toughness of mother of pearl
(American Chemical Society) In the summer, many people enjoy walks along the beach looking for seashells. Among the most prized are those that contain iridescent mother of pearl (also known as nacre) inside. But many beachcombers would be surprised to learn that shimmery nacre is one of nature's strongest, most resilient materials. Now, researchers reporting inACS Nano have made a material with interlocked mineral layers that resembles nacre and is stronger and tougher than previous mimics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 15, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

In one hour, surface coating inactivates virus that causes COVID-19
(Virginia Tech) A chemical engineering professor at Virginia Tech has developed a surface coating that, when painted on common objects, inactivates SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 15, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The road to a battery-powered Europe
(American Chemical Society) For the past century, the world has relied on combustion engines powered by fossil fuels for transportation, but now lithium-ion battery-powered vehicles are emerging as sustainable successors. As major vehicle producers, European manufacturers are looking to establish their own lithium-ion battery market to compete with firms in Asia and the US. A new report inChemical& Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores the challenges and opportunities powering Europe's mission. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New chemical analyzes: What did Danes and Italians in the Middle Ages have in common?
(University of Southern Denmark) Chemists have analyzed bones from a Danish and an Italian cemetery, casting light on the lives of nobles and common people in the north and the south of Europe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FSU researchers find sun, rain transform asphalt binder into potentially toxic compounds
(Florida State University) A study by chemists at the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory shows that asphalt binder, when exposed to sun and water, leaches thousands of potentially toxic compounds into the environment. The study was published in the journal Environmental Science& Technology (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Could the willow help us fight cancer?
An ingredient in its bark led to aspirin, now researchers are looking into the properties of another compound in the treeWillow trees are a pharmaceutical treasure trove. The ancient Egyptians used its bark for relieving pain, inflammation and fevers, and science has since shown these medical powers came from an ingredient called salicin, named aftersalix, the Latin name for the tree. That discovery eventually led to the manufacture of aspirin, one of the most widely used medicines in the world.Recently another potential drug has been found in willow, one with anti-cancer powers. Scientists atRothamsted Research in Hertfor...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Paul Simons Tags: Science Trees and forests Environment UK news Cancer research Medical research Source Type: news

Africa: New Smoking Device - a 'Hopeful Moment For the Rest of the World'
[allAfrica] Johannesburg -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has authorized the marketing of IQOS, Philip Morris International's (PMI) electrically heated tobacco system, as a modified risk tobacco product (MRTP). IQOS is reportedly the first and only electronic nicotine product to be granted marketing orders through the FDA's MRTP process. The IQOS System heats tobacco but does not burn it and therefore significantly reduces the production of harmful and potentially harmful chemicals. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 14, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Chemical pneumonitis due to accidental ingestion of liquid mosquito repellent vaporizer: a case report - Maheshwari R U, Kanimozhi T, Arunagirinathan A.
Mosquito repellents are widely used as varied forms in endemic areas infested with mosquitoes. Most vaporizers contain pyrethroid compounds. Children due to their exploratory nature and their mouthing stage are prone for ingestion and poisoning. Much of th... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Circulating and tissue biomarkers as predictors of bromine gas inhalation - Juncos JXM, Shakil S, Ahmad A, Aishah D, Morgan CJ, Dell'italia LJ, Ford DA, Ahmad A, Ahmad S.
The threat from deliberate or accidental exposure to halogen gases is increasing, as is their industrial applications and use as chemical warfare agents. Biomarkers that can identify halogen exposure, diagnose victims of exposure or predict injury severity... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

Bravery of chemist who defied fierce floods to deliver vital medicines in evacuated Derbyshire town
When the village of Whaley Bridge's dam in Derbyshire was nearing breaking point in August 2019's floods, pharmacist Raj Modi refused to leave until people had their prescriptions. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Non-organic cow's milk found to contain TOXIC chemicals like pesticides and growth hormones
(Natural News) Lots of people are waking up to the dangers of conventional produce and sticking to organic varieties, but a recent study serves as a reminder of why it’s also important to go organic when it comes to cow’s milk too. The study, which was published in the Public Health Nutrition journal, found that... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Remdesivir makers told to ramp up production by the department of pharmaceuticals
Delhi ’s state regulator has written to chemists' association also about illegal imports of Covid-related drugs remdesivir, favipiravir and tocilizumab from Bangladesh. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - July 14, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Do I Need A Face Shield For My Job? Dr. Mallika Marshall Answers Your Coronavirus Questions
BOSTON (CBS) — Dr. Mallika Marshall is answering your coronavirus-related medical questions. If you have a question for Dr. Mallika, email her or message her on Facebook or Twitter. Dr. Mallika is offering her best advice, but as always consult your personal doctor before making any decisions about your personal health. “I found out I have been using hand sanitizer that has been recalled. I have thrown it away. How worried should I be?” -Eileen The FDA has warned that dozens of hand sanitizers that may contain a toxic substance called methanol. Substantial exposure to this ch...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Health Healthcare Status Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Coronavirus Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Perceiving the flavor of fat: A Monell Center twins study
(Monell Chemical Senses Center) Most people would agree that the pleasure of some foods stems in part from its fat content. New research, led by the Monell Chemical Senses Center, has now found that liking of fatty food is more complex than its fat content alone -- it could also be related to inborn genetic traits of the consumer related to fat perception. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Monell scientist receives 2020 Klingenstein-Simons fellowship award in neuroscience
(Monell Chemical Senses Center) Amber Alhadeff, Ph.D., the newest faculty member at the Monell Chemical Senses Center, has been awarded a 2020 Klingenstein-Simons Fellowship Award in Neurosciences, totaling $225,000 over three years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news