Study revives debate over breast cancer screening age
Update to long-running study finds screening from age of 40 rather than 50 could save livesScreening women from the age of 40 for breast cancer has the potential to save lives, according to a study that will reopen the debate over the timing as well as the risks andbenefits of routine mammograms.A group at Queen Mary University of London looked at data on 160,000 women between the ages of 39 and 41 who were randomly assigned either to annual breast screening or to wait until they were eligible for the usual NHS screening, offered every three years from the age of 50.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Breast cancer Health Society Medical research Science Source Type: news

Coronavirus live news: global death toll exceeds 750,000; France reports over 2,600 new cases in 24 hours
Pandemic has killed three quarters of a million people; France sets new post-lockdown record forsecond day in a row; Germany case jump shows‘unsettling trend’;Iraq reports record daily Covid-19 casesNetherlands and Malta set to be added to England quarantine listGreece: UK passengers barred from flights over confusing formCovid-19 may have been circulating in New Zealand for weeksMobile crematorium in Bolivia as deaths surgeUK coronavirus live: latest news9.00pmBSTBolivia’s political crisis is adding to the burden on its health care system, which was already grappling with coronavirus as it continues to s...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Lucy Campbell (now); Jessica Murray, Sarah Marsh and Helen Sullivan (earlier) Tags: Coronavirus outbreak World news US news UK news Australia news Science Infectious diseases Source Type: news

Climate change most likely cause of woolly rhino extinction – study
Analysis of ancient DNA from Siberia finds human hunting probably not to blameThe woolly rhino may have been wiped out by climate change rather than human hunting, researchers have revealed.Enormous, hairy and with a huge hump, the woolly rhino roamed northern Eurasia until about 14,000 years ago. The cause of its demise has been much debated, with remains found nearprehistoric human sites raising the question of whether they were hunted to extinction.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Palaeontology Science Source Type: news

Vasectomies: men recall final cuts and close shaves | Letters
Rob Delaney ’s frank and funny account of his vasectomy revives memories for readers includingMike Cashman and theRev Trevor SmithRob Delaney ’s article about having a vasectomy (‘Could I feel what they were doing? Yes’, 12 August) brought back memories from when I had one because my wife and I did not want more children.The surgeon gave me a local anaesthetic and I was cut above my penis. All went well and I thought it was all over and how brave I had been when I realised he had only done one side and I was only halfway through the operation.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Sexual health Reproduction Rob Delaney Biology NHS Family Source Type: news

I was Obama ’s Ebola tsar. US healthcare workers are dying at a shameful rate | Ronald A Klain
More than 900 healthcare workers have died in this pandemic. Many of those deaths could have been preventedHealthcare workers usually bear the brunt of an epidemic. Doctors, nurses and other medical personnel are in constant contact with people who may be infected. The cruel math of such potential exposures, multiplied over and over, inevitably takes a toll.Covid-19 is no exception.Lost on the Frontline, a new database fromthe Guardian and Kaiser Health News, shows that more than 900 American healthcare workers have already paid the ultimate price in the battle against coronavirus.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Ronald A Klain Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Science Health Healthcare industry Ebola Source Type: news

Covid vaccine tracker: when will we have a coronavirus vaccine?
More than 170 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective vaccine. Here is their progressResearchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, withmore than 170 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO).Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Niko Kommenda and Frank Hulley-Jones Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Health Source Type: news

Up to 6% of England's population may have had Covid, study shows
Imperial College home testing programme suggests 13% of Londoners have antibodiesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageAbout 3.4 million people in England – 6% of the population – have had Covid-19, with infections more common among members of black, Asian and minority ethnic communities, according to the results of alarge home antibody testing study.The results from the study, known as React-2, are based on home finger-prick antibody test results from 100,000 participants across the 314 local authorities in England.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Coronavirus outbreak UK news London Imperial College London Infectious diseases World news Medical research Science Source Type: news

I'm disabled but was told I won't receive critical care if I get Covid. It's terrifying
I use a ventilation machine at night and by early March, I could see that if I were to catch coronavirus, I ’d be in serious troubleTowards the end of last year, I ’d just got my life back on track after a long stay in hospital. I was discharged with round-the-clock care that transformed my life.I am disabled and the care package I was on before I was admitted to hospital didn ’t provide enough support; I was admitted to a ward with problems associated with a lack of care, including malnutrition and serious pressure sores. But then I was given a personal health budget from my local authority, with respons...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Anonymous as told to Sarah Johnson Tags: Disability Society Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Science Social care Local government Politics UK news Care workers Hospitals Society Professionals Source Type: news

'They've jumped the gun': scientists worry about Russia's Covid-19 vaccine
Rising chorus of concern over Sputnik V vaccine stems from opaque development and lack of mass testingCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIn 1977, Scott Halstead, a virologist at the University of Hawaii, was studying dengue fever when he noticed a now well-known but then unexpected feature of the disease.Animals that had already been exposed to one of the four closely related viruses that cause dengue and produced antibodies to it, far from being protected against other versions, became sicker when infected a second time, and it was the antibodies produced by the first infection that were res...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Peter Beaumont Tags: Medical research Coronavirus outbreak Science World news Russia Europe Source Type: news

Coronavirus live news: India sees record daily case rise as global deaths near 750,000
India ’s infections grow by nearly 67,000 in one day;Russia vaccine not yet completed its final trials;global deaths climb towards 750,000. Follow the latest updates‘They’ve jumped the gun’: scientists worry about Russia’s Covid-19 vaccineCovid-19 may have been circulating in New Zealand for weeks, as fresh case emergesFrench and Dutch on alert over rise in casesUK economy plunges into deepest recession since records beganSee all our coronavirus coverage6.49amBSTBritish tourists cancelling trips toFrance because they may have to quarantine for 14 days on their return might be upset, but the ow...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Helen Sullivan Tags: Coronavirus outbreak World news US news UK news Australia news Science Infectious diseases Source Type: news

From the archives: the chemistry of crime fiction – podcast
The Science Weekly team are taking a summer break – well, some of them – and so we’re bringing you an episode from the archive. And not just any episode, one ofNicola Davis ’s favourites. Back in 2017, Nicola sat down with withDr Kathryn Harkup to discuss a shared love of crime fiction and the chemistry contained within their poisonous plotsContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Nicola Davis and produced by Max Sanderson with Madeleine Finlay Tags: Chemistry Crime fiction Agatha Christie Books Science Source Type: news

Spain cases jump by nearly 1,700 – as it happened
Country struggling withsurge in infections; Moscowrejects concerns over safety; Germans told tokeep guard up against virus. This blog is closedFollow the latest global coronavirus live blog hereNew Zealand begins mass testing as Australia records deadliest dayFrench and Dutch on alert over rise in casesLost on the frontline: the 900 US health workers who have diedUK economy plunges into deepest recession since records began11.58pmBSTWe ’ve launched a new blog at the link below – head there for the latest:Related:Coronavirus live news: Covid-19 may have been in New Zealand city for 'weeks'; Russia vaccine due in...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Helen Sullivan (now and earlier); Lucy Campbell , Jessica Murray, and Aamna Mohdin Tags: Coronavirus outbreak World news Australia news US news UK news New Zealand Science Infectious diseases Source Type: news

Bushfire scientists call for Australia to set up national fire monitoring agency
Inconsistencies in how fires are measured across the states leads to confusion over how much of the country actually burned, experts sayA group of bushfire scientists have used an article in one of the world ’s leading scientific journals to call for Australia to establish a national agency to monitor the scale, severity and impacts of fires.The eight scientists from Australia and Spain say inconsistencies in how the scale and severity of bushfires are measured across the states had led to confusion over how much of the country actually burned.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 12, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Graham Readfearn Tags: Bushfires Australia news Natural disasters and extreme weather Climate change Environment Science Source Type: news

Sputnik review – smart Soviet-era sci-fi chiller
The alien is the least of the horrors in Egor Abramenko ’s mostly gripping suspense, set in a dour 80s army facility with an unwanted visitor‘We sent two into space. Three came back.” At first, no one notices the extraterrestrial stowaway when a Soviet rocket lands back on Earth; the creature is tucked out of sight, getting comfy in the oesophagus of one of the two astronauts on board. But it makes itself known at a medical facility, slithering out of the man’s mouth, expanding, before chomping on the brains of a nurse. Russian director Egor Abramenko makes his feature debut with this mostly grippin...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 12, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Cath Clarke Tags: Film Culture Space Thrillers (film) Science fiction and fantasy films Source Type: news

Covid vaccine tracker: when will we have a coronavirus vaccine?
More than 170 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective vaccine. Here is their progressResearchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 170 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO).Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 12, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Niko Kommenda and Frank Hulley-Jones Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Health Source Type: news

Global report: New Zealand begins mass testing as Australia records deadliest day
New Zealand to conduct ‘tens of thousands’ of tests; 21 deaths recorded in Australian state of Victoria; US health secretary sceptical of Russia vaccineCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageAustralia suffered its deadliest day of the pandemic so far, with 21 deaths in the state of Victoria, as authorities inNew Zealand’s largest city prepared to conduct “tens of thousands” of tests to determine the source of the first locally transmitted cases in over 100 days.On Wednesday, Victorian authorities said the deaths were all among people over 70, with 16 linked to outbre...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 12, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Helen Sullivan and Helen Davidson Tags: Coronavirus outbreak World news Infectious diseases Australia news New Zealand US news Asia Pacific Medical research Microbiology Science Source Type: news

Russian vaccine must follow safety procedure, says WHO – as it happened
Coronavirus updates: New Zealandrecords first new local cases in 102 days; global deaths likely to pass 750,000 this week,says WHO. This blog is now closedFollow the latest global coronavirus live blog hereRussia approves vaccine despite testing concernsFrench and Dutch on alert over rise in casesLost on the frontline: the 900 US health workers who have diedEngland denies it has evidence older pupils pose infection risk11.54pmBSTWe ’ve launched a new blog at the link below – head there for the latest, including updates from the New Zealand press conference happening shortly:Related:Coronavirus live news: Lebano...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 12, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Helen Sullivan (now and earlier); Lucy Campbell, Kevin Rawlinson and Aamna Mohdin Tags: Coronavirus outbreak World news Science Infectious diseases Microbiology Medical research UK news US news Australia news Source Type: news

Martin Rowson on Russia approving Sputnik V Covid vaccine – cartoon
Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Martin Rowson Tags: Russia Coronavirus outbreak Vladimir Putin Infectious diseases Medical research Science World news Source Type: news

The Guardian view on artificial intelligence's revolution: learning but not as we know it | Editorial
GPT-3, the software behind the world ’s best non-human writer, is a giant step forward for machines. What about humanity?Bosses don ’t often play down their products. Sam Altman, the CEO of artificial intelligence company OpenAI, did just that when people went gaga over his company’s latest software: the Generative Pretrained Transformer 3 (GPT-3). For some, GPT-3 represented a moment in which one scientific era ends and ano ther is born. Mr Altman rightly lowered expectations. “The GPT-3 hype is way too much,” hetweeted last month. “It’s impressive … but it still has seriou...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Artificial intelligence (AI) Computing Consciousness Technology Science Source Type: news

Powerhouses: nanotechnology turns bricks into batteries
Research could pave way for cheap supercapacitor storage of renewable energyThe humble house brick has been turned into a battery that can store electricity, raising the possibility that buildings could one day become literal powerhouses.The new technology exploits the porous nature of fired red bricks by filling the pores with tiny nanofibres of a conducting plastic that can store charge. The first bricks store enough electricity to power small lights. But if their capacity can be increased, they may become a low-cost alternative to the lithium-ion batteries currently used.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Energy Energy storage Environment Science Technology Climate change UK news World news US news Source Type: news

Coronavirus: health secretary Alex Azar expects US vaccine by December
Azar plays down significance of Russian vaccine progressHealth secretary predicts ‘tens of millions of doses’ by year’s endThe US health secretary, Alex Azar, said on Tuesday morning that America hopes to have a coronavirus vaccine approved by December and tamped down Russia ’s celebrations over unveiling its own vaccine after rapid development.“The point is not to be first,” Azar said. “The point is to have a vaccine that is safe and effective for the American people and the people of the world.”Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Joanna Walters in New York Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Vaccines and immunisation Science Infectious diseases US news Trump administration Source Type: news

'As the tundra burns, we cannot afford climate silence': a letter from the Arctic | Victoria Herrmann
I study the Arctic. The decision to withdraw from the Paris climate accord is reprehensible – but we can’t give up hopeWhen you stand facing an exposed edge of permafrost, you can feel it from a distance.It emanates a cold that tugs on every one of your senses. Permanently bound by ice year after year, the frozen soil is packed with carcasses of woolly mammoths and ancient ferns. They ’re unable to decompose at such low temperatures, so they stay preserved in perpetuity – until warmer air thaws their remains and releases the cold that they’ve kept cradled for centuries.Continue reading... (Sou...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Victoria Herrmann Tags: Climate change Environment Science US news Source Type: news

Covid-19: tracking the spread of a virus in real time – podcast
Central to infectious disease control is tracking the spread of a pathogen through the population. In Cambridge, UK, researchers are looking at genetic mutations in samples from Covid-19 patients to rapidly investigate how and where hospital transmissions are occurring. Dr Est ée Török tellsNicola Davis what this real-time pathological detective work can reveal about the origins of an outbreakContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Nicola Davis and produced by Madeleine Finlay Tags: Science Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Genetics Epidemics Source Type: news

EU health agency calls for new lockdowns as Greece 'formally' enters second wave – as it happened
Finland imposes 14-day quarantine on those arriving from high-risk countries;Pakistanis flock to reopened gyms and restaurants;US halts upward trend in deaths. This blog is now closedFollow the latest global coronavirus live blog here12.16amBSTWe ’ve launched a new blog at the link below – the world is on the bring of passing 20m coronavirus cases. Head there for the latest:Related:Coronavirus live news: WHO chief says ‘it’s never too late to turn outbreak around' as cases near 20m12.12amBSTTime has never moved as slowly as it did in that last week. But eventually, the day arrived. In the five month...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Helen Sullivan (now and earlier); Lucy Campbell , Damien Gayle , Aamna Mohdin , and Amy Walker Tags: Coronavirus outbreak World news US news UK news Australia news Science Infectious diseases Source Type: news

Dwarf planet Ceres is an 'ocean world' with sea water beneath surface, mission finds
Ceres, believed to be a barren space rock, has an ‘extensive reservoir’ of brine beneath its surface, images showThe dwarf planet Ceres – long believed to be a barren space rock – is an ocean world with reservoirs of sea water beneath its surface, the results of a major exploration mission showed on Monday.Ceres is the largest object in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, massive enough to be shaped by its gravity, enabling the Nasa Dawn spacecraft to capture high-resolution images of its surface.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse Tags: Space Science Source Type: news

Did you solve it? Carry on camping
The solutions to today ’s hard onesEarlier todayI set you the following puzzle:Six friends – Babs, Charles, Hattie, Joan, Kenneth and Sid – are going camping in France. They are travelling across the Channel on a magic carpet that can take only two people at a time. So, in order for everyone to get across there will need to be 9 trips in total from their starting point in England: 5 a cross carrying two people, and 4 returning carrying one person. (Magic carpets cannot fly empty, which is why one person needs to travel back. All the friends are able to fly alone on the carpet if need be.)Continue reading....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Education Science Source Type: news

Can you solve it? Carry on camping
Sir, your puzzle is so hard!UPDATE: Solutions now posted hereToday ’s puzzle is a seasonal update of a cherished gem of British culture: the river-crossing puzzle, in which people travel back-and forth across a stretch of water in a very small vessel. The earliest-known river-crossing puzzles appear in a manuscript by Alcuin of York in the eighth century.Another British cultural artefact from a distant age is the Carry On film. Not wanting to appear too parochial, however, today ’s puzzle also includes an element from the Thousand and One Nights.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Science Mathematics Education Source Type: news

Starwatch: moonlight puts a damper on the Perseid show
Our brightest and most reliable annual meteor shower will be affected this year by the proximity of the half moonThis week one of the most reliable annual meteor showers will be on show. The Perseids will reach their peak activity over the next few days. Start looking tonight, particularly in the early hours of the morning, then again tomorrow night and on Wednesday. The meteors are small particles of dust, left in space from the tail of Comet Swift-Tuttle, that burn up high above Earth. Each particle enters our atmosphere at a velocity of around 130,000 miles per hour.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 9, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: Meteors The moon Science Astronomy Space Source Type: news

The Guardian view on Brexit bureaucracy: tied up in red tape | Editorial
Businesses already struggling with the fallout from Covid-19 will be forced to deal with a mountain of new bureaucracy in the middle of a deep recessionThe government did not quite achieve the Brexit breakthrough it was seeking on Friday, when there was hope that a fast-tracked trade agreement with Japan might be reached. Butit seems likely that a deal, essentially replicating one signed by the EU and Japan last year, will be done by the end of the month. Some kind of morale booster for Britain ’s battered and bruised businesses would certainly be welcome.As the clock runs down to the end of the transition period on ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 9, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Brexit European Union Foreign policy Politics UK news World news Keir Starmer Coronavirus outbreak Pharmaceuticals industry Michael Gove Business Science Infectious diseases Medical research Source Type: news

Katie Mack: 'I didn't anticipate being in a pop song when I went off to study physics'
The cosmologist, author and Twitter sensation on ‘heat death’, getting heckled by Stephen Hawking – and being name-checked on a No 1 albumKatie Mack achieves two improbable feats with her new book,The End of Everything (Astrophysically Speaking). First, she writes about the end of the universe with a jauntiness that makes it not actually that depressing. And second, she takes concepts in cosmology, string theory and quantum mechanics and makes them accessible. This gift for straight talking will be familiar to the 360,000 followers of Mack ’s Twitter feed –@AstroKatie– through which the ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 9, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Tim Lewis Tags: Physics Astronomy Space Science Science and nature books Source Type: news

Tough choices need to be made, but reopening schools is a priority
Young people have been hugely affected by Covid-19. We must fight this rise in cases and make classrooms as safe as possible• Coronavirus latest updates• See all our coronavirus coverageRebound, resurgence, second wave – whatever you call it, the current coronavirus situation is worrying. Evidence suggests new infections are increasing in many European countries, including Britain, while in the US, we see the dire consequences of lifting restrictions too early. Globally the pandemic continues to accelerate.We have already been here, of course. In early 2020, we had rising infection levels but didn ’t ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 9, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jeremy Farrar Tags: Education Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Society Science Source Type: news

Listen to your migraine to help you feel better – and to learn about yourself
Headaches are telling you something about how your brain works with your body, influencing your behaviour and feelingsWe need pain. It seems contradictory to say it, particularly now that we have so many ways of dealing with it and switching it off. Pain not only tells us something is wrong, it also protects us. If you slam the car door on your hand, it ’s going to hurt. You will have damaged the soft tissue; all the muscles and ligaments that help you move your fingers. It will no doubt swell up to twice its size. This inflammation is part of the healing process. Your hand feels hot and looks red because of all the ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 8, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Amanda Ellison Tags: Health Life and style Psychology Science & wellbeing Source Type: news

The fight over the Hubble constant – podcast
When it comes to the expansion rate of the universe, trying to get a straight answer isn ’t easy. That’s because the two best ways of measuring what’s known as the Hubble constant are giving different results. As each method becomes increasingly accurate, the gap between widens. Is one of them wrong? Or is it time to rejig the Standard Model of Cosmology?Madeleine Finlay investigates the so-called ‘Hubble tension’ with Prof Erminia CalabreseContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 6, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Presented and produced by Madeleine Finlay with Max Sanderson Tags: Science Astronomy Physics Space Source Type: news

Archie Young obituary
Geriatrician who pioneered the idea of strength training for elderly peopleUnlike other exercise researchers in the 1980s who were focusing on heart health, the geriatricianArchie Young, who has died aged 73, was interested in strength and balance. To live independently and avoid falls, it is fundamental to have sufficient balance to stand upright and the muscle strength to get up from the toilet or a low chair, but before Young ’s discoveries many assumed that deteriorating muscle strength was both inevitable and irreversible in elderly people.In the early 80s Young was a doctor in a rehabilitation unit in Oxford, w...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 5, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Penny Warren Tags: Medical research Older people Scotland Glasgow Edinburgh Health Source Type: news

Public Health England issues rare alert over illicit prescription drugs
Surge in tablets sold as benzodiazepines, used to treat anxiety or insomnia, linked to hospitalisations and deathsA surge in illicit prescription drugs that have been linked to hospitalisations and deaths in England has prompted health officials to issue a rare national alert.Public Health England (PHE)issued the alert to drug treatment services and healthcare providers about the availability of illicit tablets being sold as benzodiazepines, such as Xanax and diazepam, which can be prescribed to treat anxiety or insomnia.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 5, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Grierson Home affairs correspondent Tags: Drugs Health Society UK news Science NHS Source Type: news

Brain fog, phantom smells and tinnitus: my 4 months (and counting) of Covid-19 | Hannah Davis
I fell sick on 25 March. Four months later, I ’m still dealing with fever, cognitive dysfunction, memory issues and much moreI just passed the four month mark of being sick with Covid. I am young, and I had considered myself healthy.My first symptom was that I couldn ’t read a text message. It wasn’t about anything complex – just trying to arrange a video call – but it was a few sentences longer than normal, and I couldn’t wrap my head around it. It was the end of the night so I thought I was tired, but an hour later I took my temperature and realized I had a fever. I had been isolating ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 5, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Davis Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Science Infectious diseases Health Source Type: news

Why is the government buying Covid tests without evidence they work? Ravindra Gupta and Dami Collier
As clinical researchers, we searched for information about the UK ’s new 90-minute tests – but found no data about their effectivenessCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageMany of us working in NHS hospitals welcomed the news earlier this week that the government had purchased90-minute Covid-19 tests. Rapid swab tests, called LamPORE, and 5,000 machines, supplied by DnaNudge, will soon be available in adult care settings and laboratories. If they ’re effective, they could allow for rapid, on-the-spot testing. But there’s no publicly available data about the accuracy of th...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 5, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Ravindra Gupta and Dami Collier Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Medical research NHS Infectious diseases Microbiology Health Science Society World news UK news Source Type: news

‘Disgusting’ study rating attractiveness of women with endometriosis retracted by medical journal
Fertility and Sterility took seven years to take down Italian study, which was criticised by doctors for ethical concerns and dubious justificationsA widely criticised peer-reviewed study that measured the attractiveness of women with endometriosis has been retracted from the medical journal Fertility and Sterility.The study,Attractiveness of women with rectovaginal endometriosis: a case-control study, was first published in 2013 and has been defended by the authors and the journal in the intervening years despite heavy criticism from doctors, other researchers and people with endometriosis for its ethical concerns and dub...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 5, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Gabrielle Jackson Tags: Endometriosis Health Australia news Science Women Medical research Source Type: news

Terrawatch: lasting legacy of Taiwan's 2009 typhoon season
Typhoon Morakot left country with more quakes after changing stress pattern in Earth ’s crustEleven years ago,Typhoon Morakot slammed into Taiwan, deluging the country with 3,000 litres of rain per square metre in three days.Catastrophic flooding and landslides followed and more than 600 people died.It is considered one of theworst tropical cyclones in Taiwan ’s recorded history. But that wasn ’t the end of it. New research reveals that the typhoon also left Taiwan with a legacy of extra earthquakes for the next few years.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 5, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Kate Ravilious Tags: Earthquakes Geology Taiwan Extreme weather Natural disasters and extreme weather Asia Pacific World news Science Source Type: news

Counting the cost of the UK ’s Covid failures | Letters
Jeremy Cushingon the tragic consequences of the pandemic response,Prof W Richard Bowenon the need for more scientifically educated politicians,Joseph Palleyon England ’s excess deaths, andBetty Cairnson how the dead are being remembered in ItalyI was left confused by Devi Sridhar ’s article (The northern lockdown represents government failure. There is a better way, 31 July). She urged the adoption of “an objective with a timeline, forming a gameplan, appointing a high-level official to oversee things”, but none of these have any specific content. The content, far from reflecting the title, actually...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Boris Johnson Coronavirus outbreak Politics Infectious diseases Medical research Science Health Health policy Conservatives Public services policy Society Office for National Statistics Italy UK news Source Type: news

Donald Trump flounders in interview over US Covid-19 death toll
President again says he is doing ‘incredible job’ fighting pandemic and casts doubt on Jeffrey Epstein’s cause of deathCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageDonald Trump visibly floundered in an interview when pressed on a range of issues, including the number of coronavirus cases and deaths in the US, his claims that mail-in voting is fraudulent, and his inaction over the “Russian bounty” scandal.The US president also repeatedly cast doubt on the cause of death of Jeffrey Epstein, and said of Ghislaine Maxwell, the British socialite who has pleaded not guilty to pa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Martin Belam in London and Joanna Walters in New York Tags: Donald Trump US politics US news World news Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Science Ghislaine Maxwell Russia US elections 2020 Republicans Democrats Joe Biden Source Type: news

Letter from economists: to rebuild our world, we must end the carbon economy
The carbon economy amplifies racial, social and economic inequities, creating a system that is fundamentally incompatible with a stable futureFrom deep-rooted racism to the Covid-19 pandemic, from extreme inequality to ecological collapse, our world is facing dire and deeply interconnected emergencies. But as much as the present moment painfully underscores the weaknesses of our economic system, it also gives us the rare opportunity to reimagine it. As we seek to rebuild our world, we can and must end the carbon economy.Related:Environmental racism is killing Americans of color. Climate change will make it worse | Mustafa ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Sachs, Joseph Stiglitz, Mariana Mazzucato, Clair Brown, Indivar Dutta-Gupta, Robert Reich, Gabriel Zucman and others Tags: Climate change Greenhouse gas emissions Environment Science Economics Inequality Source Type: news

We're thinking about Covid-19 the wrong way. It's not a 'wave' – it's a wildfire | Michael T Osterholm and Mark Olshaker
Like a fire, the virus relentlessly seeks out its fuel, humans, and will keep spreading as long as it has access to thatWe have no previous experience with a worldwide coronavirus pandemic, so when Sars-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, began spreading, public health experts leaned on our experiences with influenza pandemics to inform their predictions. These pandemics are often described in terms of “waves” and “troughs”. We have now seen enough to replace the ocean analogy with a better one: wildfire.Related:You ’re already wearing a mask – now consider a face shield and goggles |...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Michael T Osterholm and Mark Olshaker Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Source Type: news

People need support to follow local lockdowns, not orders from above | Stephen Reicher
If communities feel singled out, discriminated against, left behind and ignored, blame the messenger not themCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageAt the start of the Covid-19 pandemic in the UK, we heard much talk of “behavioural fatigue”, the idea that people lack the willpower to endure tough restrictions. Though it wasn’t clear where the idea had come from, it was invoked many times as a justification for delaying lockdown – and so contributed to the loss ofmany thousands of lives.As psychologists who study disasters and emergencies predicted , the public showed remar...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Stephen Reicher Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Politics Dominic Cummings Matt Hancock Leicester Psychology UK news World news Source Type: news

Covid-19 treatment: Gilead Sciences urged to study drug that showed promise with cats
Activists accuse company of pushing remdesivir to boost profitGS-441524 has been used to treat a coronavirus in catsCoronavirus – latest global updatesActivists are calling on the pharmaceutical firm Gilead Sciences to study a drug for the treatment of Covid-19 that showed promise in curing cats of a coronavirus.The drug, called GS-441524, is chemically related toremdesivir, an antiviral also made by Gilead, and one of the only treatments to successfully shorten the duration of Covid-19 recovery.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jessica Glenza Tags: Coronavirus outbreak US news Pharmaceuticals industry Business Science Infectious diseases Source Type: news

Covid-19: does more testing always mean more cases? – podcast
Since the beginning of the pandemic, ‘test, test, test’ has been the key message from epidemiologists, infectious disease specialists and healthcare professionals alike. But how does a country know if it’s doing sufficient testing? Or that it’s catching enough of the asymptomatic cases?Nicola Davis speaks to Prof Rowland Kao about the positivity rate, a value that can help to answer some of these difficult questionsContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Nicola Davis and produced by Madeleine Finlay Tags: Science Coronavirus outbreak Epidemics Source Type: news

Remains of 10,000-year-old woolly mammoth pulled from Siberian lake
Rare find includes skin, tendon and excrement of what is thought to be an adult maleRussian scientists are poring over the uniquely well-preserved bones of a 10,000-year-old woolly mammoth after completing the operation to pull them from the bottom of a Siberian lake.Experts spent five days scouring the silt of Lake Pechenelava-To in the remote Yamal peninsula for the remains, which include tendons, skin and even excrement, after they were spotted by local residents. About 90% of the animal has been retrieved during two expeditions.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Staff and agencies Tags: Fossils Russia Science Europe Extinct wildlife Source Type: news

Victoria's contact-tracing effort buckles under the weight of Covid-19 cases
ANU ’s Peter Collignon says what’s important now is making sure people who test positive stay at homeStage 4 lockdown rules explainedDownload the free Guardian app to get the most important news notificationsCoronavirus Australia maps and cases: live numbers and statisticsVictoria ’s rise in Covid-19 case numbers is occurring so rapidly that contact tracing can no longer be relied upon to unearth all potential clusters in the state, according to epidemiologists who argue health detective work “won’t make much difference when you’ve got thousands of active cases potent ially out there&rdq...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Elias Visontay Tags: Victoria Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Australia news Science Health Epidemics Source Type: news

US treasury to borrow $947bn to aid recovery – as it happened
Covid-19 survivors havehigher rates of mental ill-health, study says; Belgium seesICU admissions double; Singapore to use electronic tags to monitor some travellers. This live blog is closed. Follow our new one belowCoronavirus – latest updates12.18amBSTWe are closing this blog now, but you can stay up to date on our continuing coverage on our new global live blow below.Related:Coronavirus live news: WHO says there may never be a 'silver bullet' vaccine for Covid-1912.01amBSTContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Damien Gayle (now); Amy Walker, Sarah Marsh and Helen Sullivan (earlier) Tags: Coronavirus outbreak World news Australia news US news UK news Science Infectious diseases Source Type: news

Children who suffer violence or trauma age faster, study finds
Researchers discover links with earlier puberty and signs of more rapid cellular ageingChildren who experience violence or trauma seem to age faster, going through puberty earlier and showing greater signs of ageing in their cells, researchers have found.They say the findings add to a growing body of work that suggests early adversity can become “biologically embedded” with the potential for adverse health effects later in life.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 3, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Biology Medical research Children Psychology Science Society World news Source Type: news