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Rare Roman boxing gloves found near Hadrian's Wall
Leather bands dating from AD120 are thought to be only known surviving examplesRoman boxing gloves have been discovered near Hadrian ’s Wall, thought to be the only known surviving examples, even though the sport was well- documented on Roman wall paintings, mosaics and sculptures.With a protective guard designed to fit snugly over the knuckles, the gloves were packed with natural material which acted as shock absorbers. They date from around AD120 and were certainly made to last: they still fit comfortably on a modern hand. One of them even retains the impression of the knuckles of its ancient wearer.Continue readin...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Dalya Alberge Tags: Roman Britain Archaeology Northumberland Boxing UK news Hadrian Source Type: news

Brian Sissons obituary
Brian Sissons, who has died aged 91, mapped and interpreted the effects of the Ice Age on the Scottish landscape. From the late 1950s until his retirement in 1982, Brian transformed the understanding of the evolution of Scotland ’s scenery.As a fieldworker, Brian surveyed the ways in which the landscape had evolved under glacial and post-glacial conditions. His two books, The Evolution of Scotland ’s Scenery (1967) andThe Geomorphology of the British Isles: Scotland (1976), provided a synthesis of the current knowledge. He also inspired scores of researchers, including 30 of his own PhD students, of whom I was ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Murray Gray Tags: Science Geology Geography Scotland University of Edinburgh Source Type: news

Life after death: how we hatched live shark pups from dead parents
Six years ago, researchers asked a radical question: could eggcases taken from trawler-caught sharks still hatch live, healthy young?Back in December 2012, I met up with Greg Nowell, co-founder ofSharklab-Malta, a non-profit NGO founded in 2008. Sharklab collaborates with shark researchers on a global and local scale, with an overall mission to highlight the current plight of sharks in our oceans whilst increasing awareness and education of the public.Greg was interested in my experience working with neonate small spotted catsharks (Scyliorhinus canicula) and the greater spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus stellaris);in the UK ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Lauren Smith Tags: Sharks Animals Environment Marine life Science Wildlife Conservation Source Type: news

World ’s most controversial fruit depends on giant bats for pollination
While we debate whether the durian is the best or worst food on the planet, it turns out this wonderful oddity requires healthy populations of flying fox for survivalDurian. Depending on whom you talk to it ’s either the most beloved or the most despised fruit on the planet. It suffers no moderation, no wishy-washiness. It is the king of fruits or the worst thing you’ve ever tasted. Due to its potent odour – delicate and sweet to its advocates and sewage-like to its detractors – durian has been banned from airplanes, subways, and hotels (though punishments appear light if non-existent). But arecent ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeremy Hance Tags: Environment Asia Pacific Malaysia World news Wildlife Biology Science Conservation Animal behaviour Animals South and Central Asia Source Type: news

WHO warns over measles immunisation rates as cases rise 400% across Europe
2017 saw more than 21,000 cases and 35 deaths, with large outbreaks in one in four countries, says World Health OrganisationMeasles cases have soared across Europe over the last year, with large outbreaks affecting one in four countries, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO) which is concerned by low rates of immunisation against the disease.WHO Europe says there has been a 400% increase during 2017, with more than 21,000 cases and 35 deaths. That will be a major disappointment following the record low in 2016, when there were just 5,273 cases in Europe.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah BoseleyHealth editor Tags: MMR Vaccines and immunisation Health World Health Organization Society Infectious diseases Science Source Type: news

Why don ’t the Carillion bosses seem embarrassed?
My father warned me about scoundrels in business. Now bad behaviour can be called out online, but international shame still doesn ’t stop roguesAs my father had been seriously ripped off three times during his life in business by people he trusted, he often warned me about the surprising number of rogues and scoundrels swanning around, ready to use any vile trick to relieve me of my money.Just my father ’s bad luck, I thought, until about a decade ago, when I came across one of these villains. He was a rather grand agent, who asked me to give an after-dinner talk at a serious conference on education. Flattering...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Michele Hanson Tags: Business Psychology Carillion Construction industry Social media Digital media Women Source Type: news

Are we poisoning our children with plastic?
The chemical BPA is widely added to food and drink packaging, and more than 80% of teenagers have it in their bodies. But how dangerous is it?Can exposure to plastics harm your health? It ’s a question currently being explored by researchers after a recent study suggested that traces of a synthetic chemical called Bisphenol A (BPA) can be found inmore than 80% of teenagers. BPA is added to plastic to create a special form called polycarbonate plastic, used in making robust, impact-resistant materials for everything from food and drink packaging to DVD cases and medical devices. First created in 1891, it has been used...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Cox Tags: Health & wellbeing Life and style Society Plastics Environment Chemistry Science Cancer Cancer research Medical research Source Type: news

New test can detect autism in children, scientists say
Blood and urine test, believed to be first of its kind, could lead to earlier diagnosis of autism spectrum disordersScientists in Britain say they have developed a blood and urine test that can detect autism in children.Researchers at the University of Warwick said the test, believed to be the first of its kind, could lead to earlier diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in children who could then be given appropriate treatment much earlier in their lives.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Autism Medical research Genetics Biology Science Society UK news Source Type: news

Scientists seek drug to ‘rewire’ adult brain after stroke
Therapies may one day enable healthy part of brain to take over tasks from damaged areasAdults who have experienced a stroke may one day be able to take a drug to help their brain “rewire” itself, so that tasks once carried out by now-damaged areas can be taken over by other regions, researchers have claimed.The ability for the brain to rewire, so-called “brain plasticity”, is thought to occur throughout life; however, while children have a high degree of brain plasticity, adult brains are generally thought to be less plastic.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Stroke Medical research UK news Science Health Source Type: news

Scientists unravel secrets of ‘superagers’
Researchers find elderly people with high cognitive function have more of a certain type of brain cell“Superagers” have long puzzled scientists, but now researchers say they are unpicking why some people live beyond 80 – and still appear to be in fine fettle, with cognitive capacities on a par with adults decades younger.Researchers have spent years studying superagers in an attempt to understand what sets the senior citizens apart.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Austin, Texas Tags: Older people Mental health Medical research Science Alzheimer's US news World news Source Type: news

Starwatch: a chance to bask in earthshine
A lunar phenomenon that is sometimes called the old moon in the new moon ’s arms may be visible on MondayThis evening ’s crescent moon brings with it a good chance of seeing earthshine. This is the faint glow that appears on the unlit portion of the moon’s disc. It is sometimes referred to as the old moon in the new moon’s arms because of the way the sunlit crescent appears to cradle the dimmer circle.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: Astronomy Science Space The moon Leonardo da Vinci Source Type: news

China ’s great leap forward in science
Chinese investment is paying off with serious advances in biotech, computing and space. Are they edging ahead of the west?I first met Xiaogang Peng in the summer of 1992 at Jilin University in Changchun, in the remote north-east of China, where he was a postgraduate student in the department of chemistry. He told me that his dream was to get a place at a top American lab. Now, Xiaogang was evidently smart and hard-working – but so, as far as I could see, were most Chinese science students. I wished him well, but couldn’t help thinking he’d set himself a massive challenge.Fast forward four years to when, a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Philip Ball Tags: Genetics Physics Space China 5G Biology Science Technology Source Type: news

George Church: "Genome sequencing is like the internet back in the late 1980s."
The pioneering geneticist on why he wants us to earn money by sharing our genomic data, his plans to resurrect the woolly mammoth and how narcolepsy helps him generate ideas• How can I make money from my DNA?A new genetic testing company calledNebula Genomics wants to help people profit from their own genomes. The Observer talks to Harvard University DNA sequencing pioneer George Church about his latest venture, what ’s cooking in his lab and how falling asleep on the job can sometimes be a godsend.What is the value of getting your genome sequenced? Why do it?One very compelling argument that I think justifies a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zo ë Corbyn Tags: Genetics Science Biology Medical research Stem cells Source Type: news

How can I make money from my DNA?
If you have your DNA sequenced, someone somewhere will be making money from the data. A new start-up aims to make sure that you get your share• A share in the future of DNA: Prof George Church Q&AIf you unlock the secrets of your DNA by paying a company to read your genes, behind the scenes it is probably making money by selling on your data for research. Companies like23andMe andAncestryDNA charge consumers under £150 to learn about their health and/or origins, while others do whole genome sequencing for a little over £1,000 (although in the US it is cheaper at just under $1,000). The model works like...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zo ë Corbyn Tags: Genetics Science Medical research Genealogy Human Genome Project Source Type: news

A share in the future of DNA sequencing
Professor George Church on why he wants us to earn money by sharing our genomic data, his plans to resurrect the woolly mammoth and how narcolepsy helps him generate ideas• How can I make money from my DNA?A new genetic testing company calledNebula Genomics wants to help people profit from their own genomes. The Observer talks to Harvard University DNA sequencing pioneer George Church about his latest venture, what ’s cooking in his lab and how falling asleep on the job can sometimes be a godsend.What is the value of getting your genome sequenced? Why do it?One very compelling argument that I think justifies alm...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zo ë Corbyn Tags: Genetics Science Biology Medical research Stem cells Source Type: news

Are you eager to please? Personality quiz
Do you tend to work to put another person at their ease, or are you happy to let things get awkward? Take these simple questions to find outChoose which statement, a) or b), best applies to you.Asked to give an impromptu speech, you:Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rebecca McGuire-Snieckus Tags: Life and style Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Source Type: news

Is the answer that we have run out of good questions? | Kenan Malik
We are supposed to be inquisitive and yet …John Brockman has run out of questions. Brockman, a literary agent, runs the science and philosophy siteEdge.org. Every year for 20 years, he has askedleading thinkers to answer a particular question, such as: “What questions have disappeared?” or: “What do you believe is true even though you cannot prove it?” This year, though, Brockman announced that he has no more questions left. So he asked his final question: “What is the last question?”“Judge a man by his questions rather than by his answers,” Voltaire insisted. Question...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kenan Malik Tags: Philosophy Science World news Isaac Asimov Source Type: news

How long can we treat the suffering of animals as an inconvenient truth? | Michael Brooks
A revolution is coming in our relationship with ‘lower’ creatures, provoked by a greater knowledge of their cognition. Labour’s new plans for animal welfare are just a startScientific insight is a powerful thing, but will it ever override the human lust for health, prosperity and, saddest of all, convenience? This question entered my head as I read of the Labour party ’s newly announcedpolicies for animal welfare“informed and underpinned by the latest evidence on animal sentience”. Such an approach would lead to laudable bans on foie gras imports and nonsensical badger culling. But let &...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Michael Brooks Tags: Ethical and green living Animals Animal welfare Biology Science Ethics Richard Dawkins Environment The meat industry Food Farming fish UK news Source Type: news

Breakthrough as scientists grow sheep embryos containing human cells
Advance brings us closer to growing transplant organs inside animals or being able to genetically tailor compatible organs, say researchersGrowing human organs inside other animals has taken another step away from science-fiction, with researchers announcing they have grown sheep embryos containing human cells.Scientists say growing human organs inside animals could not only increase supply, but also offer the possibility of genetically tailoring the organs to be compatible with the immune system of the patient receiving them, by using the patient ’s own cells in the procedure, removing the possibility of rejection.C...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis in Austin Tags: Genetics Organ donation Embryos Biology Health Science Society Medical research Source Type: news

Artwork hidden under Picasso painting revealed by x-ray
Non-invasive imaging reveals landscape painting beneath Pablo Picasso ’s The Crouching Beggar but who created it remains a mysteryWrapped in a mustard coloured blanket with a white scarf and her head on one side, Pablo Picasso ’sLa Misereuse Accroupie (The Crouching Beggar) is a study of forlorn resignation. But researchers say that there is more to desolate character than meets the eye.Beneath the mournful image lies another painting, a landscape, researchers have revealed after using non-invasive imaging techniques to examine the work.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis in Austin Tags: Science Pablo Picasso Art and design Culture World news Canada Painting Source Type: news

The media exaggerates negative news. This distortion has consequences | Steven Pinker
Whether or not the world really is getting worse, the nature of news will make us think that it isEvery day the news is filled with stories about war, terrorism, crime, pollution, inequality, drug abuse and oppression. And it ’s not just the headlines we’re talking about; it’s the op-eds and long-form stories as well. Magazine covers warn us of coming anarchies, plagues, epidemics, collapses, and so many “crises” (farm, health, retirement, welfare, energy, deficit) that copywriters have had to escalate to the r edundant “serious crisis.”Whether or not the world really is getting wo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Steven Pinker Tags: Psychology Media Science Source Type: news

Trump's moon shot might be steered by a woman, says Nasa chief
A third of America ’s astronauts are women, says Dr Ellen Ochoa, a director at an agency that has come a long way on equalityThere is at least a one in three chance that the first human to set foot on the moon this century will be a woman, Dr Ellen Ochoa, the head of Nasa ’s Johnson space center has said.In the early 1960s Nasa sent out rejection letters saying it had no plans to send women into space. Among those who apparently received the brush-off was ateenage Hillary Clinton. But the agency has since changed its tune, and in 1983 Sally Ride became the first American woman in space. In 2013 Nasa announced t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis in Austin Tags: Space Nasa Women The moon Source Type: news

Earthlings likely to welcome alien life rather than panicking, study shows
Should aliens be discovered, public reaction is likely to be positive, say researchers – despite alarming fictional portrayals of contact“The fear I felt was no rational fear, but a panic terror,” wrote HG Wells, describing his narrator’s response to a Martian invasion in War of the Worlds.But despite such alarming portrayals, researchers say the discovery of alien life is more likely to be welcomed with open arms than panic.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis in Austin Tags: Alien life Science Psychology Source Type: news

Want to monitor air pollution? Test a pigeon
Feral pigeons are exposed to the same environmental factors as humans, so help explore the affect of contaminants, say researchersPigeons might be seen as the scourge of cities, but researchers say they could help us explore both the levels and impacts of a host of toxins in the air, from lead to pesticides.Scientists say feral pigeons are a valuable way of probing contaminants in environment, since they are exposed to the same air, water, food and other factors as humans, and don ’t venture far from home.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis in Austin Tags: Air pollution Biology Science Birds Animals Environment Source Type: news

A child's gender can be detected in their speech from age five, research says
University of Minnesota academics say boys and girls pick up speech cues from adults around them, resulting in differencesThe gender of children can be picked up from their speech from as young as five years old, researchers have revealed.While male and female children have no physiological reason for sounding different before puberty, when changes to the larynx kick in, researchers say boys and girls pick up telltale speech cues from adults around them, resulting in perceptible differences in their speech.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis in Austin Tags: Science Children Society Biology Health Gender World news US news UK news LGBT rights Parents and parenting Life and style Family Source Type: news

E-cigarettes and the burning issues around vaping - Science Weekly podcast
Ian Sample asks: how safe is vaping? Can it help people stop smoking? And should it be available via a doctor ’s prescription?Subscribe and review onApple Podcasts,Soundcloud,Audioboom,Mixcloud andAcast, and join the discussion onFacebook andTwitterIf you ’re not a smoker, it may be hard to imagine the appeal of cigarettes. The idea of inhaling thousands of chemicals into your body just doesn’t seem that tempting. It’s hard to wrap your head around the addiction if you haven’t experienced it and even more difficult to appreciate how hard it i s to quit. But according to anew report released by...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Ian Sample and produced by Sandra Ferrari with Max Sanderson Tags: E-cigarettes Smoking Science Biology Health Society Source Type: news

Guilt over household chores is 'harming working women's health'
Worries over whether women are doing their ‘fair share’ has a clear impact on their health, according to a new analysisGuilt about not doing enough housework may be harming working women ’s health, according to new analysis of data from theInternational Social Survey Programme.Over a two-year period, women in 24 countries were asked to rate the amount of household chores they do each day in terms of their perceived “fair share”. They also ranked their physical health levels.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Naomi Larsson Tags: Inequality Equal pay Relationships Family Gender Women Health Psychology Life and style Society Science World news Source Type: news

Stress in fathers may alter sperm and affect behaviour in offspring
Research shows male mice exposed to a mildly stressful event produced sperm richer in certain types of molecules called microRNAsStressed fathers may end up with changes to their sperm that could affect behaviour in their offspring, research in mice has shown.Previous work by the team found that male mice who were exposed to a mildly stressful event, such as being restrained, produced sperm that was richer in certain types of molecules called microRNAs.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis in Austin Tags: Science Genetics Biology Children Society World news Source Type: news

Mindless eating: is there something rotten behind the research?
A storm of retractions, corrections, data irregularities and controversy over duplicate publication are destroying the credibility of Cornell ’s Food and Brand Lab. It’s time for the university to be open about what’s going onMost people probably haven ’t heard of the beleaguered marketing professor, Brian Wansink, but chances are many will know about his work. Wansink is the mind behind the concept of “mindless eating” – the idea that the unconscious decisions we make about food can have profound effects on our diet and weight. Ideas like using smaller plates to eat fewer calories...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Pete Etchells and Chris Chambers Tags: Science Psychology Controversies Peer review and scientific publishing Source Type: news

Performance-driven culture is ruining science | Anonymous Academic
I was told impact metrics could make or break careers. Instead, they broke my faith in scientific researchThe first time I heard about the impact factor I was a few weeks into my PhD. A candidate due to finish in a couple of months warned me emphatically: “It makes or breaks careers.” In my innocence, I didn’t think much about it and returned to concentrating on my research. A decade later, metrics such as these came to dominate my work and ultimately drove me to give up my permanent academic post and move into industry.Since leaving academia, I have found myself wondering about the effect of these metric...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Anonymous academic Tags: Higher Education Network Research Science Source Type: news

Laser scanning reveals 'lost' ancient Mexican city had as many buildings as Manhattan
Groundbreaking lidar scanning reveals the true scale of Angamuco, built by the Pur épecha from about 900ADArchaeology might evoke thoughts of intrepid explorers and painstaking digging, but in fact researchers say it is a high-tech laser mapping technique that is rewriting the textbooks at an unprecedented rate.The approach, known as light detection and ranging scanning (lidar) involves directing a rapid succession of laser pulses at the ground from an aircraft.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis in Austin Tags: Archaeology Mapping technologies Mexico Science Americas World news Technology Source Type: news

DIY faecal transplants carry risks including HIV and hepatitis, warn experts
Faecal transplants have been used in medical settings to tackle superbugs, but following YouTube videos at home is too risky, say researchersConcerns have been raised about the growing trend for DIY faecal transplants, with experts fearing such attempts could put individuals at an increased risk of HIV and hepatitis as well as conditions ranging from Parkinson ’s and multiple sclerosis to obesity and sleep disorders.Thetransfer of faeces from one human to another has gained attention as a growing number of studies have suggested links between microbes in the gut anda host of health problems, from autoimmune diseases ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis in Austin Tags: Microbiology Human biology Infectious diseases Medical research Science Health Source Type: news

Blood-thinning drugs designed to cut stroke risk may actually increase it
Scientists call for caution in prescribing anticoagulants after some patients with other conditions found to suffer more strokesBlood-thinning drugs may increase rather than cut the risk of stroke in some people over 65 who have an irregular heartbeat and also chronic kidney disease, according to a new study.The researchers are calling on doctors to be more cautious in prescribing the drugs, called anticoagulants, until there has been more research.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Medical research Stroke Drugs Health Science Society Doctors Source Type: news

The next level of driverless cars: how to solve the problem of humans falling asleep
Next wave of development will see drivers only expected to intervene when the car requests it, say researchersDriving down the motorway in a sw.y semi-autonomous car, the vehicle is at its own wheel, humming along smoothly. But coming off a slip road it is over to you. The only trouble is, you ’ve fallen asleep.The goal of a completely driverless car is considered top ofa six-level scale of autonomy, and researchers believe it will one day be possible to achieve that aim. But for now, cars are stuck at level two on the scale – in which the driver must still perform several key aspects of driving – while e...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis in Austin Tags: Self-driving cars Science Technology Automotive industry Source Type: news

Next-level driverless cars: how to solve the problem of humans falling asleep
Next wave of development will see drivers only expected to intervene when the car requests it, say researchersDriving down the motorway in a sw.y semi-autonomous car, the vehicle is at its own wheel, humming along smoothly. But coming off a slip road it is over to you. The only trouble is, you ’ve fallen asleep.The goal of a completely driverless car is considered top ofa six-level scale of autonomy, and researchers believe it will one day be possible to achieve that aim. But for now, cars are stuck at level two on the scale – in which the driver must still perform several key aspects of driving – while e...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis in Austin Tags: Self-driving cars Science Technology Automotive industry Source Type: news

Laser scanning reveals 'lost' ancient Mexican city 'had as many buildings as Manhattan'
Groundbreaking lidar scanning reveals the true scale of Angamuco, built by the Pur épecha from about 900ADArchaeology might evoke thoughts of intrepid explorers and painstaking digging, but in fact researchers say it is a high-tech laser mapping technique that is rewriting the textbooks at an unprecedented rate.The approach, known as light detection and ranging scanning (lidar) involves directing a rapid succession of laser pulses at the ground from an aircraft.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis in Austin Tags: Archaeology Mapping technologies Mexico Science Americas World news Technology Source Type: news

Ammonia emissions rise in UK, as other air pollutant levels fall
Levels of powerful air pollutant rose by 3.2% from 2015 to 2016 according to government statisticsEmissions of ammonia have been on the rise in the UK, new statistics from the government show, even while the amount of other pollutants entering the atmosphere has fallen.Levels of the powerful air pollutant rose by 3.2% from 2015 to 2016, the latest year for which statistics are available, according to a report published by the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on Thursday morning. The rise came despite an overall fall of 10% in ammonia emissions since 1980.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Fiona Harvey Environment correspondent Tags: Pollution Environment Farming UK news Politics Agriculture Science Source Type: news

Friends, Romans, naked wolf-men ... why an ancient festival is still controversial
The annual Lupercalia festival turned society upside down – and the location of its starting point is still hotly debatedScenes from films like Gladiator and series such as HBO ’s Rome might lead you to think that the ancient Romans were liberal in their view of nudity. In fact the opposite was true. It was only during exceptional occasions that Romans were freed from their social norms – and the most spectacular occasion was the annual Lupercalia festival.From the earliest days of Rome, 15 February was reserved for this strange festival. It was so unusual that Cicero disparaged the festival as savage and...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kre šimir Vuković Tags: Science Archaeology Anthropology Italy Source Type: news

Ultra-processed foods may be linked to cancer, says study
Findings suggest increased consumption of ultra-processed foods tied to rise in cancers, but scientists say more research is needed“Ultra-processed” foods, made in factories with ingredients unknown to the domestic kitchen, may be linked to cancer, according to a large and groundbreaking study.Ultra-processed foods include pot noodles, shelf-stable ready meals, cakes and confectionery which contain long lists of additives, preservatives, flavourings and colourings – as well as often high levels of sugar, fat and salt. They now account for half of all the food bought by families eating at home in the UK,as...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Nutrition Health Cancer & wellbeing Food drink Society Science Source Type: news

Does the Illuminati control the world? Maybe it ’s not such a mad idea | Julian Baggini
Questioning the hidden power of elites – whether big pharma or secret societies – is really quite saneIfthe Illuminati is real, it ’s got to be theleast secret secret society in the universe. It ’s so bad at keeping itself hidden that its existence is proclaimed all over the internet by people whose investigative toolkit consists entirely of Google and a lively imagination.The most recent would-be whistleblower, however, is far from your usualex-sports commentator. Paul Hellyer, a former Canadian minister of defence, has blamed the Illuminati forsuppressing technology brought to Earth by aliens that...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Julian Baggini Tags: Philosophy Psychology Science Ethics Canada World news Americas Source Type: news

Transgender woman able to breastfeed in first documented case
Doctors hail breakthrough and say case shows ‘modest but functional lactation can be induced in transgender women’A 30-year-old transgender woman has been able to breastfeed her child, the first ever case of induced lactation in a transgender woman to be documented in academic literature.Doctors said the case shows “modest but functional lactation can be induced in transgender women”. The account was published inTransgender Health.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jessica Glenza in New York Tags: Medical research Health Breastfeeding Society Life and style US news Science World news Source Type: news

'Paramedic ants' observed treating injured comrades
The social insects have been seen cleaning wounds and possibly administering antibiotics to prevent infectionWhen the battle is done the victors head home, their march broken only to gather the wounded, who are hauled back to base for life-saving treatment.Not a heroic scene from the second world war, but the daily grind for African Matabele ants, which leave their nests in the hundreds to launch raids on feeding termites – and risk life and limb in the process.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Animal behaviour Science Insects Animals Environment Wildlife Biology Source Type: news

Marine scientists urge protection for endangered shellfish reefs
Shellfish reefs, formed by oysters or mussels in or near estuaries, have declined by up 99% since British colonisationMarine scientists are lobbying the federal government to ensure protection for Australia ’s most endangered – but least known – ocean ecosystem.Shellfish reefs, formed by millions of oysters or mussels clustering together in or near the mouths of estuaries, have declined by up 99% since British colonisation.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Calla Wahlquist Tags: Marine life Environment Wildlife Australia news Science Source Type: news

What fossils reveal about the spider family tree is far from horrifying | Susannah Lydon
Recent fossils in amber tell us how spiders evolved into their modern groups, but the fossil record for arachnids goes much deeperThe discovery of a100m-year-old spider ancestor with a whip-like tail, bearing a more than slight resemblance to everyone ’s favourite parasitoid alien –the facehugger– gained a lot of media interest last week. Some arachnologists were upset by both the language of fear in the coverage (“creepy” and “horrifying” were popular descriptions) and by some folks expressing a desire to nuke it from orbit. It seems that despite (or perhaps because) of the inten ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Susannah Lydon Tags: Spiders Science Fossils Evolution Biology Environment Source Type: news

Why it's too soon to classify gaming addiction as a mental disorder
Concerns over the addictive properties of video games are reasonable but there is a lack of rigorous research behind the WHO ’s expected classificationVideo games played on smartphones, tablets, computers and consoles have been a popular form of leisure for some time now. In Europe,recent figures indicate that games are played by more than two thirds of children and adolescents, and a substantial number of adults now play games – 38% in the UK, 64% in France, 56% in Germany and 44% in Spain.The WHO will publish the next revision of its manual – the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) –...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Andy Przybylski and Amy Orben Tags: Science Psychology Games Controversies Mental health Source Type: news

Tired of texting? Google tests robot to chat with friends for you
With its new Reply system the firm is taking the art of conversion one step forwards – or should that be backwards?Are you tired of the constant need to tap on a glass keyboard just to keep up with your friends? Do you wish a robot could free you of your constant communication obligations via WhatsApp, Facebook or text messages? Google is working on an AI-based auto-reply system to do just that.Google ’s experimental product lab called Area 120 is currently testing a new system simply called Reply that will work with Google’s Hangouts and Allo,WhatsApp,Facebook Messenger, Android Messages, Skype, Twitter ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: HAL 90210 Tags: Google Alphabet Artificial intelligence (AI) Technology Chat and messaging apps Consciousness Computing Science Source Type: news

Is the Illuminati running the world? Maybe it ’s not such a mad idea | Julian Baggini
Questioning the hidden power of elites – whether big pharma or secret societies – is really quite saneIfthe Illuminati is real, it ’s got to be theleast secret secret society in the universe. It ’s so bad at keeping itself hidden that its existence is proclaimed all over the internet by people whose investigative toolkit consists entirely of Google and a lively imagination.The most recent would-be whistleblower, however, is far from your usualex-sports commentator. Paul Hellyer, a former Canadian minister of defence, has blamed the Illuminati forsuppressing technology brought to Earth by aliens that...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Julian Baggini Tags: Philosophy Psychology Science Ethics Canada World news Americas Source Type: news

Hot stuff: the thermal cameras giving us a new way of seeing our bodies
How do our bodies regulate themselves – and is it even true that we have a single body temperature? New technology will tell usI ’m one of those people who always feels cold. Maybe it’s my upbringing in the chilly north, or maybe it’s down the quirks of my own physiology, but I’m reliably found next to the fire, hiding from draughts that no-one else had noticed, or buried inside enough jumpers to stock a small shop. A t the other end of the scale, when everyone else is sweating buckets, I’m basking smugly because I’m finally at a comfortable temperature.Like most of us, my attitude...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Helen Czerski Tags: Biology Physics Science Medical research Source Type: news

Why do women talk so much? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Nichi Hodgson
Every day millions of people ask Google life ’s most difficult questions. Our writers answer some of the commonest queries‘A woman’s tongue wags like a lamb’s tail”, so an old English saying goes, and if you deign to type “why do women …” into Google’s search bar, the search engine will finish your sentence accordingly with “talk so much”. We’ve been brought up to believe that women are the talkat ive ones, the ones whose words, both soothing and scolding, are the social glue of small communities and families alike. We assume women talk more than men....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nichi Hodgson Tags: Gender Women Science Sexual harassment Source Type: news

Detailed thermal imaging reveals heat map of a badminton player – video
Technology behind thermal imaging is advancing, enabling cameras to produce a detailed heat map of the human body. In this sequence the blood vessels of a badminton player can been seen expanding, becoming brighter and lighter as the body becomes hotter with movementHot stuff: the thermal cameras giving us a new way of seeing our bodiesPhotography:Robert HollingworthCamera loan: FLIRThanks to Stuart Wardell and Wimbledon Racquets and Fitness Club. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Science Technology UK news Badminton Source Type: news