Zika epidemic sheds light on Brazil's 'invisible children'
Exclusive: families of thousands of babies born with neurodevelopmental disorders may get help for first timeBrazil ’s “invisible children”, the thousands of babies born with neurodevelopmental disorders, have been brought out of the shadows by the Zika virus epidemic and their families may get help for the first time.Almost 4,000 babies were born in Brazil with microcephaly as a result of Zika virus infection – a brain malformation that left them with small and misshapen heads and poor developmental prospects.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Brazil Zika virus Global health Science World news Neuroscience Society Americas Source Type: news

Counting crows: Vancouver college maps thousands of attacks
Tool launched in response to dive-bombing birds documents 2,500 attacks since 2016It was a crow fiercely protecting its nest – and repeated complaints of it dive-bombing and swooping – that prompted the idea.“Just about every day someone would come in and say: ‘I got smacked in the back of the head,’ or ‘Mary got smacked in the back of the head,’” said Jim O’Leary, a teacher at Langara College in Vancouver, Canada.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ashifa Kassam in Toronto Tags: Canada Birds Animals Wildlife Animal behaviour Science Biology Environment Americas World news Source Type: news

The dark side of happiness – Science Weekly podcast
Happiness means something different to all of us, be it contentment, pleasure or joy. But could pursuing it leave us sad instead?Nicola Davis explores the science and psychology of happinessSubscribe and review onAcast,Apple Podcasts,Soundcloud,Audioboom andMixcloud. Join the discussion onFacebook andTwitterHappiness means something different to all of us. It could be the contentment of sitting by the fire with a loved one, euphoria after a great night outwith yourmates, or laughing hysterically at your friends ’ daft jokes.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Nicola Davis and produced by Graihagh Jackson Tags: Science Neuroscience Psychology Source Type: news

Our job as scientists is to find the truth. But we must also be storytellers | Nick Enfield
Science can ’t exist without telling a story. The question is not whether we should use it, but how we should use it bestScientists often struggle to communicate the findings of research. Our subject matter can be technical and not easily digested by a general audience. And our discoveries – from a new type of tessellating pentagon to the presence of gravitational waves in space – have no meaning until that meaning can be defined and agreed upon. To address this, we are often advised to use the tools of narrative.Related:Are you sitting comfortably? Then we'll begin the evolutionary 'fairytale' of coralCo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nick Enfield Tags: Science Source Type: news

Weird new fruits could hit aisles soon thanks to gene-editing
Supermarkets stocked with peach-flavoured strawberries and seedless tomatoes on horizon, scientists saySmooth or hairy, pungent or tasteless, deep-hued or bright: new versions of old fruits could be hitting the produce aisles as plant experts embrace cutting-edge technology, scientists say.While researchers have previously produced plants with specific traits through traditional breeding techniques, experts say new technologies such as thegene-editing tool Crispr-Cas9 could be used to bring about changes far more rapidly and efficiently.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Food science Genetics Agriculture Farming Environment Biology GM Source Type: news

Rising global meat consumption 'will devastate environment'
Analysis suggests eating of meat will climb steeply and play significant role in increasing carbon emissions and reducing biodiversityRising global meat consumption is likely to have a devastating environmental impact, scientists have warned.A new major analysis suggests meat consumption is set to climb steeply as the world population increases along with average individual income, and could play a significant role in increasing carbon emissions and reducing biodiversity.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Food The meat industry Science Environment & drink Health Source Type: news

Huge Egyptian sarcophagus found to contain three mummies
Archaeologists open granite tomb but are dismayed at state of decay after ‘sewage leak’Egyptian archeologists have opened a 30-tonne black granite sarcophagus to find three decomposed mummies after sewage water apparently leaked inside.“The sarcophagus has been opened, but we have not been hit by a curse,”said Mostafa Waziry, the head of Egypt ’s Supreme Council for Antiquities, in response to news reports warning of maledictions hidden inside the tomb in the port city of Alexandria.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ruth Michaelson in Cairo Tags: Egypt Archaeology Africa Middle East and North Africa Science World news Source Type: news

Democrats 'less inclined to cheat on spouses than Republicans'
Analysis finds Democrats used adultery website Ashley Madison substantially less than other US votersDemocrats are less inclined than Republicans to cheat on their spouses, according to researchers who matched voter records to accounts hacked from a US website that specialises in extramarital affairs.The study of 80,000 voters in five US states found that Democrats used the Ashley Madison adultery website substantially less than Republicans, Libertarians, Greens and unaffiliated voters. Libertarians consistently ranked as the site ’s most frequent clients.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Ashley Madison Republicans Democrats US news Dating Life and style Source Type: news

Make cannabis-based medicines legal, say UK drug advisers
Advisory council ’s recommendation may pave way for loosening of lawsDoctors in the UK should be able to prescribe cannabis-derived medicine, the government ’s chief drug advisers have recommended, paving the way for a loosening of the laws governing access to the substance.The Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) has recommended after a review that cannabis-derived medicinal products should be placed in schedule 2 of the misuse of drugs regulations 2001, allowing them to be prescribed by clinicians.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Grierson Home affairs correspondent Tags: Cannabis UK news Epilepsy Sajid Javid Drugs Politics Society Drugs policy Science Source Type: news

Scientific procedures involving animals at lowest level since 2010
But animal rights groups say more should be done to reduce those bred with genetic alterationsScientific procedures involving animals are at their lowest level since 2010, but animal rights groups say the government is not doing enough to reduce the number of animals bred with genetic alterations.New statistics released by the Home Office show there were almost 3.8m scientific procedures involving animals in 2017, a 4% drop on the previous year. These included 1.89m experiments on live animals – with reasons ranging from legally required drug testing to surgical training.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Animal experimentation Science Animal welfare Animals UK news Medical research Zoology Source Type: news

Ryan Gosling astronaut biopic First Man picked to open Venice film festival
Damien Chazelle ’s film about Neil Armstong will premiere in Italy, with Alfonso Cuarón’s Roma chosen for New York film festival galaFirst Man, a biopic of the pioneering astronaut Neil Armstrong starring Ryan Gosling and directed by Damien Chazelle, has beenconfirmed as the opening film of the 2018 Venice film festival.The slot is a highly prized, high-profile one, especially in Hollywood after a string of recent Venice openers – including La La Land, Birdman and Gravity – have gone on to Oscar glory. First Man stars Gosling as Armstrong, a former navy pilot who became the first man to walk ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Pulver Tags: Film Venice film festival Ryan Gosling Damien Chazelle Neil Armstrong Culture Festivals Science Apollo 11 The moon Space Alfonso Cuar ón Source Type: news

Drugs alone won't fix our epidemic of depression | James S Gordon
To fight a rising tide of depression and suicide, psychiatrists need to do more than just fill patients up with pillsThe New York Times recently published an important investigative reportshining a long-overdue light on the painful, sometimes disabling experience of withdrawing from antidepressants – drugs that millions of Americans have been taking, sometimes for decadesThe recent deaths ofKate Spade andAnthony Bourdain threw into stark relief the human toll that depression can take. But the problem is complex, with multiple factors. We are seeing a striking increase in the number of Americans diagnosed with depress...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: James S Gordon Tags: Depression Science Mental health Medicine Source Type: news

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2018 shortlist – in pictures
The Milky Way, the Andromeda galaxy and the Running Man nebula feature in the shortlist for theInsight Investment Astronomy Photographer of the Year award. The winners will be announced on 23 October, and an exhibition of the winning images from the past 10 years of the contest will be on show at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich from 24 OctoberContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Astronomy Photography Space Science Source Type: news

Sunflowers and Santa Claus: Guardian writers and readers on how their first memory changed them
Our earliest memory can shape our lives, but new research suggests that many are false. Here, writers and readers reflect on their earliest recollectionsIt starts as a dreamy state of dizzying vertigo, and then I rattle, headfirst, down the wooden stairs. Falling down the white-painted (I think), definitely uncarpeted stairs of our first house is my first memory, and I must have been around two. But is it real? A new study suggests not, and if you can remember lying in your pram/taking your first steps/having your nappy changed, then you are almost certainly wrong, too.In a survey of more than 6,600 people, published in Ps...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Emine Saner, Polly Toynbee, Remona Aly, Stephen Moss, Jess Cartner-Morley, Hadley Freeman, Hannah Jane Parkinson, John Crace, Hugh Muir, Sarah Phillips, Anne Perkins and Poppy Noor Simon Hattenstone Tags: Memory Science Source Type: news

Routine treatment for cardiac arrest doubles risk of brain damage – study
Landmark trial likely to change the way cardiac arrest has been treated in the UK for more than half a centuryA treatment given to thousands of people who suffer cardiac arrest in Britain every year nearly doubles the risk of permanent brain damage and only marginally improves the chances of survival, a landmark study has found.More than 30,000 people have cardiac arrests – where the heart stops beating – annually in the UK. More than half receive shots of adrenaline alongside other interventions that are designed to restart the heart. In most cases the attacks are still fatal, with fewer than 10% of patients s...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Layal Liverpool Tags: Medical research Science Heart attack Society Source Type: news

Thousands of leading AI researchers sign pledge against killer robots
Co-founder of Google DeepMind and CEO of SpaceX among the 2,400 signatories of pledge to block lethal autonomous weaponsThousands of scientists who specialise in artificial intelligence (AI) have declared that they will not participate in the development or manufacture of robots that can identify and attack people without human oversight.Demis Hassabis at Google DeepMind and Elon Musk at the US rocket company SpaceX are among more than 2,400signatories to the pledge which intends to deter military firms and nations from building lethal autonomous weapon systems, also known as Laws.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Weapons technology Robots Artificial intelligence (AI) Computing Consciousness Science Military UK news Source Type: news

What is your earliest childhood memory – and did it really happen?
A new study suggests that many first memories are actually fictional and based on photographs and family stories. We would like to hear about what you believe is your earliest recollectionIt is a much pondered and discussed subject: your earliest childhood memory. For some, it is their first bee sting or a formative interaction with a parent as a toddler. Others claim to be able to recall lying in a pram. But how sure are you that you have actually remembered this experience, rather than it being informed by photographs and family anecdotes?Related:Head space: why our adolescent memories are so clear | Daniel GlaserContinu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Guardian readers Tags: Memory Science Source Type: news

What anthropologists can tell you about the US border immigration crisis
How anthropologists are helping tell real stories of migrants trying to cross US bordersI am an anthropologist because I care about people. I am an archaeologist because I know our past is relevant to our present and future. Our borderlands are areas of enduring relevance to both fields of study.Related:Life and death on the border: effects of century-old murders still felt in TexasContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Holly Norton Tags: Anthropology US immigration Source Type: news

Thousands of scientists pledge not to help build killer AI robots
Co-founder of Google DeepMind and CEO of SpaceX amongst the 2,400 signatories of pledge to block lethal autonomous weaponsThousands of scientists who specialise in artificial intelligence (AI) have declared that they will not participate in the development or manufacture of robots that can identify and attack people without human oversight.Demis Hassabis at Google DeepMind and Elon Musk at the US rocket company SpaceX are among more than 2,400signatories to the pledge which intends to deter military firms and nations from building lethal autonomous weapon systems, also known as Laws.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Weapons technology Robots Artificial intelligence (AI) Computing Consciousness Science Military UK news Source Type: news

The real palaeo diet: the nutritional value of dinosaur food
Experiments on modern plants show that the nutrients which dinosaurs could get from plants varied with carbon dioxide levelsOur fascination with giant sauropod dinosaurs such as Diplodocus, Brachiosaurus and Brontosaurus stems from their colossal size. How could something 30 metres long, weighing 50 tonnes, function as a land animal? And how could something that big gain enough nutrition from plants?We have little evidence for the diet of everyone ’s favourite giant herbivores. Reports of fossilised stomach and gut contents have been contested, and coprolites (fossilised dung) are difficult to assign to their produce...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Susannah Lydon Tags: Dinosaurs Science Fossils Biology Evolution Source Type: news

Omega-3 no protection against heart attack or strokes, say scientists
Supplements do not offer cardiovascular benefits, researchers conclude from trials involving 112,000 peopleThe widespread belief that taking omega-3 capsules will help protect you from a heart attack, stroke or early death is wrong, according to a large and comprehensive review of the evidence.Thousands of people take omega-3 supplements regularly and for years. The belief that it protects the heart has spread – and is promoted in the marketing of the supplements – because the results from early trials suggested the capsules had cardiovascular benefits.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Health Medical research Food & drink Heart attack Stroke Science Life and style Society Source Type: news

Astronomers discover 12 new moons orbiting Jupiter - one on collision course with the others
A head-on collision between two Jovian moons would create a crash so large it would be visible from earthOne of a dozen new moons discovered around Jupiter is circling the planet on a suicide orbit that will inevitably lead to its violent destruction, astronomers say.Valetudo (one of Jupiter's moons) is driving down the highway on the wrong side of the road.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Astronomy Jupiter Space Source Type: news

EPA proposal to limit role of science in decision-making met with alarm
Democratic lawmakers and scientists denounced proposal to allow administrators to reject study results if research isn ’t publicDemocratic lawmakers joined scientists, health and environmental officials and activists on Tuesday in denouncing a proposal by theEnvironmental Protection Agency (EPA), backed by industry, that could limit dramatically what kind of science the agency considers when making regulations.Related:Andrew Wheeler: 'point man for Trump' focused on undoing Obama's EPA agendaContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press in Washington Tags: US Environmental Protection Agency US news Science Source Type: news

Genetically modifying future children isn ’t just wrong. It would harm all of us | Marcy Darnovsky
Genome editing for human embryos is an unnecessary threat to society. Why has the Nuffield Council of Bioethics endorsed it?The Nuffield Council on Bioethics has taken what it clearly regards as a brave new step: it has openly endorsed the use of genome editing toengineer the traits of future children and generations. The council ’s report,Genome editing and human reproduction: social and ethical issues, asserts that such a move could be “morally permissible” under certain circumstances. In effect, it argues that the creation of genetically modified human beings should proceed after a few bioethics-lite b...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Marcy Darnovsky Tags: Genetics Biology Science Ethics World news UK news Source Type: news

Genetically modified babies given go ahead by UK ethics body
The Nuffield Council on Bioethics says changing the DNA of a human embryo could be ‘morally permissable’ if it is in the child’s best interestsThe creation of babies whose DNA has been altered to give them what parents perceive to be the best chances in life has received a cautious green light in a landmark report from a leading UK ethics body.TheNuffield Council on Bioethics said that changing the DNA of a human embryo could be “morally permissible” if it was in the future child’s interests and did not add to the kinds of inequalities that already divide society.Continue reading... (Sou...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Genetics Biology Ethics World news Source Type: news

Podcast: why is positive news coverage so vital in today's world?
This episode of our regular podcast focuses on the impact of the modern news cycle on our health and wellbeing, and whether a greater focus on positive, hopeful, solution-based stories could help to mitigate thisWhat are the effects of negative news on our mental health and sense of empowerment? How does it effect our trust in the media? Why historically has negative news become so prevalent at the expense of positive, solutions-focused, constructive news and could a more balanced picture of the world lead to greater empowerment and individual actions to make things better?Joining the Guardian ’s Executive editor for...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Lee Glendinning, produced by Stuart Silver and featuring Mark Rice-Oxley, Dr Denise Baden, Giselle Green and Sean Dagan Wood Tags: Membership Mental health Psychology News Corporation Anxiety Depression Science Society Source Type: news

Podcast: We need to talk about … the power of positive news coverage
This episode of our regular podcast focuses on the impact of the modern news cycle on our health and wellbeing, and whether a greater focus on positive, hopeful, solution-based stories could help to mitigate thisWhat are the effects of negative news on our mental health and sense of empowerment? How does it effect our trust in the media? Why historically has negative news become so prevalent at the expense of positive, solutions-focused, constructive news and could a more balanced picture of the world lead to greater empowerment and individual actions to make things better?Joining the Guardian ’s Executive editor for...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Lee Glendinning, produced by Stuart Silver and featuring Mark Rice-Oxley, Dr Denise Baden, Giselle Green and Sean Dagan Wood Tags: Membership Mental health Psychology News Corporation Anxiety Depression Science Society Source Type: news

The turbulent life of the British School of Archaeology in Iraq
Launched in 1932 the school has spent almost a century uncovering Iraq ’s ancient treasures, including the spectacular Assyrian capital at NimrudOn a dark November day in 1929, the nascent British School of Archaeology in Iraq launched its appeal for funds. Central Hall in Westminster was packed to overflowing and the audience was treated to a lantern slide show of recent discoveries in Iraq, followed by a long list of speakers, including the Archbishop of Canterbury and Lady Astor, Britain ’s first female MP. Presiding as chairman was Major-GeneralSir Percy Cox. After the first world war, Cox had served as the...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mary Shepperson Tags: Archaeology Science Iraq Middle East and North Africa World news Heritage Museums Culture Agatha Christie Source Type: news

Country diary: metamorphosis in a museum tower
Oxford University Museum:For 70 years, researchers have been watching ‘particularly hideous’ young swifts turn into long-winged angelsThis glorious structure is a place rich in history. As we walked through the galleries our guide paused to show us the great oak door behind which Bishop Wilberforce confronted “Darwin’s bulldog”,Thomas Huxley, in their famous debate on evolution. We, however, were intent on a more modest fraction of the building ’s past. For it was here in 1947 that the ecologists Elizabeth and David Lack noticed how breeding swifts were vanishing into air vents in the ro...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mark Cocker Tags: Birds Animal behaviour University of Oxford Science and nature books Wildlife Birdwatching UK news Environment Higher education Biology Research Animals Culture World news Source Type: news

Top cancer genetics professor quits job over bullying allegations
Exclusive: Nazneen Rahman will leave the ICR in October after harassment claimsA leading light in the world of cancer genetics, who was honoured at the outstanding Asian women of achievement awards and given a CBE, has quit her job at the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) after facing multiple allegations of bullying dating back 12 years.Prof Nazneen Rahman, who is the high-profile head of genetics and epidemiology at the ICR, was given leave of absence last November after a letter signed by 45 current and former employees accused her of “serious recurrent bullying and harassment”.Continue reading... (Source: ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sally Weale Education correspondent Tags: Bullying Cancer research Academic experts Higher education Society Medical research Science UK news Source Type: news

Archaeologists find earliest evidence of bread
Tiny specks of bread found in fireplaces used by hunter-gatherers 14,000 years ago, predating agriculture by thousands of yearsCharred crumbs found in a pair of ancient fireplaces have been identified as the earliest examples of bread, suggesting it was being prepared long before the dawn of agriculture.The remains – tiny lumps a few millimetres in size – were discovered by archaeologists at a site in the Black Desert in north-east Jordan.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Archaeology Science Jordan Food & drink Middle East and North Africa Source Type: news

Rocket men: locals divided over plans for UK's first spaceport
Remote Scottish peninsula chosen for satellite launchpad with promise of jobsA remote area of land on the northern coast of Scotland is on track to become the UK ’s first rocket spaceport after it was selected as the best place in the country from which to blast satellites into orbit.The isolated county of Sutherland is one of the few spots in Britain where golden eagles and sea eagles still take to the skies, but from the early 2020s the birds may be sharing airspace with rockets bearing small satellites for communications and Earth observation.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Severin Carrell, Steven Morris and Ian Sample Tags: Space Scotland UK news Science Satellites Source Type: news

Did you solve it? Head-spinning bicycle puzzles
The answers to today ’s puzzlesIn my puzzle blog earlier today I set you the following three challenges:1) The King of the Mountains went up the col at 15 km an hour and down it at 45 km an hour. It took him two hours in total. Assuming that the distance he travelled up and down are the same, how far is it from the bottom to the top of the col?Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Physics Physics puzzles Arithmetic puzzles Education Science Source Type: news

A bad marriage can seriously damage your health, say scientists
Psychologists monitored 373 couples over 16 years and found that couples who disagree often have poorer health – especially for menA bad marriage with frequent conflicts could have a serious detrimental impact on your health, according to psychologists.The researchers at the universities of Nevada and Michigan monitored 373 heterosexual couples to investigate whether disagreeing about multiple topics – such as children, money, in-laws and leisure activities – had negative health implications.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Layal Liverpool Tags: Relationships Life and style Health Psychology Source Type: news

UK's first spaceport to be built on Scottish peninsula – video
Scotland ’s north coast has been chosen as the site of Britain's first spaceport. Vertical rocket and satellite launches are planned from the A’Mhoine peninsula, in Sutherland, which the UK Space Agency says will pave the way for human spaceflightsSpaceport receives go-ahead on Scottish peninsulaContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 16, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Satellites Space Source Type: news

Archaeologists and astronomers solve the mystery of Chile's Stonehenge
A solar phenomenon found above mysterious pillars, or saywas, was likely designed to broadcast the ‘sacred power’ of the IncaGrowing up on the edge of the Atacama desert in northern Chile, Jimena Cruz was often made to feel ashamed of her indigenous identity.Related:Stargazing in Chile: dark skies in the Atacama desertContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Laurence Blair in San Pedro de Atacama Tags: Chile Deserts Astronomy Archaeology Americas Science Source Type: news

Can you solve it? Head-spinning bicycle puzzles
Run your brain through the gearsBonjour guzzleurs,As we are almost midway through the Tour de France, I thought it would be a good moment for some bicycle puzzles.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Physics Education Science Physics puzzles Arithmetic puzzles Source Type: news

Is UK science and innovation up for the climate challenge?
The government has shaken up the UK research system. But fossil fuels, not low-carbon technologies, still seem to be in the driving seat.A new report by Richard Jones and James Wilsdon invites us toquestion the biomedical bubble - the slow but steady concentration of research and development (R&D) resources in the hands of biomedical science.A provocative case, it ’s already generated some discussion. Here, I want to pick up a point that might be easily missed amongst fights over the role of biomedicine: the all-too-small amount of resource being put towards decarbonising energy.Continue reading... (Source: Guard...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alice Bell Tags: Science Environment Climate change Energy Research funding Higher education Science policy Politics Source Type: news

Spaceport receives go-ahead on Scottish peninsula
Site between Tongue and Durness could be up and running by early 2020s, with Lockheed Martin among partners signed upA peninsula on Scotland ’s north coast has been chosen for the site of the UK’s first spaceport.Vertical rocket and satellite launches are planned from the A ’Mhoine peninsula in Sutherland which the UK Space Agency said would pave the way for spaceflights.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Scotland Satellites Space UK news Science Source Type: news

Tudor shipwreck discovered by local group on Kent beach
The government has listed the vessel as the only wreck of its kind in south-east EnglandA Tudor shipwreck, discovered by members of a local history group surveying Tankerton beach, near Whitstable, in Kent for second world war pillboxes, has been given official protection by the government as the only wreck of its kind in south-east England.Another ship believed to date from the 19th century, gradually being exposed at low tides at Camber Sands near Rye harbour in East Sussex, is also being listed.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Archaeology Heritage UK news Culture Source Type: news

Starwatch: Mars, in opposition, is a radiant beacon
Over the next two weeks Mars will make its closest approach to Earth since 2003Late birds with a good south-eastern horizon will probably have already noticed Mars in the dead of night. In the early hours of the morning, it is a radiant beacon, shining low in the constellation of Capricornus. During the next fortnight, the planet is going to brighten steadily as it heads for its closest approach to Earth since 2003. Mars makes a close approach every two years. It happens when our planet “laps” Mars, passing between it and the sun. The moment is known as opposition because Mars is in the opposite hemisphere of t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: Mars Science Astronomy Space Saturn Source Type: news

Mars is spectacular this month – here’s the best way to spy the red planet
Our galactic neighbour is closer and brighter than it has been for 15 years – and its appearance will coincide with a total lunar eclipse. It has never been a better time to take up stargazingIf you look at the sky tonight and spot a very bright star, it may well be a planet. Mars is the closest it has been to Earth for 15 years – and therefore the brightest. “Mars shines through reflected light,” says Robert Massey, the deputy executive director of the Royal Astronomical Society. “That means that when it’s closer to the Earth it appears brighter, because its apparent size is bigger.&rdq...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Lucy Jones Tags: Mars Space Science Source Type: news

Scorpion deaths on rise in Brazil as arachnid adapts to urban life
Deaths have more than doubled as specialists warn of increasing danger for city-dwellersSpecialists in Brazil have warned of the rising danger of deadly scorpions amid a spiraling number of reported deaths and bites by the hardy arachnids which are proliferating in the country ’s urban centres.The number of deaths from scorpion bites reported to the country ’s public health system has more than doubled in the past four years, from 70 in 2013 to 184 in 2017, while cases of scorpion bites rose from 37,000 in 2007 to 126,000 last year.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Dom Phillips in Rio de Janeiro Tags: Brazil Animals Poison Americas Science World news Source Type: news

Venkatraman Ramakrishnan: ‘Britain’s reputation has been hurt’
The Nobel prize-winning biologist and president of the Royal Society on how Brexit might affect the sciencesBrexit hasn ’t happened yet buthow is the process affecting science?There are two answers to this. One is that we ’ve heard anecdotal evidence that people are leaving or not wanting to come here. But we don’t have any statistical evidence of a brain drain. I would add that it has had a negative impact on the mood. For a long time people outside Britain saw this attractive, outward-facing country – a great place to work. That reputation has been hurt.How many countries could somebody come to re...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Tucker Tags: Royal Society Science Brexit UK news European Union Politics Source Type: news

Intelligent birds
Certain species of bird have surprised researchers recently with their ability to fashion tools and solve complex problemsA discovery byDr Sarah Jelbert of Jesus College, Cambridge, has led to the refinement of our understanding of crow intelligence. On the south-west Pacific island of New Caledonia, a crow called Emma has stunned researchers byoperating a vending machine they constructed for it, remembering the size of a token needed to release a treat. The ongoing investigation into the intelligence of the species follows the discovery that it works material into fishing hook-style tools to extract larvae from holes in d...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Brigid Harrison-Draper Tags: Neuroscience Biology Birds Animals Source Type: news

'A goldmine': mummies' secrets uncovered in Egypt
Archaeologists find mummification workshop in the Saqqara necropolisDeep below the sands of the Saqqara necropolis, archaeologists have uncovered a unique discovery they say reveals the secrets of the ancient Egyptian mummies.A mummification workshop and adjoining burial shaft as well as five mummies, their bejewelled sarcophagi, figurines, and a gilded silver and onyx mummy mask were all unearthed at the site, which archeologists say provides a wealth of new knowledge about the mummification process.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ruth Michaelson Tags: Egypt Egyptology Archaeology Africa Middle East and North Africa World news Science Museums Culture Source Type: news

The Guardian view on alien life: what if it ’s not there? | Editorial
The universe is so big and full of stars that it seems obvious some must have evolved intelligent life. But it turns out we know so little we can ’t know what’s obvious. Quite likely we are aloneAre we alone in the universe? Of all the billions of stars out there, is there none around which intelligent life has arisen, no other conscious beings who have looked at their sky and asked themselves whether there was anyone else out here? All we can know is that we don ’t know of any others. But that has not stopped more or less well-informed speculation. The universe is so unthinkably enormous and old that it ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Alien life Space Science Philosophy World news Source Type: news

Upsurge in sleeping problems due to UK's longest heatwave in 40 years
People left tired, irritable and less productive at work after nights of poor shuteyeBritain ’s longest heatwave since 1976 has led to a upsurge in sleeping problems, with people left tired, irritable and less productive at work after sweaty nights of poor-quality shuteye.Record temperatures ofup to 32.4C (90.3F) have been stopping many people getting a proper rest as they struggle to get to sleep in rooms that are uncomfortably warm, experts say.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Denis Campbell and Sarah Marsh Tags: Science Health Sleep & wellbeing Weather Society UK news Source Type: news

From Ebola to Nipah: are we ready for the next epidemic? – Science Weekly podcast
The 2014 Ebola outbreak killed over 10,000 people before it was eventually brought under control. As new infectious diseases appear around the world, what can we learn from past outbreaks to better prepare ourselves?Subscribe and review onAcast,Apple Podcasts,Soundcloud,Audioboom andMixcloud. Join the discussion onFacebook andTwitterSomewhere in the world there ’s a bat, a monkey or a pig with a virus that could jump into humans and become the next major epidemic, or even pandemic. This is what happened with Ebola, a disease first detected in humans in the 1970s. When the 2014 west Africa outbreak finally ended in 20...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Ian Sample and produced by Graihagh Jackson Tags: Science Health Ebola Epidemics Society World news Source Type: news

Spacewatch: Martian rocks on Earth a step nearer as UK builds red planet rover
Airbus lands £3.9m contract from space agency to design spacecraft to bring back samples from Mars in the 2020sThe European Space Agency has awarded a £3.9m contract to Airbus, in Britain, to design a new rover, in a project with Nasa, that will visit Mars to retrieve samples for bringing back to Earth for the first time.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: European Space Agency Nasa Mars Astronomy Science Source Type: news