Nitrogen gets in the fast lane for chemical synthesis
(Rice University) A new one-step method discovered by synthetic organic chemists at Rice University allows nitrogen atoms to be added to precursor compounds used in the design and manufacture of drugs, pesticides, fertilizers and other products. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pea-Sized Pill Delivers Insulin Shot From Inside The Stomach
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have figured out how to hide a shot inside a pea-sized pill — creating a swallowable gadget, inspired by a tortoise shell, that can inject medicines like insulin from inside the stomach. Patients usually prefer oral treatment, and comply with it better, but many compounds, including insulin for diabetes, can’t survive the harsh trip through the digestive system. The new invention, reported Thursday by a Massachusetts Institute of Technology-led research team, has been tested only in animals so far. But if it pans out, it might offer a work-around to make not just insulin but a...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Diabetes insulin MIT Source Type: news

Key West Bans Sunscreen Containing Chemicals Believed to Harm Coral Reefs
The law ’ s supporters see it as a crucial step toward protecting the city ’ s reefs, which draw visitors from around the globe. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: KAREN ZRAICK Tags: Key West (Fla) Law and Legislation Sunscreen Reefs Coral Water Pollution Source Type: news

Image of the Day: Light Show
Sea fireflies spew a mucus with a chemical glow to lure mates and avoid being eaten. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Image of the Day Source Type: news

Science News » Mega Docking Library Poised to Speed Drug Discovery
Researchers have launched an ultra-large virtual docking library expected to grow to more than 1 billion molecules by next year. It will expand by 1000-fold the number of such “ make-on-demand ” compounds readily available to scientists for chemical biology and drug discovery. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - February 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jules Asher Source Type: news

Nanomachines are taught to fight cancer
(ITMO University) Scientists from ITMO University in collaboration with their international colleagues proposed new DNA-based nanomachines that can be used for gene therapy of cancer. This new invention can greatly contribute to making the treatment of oncological diseases more effective and selective. The results were published in Angewandte Chemie. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 7, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

What is white chocolate? (video)
(American Chemical Society) Today, we're showing our love for white chocolate. Sure, it lacks the rich flavor of milk chocolate and the glossy brown color of dark chocolate. And many people even argue it's not really chocolate at all. But in this Reactions video, we show you all there is to love about this creamy pale confection: https://youtu.be/4qI8qbfTkys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

USC scientists find a cheaper way to light up OLED screens
(University of Southern California) USC Dornsife chemists appear to have finished the quest for a cheaper, efficient alternative to the iridium compounds while also solving the decades-long problem with the color blue. Surprisingly, copper does it all. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Thirdhand smoke residue exposes children to chemicals
(University of Cincinnati) In " Nicotine on Children's Hands: Limited Protection of Smoking Bans and Initial Clinical Findings, " published Jan. 16 in Tobacco Use Insights, Cincinnati Children's attending physician Melinda Mahabee-Gittens and UC assistant professor Ashley Merianos found that not smoking around children doesn't stop children of smokers from being exposed to nicotine. They also found that higher levels of exposure to tobacco smoke residue -- which likely includes carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines -- may be linked to respiratory problems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 7, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Tak Mak lab discovers how the immune system 'thinks'
(University Health Network) New research from the laboratory of cancer scientist Dr. Tak Mak, renowned for cloning the human T-cell receptor, has demonstrated that immune cells make brain chemicals to fight off infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 7, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Tilting a ground-state reactivity landscape by vibrational strong coupling
Many chemical methods have been developed to favor a particular product in transformations of compounds that have two or more reactive sites. We explored a different approach to site selectivity using vibrational strong coupling (VSC) between a reactant and the vacuum field of a microfluidic optical cavity. Specifically, we studied the reactivity of a compound bearing two possible silyl bond cleavage sites—Si–C and Si–O, respectively—as a function of VSC of three distinct vibrational modes in the dark. The results show that VSC can indeed tilt the reactivity landscape to favor one product over the o...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Thomas, A., Lethuillier-Karl, L., Nagarajan, K., Vergauwe, R. M. A., George, J., Chervy, T., Shalabney, A., Devaux, E., Genet, C., Moran, J., Ebbesen, T. W. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Shaking up reaction-site selectivity
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Helping copper glow
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Eliminating nonradiative decay in Cu(I) emitters: >99% quantum efficiency and microsecond lifetime
Luminescent complexes of heavy metals such as iridium, platinum, and ruthenium play an important role in photocatalysis and energy conversion applications as well as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Achieving comparable performance from more–earth-abundant copper requires overcoming the weak spin-orbit coupling of the light metal as well as limiting the high reorganization energies typical in copper(I) [Cu(I)] complexes. Here we report that two-coordinate Cu(I) complexes with redox active ligands in coplanar conformation manifest suppressed nonradiative decay, reduced structural reorganization, and sufficient o...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hamze, R., Peltier, J. L., Sylvinson, D., Jung, M., Cardenas, J., Haiges, R., Soleilhavoup, M., Jazzar, R., Djurovich, P. I., Bertrand, G., Thompson, M. E. Tags: Chemistry r-articles Source Type: news

Buttery E-Cig Flavorings May Impair Lung Function
(MedPage Today) -- Chemicals altered cilia expression in lab study (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - February 6, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Here ’s Why You Always Feel Sicker at Night
Whether you’re dealing with the common cold, the flu or a stomach bug, you’ve probably noticed that your symptoms feel worse at night. You’re not imagining things. Research suggests that your body’s circadian rhythms—as well as some other factors—can exacerbate your symptoms after sundown. Along with regulating your sleep, your body’s circadian clocks help manage your immune system, says Michael Smolensky, a biological rhythm researcher and adjunct professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Texas. “When the immune system is activated”—like when you&r...
Source: TIME: Health - February 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

State Attorneys General Push for Tougher Asbestos Reporting Rule
A coalition of 15 attorneys general are calling for a tougher asbestos reporting rule as part of the recently-revised Toxic Substances Control Act. Maine’s newly elected Attorney General Aaron Frey said last week the coalition wants to eliminate the exemptions for asbestos within the current Chemical Data Reporting guidelines. The attorneys general have asked U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Acting Administrator Andrew Wheeler to initiate a new rulemaking process, helping it comply with their interpretation of the legislation. “This [new] rule would allow the EPA to comply with the Act by giving it the info...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 6, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Do microplastics harm humans?
(American Chemical Society) About 8 million metric tons of plastic waste winds up in the oceans every year -- bottles, bags and doo-dads that eventually break down into tiny pieces, called microplastics. These inedible bits have now been found in human fecal samples, but do microplastics cause harm to people? That's the question many researchers are pondering, according to an article in Chemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hibernating hamsters could provide new clues to Alzheimer's disease
(American Chemical Society) Syrian hamsters are golden-haired rodents often kept as house pets. Cold and darkness can cause the animals to hibernate for 3-4 days at a time, interspersed with short periods of activity. Surprisingly, the hibernation spurts of these cute, furry creatures could hold clues to better treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a recent study in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More physical than chemical: Researchers show what really gets cells going
(Osaka University) Collective cell migration is essential in many organisms, with roles in human cellular processes including cancer invasion and wound healing. Now, a team led by researchers at Osaka University have found that traditional thinking regarding the role of chemical signalling in collective cell migration may not hold true. The researchers found that in the later stages of development of a model unicellular amoeba, cell-to-cell contact rather than cAMP signalling is likely to trigger cell motility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Micromotors deliver oral vaccines
(American Chemical Society) Vaccines have saved millions of lives, but nobody likes getting a shot. That's why scientists are trying to develop oral vaccines for infectious diseases. But to be effective, the vaccine must survive digestion and reach immune cells within the intestinal wall. Now, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Nano Letters have developed oral vaccines powered by micromotors that target the mucus layer of the intestine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Microbial manufacturing
(Harvard University) Led by Emily Balskus, Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, a team of researchers has untangled how bacteria found in soil are able to manufacture streptozotocin, showing for the first time that the compound is produced through an enzymatic pathway and revealing the novel chemistry that drives the process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Unclonable' tag combats counterfeiters
(American Chemical Society) Discovering that your new designer handbag or gold watch is a fake is costly and annoying, and counterfeit medical devices or drugs could have even more serious consequences. But seemingly as soon as manufacturers develop a new method to ensure product authenticity, counterfeiters find a way to outsmart it. Now, researchers have created an 'unclonable' tag that can never be replicated, even by the manufacturer. They report their results in ACS Applied Materials& Interfaces. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Millions of tons of plastic waste could be turned into clean fuels, other products
(Purdue University) A new chemical conversion process could transform the world's polyolefin waste, a form of plastic, into useful products, such as clean fuels and other items.The conversion process developed at Purdue University incorporates selective extraction and hydrothermal liquefaction. Once the plastic is converted into naphtha, it can be used as a feedstock for other chemicals or further separated into specialty solvents or other products. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Making New Drugs With a Dose of Artificial Intelligence
Researchers at DeepMind, owned by Google ’ s parent company, and other companies are applying their powerful A.I. systems to drug discovery research. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CADE METZ Tags: Artificial Intelligence Computers and the Internet Contests and Prizes Proteins Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Chemistry DeepMind Technologies Ltd Google Inc Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction Source Type: news

Rafael P érez-Escamilla: Why I chose global health
Learn how P érez-Escamilla made the journey from chemical engineer in Mexico to professor of social and behavioral science at the Yale School of Public Health. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 5, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Replace harmful chemical cleaners with these essential oils
(Natural News) Harmful toxins are all around you. They often come in the form of pollutants, toxic pesticides, or harsh chemicals, but what you might not know is that some of these chemicals might already be present in your own home. Most chemical-based cleaning products tend to contain toxic substances that might negatively impact your... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A better way to measure cell survival
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT biological engineers have devised a toxicity test that can measure chemical effects on cell survival with much greater sensitivity than the tests commonly used today. The MicroColonyChip could make it easier to accurately measure cell toxicity, helping drug companies and academic researchers identify and evaluate new drugs more rapidly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 5, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Editor-In-Chief of Current Microwave Chemistry receives ICS Life Time Achievement Award
(Bentham Science Publishers) Dr. Bimal K. Banik, currently the Editor-In-Chief of Current Microwave Chemistry and Current Organocatalysis receives the Life-Time Achievement Award from the Indian Chemical Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Educational outreach, public policy changes needed to reduce health hazards at nail salons
(Drexel University) The nail salon industry has seen rapid growth within the last 20 years, becoming increasingly popular among women of all ages. For the technicians in those salons -- many of whom are non-native English speakers -- this beauty comes with a cost: an exposure to potentially unsafe chemicals and other health hazards. A study by Drexel University found that educational outreach and change in public policy are needed to help reduce these hazards for salon employees and owners. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The world's most evil chemical promoters and food POLLUTERS all exposed at one website
(Natural News) Just like in any federal prison, one can easily locate the dregs of humanity. The worst criminals, liars, thieves, and low-life scumbags always get caught, at least eventually, ruining other people’s lives in the wake of their own greed and indifference. Today, a new “cell block” has been identified, where all the shills,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Guardian view on fracking: the end can ’t come soon enough | Editorial
Launching a new fossil fuel industry was a bad idea, and a coalition of localists and environmentalists appears close to defeating itLess than four months after what was supposed to be a new beginning for fracking in England, when Cuadrilla resumed operations at its Preston New Road site in Lancashire, it appears increasingly unlikely that there is a future for this industry in the UK at all. Minorearthquakes rapidly halted fracking at Preston New Road, and led to a row about whether the legal limit for underground seismic activity, set at 0.5-magnitude after earthquakes in 2011, is unrealistically low. Now Jim Ratcliffe, ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Fracking Gas Energy Fossil fuels Environment Conservatives Politics Earthquakes Natural disasters and extreme weather World news Geology Science Scotland UK news Source Type: news

Zinc can protect against oxidative stress when it's taken together with chocolate and tea
(Natural News) The human body needs zinc to remain healthy. A study published in the journal Nature Chemistry suggests that the nutritional benefits of zinc can be bolstered when combined with a natural compound found in chocolate and tea. In particular, the study suggests that the trace mineral zinc may help activate an organic molecule that can prevent oxidative stress, which is linked to aging... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Improving tests for developmental neurotoxicity
NTP-led collection of papers evaluated cell-based models, zebrafish, and other approaches for rapid screening of thousands of chemicals. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - February 4, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Toxic by design? Formation of thermal degradants and cyanide from carboxamide-type synthetic cannabinoids CUMYL-PICA, 5F-CUMYL-PICA, AMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-FUBINACA, NNEI, and MN-18 during exposure to high temperatures - Kevin RC, Kovach AL, Lefever TW, Gamage TF, Wiley JL, McGregor IS, Thomas BF.
This study investi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Pool fires in chemical process industries: occurrence, mechanism, management - Vipin SK, Pandey SM, Tauseef T, Abbasi SA.
A pool or a pile of a flammable substance catching fire--which is termed a 'pool fire'--is among the most common of fire-related accidents. In chemical process industries (CPI) in particular, pool fires are the most frequent of all possible types of accide... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Uncertainty handling in the safety risk analysis: an integrated approach based on fuzzy fault tree analysis - Yazdi M, Zarei E.
Chemical process plants, especially the oil and gas plants operating under severe processing conditions and dealing with hazardous materials, are susceptible to catastrophic accidents. Thus safety risk assessment is vital in designing effective strategies ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Systems-based analysis of China-Tianjin port fire and explosion: a comparison of HFACS, AcciMap, and STAMP - Zhang Y, Jing L, Sun C.
China-Tianjin Port fire and explosion on August 12, 2015, was a major accident that involved hazardous chemicals and resulted in 165 fatalities and 798 injuries. Three-system-based accident models, human factor analysis and classification system (HFACS), A... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Monitoring and exposure assessment of organophosphorus flame retardants in source and drinking water, Nanjing, China - Liu X, Xiong L, Li D, Chen C, Cao Q.
This study developed a new method to determine the residues of 13 organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs) in drinking water by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) technique and investigated the chemical distribution in water samples fr... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

The silver bullet to enhancing your metabolism, coupled with simple lifestyle habits
(Natural News) Metabolism is the sum total of many chemical and physical processes that occur within your body to keep you alive. If you have a fast metabolism, this means that you can process foods into energy at a much quicker rate than on average. However, if you have a sluggish metabolism, your body will... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Revealing the path of a metallodrug in a breast cancer cell
This study is published in Angewandte Chemie. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 4, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The long battle against infectious diseases | Letters
Readers respond to a recent article and letter published in the GuardianI would like to clarify that, contrary to your article (The microbes are fighting back, and if anyone thinks there is a simple solution, they are wrong, 25 January), a few decades ago precisely no one in drug discovery thought that the war against infectious diseases had been won. Sir Alexander Fleming, who first discovered antibiotics, warned of microbial resistance and it has been known about ever since.The reason drug companies have shied away from antibiotic research is, as mentioned in the article, that it is extremely difficult to discover new on...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Infectious diseases Medical research People in science Health Society Microbiology Antibiotics China Asia Pacific World news Source Type: news

Aspartame may be making you dumb: Study finds that the artificial sweetener disrupts your neurotransmitters
(Natural News) Another study proves that artificial sweeteners like aspartame are harmful to your health. The study, which was published in the African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines, has revealed that aspartame damages the brain. In particular, consuming this chemical sweetener for a long time will increase oxidative stress in the brain tissue... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

SHOCK: More than 750 supplement brands found to be tainted with drugs... mostly steroids and weight loss chemicals
(Natural News) It can be tempting to vilify all chemical drugs while assigning a “pure, clean and healthy” label to all nutritional supplements. However, just as not all chemical medications are dangerous or unnecessary – and, in some cases, they can mean the difference between life and death – not all nutritional supplements are as... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Air pollution is so depressing: New study shows high levels of particulates impact mental health
(Natural News) Toxic chemicals in the air have been shown to cause cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. However, air pollution does not only cause damage to our physical well-being, but our mental health as well. A new study reported by the Science Daily shows that toxic air can cause psychological distress in humans. In the study, researchers... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BPA replacement chemicals found to disrupt hormones much like BPA
(Natural News) Bisphenol A (BPA), a synthetic chemical widely used in manufacturing plastic products, has long been associated with a host of adverse health conditions. BPA is classified as an endocrine disruptor and is tied to various diseases including diabetes, cardiovascular disease and abnormal liver function. Experts have looked into using chemical substitutes such as... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Book Review: Understanding the Brain
Making a cup of coffee and remembering to turn off the coffeemaker. Driving to the grocery store and not getting lost. Remembering anniversaries, birthdays, and where you were supposed to meet your friend for lunch. All of these activities require the seamless workings of the brain, and while we often take them for granted, there are even more activities that go undetected within the brain every single day. In his new book, Understanding the Brain: From Cells to Behavior to Cognition, which is an updated version of his earlier book, Dowling offers a comprehensive look at how the brain functions — from how vision occu...
Source: Psych Central - February 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders General Genetics Habits Intelligence Memory and Perception Neuroscience Psychiatry Psychology Treatment Brain Function cortisol Dowling Emotions Long Term Memory neuromodulators Neurons Neurotrans Source Type: news

Elemental: the periodic table at 150
Mendeleev ’s chemical grid system defined our world – and the rarer elements it classifies are vital to modern lifeThis year marks the 150th anniversary of the publication of the first periodic table. This grid-like arrangement of the elements is probably only familiar to most of us from the tatty poster hanging on the wall of the chemistry classroom at school – only slightly less memorable than the faint background of weird smells in the lab. But when the Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev laid out his vision for ordering the chemical world in 1869, it was revolutionary.This is because the periodic table i...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Lewis Dartnell Tags: Chemistry History of science Source Type: news

10 Tips for How to Repair Damaged Hair
A little TLC will restore health and shine to your fried, dyed and chemically treated locks ... So, let ’s cut to the chase. ... You’ve been merrily using a blow-dryer or flat or heat-curling iron o... (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - February 2, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Continued exposure to pesticides increases your risk of these potentially deadly diseases
(Natural News) Big Biotech and Big Agriculture have spent millions of dollars to push the narrative that chemical pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers are perfectly safe for humans, incapable of causing death, disease and other harmful effects. But a growing body of research proves what skeptics have long suspected: Pesticides are dangerous chemicals, capable of harming... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news