Chinese city 'plans to launch artificial moon to replace streetlights'
‘Dusk-like glow’ of proposed satellite could light an area with a diameter of 10-80km, People’s Daily reportsIn Chengdu, there is reportedly an ambitious plan afoot for replacing the city ’s streetlights: boosting the glow of the real moon with that of a more powerful fake one.The south-western Chinese city plans to launch an illumination satellite in 2020. According to an account inthe People ’s Daily, the artificial moon is “designed to complement the moon at night”, though it would be eight times as bright.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Elle Hunt Tags: The moon Cities Space Science China Asia Pacific World news Source Type: news

Groundbreaking Australian HIV trial should be replicated, researchers say
Trial resulted in 25% fall in new infections in year after rapid rollout of PrEP medicationHigh-income countries with people at high risk of HIV should replicate a groundbreaking trial in Australia, which has seen new infections fall by 25% in one year following the rapid rollout of free HIV medication, researchers say.When taken daily the pre-exposure prophylaxis drug known as PrEP is almost 100% effective in preventing HIV-negative people from acquiring the virus. In 2016, NSW became the first Australian state to trial PrEP on a large scale. In the course of just one year 9,714 HIV-negative people at high risk of acquiri...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Davey Tags: Aids and HIV Health Medical research Australia news Source Type: news

Baby-saving drug wins $3m prize in 'Oscars for science'
Treatment for rare genetic disease to receive one of seven $3m Breakthrough awards at glitzy ceremonyNew techniques for peering into the intricate innards of cells and a discovery that has given hope for infants with a deadly genetic condition are among the developments that are being lauded in this year ’s “Oscars for science”.The 2019 Breakthrough prize will see seven winning discoveries each celebrated with a $3m award for those behind the research to share, with a further six “New Horizons” prizes of $100,000 also going to young researchers in maths and physics and a $400,000-worth award o...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Science prizes Source Type: news

Robin Ince's top 10 books about the human condition
From Douglas Adams to Oliver Sacks, the standup comedian reveals some of the writers that have helped him try to work out what makes us tickMost of my standup shows, whether about the behaviour of the bonobo ape or my addiction to celebrity narrowboat TV shows, are really me trying to work out what it is to be human and trying to see how wrong I am getting it.In middle age, I ’ve been trying to evaluate the knowledge accumulated from shouting at strangers for money over the last three decades. Where does anxiety come from? What is the key to creativity? How can we deal with grief? How do we overcome impostor syndrome...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Robin Ince Tags: Books Oliver Sacks Culture Health, mind and body books Physics Richard Feynman Comics and graphic novels Alison Bechdel Kurt Vonnegut Douglas Adams Source Type: news

Smiling does make you happier – under carefully controlled conditions
The idea that smiling changes the way we perceive things seemed like another casualty of social psychology ’s replication crisis – but something more interesting was going onIn 1988, Fritz Strack and colleagues publishedone of the most wonderful studies in psychology. They asked volunteers how funny they thought some cartoons were. While looking at the cartoons, some of the participants held a pen between their teeth without it touching their lips, while some others held a pen in their lips without allowing it to touch their teeth. (The participants believed they were testing out methods disabled people could u...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Christopher Paley Tags: Psychology Science Source Type: news

We once marvelled at Neil Armstrong. Now space is a playground for the rich | John Harris
Nasa ’s greatest feats were a triumph for mankind. History will be less kind to today’s space pioneersThe promised journey is from Earth to the edge of space, rather than London Euston to Crewe, but the story of Richard Branson ’s company Virgin Galactic still has echoes of a bad passenger experience on his trains. For the best part of a decade, his potential customers have been waiting for an experience that wasmeant to arrive in 2011, with only one certainty to hang on to: the tickets are eye-wateringly expensive. The price for Virgin rocket travel now apparently hovers at around £250,000, andrepo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: John Harris Tags: Space Virgin Galactic Elon Musk SpaceX Science Technology World news Source Type: news

Self-lubricating condom design may encourage safe sex
Slippery-when-wet concept may raise comfort and outlast couples ’ stamina, say scientistsCondoms could be set for a makeover that might not only boost couples ’ sex lives but encourage safe sex, according to researchers.Experts say a big-turn off for condom use is a lack of lubrication: current latex condoms are relatively rough, which can lead to breakage and discomfort, while commercial lubricants, including those applied by manufacturers to condoms, wear off during sex and may not be something couples want to apply.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Contraception and family planning Science Sex Health Society UK news Source Type: news

Spain to beat Japan in world life expectancy league table for 2040
Mediterranean lifestyle takes effect in Spain but US continues to drop down tablePeople in Spain are predicted to have the longest life expectancy in the world by 2040 – beating Japan into second place – and much of the reason is to do with the way they eat, according to the authors of the most comprehensive study of the global burden of disease.In the years to come, the biggest threats to our health and longevity will be obesity, high blood pressure and blood sugar, tobacco use and drinking alcohol, according to the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation in Seattle, US, which has produced the forecasts.Co...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Spain Ageing US news Smoking Cancer Heart disease Health UK news World news Japan Science Source Type: news

Archeological find changes date of Pompeii's destruction
Inscription suggests Mount Vesuvius erupted weeks later than previously thoughtA newly-discovered inscription at Pompeii proves the city was destroyed by Mount Vesuvius after 17 October AD79 and not on 24 August as previously thought.Archeologists recently discovered that a worker had inscribed the date of “the 16th day before the calends of November”, meaning 17 October, on a house at Pompeii, the head of archeology at the site, Massimo Osanna, told Italian media.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: AFP in Rome Tags: Italy Archaeology Classics and ancient history Education Science Europe Source Type: news

Fact check: Donald Trump's claims versus climate science
Trump ’s assertions are at odds with scientific consensus that humans are causing higher temperatures that pose immediate and growing threatsAsked about climate change on CBS ’ 60 Minutes and by reporters in Georgia on Monday, Donald Trump suggested that climate change will “change back again, ” that it might not be man-made, and that hurricanes aren’t getting worse. The Guardian compared the US president’s comments to the science.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Emily Holden in Washington Tags: Donald Trump Climate change US news Science Trump administration Source Type: news

Countries where smacking children is banned 'are safer to grow up in'
Research reveals that fighting between youths – particularly females – is less common where corporal punishment has been outlawedCountries that ban the smacking of children appear to be safer for young people to grow up in, according to research revealing that fighting between youths – particularly females – is less common where corporal punishment has been outlawed.Experts say the study adds to a growing body of evidence that punishing children by smacking, slapping or spanking them can lead to later harm. The research has led to renewed calls for policymakers to ban such practices in both schools ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Children Society Science Law World news Health Source Type: news

Viking ship burial discovered in Norway just 50cm underground
Archaeologists detect 20-metre ship using motorised high-resolution ground-penetrating radarArchaeologists have discovered a Viking ship burial in Norway using ground-penetrating radar that suggests the 20-metre keel and many of its timbers remain well preserved just half a metre below the topsoil.The ship lies in farmland in Østfold county in south-east Norway. Just three other intact ship burials have been recorded in the country; the survival of this one is remarkable because the imposing burial mound that once covered it has long since been ploughed out. Another mound, Jelle mound, still rises high in the field,...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Archaeology Science Norway Europe Source Type: news

Perspectives on adding folic acid to flour to prevent spinal bifida | Letters
Dr JK Anand, Chris Pageand Pam Lunnreflect on the UK government ’s decisionOf course the planned fortification of flour with folic acid will help – where the cause of spina bifida is nutritional deficiency of folic acid (All UK flour to be given folic acid additive, 15 October). However, it can not conceivably prevent the defect where it is due to genetic factors – two defective genes from two parents coming together.In some parts of the world consanguineous marriages are commoner than in others. An academic paper in the Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition (Vol 32, No 2, June 2014) by Nazish Jabee...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Health Pregnancy Disability Society Food Parents and parenting Family & wellbeing Life and style Children Genetics Science Source Type: news

Finding hope in the reign of a super-ego | Letters
Guardian readers respond to Gary Greenberg ’s essay on Trumpian psychoanalysisGary Greenberg ’s beautifully written but flawed account of the first two years of the Trump presidency highlights the limitations of using psychoanalytic concepts to explain wider political and social developments (Analyse this, The long read, 12 October).Far from Trumpism representing the return of “our archaic heritage”, our deep instinctual need to “consume, to pillage, to destroy, to wall out our neighbours and to hate people living in shitholes”, it is rather, like Brexit, a response to 30 years of neolib...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Donald Trump Psychology US news Science Mental health Society Protest World news US politics Source Type: news

Nick Foster obituary
My father, Nick Foster, who has died aged 61 after suffering a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, was an agricultural engineer devoted to improving conditions for rural people in the developing world.He wanted to empower communities by encouraging participation and education, and established water-user groups that led to the sustainable management of irrigation schemes.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Foster-Devaney Tags: Agriculture Access to water Bangor University Source Type: news

Earth Science in Our Lives: photography competition winners 2018 – in pictures
The Geological Society of London has announced the results of its 2018 Earth Science Week photography competition. Entrants were asked to submit images of geological sites in the UK and Ireland that meant something in their lives. These 12 winning images will feature in a calendar and be displayed at the Geological Society duringEarth Science Week 2018 (13-21 October).Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 15, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Geology Science Environment Photography Source Type: news

First Man: Ryan Gosling's abstract Apollo mission – discuss with spoilers
The biopic of Neil Armstrong and the first moon landing has US patriots all fired up, but do Gosling and director Damien Chazelle achieve their objectives?Damien Chazelle ’s film about the iron-jawed, ice-water-in-the-veins pilot and astronautNeil Armstrong is a rocket pointed directly at the distant planet known as Awards Season. It ought to do well there, as its thrilling set-pieces, strong performances, dramatic score and sweeping emotions achieve escape velocity from typical biopic trappings.You ’d think a movie like First Man wouldn’t have too many surprises; most people know that Apollo 11 landed on...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jordan Hoffman Tags: First Man Ryan Gosling Film Damien Chazelle Culture Nasa Space Science Drama films Claire Foy Source Type: news

Cannabis health products are everywhere – but do they live up to the hype?
Cannabidiol, or CBD, is now available in the UK in everything from skin creams to beers. But don ’t set your hopes too highThis has been the year medical cannabis hit the mainstream. The government hasannounced that it is relaxing laws on when cannabis medicines can be prescribed by doctors, following high-profile cases such as that ofBilly Caldwell, the 13-year-old boy hospitalised by his epileptic seizures after he was denied legal access to the cannabis oil that helps control them. Meanwhile a new generation of cannabis medicines has shown great promise (both anecdotally and in early clinical trials) in treating a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amy Fleming Tags: Health & wellbeing Alternative medicine Medical research Science Cannabis Source Type: news

UFO sightings may be falling, but Congress is still paying attention | Nick Pope
Renewed US interest could produce some fascinating hearings, but the focus should be on the quality not just the quantity of reported sightingsThere ’s renewed interest in the UFO phenomenon and it’s coming from an unexpected source: the United States Congress.The Senate Armed Services Committee is looking into a 2004 incident where US Navy pilots flying with the USS Nimitz strike group encountered, chased and filmed fast-moving unidentified objects. Reliable sources say at least two of the military pilots involved have already been interviewed, and a radar operator was subsequently invited to get in touch.Cont...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nick Pope Tags: Space UFOs Science Source Type: news

Starwatch: Mars and Saturn line up with the moon in the southern sky
The moon takes centre stage in this week ’s planetary line-up – but Pluto is there too, invisible to the naked eyeThis week the waxing Moon glides between Saturn and Mars in the low southern sky. Mars is the brighter and redder of the two planets. The chart shows the sky at 20:00 BST on 16 October 2018 when the Moon is roughly halfway between the two visible planets. The Moon will be at first quarter phase, when half the illuminated surface will be visible from Earth. While Mars and Saturn are the planetary stars of this show, on the 16th the Moon is actually aligned most closely with the planetPluto, which sit...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: Astronomy The moon Mars Saturn Pluto Science Space Source Type: news

How irritating that smug couples have stumbled on the secret of a perfect relationship | Arwa Mahdawi
‘We-talk’ – constantly referring to yourself and your partner in the plural – is annoying. But it is also a sign that your relationship is solid. What else has science got to teach us about staying together?It ’s always we, we, we … have you noticed? We all know people who seem to have lost the capacity to talk about themselves as autonomous individuals the moment they couple up. “We’re doing well, thanks”; “We love spaghetti”; “We are thinking about buying an emotional support squirrel.”Irritatingly, it turns out that these people are not just ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Arwa Mahdawi Tags: Relationships Science Life and style Psychology Source Type: news

Essays reveal Stephen Hawking predicted race of 'superhumans'
Physicist said genetic editing may create species that could destroy rest of humanityThe late physicist and author Prof Stephen Hawking has caused controversy by suggesting a new race of superhumans could develop from wealthy people choosing to edit their and their children ’s DNA.Hawking, the author of A Brief History of Time,who diedin March, made the predictions in a collection of articles and essays.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Marsh Tags: Stephen Hawking UK news Science Genetics Biology Essays Books Source Type: news

Reproduction revolution: how our skin cells might be turned into sperm and eggs
Scientists may soon be able to create human sperm and eggs using ordinary cells – a boon for those with fertility problems that raises troubling ethical questionsForty years ago, couples suffering from infertility were given hope by the birth of Louise Brown, the first “test-tube baby”. But although millions of babies have now been born by IVF, the technique can offer no help to couples eager to have a child that is genetically theirs but who lack the eggs or sperm to make it: men whose testes produce no sperm, say, or women who have undergone surgery for ovar ian cancer. Some opt for donor eggs or sperm,...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Philip Ball Tags: Genetics Reproduction Fertility problems IVF Biology Science Health Society Source Type: news

How to learn: boost your brain with a trip down memory lane
Anyone can be taught anything if they are inspired enough to pay attention – the key to remembering it is firing up the imaginationI first encountered memory techniques just after leaving secondary school. I ’d been struck down by an illness, and had to spend a few months in hospital. Needing a project to escape the boredom of the ward, I was unable to resist diving into memory techniques when a friend brought me a book calledLearn to Remember by Dominic O ’Brien (the “eight-time world memory champion”, I was reassured to learn).I still recall the delight at realising how simple and intuitive ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ed Cooke Tags: Health & wellbeing Memory Education Students Secondary schools Life and style Psychology Source Type: news

First Man review – an inner space odyssey
Damien Chazelle ’s drama about Neil Armstrong and the 1969 Apollo 11 moon landing is a moving tale of loss and perilIn William Peter Blatty ’s underrated 1980 mystery-thrillerThe Ninth Configuration, a grounded lunar astronaut played by Scott Wilson (whosadly died last week) delivers a heartbreaking soliloquy that perfectly encapsulates the existential crisis at the centre of much space-travel cinema. “See the stars, so cold, so far and so very lonely,” he says, plaintively. “What if I got there, got to the moon and couldn’t get back… I’m afraid to die alone, so far from hom...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mark Kermode, Observer film critic Tags: First Man Damien Chazelle Ryan Gosling Biopics Film Culture Apollo 11 Space Source Type: news

Eco-pioneers in the 1970s: how aerospace workers tried to save their jobs – and the planet
A new documentary recalls the extraordinary but largely forgotten Lucas Plan, which saw British workers attempt to make wind turbines instead of weaponsIt was 1974. A new Labour government had come to power on the promise of defence cuts. Swingeing job losses were soon to follow. Desperate workers at one Birmingham factory – Lucas Aerospace – fought to save their livelihoods, not by downing tools but by transforming from weapons-makers into one of Britain’s first eco-manufacturers, with early designs for wind turbines and hybrid cars.The extraordinary story of what became known as the “Lucas Plan&rd...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rob Walker Tags: Film Documentary films UK news Science Technology Manufacturing sector Trade unions Source Type: news

Forget coal wars, says Alan Finkel – look at emission outcomes
Chief scientist says Australia must use all available technologiesAustralia ’s chief scientist says the question facing the nation’s energy future is not about renewables versus coal but how best to create “a whole-of-economy emissions reduction strategy”.In a prerecorded interview with Sky released on Sunday, Dr Alan Finkel responded to theIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change ’s report, which warned that greenhouse gas pollution needs to reach zero by 2050 if the world is to have any hope of stopping global warming at 1.5C.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amy Remeikis Tags: Energy Greenhouse gas emissions Climate change Coal Environment Science Fossil fuels Energy storage Australia news Renewable energy Hydrogen power Liberal party Australian politics Coalition Australian economy Finkel review Source Type: news

A strong libido and bored by monogamy: the truth about women and sex
When a heterosexual couple marries, who ’s likely to get bored of sex first? The answer might surprise you…What do you know about female sexuality? Whatever it is, chances are, saysWednesday Martin, it ’s all wrong. “Most of what we’ve been taught by science about female sexuality is untrue,” she says. “Starting with two basic assertions: that men have a stronger libido than women, and that men struggle with monogamy more than women do.”Martin pulls no punches. Her bestselling memoirPrimates of Park Avenue cast her as an anthropologist observing the habits of her Upper East ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Joanna Moorhead Tags: Sex Marriage Life and style Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Family Source Type: news

Mind games: a mental workout to help keep your brain sharp
Lifestyle habits matter when it comes to brain health, and the rewards of increased mental stimulation can be seen in a very short space of timeSharon, a 46-year-old single mother of three teenagers, came to see me about her increasing forgetfulness. Working full-time and managing her household was becoming overwhelming for her, and she was misplacing lunchboxes, missing appointments and having trouble focusing her attention. She was worried because her grandmother got Alzheimer ’s disease at the age of 79, and Sharon felt she might be getting it too – just a lot younger. I said it was highly unlikely that Shar...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gary Small Tags: Health & wellbeing Memory Life and style Mental health Psychology Source Type: news

First woman: Smithsonian Air and Space director looks from the moon to Mars
Ellen Stofan made history this summer when she became the first female director of the third-most-visited museum in the worldOn the red carpet beneathan Apollo lunar module and Charles Lindbergh ’s Spirit of St Louis, actors Ryan Gosling and Claire Foy mingled with astronauts, Nasa engineers and members of the US Congress. Washington was staging the national premiere of aNeil Armstrong biopic. But before it saw First Man, it heard from the first woman.Related:First Man review: Ryan Gosling shoots for the moon in Neil Armstrong biopicContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Smith in Chantilly,  Virginia Tags: Space Museums First Man Nasa Science Source Type: news

'We will fly again': Nasa to keep using Russia's Soyuz despite failure
After Russian-American crew made emergency landing, chief of US space agency predicts return to flight by DecemberNasa ’s chief has praised the Russian space programme and said that he expected a new crew to go to the International Space Station in December, despite a rocket failure.Jim Bridenstine spoke to reporters at the US embassy in Moscow a day after a Soyuz rocket failure forced Russian cosmonaut Aleksey Ovchinin and US astronaut Nick Hague to make an emergency landing shortly after takeoff in Kazakhstan. The pair escaped unharmed.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse Tags: Space The space shuttle Nasa Science Source Type: news

'Huge concentrations' of toxins found in Grenfell soil, study finds
Exclusive: Public Health England has not acted on early findings of report warning of potential carcinogensToxins that could have long-term health implications for the survivors of the Grenfell Tower fire and thousands of people who live nearby have been identified by one of the world ’s leading toxicology experts, the Guardian can reveal.Early results of the study byProf Anna Stec prompted her to privately urge Public Health England (PHE), the Department of Health, the police and Kensington and Chelsea council to organise a range of tests to ensure any potential health risks can be properly assessed.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nick Hopkins Tags: Grenfell Tower fire Grenfell Tower inquiry Health policy UK news London Science Chemistry Source Type: news

Digital contraceptives and period trackers: the rise of femtech
With market predicted to be worth $50bn by 2025, is women ’s health no longer being overlooked by tech? Digital contraceptive techniques have been on the receiving end of bad press recently after Swedish company Natural Cycles was described as “misleading” by the UK’s advertising body, and a number of women complained about becoming pregnant while relying on the app.But that hasn ’t stopped the industry from thriving, with the launch ofMoody Month, which tracks hormones and menstrual cycles , andFlo Health, an ovulation calculator, being valued at $200m in the same week, suggesting there is st...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Isabel Woodford Tags: Apps Technology Life and style Reproduction Science Biology Pregnancy Health & wellbeing Family Parents and parenting NHS Society Technology startups Source Type: news

Mary Robinson on climate change: ‘Feeling “This is too big for me” is no use to anybody’
The former president of Ireland has a new raison d ’être: saving the planet. Yet, despite the dire warnings of this week’s IPCC report, she is surprisingly upbeatOn the morning that the world ’s leading climate scientists warn thatthe planet hasuntil 2030 to avert a global warming catastrophe, Mary Robinson appears suitably sombre. She wears black shoes, black trousers and a black sweater and perches at the end of a long table at her climate justice foundation, headquartered in an austere, imposing Georgian building opposite Trinity College Dublin. The only dash of brightness is a multicoloured broo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rory Carroll Tags: Climate change United Nations Ireland Politics Source Type: news

A step in the right direction: could implants help people walk again? – Science Weekly podcast
Four people with paraplegia were recently implanted with electrodes in their lower backs. They all regained movement below their injuries, and two walked again. This weekNicola Davis investigates this technique – epidural stimulation – and other approaches for treating spinal cord injuriesJeff Marquis was spending his day off work on his bike on a mountain trail in Montana. After he landed a jump badly, he realised he could no longer move his legs. He was eventually diagnosed with a spinal cord injury, and doctors told him that he would never walk again.Fast-forward to 2018, and Marquis is now taking steps for ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Nicola Davis and produced by Geoff Marsh Tags: Science Medicine Stem cells Medical research Biology Source Type: news

Analyse this: what Freud can teach us about Trumpism
As a psychotherapist, here ’s what I’ve learned in the two years since Donald Trump moved into the White House.By Gary GreenbergIt will be left to future historians, if there are any, to explain to their contemporaries why a profession came into existence in the 20th century whose well-paid practitioners sat in an office while people otherwise unknown to them talked about their unhappiness, one after the other, for an hour at a time. I have been a therapist for 35 years, and I still don ’t really understand it. I don’t speak in delphic tongues or offer holy absolution or perform shamanic hocus pocus...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gary Greenberg Tags: Donald Trump Sigmund Freud US news Psychology Society Source Type: news

Use of caesarean sections growing at 'alarming' rate
In some countries more than half of births now involve the procedure, experts sayThe use of caesarean sections to deliver babies has reached epidemic proportions, say experts, with the procedure growing in use at an “alarming” rate.While caesarean sections can be a crucial intervention for the safety of the mother and child, for example if the baby is showing distress or if the mother is bleeding before birth, experts say the procedure would account for about 10-15% of births if only used when medically necessary.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis and Ciara Long Tags: Caesareans Health Society Life and style Pregnancy Parents and parenting Family Science Source Type: news

Rocket launches to be grounded while mid-air failure is investigated
Problem with Soyuz ’s thrusters must be identified before space flights can resume, say expertsThe Russian Soyuz rocket that launches astronauts to the International Space Station will be grounded for months after two crew members wereforced to make an emergency landing in Kazakhstan.American Nick Hague and Alexey Ovchinin from Russia were aboard the Soyuz rocket when it developed a thruster problem nearly two minutes after takeoff and were forced to make an emergency landing in their capsule. The Russian space agency, Roscosmos, announced an immediate investigation into the incident.Continue reading... (Source: Guar...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Space International Space Station Kazakhstan Russia World news Science Europe Nasa South and Central Asia Source Type: news

Healthy mice with same-sex parents born for first time
Findings show barriers to same-sex reproduction in humans can technically be overcome – but not yetHealthy mice with two mothers have been born for the first time in a study that pushes the boundaries of reproductive science.Mice with two fathers were also born, but only survived a couple of days, the Chinese team behind the work reported. There is no imminent prospect of the techniques being used clinically in people, but the findings demonstrate that the biological barriers to same-sex reproduction can, technically, be overcome.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Science Gene editing Biology Reproduction Animals World news Source Type: news

Footage from inside Soyuz spacecraft shows crew at moment of failure – video
A Russian-American space crew have been forced to make an emergency landing in Kazakhstan after their Soyuz rocket suffered a failure shortly after launching from Russia ’s Baikonur cosmodrome in one of the most serious space incidents in recent yearsSpace crew abort flight after post-launch rocket failureContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Space Kazakhstan South and Central Asia Nasa Russia US news Source Type: news

Space crew abort flight after post-launch rocket failure
US and Russian crew of Soyuz spacecraft reported safe after emergency landingA Russian-American space crew have been forced to make an emergency landing in Kazakhstan after their Soyuz rocket suffered a failure shortly after launching from Russia ’s Baikonur cosmodrome in one of the most serious space incidents in recent years.The launch began as a routine affair. Missions bound for the International Space Station (ISS) have been conducted every few months for the past 20 years. But 119 seconds into Thursday ’s flight, mission controllers on the Nasa broadcast began to speak of a failure.Continue reading... (So...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Matthew Bodner in Moscow Tags: Space International Space Station Nasa Russia Kazakhstan Science South and Central Asia World news US news Europe Source Type: news

Rocket failure forces astronauts to make emergency landing
US and Russian crew of Soyuz spacecraft reported safe after being forced back down to EarthA Russian-American space crew have been forced to make an emergency landing in Kazakhstan after their Soyuz rocket suffered a failure shortly after launching from Russia ’s Baikonur cosmodrome in one of the most serious space incidents in recent years.The launch began as a routine affair. Missions bound for the International Space Station (ISS) have been conducted every few months for the past 20 years. But 119 seconds into Thursday ’s flight, mission controllers on the Nasa broadcast began to speak of a failure.Continue ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Matthew Bodner in Moscow Tags: Space Nasa Kazakhstan International Space Station Science South and Central Asia World news US news Russia Source Type: news

Black holes and soft hair: why Stephen Hawking's final work is important
Malcolm Perry, who worked with Hawking on his final paper, explains how it improves our understanding of one of universe ’s enduring mysteriesStephen Hawking ’s final scientific paper releasedThe information paradox is perhaps the most puzzling problem in fundamental theoretical physics today. It was discovered by Stephen Hawking 43 years ago, and until recently has puzzled many.Starting in 2015, Stephen, Andrew Strominger and I started to wonder if we could understand a way out of this difficulty by questioning the basic assumptions that underlie the difficulties. We published our first paper on the subject in...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Malcolm Perry Tags: Stephen Hawking Black holes Astronomy Science Space Source Type: news

Stephen Hawking's final scientific paper released
Black Hole Entropy and Soft Hair was completed in the days before the physicist ’s death in March•Black holes and soft hair: why Stephen Hawking ’s final work is importantStephen Hawking ’s final scientific paper has been released by physicists who worked with the late cosmologist on his career-long effort to understand what happens to information when objects fall into black holes.The work, which tackles what theoretical physicists call “the information paradox”, was completed in the days beforeHawking ’s death in March. It has now been written up by his colleagues at Cambridge and...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Stephen Hawking Black holes Science Physics Source Type: news

Remember my name: when recognising 5,000 faces isn't enough
Humans can memorise thousands of faces, say scientists. But that only makes the social awkwardness of not being able to place an acquaintance even worse. Here ’s how to brazen it outScientists from the University of York have claimed that humans canrecognise and memorise 5,000 faces– making those occasions where you can’t quite place or name someone even more excruciating. Here is the modern etiquette for navigating this social nightmare:Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Martin Belam Tags: Psychology UK news Science Source Type: news

What does climate change really cost society? This lab is trying to find out
Studies by the Climate Impact Lab have found that higher temperatures increase suicide ratesOne of the biggest hubs of real-time climate research is a lab hundreds of miles from the rising seas and melting ice caps. There are no test tubes or beakers. Instead young scientists and economists hunch over computers analyzing the newest data.A group of them are currently reviewing a study that considers whether crime levels are connected to monsoon seasons. The findings are a tiny part of a big question: how much is climate change costing society, and who ’s paying?Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Emily Holden in Chicago Tags: Climate change Environment Science US news India Source Type: news

The one good thing about Brexit? Leaving the EU ’s disgraceful farming system | George Monbiot
The government ’s plans are an improvement, but still fatally flawed. We need a proper agriculture debateI ’m a remainer, but there’s one result of Brexit I can’t wait to see: leaving the EU’s common agricultural policy. This is the farm subsidy system that spends€50bn (£44bn) a year on achieving none of its objectives. It is among the most powerful drivers of environmental destruction in the northern hemisphere. Because payments are made only for land that ’s in “agricultural condition”, the system creates a perverse incentive to clear wildlife habitats, even in p...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: George Monbiot Tags: Farming Agriculture Science Wildlife Environment Food Brexit UK news European Union Politics Animal welfare Animals World news Source Type: news

Psychologists' face off reveals humans can recognise 5,000 people
University of York says first evidence-based study nails down facial-recognition abilityThe next time an old friend meets your greeting with a quizzical who-are-you stare, you ’re right to take offence: new research suggests the average person can recognise 5,000 different faces.Psychologists at the University of York embarked on the study after realising that for all the work scientists have done on faces, they had never nailed down, even roughly, the number of faces the average human knows. They say it is the first evidence-based estimate of this figure.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Psychology Facial recognition Science Technology Source Type: news

Air pollution linked to greater risk of mouth cancer, finds study
Research in Taiwan has show a link between very high levels of air pollution and oral cancerHigh levels of air pollution are linked to an increased risk of mouth cancer, new research has revealed.Scientists have previously linked high air pollution to a host of health problems, from an increasedrisk of dementia toasthma and even changes in thestructure of the heart, with recent research suggesting there is no“safe level” of air pollution.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Pollution Cancer Health Taiwan Science Environment Society World Health Organization World news Asia Pacific Source Type: news

Are women in science any better off than in Ada Lovelace ’s day? | Jess Wade
On Ada Lovelace Day, let ’s rethink how we ensure scientists from diverse backgrounds can contribute to our understanding of the worldIn recognition of the fact that their obituary pageshad been dominated by white men, in 2018 the New York Times published an obituary of the Countess Ada Lovelace. Alongside Grace Hopper and Katherine Johnson, Lovelace has become an icon for women in technology. So much so that the second Tuesday in October is recognised internationally as Ada Lovelace Day. But what would a modern-day Lovelace make of the situation for women working in science today?Lovelace was from a wealthy backgrou...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jess Wade Tags: Ada Lovelace Wikipedia Technology Mathematics Science Computer science and IT Education Gender World news Source Type: news