'A goldmine': mummies' secrets uncovered in Egypt
Archaeologists find mummification workshop in the Saqqara necropolisDeep below the sands of the Saqqara necropolis, archaeologists have uncovered a unique discovery they say reveals the secrets of the ancient Egyptian mummies.A mummification workshop and adjoining burial shaft as well as five mummies, their bejewelled sarcophagi, figurines, and a gilded silver and onyx mummy mask were all unearthed at the site, which archeologists say provides a wealth of new knowledge about the mummification process.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ruth Michaelson Tags: Egypt Egyptology Archaeology Africa Middle East and North Africa World news Science Museums Culture Source Type: news

The Guardian view on alien life: what if it ’s not there? | Editorial
The universe is so big and full of stars that it seems obvious some must have evolved intelligent life. But it turns out we know so little we can ’t know what’s obvious. Quite likely we are aloneAre we alone in the universe? Of all the billions of stars out there, is there none around which intelligent life has arisen, no other conscious beings who have looked at their sky and asked themselves whether there was anyone else out here? All we can know is that we don ’t know of any others. But that has not stopped more or less well-informed speculation. The universe is so unthinkably enormous and old that it ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Alien life Space Science Philosophy World news Source Type: news

Upsurge in sleeping problems due to UK's longest heatwave in 40 years
People left tired, irritable and less productive at work after nights of poor shuteyeBritain ’s longest heatwave since 1976 has led to a upsurge in sleeping problems, with people left tired, irritable and less productive at work after sweaty nights of poor-quality shuteye.Record temperatures ofup to 32.4C (90.3F) have been stopping many people getting a proper rest as they struggle to get to sleep in rooms that are uncomfortably warm, experts say.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Denis Campbell and Sarah Marsh Tags: Science Health Sleep & wellbeing Weather Society UK news Source Type: news

From Ebola to Nipah: are we ready for the next epidemic? – Science Weekly podcast
The 2014 Ebola outbreak killed over 10,000 people before it was eventually brought under control. As new infectious diseases appear around the world, what can we learn from past outbreaks to better prepare ourselves?Subscribe and review onAcast,Apple Podcasts,Soundcloud,Audioboom andMixcloud. Join the discussion onFacebook andTwitterSomewhere in the world there ’s a bat, a monkey or a pig with a virus that could jump into humans and become the next major epidemic, or even pandemic. This is what happened with Ebola, a disease first detected in humans in the 1970s. When the 2014 west Africa outbreak finally ended in 20...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Ian Sample and produced by Graihagh Jackson Tags: Science Health Ebola Epidemics Society World news Source Type: news

Spacewatch: Martian rocks on Earth a step nearer as UK builds red planet rover
Airbus lands £3.9m contract from space agency to design spacecraft to bring back samples from Mars in the 2020sThe European Space Agency has awarded a £3.9m contract to Airbus, in Britain, to design a new rover, in a project with Nasa, that will visit Mars to retrieve samples for bringing back to Earth for the first time.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: European Space Agency Nasa Mars Astronomy Science Source Type: news

Neutrino that struck Antarctica traced to galaxy 3.7bn light years away
Discovery may solve 100-year-old puzzle of high-energy cosmic rays that occasionally hit EarthA mysterious, ghostly particle that slammed into Earth and lit up sensors buried deep beneath the south pole has been traced back to a distant galaxy that harbours an enormous spinning black hole.Astronomers detected the high-energyneutrino, a kind of subatomic particle, when it tore into the southern Indian Ocean near the coast of Antarctica and carried on until it struck an atomic nucleus in the Antarctic ice, sending more particles flying.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Particle physics Astronomy Science Nasa Space Antarctica Source Type: news

Ötzi’s last supper: mummified hunter's final meal revealed
Scientists say iceman ate ‘horrible-tasting’ high-fat meal of ibex before his murder 5,300 years agoÖtzi the iceman filled his belly with fat before he set out on the ill-fated hunting trip that ended with his bloody death on a glacier in the eastern Alps 5,300 years ago, scientists say.The first in-depth analysis of the hunter ’s stomach contents reveal that half of his last meal consisted of animal fat, primarily from a wild goat species known as the Alpine ibex.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Forensic science Archaeology Anthropology Diets and dieting Source Type: news

Fahrenheit 100: could this be the summer Britain wakes up to climate change? | Michael McCarthy
I hoped 2003 ’s record heatwave would make people more aware. Yet they promptly forgot all about itI don ’t know anybody who remembers 10 August 2003 and its significance, although the date has never faded from my mind. That was Britain’s hottest ever day, the day the current British air temperature record was set: it leapt from the old record of37.1C, set on 3 August 1990, to thenew figure of 38.5C.Related:This heatwave is just the start. Britain has to adapt to climate change, fast | Simon LewisContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Michael McCarthy Tags: Weather Climate change Environment Science UK news Source Type: news

Archaeologists prepare to open huge granite sarcophagus in Egypt
Untouched for millennia, tomb was found during construction work in AlexandriaArchaeologists are preparing to open a large black granite sarcophagus unearthed in the Egyptian port city ofAlexandria.At almost two metres high and three metres in length, the sarcophagus is the largest of its kind to be discovered intact in the ancient city. It was found alongside a large alabaster head believed to represent the inhabitant of the tomb, which had remained untouched for thousands of years.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ruth Michaelson Tags: Egypt Egyptology Archaeology Africa Middle East and North Africa Science World news Source Type: news

The real reason the sound of your own voice makes you cringe
Does the sound of your own voice make you want to cover your ears? You are not aloneMost of us have shuddered on hearing the sound of our own voice. In fact, not liking the sound of your own voice is so common that there ’s a term for it: voice confrontation.But why is voice confrontation so frequent, while barely a thought is given to the voices of others?Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Philip Jaekl Tags: Psychology Science Source Type: news

It ’s time to burst the biomedical bubble in UK research
A new study calls for a rebalancing of research and innovation funding to better meet the UK ’s economic, social and health needsThe political turmoil over recent days has meant that aspeech last week by Sam Gyimah, minister for universities and science, hasn ’t received the attention it deserves. Opening theSchr ödinger Building in Oxford, Gyimah set out in the most comprehensive terms yet why the government has made thebiggest increase in research spending for 40 years, and seta further ambitious target of investing 2.4% of GDP in research and development (R&D) by 2027 (up from roughly 1.7% now).Alth...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Richard Jones and James Wilsdon Tags: Science Science policy Research Research funding Higher education Politics Economic growth (GDP) Economic policy Source Type: news

Automated virtual reality therapy helps people overcome phobia of heights
Scientists hope computer programme which requires no human therapist could be used to treat other mental health problemsDaniel and Jason Freeman: Don ’t dismiss tech solutions to mental health problemsA fear of heights could be overcome with the help of a virtual therapist, new research suggests, with experts saying the findings boost hopes virtual reality could play a key role in tackling other mental health problems.According toa 2014 YouGov survey, an aversion to heights is more common in the UK than a fear of spiders, snakes, or being on a plane, with 23% of British adults “very afraid” of heights and...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Science Virtual reality Technology Mental health Psychology Artificial intelligence (AI) Computing Consciousness Society Neuroscience Source Type: news

Country diary: soft sounds of sparrow seduction
Sandy, Bedfordshire:The house sparrows are busy caring for their young, but can still find time to mate dozens of times a dayLolling in the shade under a hazel bush, I had become the inadvertent eavesdropper on a private conversation. Out of the canopy came a whispered “brrr” whirr of wings and then the soft sounds of sparrow seduction, a love song of tenderness that was scarcely imaginable from a bird known for its strident chirps.Gentle, soothing, piteous peeps drifted down, an intimate dialogue that was both charming and disarming. I caught a glimpse through the sparrows ’ bower and saw the female, mou...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Derek Niemann Tags: Birds Animal behaviour Insects Environment Rural affairs Animals Wildlife Biology UK news Science World news Source Type: news

Stone tools found in China could be oldest evidence of human life outside Africa
Discovery of simple stone tools suggests human ancestors were in Asia as early as 2.1m years agoThe remains of crudely fashioned stone tools unearthed in China suggest human ancestors were in Asia 2.1m years ago, more than 200,000 years earlier than previously thought, scientists said on Wednesday.If correctly dated, the find means that hominins – the group of humans and our extinct forefather species – left Africa earlier than archaeologists have been able to demonstrate thus far, a team reported in the scientific journal Nature.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse Tags: China Science Asia Pacific World news Source Type: news

Don't dismiss tech solutions to mental health problems
There is a desperate shortage of skilled clinicians to treat mental health disorders. Our study shows how virtual reality could fill the gapThe words “mental health” and “crisis” now appear to be yoked together. About a quarter of us willsuffer from a clinical psychological disorder over the next year, but most peoplewill receive no help at all. The question is no longer about whether we have a problem, but what we are going to do about it.We don ’t lack high-quality, evidence-based psychological treatments for many mental health problems. These treatments have beenverified by dozens of clinic...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Daniel Freeman and Jason Freeman Tags: Mental health Psychology Science Artificial intelligence (AI) Consciousness Neuroscience Computing Technology Society Virtual reality Source Type: news

Burnt out: heatwaves can lead to poor decisions and thinking, studies say
A new study by Harvard researchers found students without air conditioning showed 13% longer reaction times on testsIf you feel like having to work during a heatwave should be banned, you may have a point. A new study conducted by the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health suggests that hot weather can make your thinking 13% slower.The study, published on Tuesday in the journal PLOS Medicine, examined cognitive performance during a 2016 Boston heatwave among students who lived in buildings without air conditioning versus those who had it. Researchers found that students without air conditioning demonstrated about a 13% lo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Arwa Mahdawi Tags: Science Summer Health Source Type: news

Trial of anti-ageing drugs that rejuvenate immune system hailed a success
Most middle aged adults could benefit from a short term treatment to revitalise the immune system and organs that deteriorate with age, say researchersScientists have hailed the success of a clinical trial which found that experimental anti-ageing drugs may protect older people from potentially fatal respiratory infections by rejuvenating their immune systems.In a trial involving people aged 65 and over, those who received a combination therapy of two anti-ageing compounds reported nearly half the number of infections over the following year as a control group who received only placebos.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Layal Liverpool Tags: Science Ageing Medical research Immunology Biochemistry and molecular biology Health Source Type: news

Transatlantic tales of Morris Minors | Brief letters
Graham Kelly on football psychology | A Minor marriage | Morris Minus | Jeremy Hunt | PuffinsAlthough a respected sports scientist accompanied England manager Bobby Robson to Italia 90, the Football Association was not so attuned then to the psychology of winning matches at this level (Get your head in the game, G2, 11 July). When Robson ’s successor, Graham Taylor, recruited a sports psychologist, the chairman of the FA international committee (who also chaired a not notably successful club then) repeatedly complained: “How much is this psychiatrist costing us?”Graham KellyFA chief executive, 1988-9...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: World Cup Psychology Sport Football Science Motoring Technology Jeremy Hunt Politics UK news Source Type: news

No single birthplace of mankind, say scientists
Researchers say it is time to drop the idea that modern humans originated from a single population in a single locationThe origins of our species have long been traced to east Africa, where the world ’s oldest undisputedHomo sapiens fossils were discovered. About 300,000 years ago, the story went, a group of primitive humans there underwent a series of genetic and cultural shifts that set them on a unique evolutionary path that resulted in everyone alive today.However, a team of prominent scientists is now calling for a rewriting of this traditional narrative, based on a comprehensive survey of fossil, archaeological...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Science Anthropology Evolution Biology Source Type: news

There is a secret to saving a World Cup penalty. Here it is | Andr é Spicer
Left or right? In football, as in life, it ’s so easy to jump the wrong way. And the reason is very simpleThe referee blows his whistle, the penalty taker begins to limber up, and fans tense up. The goalkeeper has a high-stakes decision to make. Where will he jump – to his right or left, or will he stay in the middle? No matter how experienced, the keeper is likely to make a common mistake: jumping into action when doing nothing would be a better idea.An analysis of286 penalty shootouts found most keepers prefer to leap left (49.3%) or right (44.4%) instead of staying put in the centre (6.3%). However, staying ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Andr é Spicer Tags: Football World Cup Sport World Cup 2018 Psychology Science UK news World news Source Type: news

MPs want new watchdog to root out research misconduct
Proposed body would monitor universities to ensure that allegations of malpractice are properly investigatedA national watchdog that has the power to punish British universities for failing to tackle research misconduct is needed to ensure that sloppy practices and outright fraud are caught and dealt with fast, MPs say.The new body would rule on whether universities have properly investigated allegations of malpractice and have the authority to recommend research funds be withdrawn or even reclaimed when it finds that inquiries into alleged wrongdoing have fallen short.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Research Higher education Science Politics Research and development Research funding UK news Source Type: news

We need more investigations into research misconduct
Why I ’m calling for watchdog to help rid research of malpractice and fraudMPs want new watchdog to monitor misconduct by researchersLast year the Guardian reported onthe case of Paulo Macchiarini, an Italian surgeon working in Sweden, who was “hailed for turning the dream of regenerative medicine into a reality – until he was exposed as a con artist and false prophet”. The Swedish Central Ethics Review Board concluded recently that six papers should be retracted as they falsely claimed that the artificial windpipe transplants he ga ve them were much more effective than they actually were. In fact, ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Norman Lamb Tags: Research Higher education Science Medical research Politics Research and development Research funding UK news Source Type: news

There is a secret to saving a penalty. Here it is | Andr é Spicer
Left or right? In football, as in life, it ’s so easy to jump the wrong way. And the reason is very simpleThe referee blows his whistle, the penalty-taker begins to limber up, and fans tense up. The goalkeeper has a high-stakes decision to make. Where will he jump – to his right or left, or will he stay in the middle. No matter how experienced, the keeper is likely to make a common mistake: jumping into action when doing nothing would be a better idea.An analysis of286 penalty shootouts found most keepers prefer to leap left (49.3%) or right (44.4%) instead of staying put in the centre (6.3%). However, staying ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Andr é Spicer Tags: Football World Cup Sport World Cup 2018 Psychology Science UK news World news Source Type: news

What is love? You asked Google – here’s the answer
Every day millions of people ask Google life ’s most difficult questions. Our writers answer some of the commonest queriesExperts say the western ideal ofromantic love is constantly disappointing us. Which is a shame because our culture loves romantic love. It ’s an idea that pervades pop music, novels, TV and film. Somewhere out there our perfect match is waiting to meet us, so the theory goes. But maybe love isn’t really about The One. Maybe the early films ofRichard Curtis don ’t have all the answers.So what is love, actually? There are many answers to this question, says the anthropologist Anna ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alfie Packham Tags: Relationships Life and style Anthropology Science Source Type: news

MPs want new watchdog to monitor misconduct by researchers
Proposed body would monitor universities to ensure that allegations of malpractice are properly investigatedA national watchdog that has the power to punish British universities for failing to tackle research misconduct is needed to ensure that sloppy practices and outright fraud are caught and dealt with fast, MPs say.The new body would rule on whether universities have properly investigated allegations of malpractice and have the authority to recommend research funds be withdrawn or even reclaimed when it finds that inquiries into alleged wrongdoing have fallen short.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Research Higher education Science Politics Research and development Research funding UK news Source Type: news

Romans had whaling industry, archaeological excavation suggests
Ancient whale bones have been found on three Roman fish processing sites close to the Strait of GibraltarAncient bones found around the Strait of Gibraltar suggest that the Romans might have had a thriving whaling industry, researchers have claimed.The bones, dating to the first few centuries AD or earlier, belong to grey whales and North Atlantic right whales – coastal migratory species that are no longer found in European waters.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Archaeology Science Whales Cetaceans Environment Marine life Wildlife Source Type: news

Romans had whale industry, archeological excavation suggests
Ancient whale bones have been found on three Roman fish processing sites close to the Strait of GibraltarAncient bones found around the Strait of Gibraltar suggest that the Romans might have had a thriving whaling industry, researchers have claimed.The bones, dating to the first few centuries AD or earlier, belong to grey whales and North Atlantic right whales – coastal migratory species that are no longer found in European waters.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Archaeology Science Whales Cetaceans Environment Marine life Wildlife Source Type: news

Birdwatch: seasonal flow in a farewell call and dusky drapes
It ’s mid-summer yet the cuckoo’s adieu and spotted redshank’s dark plumage hint at autumnIt may be the hottest, driest, summer since 1976 but on the first day of July I said goodbye to spring and greeted the coming of autumn, within a few short hours.The farewell to spring came in the form of a calling cuckoo at the RSPB ’s flagshipHam Wall reserve in Somerset.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Stephen Moss Tags: Birds RSPB Birdwatching Rivers Animal behaviour Wildlife Autumn Summer Environment Biology UK news Arctic Source Type: news

Ancient find may be earliest extract of epic Homer poem Odyssey
Clay slab believed to date from 3rd century AD discovered near ancient city of OlympiaArchaeologists have unearthed an ancient tablet engraved with 13 verses of the Odyssey in the ancient city of Olympia, southern Greece, in what could be the earliest record ofthe epic poem, the Greek culture ministry said.Related:The Odyssey by Homer – the first stepContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: AFP in Athens Tags: Archaeology Greece Poetry Classics History books World news Europe Classics and ancient history Culture Source Type: news

Dragons return to Kew Gardens pagoda after 200-year absence
Replacements installed during £5m restoration of spectacular garden follyThe dragons are back at Kew after more than two centuries, tails curled, wings neatly furled to make them less of a wind catcher, gazing down with glittering eyes on the acres of gardens and thousands of visitors far below.The most spectacular garden folly in England, the great pagoda towers 50 metres over Kew Gardens. It was designed by Sir William Chambers in 1762 after visiting China, where his travels were restricted, but he sketched every traditional building he could see – including pagodas.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Kew Gardens London UK news Sculpture Art Art and design Heritage Culture Source Type: news

Has the tide turned towards responsible metrics in research?
A new report takes stock of how metrics are being used and abused in research management across UK universitiesIn his 2003 bestsellerMoneyball, the writer Michael Lewis describes how the fortunes of the Oakland Athletics baseball team were transformed by the rigorous use of predictive data and modelling to identify undervalued talent. These approaches soon spread through baseball and into other sports, and are now widely used in the financial sector, recruitment industry and elsewhere, to inform hiring and promotion decisions.A recent study by researchers at the MIT Sloan School of Management suggests thatuniversities are ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: James Wilsdon Tags: Science Science policy Research Research funding Higher education Source Type: news

How the psychology of the England football team could change your life
England players seem happier and more grounded – and much of the credit goes to psychologist Pippa Grange. What can the team’s approach teach us all about facing fear and failure?This week, the England midfielder Dele Alli was asked if he was nervous about the big tests up ahead: first, of course, the team ’s semi-final against Croatia on Wednesday. “Excited, not nervous,” he replied. His apparent happiness and confidence reflected an England team that seems transformed from previous incarnations. Where once it was stuffed with entitled, surly stars, burdened with the weight of history and the...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Emine Saner Tags: World Cup 2018 Psychology England Football Sport Science Health & wellbeing Life and style Source Type: news

Will criminalising misogyny be the end of the world as we know it? I hope so | Suzanne Moore
Making misogynistic behaviour a criminal offence is unworkable, but highlighting it – as a trial in the Midlands has done – will cause attitudes to shiftWe are going to have to start building more prisons. Huge ones for all the men who are going to be banged up for wolf-whistling. (God knows who is going to build them.) The knee-patters will have to be put away. The blokes who say: “Nice legs, want something between them?” when a woman walks past in the street. Sorry, men, that’s just the way it is. All these things you call flirting, “banter” or just showing appreciation will now ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Suzanne Moore Tags: Sexual harassment World news Women Life and style Ageing Science Melania Trump US news Donald Trump Source Type: news

Monsanto 'bullied scientists' and hid weedkiller cancer risk, lawyer tells court
As ill California man ’s landmark case begins, attorney attacks Roundup maker’s response to researchers’ findingsMonsanto has long worked to “bully scientists” and suppress evidence of the cancer risks of its popular weedkiller, a lawyer argued on Monday in a landmark lawsuit against the global chemical corporation.“Monsanto has specifically gone out of its way to bully ... and to fight independent researchers,” said the attorney Brent Wisner, who presented internal Monsanto emails that he said showed how the agrochemical company rejected critical research and expert warnings over ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sam Levin in San Francisco Tags: Monsanto US news California San Francisco Cancer research Medical research Science Health Business Source Type: news

'Not the same science': Longman LNP candidate on climate change – video
In a video recorded on Saturday, the Liberal National party candidate for Longman, Trevor Ruthenberg, is shown talking to members of the Australian Youth Climate Coalition, who were campaigning in Longman before the 26 July 'super Saturday' byelection. When askedif he rejects the science of climate change, Ruthenberg tells the AYCC campaigner 'your understanding of science … and my understanding of science, are not the same science'Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Australian politics Queensland Queensland politics Climate change Science Source Type: news

The Guardian view on climate change: a global heatwave | Editorial
The weather in Britain is only a small part of a global pattern and as the Arctic warms, it will make extreme events into the new, and dangerous, normalThe British are parochial about weather. It is our cherished grievance, not to be shared with foreigners. Perhaps it is the fact that our weather tends to come from the west, across the Atlantic, and not from our neighbours in Europe (unless it ’s a “beast from the east”) which reinforces the belief that our weather is a uniquely British problem. But though we cannot say definitively that the current heatwave is caused by carbon emissions, it fits the patt...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Climate change Environment Climate change scepticism Science Arctic World news Donald Trump Source Type: news

Scientists discover world's oldest colour – bright pink
Pigments found in 1.1bn-year-old rocks beneath the Sahara desert shed light on ‘major puzzle’ about early lifeScientists have discovered what they say are the world ’s oldest colours – and they are bright pink.The pigments were discovered after researchers crushed 1.1bn-year-old rocks found in a marine shale deposit, beneath the Sahara desert, in the Taoudeni basin in Mauritania, west Africa.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Luke Henriques-Gomes Tags: Science Archaeology Western Sahara Africa Mali World news Australia news Australian universities Research Source Type: news

Nightshifts disrupt rhythm between brain and gut, study shows
Blood tests on participants show profound impact work pattern has on hormonesWorking night shifts can mess up the body ’s natural rhythms so much that the brain and digestive system end up completely out of kilter with one another, scientists say. Three night shifts in a row had little impact on thebody ’s master clock in the brain, researchers found, but it played havoc with gut function, throwing the natural cycle out by a full 12 hours.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Layal Liverpool Tags: Science Medical research Work & careers wellbeing at work Sleep Health Life and style Money Work-life balance Source Type: news

Feeding your baby solids early may help them sleep, study suggests
Advice on when to introduce babies to solid food has been hotly disputed for years, but the latest research seems to indicate that earlier is betterIntroducing solid food to babies before they reach six months might offer a small improvement to their sleep, new research suggests.Researchers from the UK and US looked at data collected as part of a clinical trial exploring whether early introduction of certain foods couldreduce the chance of an infant developing an allergy to them. As part of the study the team also looked the impact on other measures, including growth and sleep.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Parents and parenting Medical research Health Science Source Type: news

Government halts vaginal mesh surgery in NHS hospitals
Suspension ordered in England to avoid further risk of ‘life-changing injuries’ to womenThe government has accepted the use of vaginal mesh implants to treat complications after childbirth should be stopped immediately to prevent further risk of “life-changing and life-threatening injuries” to women.It would effectively suspend the use of vaginal mesh implants in NHS hospitals, which would represent a major victory for campaigners. It follows an independent inquiry,ordered in February by the health secretary, Jeremy Hunt, which concluded the surgery must be stopped until steps have been taken to mit...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Tags: Vaginal mesh implants Health NHS Science Women UK news Source Type: news

I ’ve had breast cancer. But I know some screening can do more harm than good | Fay Schopen
Although there are benefits to genetic screening, it could take a great psychological toll on women who carry mutationsApproximatelyone in eight women in the UK will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime, and early screening can save lives – around 1,300 a year, according to the NHS. That’s one in every 200 women screened; all women aged between 50 and 70 are invited for a mammogram every three years.But researchers at University College London have found that women who are at lower risk of breast cancer – about a third of the population –would be better off not being screened at all. Th...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Fay Schopen Tags: Breast cancer Health Society UK news NHS Medical research Science Source Type: news

A Particle Physicist in Whitehall
Adventures on the Royal Society Policy Secondment SchemeThe Royal Society has started a Policy Secondment Scheme: placing research fellows in Governmental departments to foster communication between scientists and science policy-makers. Dr Lily Asquith is a Royal Society Dorothy Hodgkin Research Fellow based at the University of Sussex, and is one of three participants on the pilot round for this scheme. Lily ’s secondment is in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, working with the team focused on combatting Illegal Wildlife Trade (IWT). Dr Emma Hennessey is the deputy Chief Scientific Adviser, and has taken Lily und...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Lily Asquith Tags: Science Physics Royal Society Illegal wildlife trade Conservation Particle physics Source Type: news

Books to get inside your head: Tim Parks picks the smartest books about the brain
Is consciousness internal, readable, even uploadable? Does it exist in the external world? Here are some mind-bending reads that have the answersHumankind has been reflecting on consciousness from the moment thought became possible. What is this business of experiencing colour, touch, taste, sound, smell? How does it happen, and where? Is the world as we experience it? There ’s hardly a philosopher hasn’t made a contribution, or, more recently, a neuroscientist.To get your bearings in the literature, then, it ’s not a bad idea to divide the field into those who think consciousness is all internal to the b...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Tim Parks Tags: Science and nature books Culture Neuroscience Consciousness Human biology Psychology Daniel Dennett David Eagleman Source Type: news

UK fertility regulator to issue new rules on expensive IVF add-ons
Patients will have to be told when fertility treatment extras are not likely to be effectiveIVF patients will need to be told when expensive “add-ons” to fertility treatments are not likely to be effective, under new rules due to be issued to clinics later this year.The crackdown by the government ’s fertility regulator, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, comes as an increasing number of clinics are charging patients top-up fees for experimental procedures that have not been tested in clinical trials, or have been shown to make no difference.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin and Ian Sample Tags: IVF Fertility problems Health Society UK news Medical research Science Source Type: news

Starwatch: Venus in conjunction with a slender crescent moon
As dusk darkens into night next Sunday, the patient watcher will be rewarded by a sight worth waiting forSet a reminder on your phone for this one – it will be worth it. Just after sunset on Sunday 15 July, the moon and Venus will come intoconjunction, very low in the west. Although you will need a clear horizon to see, it will be a particularly beautiful sight. Only 11% of the moon will be illuminated, making it a very slender crescent indeed. The chart shows the view looking west at 21:30 BST on Sunday. The sky will still be quite bright, but brilliant Venus will cut through the late evening twilight and guide your...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: Astronomy Science The moon Venus Space Source Type: news

Memo to those seeking to live for ever: eternal life would be deathly dull | Julian Baggini
It ’s great that more of us are living to 100, but the transhumanist dream of immortality would betray what it means to be humanHow long would you like to live? One hundred no longer seems too greedy. In 1983, the Queen sent 3,000 congratulatory telegrams to centenarians. By 2016 she was sending 14,500cards. One in three children born that year are expected to make it to three figures. Should you receive the second royal card that is sent out for reaching 105,a recent study suggested that every year that followed you ’d have a 50-50 chance of surviving – better odds than an 80-year-old. If you made it to ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Julian Baggini Tags: Ageing Death and dying Philosophy Medical research Science Life and style UK news Source Type: news

Five UK scientific investments threatened by Brexit
From satellites to drugs, article 50 will be a spanner in the works of many costly projectsThe EU ’s £9bn rival to the GPS satellite navigation system developed by the US. It was commissioned in 2003 and is due for completion in 2020. The European commission has decided to block the UK from working on the system as post-EU it will be considered a “third country”. T he UK isthreatening to demand a £900m refund of contributions to the project.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Tucker Tags: Science Brexit Science funding crisis Satellites Space European Union Research funding European Space Agency Article 50 Source Type: news

Seven ways IVF changed the world – from Louise Brown to stem-cell research
The first ‘test-tube’ baby turns 40 this month, but the impact of in vitro fertilisation extends far beyond solutions to fertility problemsIt sounds rather perverse and archaic today to call a childborn by IVF a “test-tube baby”. The technique of assisted reproduction has become so widespread and normalised, more than 6 million babies down the road, that there ’s nothing so remarkable or stigmatising in having been conceived in a petri dish (“in vitro”means in glass, although test tubes were never involved). In many countries worldwide, 3-6% of allchildren are now conceived this wa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Philip Ball Tags: IVF Science Reproduction Health Fertility problems Society Pregnancy Stem cells Medical research Biology Reproductive rights Women Parents and parenting Family & wellbeing Ethics World news Source Type: news

Cats can make you laugh, cry, lose sleep – and then break your heart
She reads to them, watches TV and sleeps with them. Britt Collins on her enduring passion for catsAfter my marriage ended three years ago, my husband ’s parting words were: “You always loved the cats more than me, anyway.” It would’ve been funny if it weren’t true. Not that he didn’t share my passion for our feline family. And not that I didn’t love him. I did, deeply, though never with the ferocious intensity of the strays I’d re scued. Even as I leave behind those I’ve outgrown or fallen out of love with, the consuming affection I feel for my cats is unbreakable.Every...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Britt Collins Tags: Cats Pets Life and style Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Source Type: news

Why science breeds a culture of sexism
Late-night research, isolation and a strict, male-dominated hierarchy are the perfect conditions for sexual harassment. With colleges struggling to enforce conduct codes, what can be done?Lois, a medical researcher, endured more than five years of sexual harassment during her postgraduate study at a leading UK university. It started when she worked on a project between her MSc and PhD. The professor overseeing the research bombarded her and the other women in the group of junior researchers with crude and humiliating sexual comments.“He said I looked so sexy in overalls that he had to resist the urge to rip them off ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Batty and Nicola Davis Tags: Science Sexual harassment MeToo movement Feminism Inequality Gender Students US universities Women Discrimination at work Source Type: news