Probing the genetic basis of Roundup resistance in morning glory, a noxious weed
(University of Michigan) The herbicide Roundup is the most widely used agricultural chemical in history. But over the past two decades, a growing number of weed species have evolved resistance to Roundup's active ingredient, glyphosate, reducing the product's dominance somewhat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 3, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Too many unanswered questions
Hundreds of delegates were silent at Black members’ conference today as they listened to the tragic story of Zane Gbangbola, who was killed by hydrogen cyanide poisoning. Zane’s father, Kye (pictured), spoke calmly and with great dignity as he described how, after years of fighting for the truth, he is still confronted daily with silence from the authorities involved. “Zane deserves justice, he deserves the truth. I’m sure many of you in the audience have children and I would not wish what has happened to me and my family to ever happen again,” he said. “Yet until we get to the truth, th...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - February 2, 2020 Category: Food Science Authors: Amanda Kendal Tags: Article News 2020 Black Members Conference Source Type: news

Anhydrous ammonia chemical release - Lake County, Illinois, April 2019 - Rispens JR, Jones SA, Clemmons NS, Ahmed S, Harduar-Morano L, Johnson MD, Edge C, Vyas A, Bourgikos E, Orr MF.
On April 25, 2019, a farm tractor towing two 2-ton ammonia tanks on a county road in Lake County, Illinois, experienced a mechanical failure that resulted in the release of anhydrous ammonia, a colorless, pungent, irritating gas that can cause severe respi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Nerve agents: emergency preparedness - Weir AGA, Makin S, Breeze J.
Nerve agents (NAs) are a highly toxic group of chemical warfare agents. NAs are organophosphorus esters with varying physical and chemical properties depending on the individual agent. The most recently developed class of NA is 'Novichok'... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

A spatial and temporal investigation of medical surge in Dallas-Fort Worth During Hurricane Harvey, Texas 2017 - Stephens W, Wilt GE, Lehnert EA, Molinari NM, LeBlanc TT.
OBJECTIVE: When 2017 Hurricane Harvey struck the coastline of Texas on August 25, 2017, it resulted in 88 fatalities and more than US $125 billion in damage to infrastructure. The floods associated with the storm created a toxic mix of chemicals, sewage an... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

Bees love cannabis, and it's helping to restore their declining populations
(Natural News) New research published in the journal Environmental Entomology has found that bees absolutely love to feed on cannabis sativa, which in turn is helping to boost their dwindling populations caused by prolific exposure to deadly crop chemicals like neonicotinoids and Roundup (glyphosate). Entitled, “The Bee Community of Cannabis sativa and Corresponding Effects of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

I-Team: Some Drinking Water Is Making Massachusetts Residents Sick
BOSTON (CBS) – Ever wonder what’s in the water coming out of your faucet? WBZ-TV’s I-Team dug into a database of drinking water test results from every community in the state and found some people who say their water has made them sick. “I knew there had been bad stuff in the water,” said Kristen Mello, who is from Westfield. “But it didn’t occur to me that it had gone across the whole city.” Tests done on Westfield’s water supply have shown high levels of toxic chemicals known as PFAS, believed to be from foam used in firefighter training at the nearby Barnes Air Natio...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Featured Health I-Team Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Drinking Water Source Type: news

Harvard professor arrested for conspiring with Chinese spies to smuggle "biological material" into communist China
(Natural News) A federal court has reportedly unsealed a shocking set of indictments implicating Charles Lieber, the head of Harvard University‘s chemistry department, as well as two Chinese nationals, for smuggling “biological material” into China and later lying about it. One of the Chinese nationals was a researcher at Boston University and a former lieutenant... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Metformin latest drug to be investigated for possible carcinogenic chemicals
(Natural News) Living with diabetes means lots of health-related worries, and if you’re taking one very popular diabetes drug, you can add cancer to your list of concerns. Metformin, which is given to many people with type 2 diabetes to control high blood sugar, has been found to contain carcinogens in other countries, prompting official... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

As of January 1, 2020, the cancer industry has now killed 20 million people around the world since the year 2000
(Natural News) If you’re curious how many people are dying from things that the government claims are “safe and effective,” look no further than the Pharma Death Clock website, which explains that more than 20 million people have died from chemotherapy alone since the year 2000. As it turns out, the chemical cocktails manufactured by Big... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Accelerating chemical reactions without direct contact with a catalyst
(Northwestern University) Northwestern University researchers demonstrate a chemical reaction produced through an intermediary created by a separate chemical reaction, findings that could impact environmental remediation and fuel production. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 31, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Anhydrous Ammonia Chemical Release --- Lake County, Illinois, April 2019
An accidental residential-area release of anhydrous ammonia gas, used as an agricultural fertilizer, resulted in multiple emergency department evaluations and further hospitalizations, including some for cases of respiratory failure. (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - January 30, 2020 Category: American Health Tags: Ammonia First Responders MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Source Type: news

Fire hazards management for polymeric materials via synergy effects of pyrolysates-fixation and aromatized-charring - Fu T, Guo DM, Chen L, Wu WS, Wang XL, Wang YZ.
Previous approaches to suppressing fire hazards are concentrated on brominated flame retardants (BFRs) or phosphorus flame retardants (PFRs). However, their chemical hazards to health and environment have not been able to be ignored currently. It is quit... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

U.S. refiners, chemical makers pare insurance coverage as accidents boost costs
U.S. refineries and petrochemical plants are cutting back on insurance because several years of severe accidents have driven up the cost of coverage, industry and insurance sources said. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Study Reveals Midwest Farmers' Top Concerns and Stressors
Provides an overview of a study in which farmers were asked to identify what they perceived as hazards and stressors in their job, responses were used to better understand how to reduce injury and illnesses in Midwestern farmers. Top safety concerns were on farm chemical safety and specific health conditions, with the majority of farmers identifying finances as their top stressor. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - January 30, 2020 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Hemp 'goes hot' due to genetics, not growing conditions
(Cornell University) As the hemp industry grows, producers face the risk of cultivating a crop that can become unusable -- and illegal -- if it develops too much of the psychoactive chemical THC. Cornell University researchers have determined that a hemp plant's propensity to 'go hot' -- become too high in THC -- is determined by genetics, not as a stress response to growing conditions, contrary to popular belief. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 30, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Prominent Harvard Chemist Arrested For Concealing Ties to China
The Department of Justice also released the names of two Chinese researchers who allegedly acted against US interests. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - January 30, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Electricity turns garbage into high-quality graphene
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Service, R. F. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science In Depth Source Type: news

Stitching two chiral centers with one catalyst
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Xu, J., Watson, M. P. Tags: Chemistry perspective Source Type: news

Convergent coupling
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Charging up cobalt for hydroformylation
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Highly active cationic cobalt(II) hydroformylation catalysts
The cobalt complexes HCo(CO)4 and HCo(CO)3(PR3) were the original industrial catalysts used for the hydroformylation of alkenes through reaction with hydrogen and carbon monoxide to produce aldehydes. More recent and expensive rhodium-phosphine catalysts are hundreds of times more active and operate under considerably lower pressures. Cationic cobalt(II) bisphosphine hydrido-carbonyl catalysts that are far more active than traditional neutral cobalt(I) catalysts and approach rhodium catalysts in activity are reported here. These catalysts have low linear-to-branched (L:B) regioselectivity for simple linear alkenes. However...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Hood, D. M., Johnson, R. A., Carpenter, A. E., Younker, J. M., Vinyard, D. J., Stanley, G. G. Tags: Chemistry r-articles Source Type: news

Catalyst-controlled doubly enantioconvergent coupling of racemic alkyl nucleophiles and electrophiles
Stereochemical control in the construction of carbon-carbon bonds between an alkyl electrophile and an alkyl nucleophile is a persistent challenge in organic synthesis. Classical substitution reactions via SN1 and SN2 pathways are limited in their ability to generate carbon-carbon bonds (inadequate scope, due to side reactions such as rearrangements and eliminations) and to control stereochemistry when beginning with readily available racemic starting materials (racemic products). Here, we report a chiral nickel catalyst that couples racemic electrophiles (propargylic halides) with racemic nucleophiles (β-zincated ami...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Huo, H., Gorsline, B. J., Fu, G. C. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Understanding the dangers of bisphenol (and how you can avoid it)
(Natural News) Before you start digging in your latest take-out purchase and taking a sip out of your soda can, it would be wise to make sure that you aren’t exposing yourself to plastics that contain toxic chemicals. Bisphenols are a group of industrial chemicals used to manufacture plastics and resins. Bisphenol-A (BPA), the most... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Finer particulate matter (PM1) could increase cardiovascular disease risk
(American Chemical Society) In addition to harmful gases such as carbon monoxide, air pollution contains tiny particles that have been linked to health problems, including cardiovascular disease and asthma. Most studies have analyzed the potential health effects of larger-sized particulate matter (PM), such as particles less than 2.5μm in diameter (PM2.5). Now, researchers report in Environmental Science& Technology Letters that particles with diameters less than 1μm (PM1) are even more strongly correlated with cardiovascular disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Microplastics from ocean fishing can 'hide' in deep sediments
(American Chemical Society) Microplastic pollution in the world's oceans is a growing problem, and most studies of the issue have focused on land-based sources, such as discarded plastic bags or water bottles. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science& Technology have linked microplastics in China's Beibu Gulf with heavy fishing activities. Surprisingly, many of the particles were hidden in deep sediments on the ocean floor, which could have led scientists to underestimate the extent of the contamination. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Traditional Chinese medicinal plant yields new insecticide compounds
(American Chemical Society) For hundreds of years, practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine have used an herb called Stemona sessilifolia as a remedy for parasitic infections, such as those caused by pinworms and lice. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have identified 10 compounds that might be responsible for the herb's effectiveness. But there's a twist: The insecticides are produced by symbiotic microbes that live within the plant's cells -- not by S. sessilifolia itself. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Color-changing bandages sense and treat bacterial infections
(American Chemical Society) According to the World Health Organization, antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health. Sensing and treating bacterial infections earlier could help improve patients' recovery, as well curb the spread of antibiotic-resistant microbes. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have developed color-changing bandages that can sense drug-resistant and drug-sensitive bacteria in wounds and treat them accordingly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

U.S. Accuses Harvard Scientist of Concealing Chinese Funding
Prosecutors say Charles M. Lieber, the chair of Harvard ’s chemistry department, lied about contacts with China’s Thousand Talents Program, a state-run initiative that seeks to draw foreign-educated talent. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ellen Barry Tags: Harvard University China Colleges and Universities Research Crime and Criminals Source Type: news

Namibia: Coca-Cola Workers Treated for Ammonia Exposure
[Namibian] FOUR employees at Coca-Cola Namibia plant in Windhoek were exposed to ammonia, in another chemical leak incident to hit the food and beverages industry. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 28, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Harrington Seed Destructor kills nearly 100 percent of US agronomic weed seeds in lab study
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) In the battle against herbicide-resistant weeds, farmers are increasingly eager to add non-chemical control methods to their management toolbox. Impact mills, which destroy weed seeds picked up by a combine, have been shown to kill 70-99% of weed seeds in soybeans, wheat, and other small-statured cropping systems. And a recent Weed Science study from the University of Illinois shows even seeds that appear unscathed after impact milling don't germinate the following spring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stopping sperm in its tracks: latest progress in the hunt for a male contraceptive
(University of Dundee) Researchers at the University of Dundee have developed an unrivalled, fully automated robotic screening system which allows them to rapidly test the effect of drugs and other chemicals on human sperm. The research team at Dundee, led by Professor Chris Barratt and Dr Paul Andrews, are working towards finding a safe and effective male contraceptive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FDA finds cancer-inducing "forever chemicals" in common grocery foods
(Natural News) People looking to buy their favorite foods at grocery stores could also be getting “worrisome” chemicals on the side, according to food-test results released by the Food and Drug Administration. In the report, the regulators discovered that grocery store meats and seafood, and off-the-shelf chocolate cake contained substantial levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

6 Food preservatives with negative side effects and how to avoid them
(Natural News) On paper, food preservatives sound incredibly beneficial. Various food products can last much longer in your fridge and pantry thanks to these chemicals. But did you know that certain food preservatives are linked to harmful side effects such as headaches, cell death and heart disease? Food preservatives are bad news When you take a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Six patients with rare blood disease are doing well after gene therapy clinical trial
UCLA researchers are part of an international team that reported the use of a stem cell gene therapy to treat nine people with the rare, inherited blood disease known as X-linked chronic granulomatous disease, or X-CGD. Six of those patients are now in remission and have stopped other treatments. Before now, people with X-CGD – which causes recurrent infections, prolonged hospitalizations for treatment, and a shortened lifespan – had to rely on bone marrow donations for a chance at remission.“With this gene therapy, you can use a patient’s own stem cells instead of donor cells for a transplant,&rdqu...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 28, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study Shows ‘ Water Pill ’ May Help Reduce Some Autism Symptoms In Young Kids
BOSTON (CBS) — A drug that has been used to treat heart failure for decades may improve behavioral symptoms in some young children with autism. Bumetanide is a diuretic, which is used to treat the buildup of fluid in the body. Researchers in China and at the University of Cambridge looked at 83 kids between three and six years old and found that, three months later, the children treated with the diuretic scored better on a behavior scale which measures emotional response as well as verbal and non-verbal communication. They believe the drug helps nerve cells communicate more effectively by reducing the level of a...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Autism Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

A sustainable alternative to crude oil
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) A research team from the Fraunhofer Society and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) led by chemist Volker Sieber has developed a new polyamide family which can be produced from a byproduct of cellulose production -- a successful example for a more sustainable economy with bio-based materials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 27, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Current model for storing nuclear waste is incomplete
(Ohio State University) The materials the United States and other countries plan to use to store high level nuclear waste will likely degrade faster than anyone previously knew, because of the way those materials interact, new research shows. The findings, published today in the journal Nature Materials, show that corrosion of nuclear waste storage materials accelerates because of changes in the chemistry of the nuclear waste solution, and because of the way the materials interact with one another. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 27, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Are hair dyes safe? Health worries are increasing interest in the go-gray style trend.
New research raises some concerns about the possible risks from the chemicals. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - January 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ronnie Cohen Source Type: news

Tanzania: KCMC Embarks On Oxygen Production
[Daily News] A major milestone has been recorded at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC) as it has started producing oxygen for itself and neighbouring hospitals to cater for the need of that chemical element for saving lives. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 26, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Prescription drug improves symptoms of autism by targeting brain's chemical messengers
(University of Cambridge) Bumetanide -- a prescription drug for oedema (the build-up of fluid in the body) -- improves some of the symptoms in young children with autism spectrum disorders and has no significant side effects, according to a new study from researchers in China and the UK. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tylenol Could Have A Cancer Warning In California, Here Are The Issues
California is considering whether to put acetaminophen on its Proposition 65 list of chemicals. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - January 26, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Y. Lee, Contributor Source Type: news

FDA reports that PFAS, or "forever chemicals," are NOT a health concern for customers, but other public health experts aren't convinced
(Natural News) The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s main responsibility is ensuring that the food, drugs, cosmetics and other products sold in the country are safe for human health. Unfortunately, there are lots of ways they’re failing the public, especially when it comes to a group of chemicals known as PFAS. PFAS, or per- and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Toxic chemicals that never break down were found in the drinking water in several major US cities
Cities like Miami, New Orleans and Washington, DC, had high levels of manmade chemicals called PFAS. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - January 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Floridians are fighting over sunscreen bans
Environmentalists say chemicals destroy coral reefs that support tourism, but some state lawmakers see skin cancer danger. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - January 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers Find 102 Genes Linked to Autism in One of the Largest Studies of its Kind to Date
Autism spectrum disorder is a complex neurodevelopmental condition that is likely caused by both genetic and environmental factors. As the name suggests, it also represents a range of symptoms and behaviors, all of which makes teasing apart the genes involved quite challenging. In a study published Jan. 23 in Cell, researchers led by Joseph Buxbaum, director of the Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment at Mount Sinai, took advantage of better genetic sequencing technologies and one of the largest databases of DNA samples from people with autism to identify 102 genes associated with autism, including 30 that had n...
Source: TIME: Health - January 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Autism Brain Genetics Source Type: news

American Chemical Society names Dr. James Milne head of its Publications Division
The American Chemical Society (ACS) has named James Milne, Ph.D., president of the ACS Publications Division. He has served as acting president since September 2019, when Brian Crawford, Ph.D., retired. Based in Oxford, U.K., Milne joined ACS in 2016. In his role as president, he will oversee the publication of the Society’s more than 60 peer-reviewed journals, a suite of eBooks, as well as the industry-leading weekly news periodical, Chemical & Engineering News. He also ensures the continued offering of high-quality service to authors and readers, including rapid time to publication, cutting-edge web and...
Source: News from STM - January 24, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured Source Type: news

A new stretchable battery can power wearable electronics
(Stanford School of Engineering) The adoption of wearable electronics has so far been limited by their need to derive power from bulky, rigid batteries that reduce comfort and may present safety hazards due to chemical leakage or combustion. Stanford researchers have developed a soft and stretchable battery that relies on a special type of plastic to store power more safely than the flammable formulations used in conventional batteries today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Assessing risk of chemicals to wildlife is huge challenge that requires new approach
(Centre for Ecology& Hydrology) Computer modelling and long-term ecological monitoring will be essential to assess the environmental risks of the rapidly growing number of chemicals across the world, according to a new review paper in the journal Science. The analysis has been led by the UK Centre for Ecology& Hydrology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 24, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chemstor: using formal methods to guarantee safe storage and disposal of chemicals - Ott J, Tan D, Loveless T, Grover WH, Brisk P.
While safe chemical storage and disposal are simple in principle-users should read safety specifications and place chemicals in appropriate cabinets or collection points-high-profile incidents involving improper storage and disposal of chemicals continue t... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news