Pole position: human body might be able to pick up on Earth's magnetic field
Scientists say there are signs of humans having a subconscious magnetic senseIt sounds like a power to be boasted of by the X-Men, but researchers say humans might have the ability to pick up on Earth ’s magnetic field.Many animals, from pigeons to turtles, use it to navigate, while research has shown cattle prefer to align themselves with the field when standing in, well, a field. Even dogs make use of it –albeit when defecating.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Science Neuroscience UK news World news Animals US news Source Type: news

Use forecast to talk about climate change, urges ex-BBC presenter
Bill Giles calls on broadcasters to add slot explaining humans ’ impact on climateThe veteran weatherman Bill Giles is calling on the BBC and other major broadcasters to radically overhaul their forecasts to incorporate information about climate change.The former head of BBC weather presenters has said more needs to be done by broadcasters tohighlight climate change to face the “reality more squarely and openly”.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Simon Murphy Tags: UK weather UK news Climate change Environment Television industry Media BBC Science Source Type: news

Securing a future for humanities: the clue is in the name| Letters
Prof Joe Smith, director of the Royal Geographical Society,Prof Sir David Cannadine, president of the British Academy, andProf Norman Gowar respond to a Guardian editorialYoureditorial in defence of the humanities (13 March) is well timed and well argued. The UK needs the contribution of Stem graduates and that made by graduates with knowledge, skills and understanding gained through study of the humanities and wider social sciences. And geography, a subject that is a humanity, a social science and has part Stem designation in higher education, is well placed to make such a contribution.For example, the cabinet office &rsq...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Humanities Education Geography Science Geography and environment studies Mathematics Physics Ordnance Survey UK news Climate change Universities Higher education Fees Students Source Type: news

Scientists grow 'mini-brain on the move' that can contract muscle
Cambridge researchers grew ‘organoid’ that spontaneously connected to spinal cordScientists have grown a miniature brain in a dish with a spinal cord and muscles attached, an advance that promises to accelerate the study of conditions such as motor neurone disease.The lentil-sized grey blob of human brain cells were seen to spontaneously send out tendril-like connections to link up with the spinal cord and muscle tissue, which was taken from a mouse. The muscles were then seen to visibly contract under the control of the so-called brain organoid.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Neuroscience Medical research Biology Genetics Motor neurone disease Epilepsy Society Schizophrenia Mental health University of Cambridge Stem cells Source Type: news

Meteor blast over Bering Sea was 10 times size of Hiroshima
Fireball over Kamchatka peninsula in December went largely unnoticed at the timeA meteor explosion over the Bering Sea late last year unleashed 10 times as much energy as the atomic bomb that destroyed Hiroshima, scientists have revealed.The fireball tore across the sky off Russia ’s Kamchatka peninsula on 18 December and released energy equivalent to 173 kilotons of TNT. It was the largest air blast since another meteor hurtled into the atmosphere over Chelyabinsk, in Russia’s south-west, six years ago, and the second largest in the past 30 years.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Meteors Nasa Science Russia Europe World news Source Type: news

For Northern Irish farmers, no-deal Brexit would be a calamity | Ivor Ferguson
Without an exit deal with the EU, the whole NI agricultural industry will be destroyed. The DUP must take note• Ivor Ferguson is president of the Ulster Farmers’ UnionAs president of the Ulster Farmers ’ Union (UFU), my last three years have been dominated by Brexit andwhat it means for farming families. More than 33 months on from the referendum all we have are unanswered questions and uncertainty.The threat of a no deal is still there. Parliament ’s vote to reject a no-deal Brexit, and to seek an extension to article 50, are positive steps but the legislation is clear. If the UK does not agree an e...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ivor Ferguson Tags: Northern Ireland Brexit Farming Article 50 UK news European Union Foreign policy Politics Environment Farm animals Agriculture Science Trade policy Democratic Unionist party (DUP) Source Type: news

Sir Freddie the ram's 50-year-old frozen sperm used to produce offspring
Australian researchers believe it is the oldest viable stored semen of any species in the worldDecades after his 1960s heyday, Sir Freddie the ram has sired offspring from beyond the grave in what researchers believe is a project that shows the world ’s oldest viable stored semen.A team at the University of Sydney has defrosted Sir Freddie ’s 50-year-old semen and that of three other rams and successfully impregnanted it in 34 merino ewes.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Lisa Martin Tags: Science Animals Australia news New South Wales Reproduction Biology Source Type: news

Starwatch: a supermoon to celebrate the vernal equinox
Full moon marks the midway point of the moon ’s cycle, and this month it will be a supermoon – the third supermoon of the yearSpring arrives this week in the form of thevernal equinox. This marks the moment when day and night are of approximately equal length. From here on, there will be more daylight hours in the northern hemisphere than night time ones. This situation continues until the next equinox (in October) when the situation reverses. The moment of the equinox takes place at 21:58 GMT on 20 March and by coincidence the moon reaches full illumination approximately four hours later at 01:43 GMT on 21 Mar...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: The moon Astronomy Science Source Type: news

Screening service in 'meltdown' as more women attend smears
Public health campaign triggers surge in numbers attending cervical screenings at ‘worst possible time’Women could be forced to wait months for cervical cancer screening results because the planned closure of dozens of laboratories has left the service in “meltdown”, the Guardian has been told.The crisis has been triggered by a surge in numbers of women attending smear tests following a governmentpublic awareness campaign launched earlier this month. The campaign coincides with an exodus of biomedical scientists due to a restructuring process that will reduce nearly 50 hospital screening laboratorie...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: NHS Health Cervical cancer Health policy Public services policy Science Society Politics UK news Source Type: news

Ask your mum questions and you may discover … yourself
When Elma van Vliet decided to start asking her mother about her life, the results were remarkableIt wasn ’t until Margreeth van Vliet-Smit was diagnosed with inoperable cancer in 2001 that Elma van Vliet realised how much she didn’t know about her own mother. She didn’t know what dreams and adventures Margreeth had had when she was a young woman. She didn’t know what her mother had done on Satu rday afternoons as a small girl. She didn’t even know how to make the chicken soup Margreeth had always made when her daughter was ill. “And she was the only person in the world who knew how to m...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Amelia Hill Tags: Family Books Life and style Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Culture Source Type: news

Nile shipwreck discovery proves Herodotus right – after 2,469 years
Greek historian ’s description of ‘baris’ vessel vindicated by archaeologists at sunken city of Thonis-HeraclionIn the fifth century BC, the Greek historian Herodotus visited Egypt and wrote of unusual river boats on the Nile. Twenty-three lines of hisHistoria, the ancient world ’s first great narrative history, are devoted to the intricate description of the construction of a “baris”.For centuries, scholars have argued over his account because there was no archaeological evidence that such ships ever existed. Now there is. A “fabulously preserved” wreck in the waters around ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Dalya Alberge Tags: Archaeology UK news Science Egypt Source Type: news

DNA from 200-year-old pipe sheds light on life of enslaved African woman
US archaeologists trace roots of woman to modern-day Sierra Leone as part of ongoing ancestry researchArchaeologists used DNA taken from a broken clay pipe stem found in Maryland to build a picture of an enslaved woman who died around 200 years ago and had origins in modern-day Sierra Leone. One researcher called the work “a mind-blower”.Related:El Norte review: an epic and timely history of Hispanic North AmericaContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Martin Pengelly Tags: Slavery Maryland US news American civil war Africa Sierra Leone World news Archaeology Genetics Science Source Type: news

The untold tale of the woman who dug up ancient sea monsters
Born poor and nonconformist, Mary Anning ’s contributions to the birth of palaeontology had been forgotten. But not any longerA few months ago a stylish set of rooms were opened in London ’s Natural History Museum. They include a restaurant, a study and a floor-to-ceiling cabinet displaying biological treasures and curiosities. Here, patrons of the museum gather to relax and contemplate nature’s wonders in a setting named after one of the most remarkable of all explorers of Earth ’s ancient marvels: Mary Anning.“We could have named the rooms after many ‘greats’: Alfred Waterhouse, ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie, Observer science editor Tags: Palaeontology Natural History Museum Science Women Museums Culture Life and style UK news Source Type: news

The Guardian view on language: the flesh made word | Editorial
Teeth and tongues make the sounds of our speech, but our humanity makes its meaningsBabies have an astonishing talent that adults entirely lose. By the age of one, they can recognise the significant noises in the babble around them and group them into a language. When we have lost this capacity as adults, it becomes enormously difficult to distinguish betweensounds that are glaringly different to a native speaker. It all sounds Greek to us, or, as the Greeks would have it, barbarous. This is because the range of possible sounds that humans use to convey meaning may be as high as 2,000, but few languages use more than 100 a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Language Languages Evolution Children Biology Science UK news Australia news Source Type: news

Four ways you can support the YouthStrike4Climate movement | UK Student Climate Network
The school climate strikes show how we are trying to save the world and change it for the better. Everyone can helpSince we madeheadlines in February with the UK ’s first school strike, we’ve seen an outpouring of support from our peers, parents, carers, politicians and other people from all walks of life. It seems that most people know we’re in a mess, but they just didn’t know what we can to do to get out of it.This is where the UK Student Climate Network (UKSCN) stepped in, not necessarily out of choice, but necessity. There ’s no time left for the “adults in the room” to solve ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: UK Student Climate Network Tags: Climate change Environment Science Schools Education Wildlife UK news Source Type: news

Woman in first legal challenge against UK's 10-year limit on egg-freezing
Fertility laws compel clinics to destroy frozen eggs after a decade, irrespective of a woman ’s ageA woman who is fighting for her chance to start a family is bringing the first legal challenge in the UK against fertility legislation that places a 10-year time limit on the storage of frozen eggs.The woman paid to freeze her eggs in 2009 because she was not in a relationship, but hoped to have a baby in the future. However, fertility laws compel clinics to destroy frozen eggs after 10 years, irrespective of a woman ’s age or wishes.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Fertility problems Embryos Health Science Biology Society UK news Source Type: news

Isolationism is deadly. Only global collective action can save us | Noga Levy-Rapoport
To tackle the oil and gas giants driving climate change, young people of all nations must act togetherBrexit is reversible. Article 50 can be juggled, delayed, and bounced around until the government decides to reboot and restart the process. In the meantime, another meaningless “meaningful vote” could happen in the next few days – while we ignore the only threat that truly matters.The effects of climate change are irreversible. That ’s why it’s a crisis. TheUN ’s warning last year lays bare the dangers of this emergency. And these are dangers that we can only attempt to predict, because...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Noga Levy-Rapoport Tags: Climate change Environment Science Young people Society Protest World news UK news Gas Oil Source Type: news

Thank you, climate strikers. Your action matters and your power will be felt | Rebecca Solnit
Nothing is possible without action, and almost anything is when we rise up together, as you are todayI want to say to all the climate strikers today: thank you so much for being unreasonable. That is, if reasonable means playing by the rules, and the rules are presumed to be guidelines for what is and is not possible, then you may be told that what you are asking for is impossible or unreasonable. Don ’t listen. Don’t stop. Don’t let your dreams shrink by one inch. Don’t forget that this might be the day and the pivotal year when you rewrite what is possible.Related:The lessons infantile adults can ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Rebecca Solnit Tags: Climate change Activism Protest Environment Science Pollution Source Type: news

Capitalism is destroying the Earth. We need a new human right for future generations | George Monbiot
The children on climate strike are right: their lives should not be sacrificed to satisfy our greedThe young peopletaking to the streetsfor the climate strike are right:their future is being stolen. The economy is an environmental pyramid scheme, dumping its liabilities on the young and the unborn. Its current growth depends on intergenerational theft.At the heart of capitalism is a vast and scarcely examined assumption: you are entitled to as great a share of the world ’s resources as your money can buy. You can purchase as much land, as much atmospheric space, as manyminerals, as much meat and fish as you can affor...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: George Monbiot Tags: Climate change Environment Protest Science Young people Society World news Source Type: news

Young climate activists around the world: why I ’m striking today | Brianna Fruean and others
As young people walk out of classrooms for a global climate strike, a panel of campaigners share their reasons for actionI am from the Central Taiwan Plains Indigenous People. As the indigenous people of Taiwan, we have a particular vulnerability to climate change. Our traditional culture is deeply rooted in the harmony we have with the spirit of nature. We face heartbreaking loss due to increasingly extreme weather events. We urge the Taiwanese government to implement mitigation measures and face up to the vulnerability of indigenous people, halt construction projects in the indigenous traditional realm, and recognise the...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Brianna Fruean and others Tags: Environmental activism Climate change Science Protest World news Children Society Greta Thunberg Source Type: news

A manifesto for tackling the climate change crisis | UK Student Climate Network
As thousands of pupils strike over the catastrophe facing the planet, we demand a state of emergency be calledWe ’re the UKStudent Climate Network. We ’re young, we’re students and we’re calling for change. Our movement startedin February when tens of thousands of young people took to the streets in towns and cities around Britain, in an unprecedented emergence of a youth climate justice movement.We ’ve joined a movement that’s spreading rapidly across the world, catalysed by the actions of one individual in taking a stand in August last year.Greta Thunberg may have been the spark, but w...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Climate change Environment Science Wildlife Schools Young people Environmental activism Protest UK news Source Type: news

Cross Section: Matt Parker - Science Weekly podcast
Happy International Pi Day. To celebrate, Hannah Devlin is joined by the mathematician and comedian Matt Parker to discussmaths anxiety, how much today ’s world relies on number crunching and what happens when we get it wrongHappy International Pi Day! On 14 March, the world celebrated this mathematical constant because 3/14 matches the first three digits of pi – 3.14. To mark the occasion,Hannah Devlin invites the mathematician and comedian Matt Parker to talk about Pi, maths and his new book,Humble Pi: A Comedy of Maths Errors. They discussmaths anxiety, how much today ’s world relies on number crunchin...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Hannah Devlin and produced by Graihagh Jackson Tags: Mathematics Pi Education Science Source Type: news

Holy fudge: soft foods helped humans form 'f' and 'v' sounds – study
Diet of porridge and gruel shaped human faces, which diversified English languageThe texts of the 16th century were first to record the F-word for posterity. It appeared in William Dunbar ’s poem A Brash of Wowing in 1503 and later, thanks to an angry monk, in a notescrawled in the margin of a 1528 copy of De Officiis, Cicero ’s moral manifesto.But according to researchers, the English language might never have enjoyed a richness of F-words had it not been for early farmers and the food processing they favoured. Dairy products and other soft foods, such as gruel, porridge, soup and stews, helped shape our faces...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Anthropology Linguistics World news Food Evolution Biology Source Type: news

Mary Rose crew might have included sailors of African heritage
Bone analysis adds to evidence that Tudor England was a melting pot of ethnic diversityAnalyses of skeletons fromthe Mary Rose are fleshing out the crew ’s past, offering further evidence that Tudor England was a bustling scene of ethnic diversity.Researchers say studies on the human remains recovered from the warship, which sank in the Solent during a battle with the French in 1545, have revealed at least two of the crew might have had heritage from as far afield as north Africa.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Archaeology Race Science Heritage Culture UK news Source Type: news

Why your memories can't be trusted – video
Memory does not work like a video tape – it is not stored like a file just waiting to be retrieved. Instead, memories are formed in networks across the brain and every time they are recalled they can be subtly changed. So if these memories are changeable, how much should we trust them? With experts Dr Julia Shaw and Prof Elizabeth Loft us, the Guardian's Max Sanderson explores the mysterious world of human memory, how false memories can be implanted – and how this can be harnessed for good and illContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Max Sanderson Josh Toussaint-Strauss Phil Maynard Simon Roberts Joseph Pierce Paul Boyd Katie Lamborn Tags: Memory Psychology Source Type: news

‘Maths anxiety’ causing fear and despair in children as young as six
Study says condition can cause physical symptoms and behaviour problems in classChildren as young as six feel fear, rage and despair as a result of “mathematics anxiety”, a condition which can cause physical symptoms and behaviour problems in class, according to a study.Pupils in both primary and secondary school can find themselves locked in a cycle of despair, suffering from anxiety which harms their maths performance, which in turn leads to increased anxiety.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sally Weale Education correspondent Tags: Mathematics Education Schools Teaching Mental health Society UK news Neuroscience Source Type: news

Scientists call for global moratorium on gene editing of embryos
Crispr ‘tops list’ of recent scientific discoveries with massive consequences for humanity, says lead proponentLeading scientists have called for a global moratorium on the use ofpowerful DNA editing tools to make genetically modified children.The move is intended to send a clear signal to maverick researchers, and the scientific community more broadly, that any attempt to rewrite the DNA of sperm, eggs or embryos destined for live births is not acceptable.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 13, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Gene editing Genetics Medical research Biology World news Source Type: news

Millions in Britain at risk of poor-quality later life, report says
Ageing population and stretched care services leave poorest most vulnerableA landmark report on the state of ageing in Britain has warned that a significant proportion of people are at risk of spending later life in poverty, ill-health and hardship.Britain is undergoing a radical demographic shift, with the number of people aged 65 and over set to grow by more than 40% in two decades, reaching more than 17 million by 2036. The number of households where the oldest person is 85 or over is increasing faster than any other age group.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 13, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Amelia Hill Tags: Ageing UK news Society Health Poverty Older people Social trends Public finance Local government Social care Source Type: news

Toyota joins space race with plan for self-driving lunar rover
Japanese firm ’s vehicle would allow astronauts to travel on moon without space suitsToyota is to build a self-driving lunar rover that will enable astronauts to travel on the surface of the moon without space suits, as Japan raises the stakes amid renewed international interest in lunar exploration.The Japanese carmaker and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Jaxa) hope the vehicle will be included in a mission to the moon between 2029 and 2034, according toKyodo news agency.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 13, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Justin McCurry in Tokyo Tags: Space Toyota Japan Asia Pacific Automotive industry Business Science World news Source Type: news

Spring statement policies look to Brexit and a hi-tech future
Chancellor promises a global Britain and announces funds for science and digital projectsThe chancellor outlined a package of measures at the spring statement designed to prepare Britain for life outside the EU, as well as for the hi-tech digital jobs of the future.Alongside the central update on the economy, other announcements made by Philip Hammond included:Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 13, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Richard Partington Tags: Spring statement 2019 Philip Hammond Immigration and asylum Brexit Science Communities Digital media Digital Britain Politics Society Technology UK news Source Type: news

Actors show different brain activity when in character, study finds
Method actors were trained to take on role of Romeo or Juliet and then respond to questions“Acting is the least mysterious of all crafts,” Marlon Brando once said. But for scientists, working out what is going on in an actor’s head has always been something of a puzzle.Now, researchers have said thespians show different patterns of brain activity depending on whether they are in character or not.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 13, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Science Acting Canada World news Culture Source Type: news

Genetics may reduce efficacy of hormonal contraception – study
Tentative link found between genetic variant and faster breakdown of hormoneAn unintended pregnancy while using hormonal contraception may not always be down to the woman ’s mistake, according to research that suggests for some genetics could play a role.Millions of women use hormonal contraceptives such as different types of the pill, contraceptive implants or hormone-releasing intrauterine systems (IUS) or vaginal rings. These devices release hormones to prevent the release of an egg, as well as triggering other changes in the body to prevent a pregnancy.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Contraception and family planning Genetics Medical research Biology Science Society Women Source Type: news

Orange-bellied 'starry dwarf frog' discovered in Indian mountains
Astrobatrachus kurichiyana lurks in leaf litter and is sole member of an ancient lineageAn orange-bellied frog with a brown back, covered in tiny spots that resemble a starry sky, has been discovered in a mountain range in India, surprising researchers who said its ancestors branched off on the evolutionary tree from other members of the same frog family tens of millions of years ago.The frog, which is about 2cm to 3cm long, has been namedAstrobatrachus kurichiyana, although some might prefer its more rock-star sobriquet: “starry dwarf frog.”Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Amphibians Animals India Environment Science South and Central Asia World news Source Type: news

Stephen Hawking ’s former nurse struck off for failings in his care
Patricia Dowdy deemed not fit to practise over multiple misconduct chargesOne of Stephen Hawking ’s former nurses has been struck off after the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) ruled that she “failed to provide the standards of good, professional care that we expect and Professor Hawking deserved”.The NMC said Patricia Dowdy had faced multiple misconduct charges in relation to the care she was providing to the eminent physicist including financial misconduct, dishonesty, not providing appropriate care and failing to cooperate with the NMC and not having the correct qualifications.Continue reading... (S...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nadeem Badshah Tags: Stephen Hawking Science UK news Nursing Health Society Source Type: news

What animals can teach us about politics
Decades of studying primates has convinced me that animal politics are not so different from our own – and even in the wild, leadership is about much more than being a bully. By Frans de WaalIn July 2017, when Sean Spicer, then the White House press secretary, was discoveredhiding in the bushes to dodge questions from reporters, I knew Washington politics had become truly primatological. A few weeks earlier, James Comey had intentionally worn a blue suit while standing at the back of a room with blue curtains so as to blend in. The FBI director hoped to go unnoticed and avoid a presidential hug. (The tactic failed.)M...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Frans de Waal Tags: Animal behaviour Politics Donald Trump Animals World news Biology Science US news UK news Source Type: news

Fake drugs kill more than 250,000 children a year, doctors warn
Printer ink, paint and arsenic found in some drugs sold to treat life-threatening illnessesDoctors have called for an urgent international effort to combat a “pandemic of bad drugs” that is thought to kill hundreds of thousands of people globally every year.A surge in counterfeit and poor quality medicines means that 250,000 children a year are thought to die after receiving shoddy or outright fake drugs intended to treat malaria and pneumonia alone, the doctors warned.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Global health Antibiotics Drugs Drug resistance Source Type: news

Radical plan to artificially cool Earth's climate could be safe, study finds
Experts worry that injecting sulphur dioxide into the atmosphere could put some regions at riskA new study contradicts fears that using solargeoengineering to fight climate change could dangerously alter rainfall and storm patterns in some parts of the world.Related:Geoengineering may be used to combat global warming, experts sayContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Emily Holden in Washington Tags: Geoengineering Environment Climate change US news Science Source Type: news

Radical proposal to artificially cool Earth's climate could be safe, new study claims
Experts worry that injecting sulphur dioxide into the atmosphere could put some regions at riskA new study contradicts fears that using solargeoengineering to fight climate change could dangerously alter rainfall and storm patterns in some parts of the world.Related:Geoengineering may be used to combat global warming, experts sayContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Emily Holden in Washington Tags: Geoengineering Environment Climate change US news Science Source Type: news

Radioactive particles from huge solar storm found in Greenland
Discovery raises questions about emergency plans in place for severe space weatherTraces of an enormous solar storm that battered the atmosphere and showered Earth in radioactive particles more than 2,500 years ago have been discovered under the Greenland ice sheet.Scientists studying ice nearly half a kilometre beneath the surface found a band of radioactive elements unleashed by a storm that struck the planet in 660BC.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: The sun Science Greenland World news Space Source Type: news

Michael Wilks obituary
My friend Michael Wilks, who has died of prostate cancer aged 69, was a forensic physician. His professional achievements were underpinned by his courage and honesty in confronting his problems with alcohol and he made an outstanding contribution to changing attitudes towards addiction.Michael was born in Paddington, west London, to Dennis, a GP, and Bridget (nee Chetwynd-Stapylton), a nurse. After attending St John ’s school in Leatherhead, Surrey, he graduated in 1972 from St Mary’s hospital medical school in London, where we met in 1967. Afterwards he became a GP and soon became a principal at practices in K...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Finlay Tags: Doctors Medical research Alcoholism Metropolitan police Liberal Democrats Source Type: news

Solve it did you? Speak Yoda how to
The answers to today ’s Jedi language puzzleEarlier today I set you the following puzzle about the peculiar grammar of Yoda, Star Wars ’ pointy-eared Jedi master.Yoda inverts pairs of phrases before speaking. If Yoda says “Believe you I don’t”, we know what he means is “I don’t believe you.”Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Linguistics Education Science Source Type: news

Solve it can you? Speak Yoda how to
A Jedi language puzzleToday the British linguistics community is launching a campaign to make language analysis – the study of patterns in language – part of mainstream school education.To celebrate this campaign, about which more below, here ’s a puzzle about Yoda, the cuddly Star Wars Jedi Master. Ready are you?Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Education Science Language Source Type: news

'A big jump': People might have lived in Australia twice as long as we thought | Paul Daley
The result of 11 years of research suggests that human habitation could stretch to 120,000 yearsExtensive archaeological research in southern Victoria has again raised the prospect that people have lived in Australia for 120,000 years – twice as long as the broadly accepted period of human continental habitation.The research, with its contentious potential implications for Indigenous habitation of the continent that came to be Australia, has been presented to theRoyal Society of Victoria by a group of academics includingJim Bowler, the eminent 88-year-old geologist who in 1969 and 1974 discovered the bones of Mungo L...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Paul Daley Tags: Anthropology Archaeology Indigenous Australians Evolution Science Biology Source Type: news

Starwatch: the waxing gibbous moon moves into Cancer
As the moon moves into its second phase, it can help star watchers locate the faint constellation of the crabThis week the moon passes through its first quarter phase, when half of the visible surface is illuminated. It occurs on 14 March and marks the moment when the moon stops being a waxing crescent and becomes a waxing gibbous moon. In another week ’s time, it will be full. The chart shows the moon’s position in the southern sky on 17 March at 20:00 GMT. Its visible surface will be 85% illuminated and it will be sitting smack in the middle of the faint constellationCancer, the crab. This is one of the 12 zo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: The moon Astronomy Science Source Type: news

The five: back-from-the-brink species once thought extinct
From wild dogs to horned frogs, all manner of animals are still capable of keeping out of our sight, some for over 100 yearsThis week, scientists in South Americaspotted a rare frog previously thought to be extinct. The Tropical Herving research group found a colony of horned marsupial frogs in a recent expedition into the Choc ó rainforest. The species had last been seen in Ecuador in 2005. The frogs’ natural habitat is in the high canopy of the rainforest, threatened by deforestation.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Inigo Alexander Tags: Extinct wildlife Zoology Animals World news Biology Science Technology Source Type: news

Chancellor pledges £200m for research into medical lasers and gene technology
Philip Hammond will use spring statement to support hi-tech industry in Cambridge, Edinburgh and OxfordshirePhilip Hammond will boost public spending on genetic research and laser technology by £200m inthis week ’s spring statement to support some of Britain ’s fastest-growing industries as they prepare for Brexit.The chancellor said the extra spending on projects in Cambridge, Edinburgh and Oxfordshire, would ensure the UK was “at the forefront of science and technology innovation” and maintain its reputation as a “pioneering nation as it leaves the EU”.Continue reading... (Source...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Phillip Inman Tags: Philip Hammond Economic policy Politics Technology startups Technology sector Business Medical research Science UK news Brexit Source Type: news

15-minute laser is best treatment for glaucoma patients, says study
Top surgeon hails fast procedure that saves a lifetime using eye dropsLasers should become the principal method in the UK for treating patients with the debilitating eye condition glaucoma. That is the stark conclusion of a three-year study published on Sunday.The report, which appears in theLancet, says the laser technique – known as selective laser trabeculoplasty or SLT – should replace the prescribing of eye drops, the current favoured way to treat glaucoma. The study has revealed that SLT is not only more effective and safer, but should also save the NHS £1.5m a year in tackling the condition.Continu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie science editor Tags: Health NHS Society Science Source Type: news

After a close shave with murder, life in the Arctic helped me overcome debilitating fear
Isolation in Greenland helped stop constant worrying about my daughter ’s safetyIn recent years I ’ve often felt on top of the world, but I also know what it’s like to teeter on the edge of the precipice, unsure whether I could save myself. Six years ago, I was an author with two conspiracy thrillers under my belt; both were bestsellers in Denmark and my path as a writer seemed set. But a fe w short moments, out walking with my 11-year-old daughter on an ordinary summer’s day, changed everything.We would often take a stroll past an abandoned sawmill near our house – something we’d been d...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Mads Peder Nordbo Tags: Life and style Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Books Parents and parenting Culture Family Source Type: news

I used to pretend my epilepsy didn ’t exist. Like a no-deal Brexit, it’s a dangerous game | Hadley Freeman
I try to avoid writing about Brexit. But one question has become too pressing to ignoreLike everyone else at this point, I have many questions about Brexit, starting with “why” and going from there. For example: are concerns about how Britain is going to cope merely “project fear”, assome Brexity folk still have it? Is it going to be like the blitz,as other Brexity people havepromised enthusiastically? Such people include someone called Ant Middleton fromChannel 4 ’s SAS: Who Dares Wins, who said last year ina tweet(sincedeleted): “A ‘no deal’ for our country would actually b...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hadley Freeman Tags: Brexit Drugs Life and style Health Society UK news European Union Foreign policy Politics Pharmaceuticals industry Business Science Epilepsy Source Type: news

'It's scary': motor neurone disease spikes sevenfold in rural NSW
In centres like Griffith and Wagga Wagga, locals fear there may be something in the waterAs a child, Tania Magoci spent every weekend at Lake Wyangan near Griffith, waterskiing, swimming and boating with her family.She and her siblings would use the serpentine concrete outlet into the lake as a slippery slide. In summer, the slime from algal blooms exacerbated by the run-off from the nearby farms made it more fun to slide down the chicanes.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Gabrielle Chan Tags: Motor neurone disease Health New South Wales election 2019 Australia news New South Wales politics Rural Australia Medical research Water Source Type: news