Covid-19: v | podcast
Last week, testing at a private Covid lab in Wolverhampton was halted, after the UK Health Security Agency found tens of thousands of people may have been falsely given a negative PCR result. But since the start of September, scientists had been alerted to strange patterns in the testing data which suggested something was out of the ordinary. Anand Jagatia speaks to Dr Kit Yates, a mathematical biologist, about why it took so long for these errors to be traced back to the lab, and what the consequences could beContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 19, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Anand Jagatia and produced by Madeleine Finlay Tags: Science Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Source Type: news

We must not allow Covid deaths to be ‘normalised’ | Letters
Dr Jo Fayram hopes the apathy of the British public will not last;ProfessorsJoe Sim andSteve Tombs condemn the government ’s lamentable failures;Professor Patricia Deps reports on Brazil ’s Covid inquiry; andMargaret Farnworth highlights a super-spreader football matchLast week the government ’s response to Covid was criticised in areport by two Commons committees for apparently pursuing herd immunity by infection at the start of the pandemic. Continuing high Covid rates indicate that nothing has changed except the public ’s ability to react. According to experts (Why Britons are tolerating sky-high...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Coronavirus Science Infectious diseases World news Brazil Jair Bolsonaro Football Sport Politics Source Type: news

Sharp-eyed diver finds crusader ’s ancient sword on Israeli seabed
Metre-long relic, encrusted with marine organisms, is believed to be about 900 years oldA sword believed to have belonged to acrusader who sailed to the Holy Land almost a millennium ago has been recovered from the Mediterranean seabed thanks to an eagle-eyed amateur diver, the Israel Antiquities Authority has said.Though encrusted with marine organisms, the metre-long blade, hilt and handle were distinctive enough to notice after undercurrents apparently shifted sands that had concealed it.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Reuters in Caesarea Tags: Israel Archaeology Middle East and North Africa Science World news Source Type: news

US ‘very concerned’ despite China denials over hypersonic missile
Disarmament ambassador casts doubt on ability to defend against technology after reports of testThe United States is “very concerned” about China’s development of hypersonic technology, the US disarmament ambassador, Robert Wood, has said, after reports that Beijing had recently launched a hypersonic missile with a nuclear capacity.“We are very concerned by what China has been doing on the hypersonic front,” Robert Wood told reporters in Geneva.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Vincent Ni, Julian Borger in Washington and agencies Tags: China Weapons technology Space US news Asia Pacific Science World news Source Type: news

Did you solve it? Hamiltonian ingenuity on the grid
The solutions to today ’s puzzlesEarlier todayI set you two puzzles based on Hamiltonian paths in a square grid. A Hamiltonian path is one which visits every cell exactly once. (If you want a print out of the puzzles,click here.)1. The Hamiltonian pathContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Education Science Source Type: news

Valneva Covid vaccine could be as effective as Oxford jab, study suggests
Vaccine produced by French company uses inactivated Sars-CoV-2 virus and can be stored in fridgeCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageA coronavirus jab based on traditional vaccine technology might be as effective as the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine, data suggests, offering new hope for global vaccination efforts.Vaccines currently approved for use in the UK deliver instructions for producing the coronavirus “spike” protein to cells in order, which triggers an immune response. However, the jab produced by the French pharmaceutical company Valneva involves delivering the whole – b...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus Health Medical research UK news Science France World news Source Type: news

Can you solve it? Hamiltonian ingenuity on the grid
Mental chicaneryNo, notthatHamilton. I meant William Rowan Hamilton, the nineteenth century Irish mathematician.And notthatsort of grid. I meant a square grid, like a chessboard or a Sudoku.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Education Science Source Type: news

TGA dismisses bid to make contraceptive pill available over the counter in Australia
Two applications were made to amend poisons legislation so that the pill would not need ongoing prescriptions from doctorDownload the free Guardian app;get our morning email briefingA push to make the contraceptive pill available over the counter has been dismissed by Australia ’s drugs regulator.In an interim decision, now open for further consultation, the Therapeutic Goods Administration found the risk of making the contraceptive pill available over the counter outweighed the benefits.Sign up to receive an email with the top stories from Guardian Australia every morningContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Davey Medical editor Tags: Australia news Medical research Contraception and family planning Health Science Pharmaceuticals industry Source Type: news

Factory farms of disease: how industrial chicken production is breeding the next pandemic
At least eight types of bird flu, all of which can kill humans, are circulating around the world ’s factory farms – and they could be worse than Covid-19One day last December, 101,000 chickens at a gigantic farm near the city of Astrakhan in southern Russiastarted to collapse and die. Tests by the state research centre showed that a relatively new strain of lethal avian flu known as H5N8 was circulating, and within days 900,000 birds at the Vladimirskaya plant werehurriedly slaughtered to prevent an epidemic.Avian flu is the world ’s other ongoing pandemic and H5N8 is just one strain that has torn through...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: John Vidal Tags: Global health Food Bird flu Coronavirus Farming Environment Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Society World news Wildlife & drink industry Business China Asia Pacific Global development Source Type: news

Starwatch: early risers can enjoy a Mercury morning
Copernicus never saw it, so the story goes, but here ’s your chance to chase the elusive planetThis coming week, there is a chance to spot the elusive inner planet Mercury in the morning sky. It will be tricky as the solar system ’s smallest planet will only appear low in the dawn sky before the sunrise washes it away.The chart shows the view looking east from London at 0700 BST on 25 October. The sky will already be twilit and Mercury will be at its greatest distance from the sun.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: Astronomy Mercury Science Space Source Type: news

Psychosis cases soar in England as pandemic hits mental health
75% rise in referrals for first suspected episode of psychosis between April 2019 and April 2021Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageCases of psychosis have soared over the past two years in England as an increasing number of people experience hallucinations and delusional thinking amid the stresses of the Covid-19 pandemic.There was a 75% increase in the number of people referred to mental health services for their first suspected episode of psychosis between April 2019 and April 2021,NHS data shows.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 17, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Helen Pidd Tags: Mental health NHS Society England UK news Coronavirus Source Type: news

Australia could see Covid surge from new variants even after 80% vaccination when border reopens
Modelling shows increased risk of outbreaks if a mutation similar to the transmissibility of Delta were to circulate with international arrivalsFollow our Covid live blog for the latest updatesVaccine rollout and rates tracker; cases and data trackerGet our free news app;get our morning email briefingIf the Australian international border is reopened while highly transmissible Covid-19 variants are circulating overseas or locally, large and disruptive outbreaks will still be possible after 80% of people aged 16 years are fully vaccinated, modelling published in the Medical Journal of Australia on Monday says.It comes after...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 17, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Davey Medical editor Tags: Australia news Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Health Medical research Travel Infectious diseases Source Type: news

Polygenic screening of embryos is here, but is it ethical?
The first child born using the technique arrived last year. But can it really help reduce diseases in a new generation, or is it ‘techno-eugenics’?The birth of the first IVF baby, Louise Brown, in 1978 provoked a media frenzy. In comparison, a little girl named Aurea born by IVF in May 2020 went almost unnoticed. Yet she represents a significant first in assisted reproduction too, for the embryo from which she grew was selected from others based on polygenic screening before implantation, to optimise her health prospects.For both scientific and ethical reasons, this new type of genetic screening is highly contr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 17, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Philip Ball Tags: Genetics Biology Science Ethics Health World news Medical research Source Type: news

We put our child in charge for a day – it was both terrifying and freeing
One day a year our daughter does as she pleases and it ’s always great fun… and a good education for us allWe call it her “in-charge day”. A day when our nine-year-old daughter Flora is in charge, and we are, effectively, hers to command. A day when all the traditional hierarchies between parent and child are reversed, when she can fulfil her fantasies, refuse to do anything she doesn’t want to and experience a t aste of power, authority and absolute freedom.OK, not absolute freedom. There are some ground rules. She can ’t do anything we deem to be unsafe or illegal. She can’t ask...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 17, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Donna Ferguson Tags: Family Life and style Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Source Type: news

Pregnant women at risk from NHS workers ’ mixed messages over safety of jab
Expectant mothers tell helpline that midwives are advising them against vaccines despite threat posed by virus•Coronavirus – latest updates•See all our coronavirus coveragePregnant women are being advised by some health professionals not to have the Covid vaccine despitean edict from the NHS that they should encourage them to get the jab. One in six of the most critically ill Covid patients requiring life-saving care are unvaccinated pregnant women,figures released last week show.Yet messages sent to the Vaccines and Pregnancy helpline, launched on 20 August to help pregnant women navigate information about...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 17, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Summers Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Pregnancy Coronavirus UK news NHS Society Health Science Source Type: news

Russian film crew return to Earth after shooting the first movie in space
Actor and director land safely in Kazakhstan after spending 12 days on the International Space Station shooting the first movie in orbitA Russian actor and a film director have returned to Earth after spending12 days on the International Space Station shooting scenes for the first movie in orbit.Yulia Peresild and Klim Shipenko landed as scheduled on Kazakhstan ’s steppe early on Sunday, according to footage broadcast live by the Russian space agency.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 17, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse Tags: Space International Space Station Science Film Russia Source Type: news

Nasa ’s Lucy rockets into the sky with diamonds to explore asteroids
Spacecraft with name inspired by a skeleton and the Beatles, and with lab-grown gems, starts 12-year questA Nasa spacecraft named Lucy has rocketed into the sky with diamonds on a 12-year quest to explore eight asteroids.Seven of the mysterious space rocks are among swarms of asteroids sharing Jupiter ’s orbit, thought to be the pristine leftovers of planetary formation.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press in Cape Canaveral Tags: Nasa Space Asteroids The Beatles US news Ringo Starr Florida Science World news Source Type: news

Figures of Babylon: oldest drawing of a ghost found in British Museum vault
A 3,500-year-old image tablet of a ‘miserable male ghost’ gives up its secretIts outlines are faint, only discernible at an angle, but the world ’s oldest drawing of a ghost has been discovered in the darkened vaults of the British Museum.A lonely bearded spirit being led into the afterlife and eternal bliss by a lover has been identified on an ancient Babylonian clay tablet created about 3,500 years ago.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Dalya Alberge Tags: British Museum Culture Archaeology Science UK news Middle East and North Africa World news Source Type: news

Well you would say that: the science behind our everyday biases
Covid has turned us into pandemic experts, all too ready to gainsay scientists and distorting our reasoning, but psychology can help us understand how our prejudices are formedAs I wasted an hour ’s worth of petrol trying to find more petrol last month,Justin Webb poked at the chief secretary to the Treasury, Simon Clarke, on theToday programme, seeking a reason why much of the country is running on fumes and why HGV drivers are currently more elusive than dark matter. Clarke explained that the problem is “driven in part by workforce demographics” – no doubt – and is “worsened by Covid r...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Adam Rutherford Tags: Psychology Science Society Source Type: news

More power to Mark Billingham ’s book-hurling elbow. I might join in | Rebecca Nicholson
Life ’s too short for bad literature, so let’s follow the writer’s exampleDo you ditch a book if it does not immediately grab your attention or do you trudge through it joylessly, weighed down by some invisible obligation to complete it, no matter how arduous the task? The writerMark Billingham got stuck into this endless debate at the Cheltenham literature festival last week, admitting that he gives up on five out of 10 books that he starts, because “life’s too short” and “there are so many great books out there”. If genre fiction, in particular, doesn’t grab you after...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Rebecca Nicholson Tags: Books Culture William Shatner Space Source Type: news

Viva la vulva: why we need to talk about women ’s genitalia
Ignorance about the basic biology of vulvas is still shockingly high – yet there are huge health benefits, physical and emotional, to be won with better understandingIf you have a vulva between your legs, could you identify the seven separate structures in a mirror? If your partner has a vulva, can you identify theirs?For over half the population, the vulva is a significant part of their body; an exit and an entrance, a site of pleasure and, often, pain, that speaks to core human function and need. In 2021, it can feel as if we ’re on the cliff-edge of emancipation from the history of oppression and ick surroun...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Eleanor Morgan Tags: Sex Biology Science Education Women Gender Life and style Source Type: news

'Johnny'll love that': Ringo Starr wishes Nasa Lucy mission well – video
The Beatles drummer, Ringo Starr, was among those asked to add their messages to a Lucy mission plaque. The spacecraft has set off on a 12-year quest to explore eight asteroids, mostly around Jupiter's orbit. The mission was named after the 3.2m-year-old skeletal remains of a human ancestor found in Ethiopia nearly a half a century. Dr Donald Johanson discovered the remains while the Beatles song Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds was playing, passing on the name to his discoveryContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2021 Category: Science Tags: Nasa Space Jupiter Ringo Starr Florida The Beatles Source Type: news

How did Jeff Bezos ’s Blue Origin fail to dominate the billionaire space race?
The company employs the world ’s top engineers and has access to unlimited money but is plagued by safety concerns and toxic workplace cultureThebillionaire space race is only a race by name. In actuality, there is SpaceX – and everyone else.Only the company founded by Elon Musk nearly two decades ago has sent a rocket booster into orbit and landed it safely again. Only SpaceX has landed a rocket the size of a 15-storey building on a drone ship in the middle of the ocean. Only SpaceX has carried bothNasa astronauts andprivate citizens to the International Space Station. Only SpaceX is producing thousands of its...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Daniel Oberhaus Tags: Blue Origin Jeff Bezos Science Technology Space US work & careers Source Type: news

Chinese astronauts arrive at space station for longest mission
The Shenzhou-13 vessel docked at its space station to kick off a record-setting six-month stayThree astronauts successfully docked with China ’s new space station, state media said, on what is set to be Beijing’s longest crewed mission to date and the latest landmark in its drive to become a major space power.The three blasted off shortly after midnight on Saturday (1600 GMT) from the Jiuquan launch centre in northwestern China ’s Gobi desert, state-run news agency Xinhua said, with the team expected to spend six months at the Tiangong space station.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse Tags: Space China Science Asia Pacific World news Source Type: news

‘Sensational’: skeleton buried in Vesuvius eruption found at Herculaneum
Archaeologists find remains of fugitive during first dig at site near Pompeii in almost three decadesThe partially mutilated remains of a man buried by the AD79 eruption of Mount Vesuvius at Herculaneum, the ancient Roman town close to Pompeii, have been discovered in what Italy ’s culture minister described as a “sensational” find.Archaeologists said the man, believed to have been aged between 40 and 45, was killed just steps away from the sea as he tried to flee the eruption.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Angela Giuffrida in Rome Tags: Archaeology Europe Italy Volcanoes Science World news Source Type: news

Nasa prepares to launch Lucy mission to distant asteroids
Six-year voyage to Trojans could reveal vital information on history of solar systemNasa is gearing up to launchthe Lucy mission on Saturday for a voyage that could revolutionise our knowledge of planetary origins and the formation of the solar system.A space probe will fly atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: Nasa Science Space Source Type: news

Why Britons are tolerating sky-high Covid rates – and why this may not last
Analysis: as Covid cases reach 40,000 a day, scientists think normalisation is partly to blame for the lack of public reactionCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIt ’s one of the conundrums of the current phase of the Covid pandemic; the UK has among the highest number of infections across the world and a death toll that continues to steadily climb, yet the national mood seems sanguine. So is this down to British stoicism, a Keep Calm and Carry on mentality?Not according to experts. They talk of many factors being at play – and warn it may not last.Continue reading... (Source: Guar...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Hospitals Vaccines and immunisation NHS Health Science UK news Source Type: news

Covid: how did error over wrong PCR test results in UK happen?
An estimated 43,000 people may have been given false negative results. Here are the key issuesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageAn estimated 43,000 people may have been given wrong negative PCR Covid test results, the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) has said.Here we answer key questions about the error:Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Grierson Tags: Coronavirus NHS World news Health Society Infectious diseases Medical research UK news Source Type: news

AI and maths to play bigger role in global diplomacy, says expert
Professor of negotiation and conflict management says recent advances mean techniques will be used moreInternational diplomacy has traditionally relied on bargaining power, covert channels of communication and personal chemistry between leaders. But a new era is upon us in which the dispassionate insights of AI algorithms and mathematical techniques such as game theory will play a growing role in deals struck between nations, according to the co-founder of the world ’s first centre for science in diplomacy.Michael Amb ühl, a professor of negotiation and conflict management and former chief Swiss-EU negotiator, s...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Artificial intelligence (AI) World news Science Mathematics International trade Switzerland Global economy Technology Source Type: news

Covid PCR tests: at least 43,000 in UK may have had false negatives
Health Security Agency suspends operations at privately run lab in WolverhamptonCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageAt least 43,000 people may have been wrongly given a negative Covid test result, the UK Health Security Agency has said, as it announced the suspension of operations at a privately run lab in Wolverhampton.NHS test and trace has suspended testing operations by Immensa Health Clinic at its laboratory in Wolverhampton, the agency said.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Grierson, Steven Morris and Rowena Mason Tags: Coronavirus England Infectious diseases Medical research UK news Science Source Type: news

‘This comforter of blue’: how Shatner’s blast into space became an ode to Earth
Captain Kirk ’s profound reflection on our home planet was an ironic outcome for a trip that was meant to boost space travelThere ’s nothing like a vacation to make you appreciate home.That seemed to be the sentiment behind William Shatner ’s words as hereturned from a brief journey to space on Wednesday. Inremarks filmed after he landed, the actor described having had “the most profound experience I can imagine”.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Matthew Cantor Tags: William Shatner Space Blue Origin Jeff Bezos Technology US news Source Type: news

People taking statins less likely to die from Covid, study suggests
Experts warn findings do not prove cholesterol-lowering drugs can reduce death ratesMillions of people who take statins may be less likely to die from Covid, research suggests.The cholesterol-lowering drugs are one of the world ’s most popular medications. They can also reduce inflammation in blood vessels, which has prompted questions over whether they could help with outcomes in coronavirus patients.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Gregory Health editor Tags: Statins Coronavirus Medical research Science Health Source Type: news

William Shatner has taken a small step, but it ’s a giant leap to call him an astronaut | Brief letters
Space travel | Books | Duels in filmAmazing though William Shatner ’s short journey into near space was, I think it ’s a bit of a stretch to call him an astronaut (William Shatner in tears after historic space flight: ‘I’m so filled with emotion, 13 October). You ’ll be calling us letter writers journalists next.David Edwards HulmeStockport, Greater Manchester• As we seem to have entered a period of pointless “space” travel, can I put forward my qualifications to be the first 84-year-old retired solicitor born in Bishop Auckland with a wife called Shirley and th...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: William Shatner Space Culture Science Books Film Source Type: news

Lupus sufferers pleaded for hydroxychloroquine before Clive Palmer ’s doses were destroyed
Drug ’s potential as Covid treatment, since dispelled, affected availability for people with proven medical needGet our free news app;get our morning email briefingLupus sufferers pleaded for more supplies of hydroxychloroquine two months before the federal government told billionaire Clive Palmer it didn ’t want more of the 33m doses he wanted to donate as a potential Covid-19 treatment.One tonne of Palmer ’s hydroxychloroquine – equivalent to 5m doses – was destroyed after it was left unclaimed in Melbourne due to a lengthy standoff with the commonwealth, Guardian Australiarevealed on Wednes...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Christopher Knaus Tags: Clive Palmer Australia news Health Coronavirus Medical research Source Type: news

Meteorite crashes through roof of Canada woman ’s home and on to bed
‘I’ve never been so scared in my life,’ says Ruth Hamilton after meteorite shower above a western Canadian regionA woman in Canada awoke in shock earlier this week when a rock crashed through the ceiling of her home and landed on her bed, narrowly missing her but spraying grit and other debris on her face, as her dog barked frantically.Police were called and the culprit was initially suspected to be a construction site nearby, where work must have sent the fist-sized projectile onto the woman ’s pillow. But when the construction workers said they had not set any blasts – but had just seen an e...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Guardian staff and agencies Tags: Canada Meteors Americas Science World news Source Type: news

The world finally has a malaria vaccine. Why has it taken so long? – podcast
Last week the World Health Organization approved the world ’s first malaria vaccine. It’s been hailed as a historic breakthrough that could save tens of thousands of lives each year. But researchers have been trying to create one for more than a century – so why has it taken so long? Anand Jagatia speaks to Dr Latif Ndeketa and Prof Chris Drakeley abo ut how the new RTS,S vaccine works and why it’s been so difficult to produceArchive: WHO, ITV NewsContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented and produced by Anand Jagatia Tags: Science Malaria Vaccines and immunisation Health World news Source Type: news

Prince William: great minds should focus on saving Earth not space travel – video
The Duke of Cambridge has criticised the space race and space tourism, saying the world ’s greatest minds need to focus on fixing the Earth instead. In an interview with Newscast on BBC Sounds before his Earthshot prize awards, Prince William also warned about a rise in ‘climate anxiety’ among younger generations. His comments come the day after William Shatner, 90, made history by becoming the oldest person in spacePrince William criticises space race and tourism ’s new frontierContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2021 Category: Science Tags: Space Prince William Climate change World news Environment Earthshot prize Monarchy Source Type: news

Prince William criticises space race and tourism ’s new frontier
Duke of Cambridge says world ’s greatest minds need to focus on trying to fix the Earth insteadThe Duke of Cambridge has criticised the space race and space tourism, saying the world ’s greatest minds need to focus on trying to fix the Earth instead.Prince William ’s comments, in an interview with Newscast on BBC Sounds, will be aired the day afterWilliam Shatner made history by becoming the oldest person in space.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: PA Media Tags: Space Prince William Monarchy Science UK news Environment Climate change Cop26 Prince Charles Source Type: news

‘Debilitating’: health impacts of smoke from Australia’s black summer bushfires revealed in study
Only one in five people sought medical attention but half reported anxiety, depression and sleep lossGet our free news app;get our morning email briefingThe film-makerShaun Humphreys vividly remembers the miserable summer of the 2019-20 bushfires.His house, in a north Canberra suburb, was far from the burning fires, but the surrounding smoke was thick and stifling.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Donna Lu Tags: Bushfires Health Canberra Australian Capital Territory (ACT) Medical research Science Australia news Source Type: news

Covid booster shots important to stop infection, finds English study
Study shows protection against Covid starts to wane several months after full vaccinationScientists have urged eligible people to have Covid booster shots after a major survey in England found evidence of “breakthrough infections” more than three months after full vaccination.Researchers at Imperial College London analysed more than 100,000 swabs from a random sample of the population and found that Covid infection rates were three to four times higher among unvaccinated people than those who had received two shots.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Coronavirus Health Vaccines and immunisation UK news Science Source Type: news

‘Sophisticated’: ancient faeces shows humans enjoyed beer and blue cheese 2,700 years ago
Austrian Alps salt miners had a ‘balanced diet’, with an analysis of bronze and iron age excrement finding the earliest evidence of cheese ripening in EuropeIt ’s no secret that beer and blue cheese go hand in hand – but a new study reveals how deep their roots run in Europe, where workers at a salt mine in Austria were gorging on both up to 2,700 years ago.Scientists made the discovery by analysing samples of human excrement found at the heart of the Hallstatt mine in the Austrian Alps.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Agence France Presse Tags: Anthropology Science Europe Austria Biology World news Source Type: news

Climate study linking early M āori fires to Antarctic changes sparks controversy
Research tying M āori activity 700 years ago to Antarctic changes sparks debate in New Zealand over Indigenous inclusion in scienceDeep in the ice of a remote Antarctic peninsula, a group of researchers found evidence that fires started by early M āori wreaked changes in the atmosphere detectable 7,000km away. In New Zealand, the research sparked a heated controversy of its own – over Indigenous inclusion in scientific enterprise, and what scientists owe the people whose history becomes a subject of their research.The research, published this month, examined ice cores from the Antarctic peninsula. Scientists found ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Tess McClure in Christchurch and Eva Corlett in Wellington Tags: New Zealand Asia Pacific M āori Science Antarctica Source Type: news

William Shatner in tears after historic space flight: ‘I’m so filled with emotion’
Star Trek actor, 90, says ‘I hope I never recover from this’ after becoming oldest human in space on Jeff Bezos rocket New ShepardThe Star Trek actor William Shatner declared himself “overwhelmed” at becoming the oldest human in space, at the age of 90, during a brief but successful second crewed flight on Wednesday of Blue Origin’s New Shepard rocket ship from the west Texas desert.The Canadian, who for four decades played Captain James Kirk, the fearless commander of the USS Enterprise, broke down in tears at the landing site as he described to the private space company ’s founder, the...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Richard Luscombe Tags: Space Jeff Bezos Science Technology Star Trek Culture US television & radio Source Type: news

President of Brazil says it ‘makes no sense’ for him to be vaccinated
Jair Bolsonaro ’s comments called ‘stupid and selfish’ in country where 600,000 people have died of CovidCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageMore than 600,000 of his citizens have lost their lives to a Covid-19 outbreak he once pooh-poohed as a “little flu”, but Brazil’s science-denying president,Jair Bolsonaro, has announced he will decline to be vaccinated, saying “it makes no sense” for him to do so.“With regard to the vaccine, I’ve decided not to have it any more,” the 66-year-old populisttold a right-wing radio station on T...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Tom Phillips in Rio de Janeiro Tags: Jair Bolsonaro Brazil Americas Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Science Source Type: news

'Most profound experience': William Shatner starstruck by encounter with space – video
Actor William Shatner soared aboard a Blue Origin rocketship on a suborbital trip on Wednesday to become, at the age 90, the oldest person ever in space - an experience he called profound - as US billionaire businessman Jeff Bezos's company carried out its second tourist flightWilliam Shatner completes flight on Bezos rocket to become oldest person in spaceContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2021 Category: Science Tags: William Shatner Space Blue Origins Jeff Bezos US news Source Type: news

Ultrasound trial offers hope for brain cancer patients
New technique temporarily allows drugs to cross blood brain barrier to treat tumoursA technique has been developed that could revolutionise thetreatment of brain cancers and neurodegenerative diseases by temporarily allowing drugs and other substances to cross the blood brain barrier – a structure that separates the brain’s blood vessels from the rest of its tissues.A trial in four women whose breast cancer had spread to the brain showed that magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) could safely deliver the antibody therapy Herceptin into their brain tissue, causing the tumours to shrink.Continue r...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Medical research Neuroscience Breast cancer Alzheimer's Health Society Source Type: news

What will happen after the sun dies? ‘Serendipitous’ discovery gives clues
A distant gas giant found orbiting a white dwarf star suggests outer planets in our solar system might survive the sun ’s demiseGet our free news app;get our morning email briefingA Jupiter-sized planet has been found orbiting a white dwarf star in the Milky Way, providing clues as to what will happen in our solar system when the sun eventually dies.An international team of astronomers observed the phenomenon, which forms when a star runs out of nuclear fuel to burn, and dies.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Donna Lu Tags: Space Science Australia news The sun Source Type: news

Scientists abused and threatened for discussing Covid, global survey finds
Poll of 321 scientists found 15% received death threats after speaking publicly on the pandemicHow my ivermectin research led to Twitter death threatsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageScientists around the world have received threats of death and sexual assault after speaking to the media about Covid-19, a survey has revealed.Of 321 scientists asked by Nature magazine, 15% said they had received death threats and 22% had been threatened with physical or sexual violence as a result of talking publicly about the pandemic.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Denis Campbell Health policy editor Tags: Coronavirus Science Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Health Microbiology World news Source Type: news

How my ivermectin research led to Twitter death threats | Dr Andrew Hill
I was sent images of coffins and hanged Nazi war criminals after finding medical fraud in clinical trialsThe story of online threats and abuse is very dark. In early 2021, my research team was analysing a new drug called ivermectin. In the first clinical trials, this drug seemed to prevent new infections and improve survival. When I first wrote about this, I started getting regular threats on Twitter, demanding that ivermectin should be approved worldwide and questioning the safety of vaccines.In March 2021, I received my first vaccine dose and posted a photo on Twitter from the clinic. Within minutes I was receiving stran...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Hill Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Microbiology Medical research Science Health UK news Source Type: news

William Shatner to blast off on Bezos rocket to become oldest person in space
Famed Star Trek actor, 90, set for real-life leap into the starsAmazon owner Bezos bids to dominate space tourism industryWilliam Shatner, the veteran actor who spent four decades playing the fearless commander of Star Trek ’s USS Enterprise, is set for a real-life leap into the stars on Wednesday on the next stage of billionaire Jeff Bezos’s quest to dominate the fledgling space tourism industry.The successful completion of the 11-minute flight alongside three civilian crew mates, with lift-off of Blue Origin ’s New Shepard rocket scheduled for 8.30am CT (2.30pm BST) from its Van Horn, Texas, launchpad, ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Richard Luscombe Tags: Space Jeff Bezos Science Technology Star Trek Culture US television & radio Source Type: news