Frog regrows amputated leg after drug treatment
Nearly complete limb develops over 18 months, raising exciting possibilities for human patientsA frog has regrown a lost leg after being treated with a cocktail of drugs in a significant advance for regenerative medicine.The African clawed frog, which is naturally unable to regenerate its limbs, was treated with the drugs for just 24 hours and this prompted an 18-month period of regrowth of a functional leg. The demonstration raises the prospect that in the future drugs could be used to switch on similar untapped abilities for regeneration in human patients to restore tissues or organs lost to disease or injury.Continue re...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 27, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Medical research Amphibians Animals Science UK news US news World news Source Type: news

British scientist finds new species of rare leafhopper in Uganda
The last recorded sighting of a leafhopper from the same genus as Phlogis kibalensis was in 1969A new species of insect has been found in the Ugandan rainforest that belongs to a group of insects so rare that its closest known relative was last seen more than 50 years ago.The species of leafhopper, namedPhlogis kibalensis, was discovered by a British scientist doing field work in a national park in western Uganda.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 27, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Hibaq Farah Tags: Insects Science Uganda Wildlife UK news World news Anglia Ruskin University Animals Africa Environment National parks Source Type: news

Orcas recorded killing and feeding on blue whales in 2019 – video
Footage from March 2019 shows killer whales hunting the planet ’s largest creature.This is the first time time killer whales, also known as orcas, have been recorded hunting the blue whale in coordinated and brutal attacksOrcas recorded killing and feeding on blue whales in brutal attacksContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 27, 2022 Category: Science Tags: Whales Animal behaviour Marine life Environment Science Source Type: news

‘Don’t Look Up’: humanity could avert asteroid Armageddon, say scientists
Planet likely to be spared from catastrophic end if 10km-wide Earthbound asteroid was spotted, analysis findsAs a planet-killing asteroid hurtles towards Earth in the filmDon ’t Look Up, scientists Jennifer Lawrence and Leonardo DiCaprio scramble to get the world to take the threat seriously.For many, the Netflix hit was an allegory of the world ’sinaction on climate change, but now a pair of physicists have taken a more literal view of the question at the heart of the drama: if a 10km-wide asteroid is six months away from impact, is it possible to avert a planet-ending catastrophe?Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 27, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Asteroids Astronomy Science Space UK news Don't Look Up Climate crisis Source Type: news

What are the new Covid rules for English care homes and are they safe?
The self-isolation period for positive cases is being cut and the limit on visitors lifted from next weekCoronavirus – latest updatesFrom Monday, coronavirus restrictions related to care homes in England will be eased. Here are the changes, and the science behind them.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 27, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Social care Coronavirus Older people Health policy Science Society UK news England Source Type: news

UK Covid efforts should target unvaccinated, says expert
Vaccine expert says focus should shift away from booster programme and be directed to first dosesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageEfforts to increase uptake of Covid jabs in the UK should be concentrated on reducing the number of unvaccinated people rather than booster jabs, a leading expert has said.As Omicron spread rapidly around the country towards the end of 2021, health advisers and government ministers stressed that two doses “are not enough” to protect against the new variant, urging those eligible to take up a booster dose as soon as possible.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 27, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Coronavirus Omicron variant UK news Science Vaccines and immunisation Health Infectious diseases Source Type: news

Spotify removes Neil Young music in feud over Joe Rogan ’s false Covid claims
Musician has condemned misinformation on platform ’s top podcast, saying ‘they can have Rogan or Young’Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe music streaming platform Spotify is in the process of removing Neil Young ’s music after the company refused to take down Joe Rogan’s podcast amid the musician’s objections that it spreadvaccine misinformation.Rogan has been described by the New York Times as “one of the most consumed media products on the planet”. His podcast, The Joe Rogan Experience, is Spotify’s most popular. In 2020, Rogan signed a $100m deal that gave the streaming c...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 27, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Maya Yang and Ben Beaumont-Thomas Tags: Spotify Neil Young Joe Rogan US news Culture Coronavirus Podcasting Music Science Digital media Digital music and audio Internet Technology Source Type: news

What are the hidden costs of our obsession with fish oil supplements? – podcast
They may be one of the world ’s favourite supplements but, according to arecent study, more than one in 10 fish oil capsules are rancid. Most of the oil comes from Peruvian anchovetas, a type of anchovy, which is also used to feed pigs, poultry and farmed fish. And despite catching more than 4m tonnes a year of Peruvian anchovetas to cater to the global demand, large industry players want to scale this up even further.Madeleine Finlay speaks to environment journalist Richa Syal about why so many fish oil pills are rancid, and hears from journalist Dan Collyns in Chimbote, Peru, about how the industry is affecting the loc...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 27, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Presented and produced by Madeleine Finlay with Richa Syal and Dan Collyns. Sound design by Axel Kacouti é Tags: Science Peru Fishing Health Oceans Food Marine life Source Type: news

Drug used to treat cancer may also help fight HIV, Australian research finds
Pembrolizumab has revolutionised treatments of cancers, including melanoma, and makes HIV vulnerable to attackGet our free news app;get our morning email briefingNew research co-led by the director of the Doherty Institute, Prof Sharon Lewin, has found a medicine used to treat cancer can also draw HIV out of hibernation, exposing the virus to the immune system and making it more susceptible to attack.HIV ’s ability to “hide” in cells, even in people on antiretroviral therapy and with undetectable amounts of the virus in their blood, is one of the significant barriers to finding a cure for the disease.Sign up to recei...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 27, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Davey Medical editor Tags: Aids and HIV Medical research Australia news Health Science Source Type: news

Regions growing coffee, cashews and avocados at risk amid global heating
Analysis finds many areas growing the crops may not be suitable by 2050, while others could benefitSome regions that produce coffee, cashews and avocados may not be able to support the growing of these crops within decades as a result of global heating, a study has found.Researchers combined climate change projections and soil factors to model how suitable various regions will be for growing crops in 2050. The analysis found that all major coffee-producing regions face a decline in suitability, including Brazil, Vietnam, Indonesia and Colombia.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 26, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Hibaq Farah Tags: Climate crisis Farming Agriculture Environment Science Global development Source Type: news

Coronavirus vaccines may reduce risk of long Covid, ONS study finds
Observational study finds double-jabbed people 41% less likely to report Covid symptoms 12 weeks after a positive testCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageVaccination could reduce the risk of long Covid,research by the Office for National Statistics suggests.The study, of more than 6,000 adults, found those who were double-vaccinated had a 41% lower likelihood of self-reporting Covid symptoms 12 weeks after first testing positive.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 26, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin and Nicola Davis Tags: Long Covid Coronavirus Infectious diseases Science Society World news Medical research Office for National Statistics UK news Health Source Type: news

Astronomers discover mysterious pulsing object that may be new class of star
Experts say object is a match for predicted class of neutron star with ultra-powerful magnetic fieldAstronomers have discovered a mysterious object emitting a radio wave beam that pulsed every 20 minutes.The team behind the discovery believe the object could be a new class of slowly rotatingneutron star with an ultra-powerful magnetic field. The repeating signals were detected during the first three months of 2018, but then disappeared, suggesting they were linked to a dramatic, one-off event, such as a starquake.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 26, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Astronomy Space Science Source Type: news

Why mathematicians sometimes get Covid projections wrong | Kit Yates
Modelling may not be a crystal ball, but it remains the best tool we have to predict the futureOfficial modelling efforts have been subjected to barrages of criticism throughout the pandemic, from across the political spectrum. No doubt some of that criticism has appeared justified – the result of highly publicised projections that never came to pass. In July 2021, for instance, the newly installed health secretary, Sajid Javid, warned that cases couldsoon rise above 100,000 a day. His figure was based on modelling from the Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Modelling, known as SPI-M.One influential SPI-M member, Pro...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 26, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Kit Yates Tags: Coronavirus Mathematics UK news Science World news Source Type: news

‘I had this strong feeling that my face was disfigured’ – Kitty Wallace, the body dysmorphic sufferer turned campaigner
Her early life was blighted by the condition, until a TV documentary changed everything. Now, she works for the UK ’s leading support groupKitty Wallace remembers very clearly the first time she felt there was something horribly wrong with her face.She was eight years old, in her downstairs bathroom with a friend as they washed their hands before dinner. “I just remember looking at our reflection and thinking how different I looked to her,” she says. “At that moment, I had this very strong feeling that my face was offensive or disfigured compared with hers, and then a sudden realisation that this must be as obvious...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 26, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Annie Kelly Tags: Life and style Disability Body image Psychology Health & wellbeing Society Robert Pattinson Billie Eilish Shirley Manson Source Type: news

UK government advisers call for ‘proactive regulation’ around genomics
Report highlights ethical and practical issues surrounding the rapid advancement of the fieldBefore your child is born, you have their genome tweaked to boost their stature, build and intelligence. When they head to school, the teacher streams them according to their genetic makeup. And when working life begins, an employer checks their DNA to ensure they are healthy, agreeable and sufficiently extrovert for the role.It may sound like the worst science fiction. But a new government report warns that genomics is advancing so fast that such scenarios are plausibly on the horizon, with often few laws and regulations to preven...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 26, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Genetics Source Type: news