Diabetes drug leads to notable weight loss in people with obesity – study
Experts say the apparent effects of a weekly dose of tirzepatide are potentially game changingA weekly dose of a diabetes drug appears to lead to significant weight loss in people with obesity, in a development experts have hailed as gamechanging.Obesity causes 1.2 million deaths in Europe each year,according to the World Health Organization, and the UK has one of the worst obesity rates.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 5, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Medical research Obesity Science Society World news Source Type: news

Romans ventured deeper into Wales than thought, road discovery shows
Evidence uncovered in Preseli Hills in Pembrokeshire extends known reach further west across BritainThe awe-inspiring beauty of the Preseli Hills and the surrounding wild moorlands have long drawn visitors to north Pembrokeshire in Wales. Now an archaeologist has found evidence that even the Romans were drawn to the area with the discovery of an ancient road showing they travelled further west across Britain than previously thought.Dr Mark Merrony, a Roman specialist, tutor at Oxford University and “a native of Pembrokeshire”, said the road had been completely missed. “This thing is just extraordinary. I’m astonish...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 5, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Dalya Alberge Tags: Roman Britain Wales Archaeology Science UK news Source Type: news

How to make big decisions more easily
Most of us shy away from life ’s hardest decisions. But there are ways to help usPsychology professorLaurence Alison is an expert in how to make decisions, but in the early days of his career, it was all theoretical. Then one day he took a call from “someone very senior”, who described a worrying trend: police chiefs were showing themselves unable, in critical situations, to make crucial choices. “He asked, ‘Is there anything you can do to help?’”There was. Alison – a straight-talking, no-nonsense person – started to translate what he knew from textbooks and turn it into practical advice. “Academic work...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 5, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Joanna Moorhead Tags: Life and style Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Source Type: news

The great Coronapause is over, but history tells us that complacency can be a killer | Mark Honigsbaum
Just as in the flu pandemic of the 19th century, waves of infections in the US and Portugal should remind us that Covid shows no signs of going awayShortly before the first British lockdown, the Italian novelist Francesca Melandri wrotean open letter to the UK describing our soon-to-be coronavirus future. At the time, Melandri had been under lockdown in Rome for three weeks and cemeteries in Lombardy, in northern Italy, had run out of plots to bury the dead. “We are but a few steps ahead of you in the path of time, just like Wuhan was a few weeks ahead of us,” Melandri warned. “You [will] hold the same arguments we d...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 5, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Mark Honigsbaum Tags: Coronavirus Science Infectious diseases World news History of science Source Type: news

Severe Covid cases ‘more likely in highly polluted areas’
Air pollutant nitrogen dioxide may contribute to intensive care admissions, German study findsPeople who contract Covid-19 are more likely to suffer severe symptoms if they have been exposed to air pollution for long periods.A study found that people who live in places where there are high levels of the atmospheric pollutantnitrogen dioxide had higher chances of ending up in intensive care units (ICUs) or of needing mechanical ventilation after they had caught Covid.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 4, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Science Editor Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Source Type: news

Beyond our ‘ape-brained meat sacks’: can transhumanism save our species?
The 21st century will be make or break for humanity, says Oxford University transhumanist Elise Bohan. If we get it right, she thinks we might find something betterGet our weekend culture and lifestyle email andlisten to our podcastAgeing cured. Death conquered. Work ended. The human brain reverse-engineered by AI. Babies born outside of the womb. Virtual children, non-human partners. The future of humanity could be virtually unrecognisable by the end of the 21st century, according to Elise Bohan – and that’s if we get the transition right. If we get it wrong, well.“The future is wildly scary,” says the young philo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 4, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Celina Ribeiro Tags: Australian books Technology Science Philosophy books Culture Source Type: news

Julia Shaw: ‘I had so many questions about bisexuality’
The psychologist is known for her work on the criminal mind, but wrote her new book to answer her own questions about her sexualityJulia Shaw is a psychologist at University College London and part of Queer Politics at Princeton University, a thinktank engaged in the research of LGBTQ+ equality and rights. Her new book,Bi: The Hidden Culture, History and Science of Bisexuality,draws on her experiences of being bisexual and her background in the psychological sciences to explore and celebrate a sexual identity she says remains marginalised and forgotten.What led you to begin researching bisexuality andwrite this book?I was ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 4, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Laurie Clarke Tags: Psychology Sexuality LGBT rights Science Society Science and nature books Source Type: news

Let doctors use MDMA to treat veterans with PTSD and depression, former ADF boss says
Chris Barrie says he hopes common sense will prevail and the TGA will allow drug to be more readily used to treat patientsGet our free news app;get our morning email briefingThe former chief of the Australian defence force, Chris Barrie, is campaigning to remove barriers stymying doctors from using MDMA to treat veterans suffering post-traumatic stress disorder and depression, saying he hopes “common sense is going to prevail”.Late last year, the Therapeutic Goods Administrationdecided against downgrading the classification of psilocybin or MDMA as a prohibited substance to a controlled substance, a move which would ha...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 3, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Christopher Knaus Tags: Australian military Drugs Mental health Australia news Law (Australia) Australian Capital Territory (ACT) Depression Medical research Source Type: news

Fifth case of monkeypox discovered in New York City
The positive test was revealed the same day the CDC reported that there have been 21 confirmed cases across the USA fifth person has tested positive for monkeypox in New York City, local health authoritiesannounced on Thursday,saying“we are monitoring the situation and will investigate any other suspected cases”.This positive test was revealed the same day the federal Centers for Disease Control and Preventionreported that there have been a total of 21 confirmed monkeypox cases across the US in 2022.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 3, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Victoria Bekiempis Tags: Monkeypox New York Infectious diseases Science World news US news Source Type: news

‘Fexting’ like Bidens can make relationships worse, say experts
Arguing by text often raised as a problem during sessions with counsellors and psychologistsIf you ’re the first lady, then having an argument with the US president via text message (or “fexting”, as Jill Biden called it) might keep marital disputes private from the Secret Service, but relationship experts have warned it could make things worse.Biden revealed earlier this week how she and her husband, Joe,discreetly carry on arguments via text message in the White House, but according to relationship experts, arguing by text has become a problem commonly raised in couple ’s counselling in recent years.Continue read...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 3, 2022 Category: Science Authors: David Batty Tags: Relationships Jill Biden World news Social media Mobile phones Joe Biden Psychology US news Life and style Source Type: news

Emotional support pets: experts warn of animal welfare risk
Exclusive: Focus on human needs must not result in impact on animals being overlooked, say researchersTaking a pet everywhere for emotional support, from aeroplanes to the daily shop, may be all the rage, but experts have warned animal welfare is at risk of being overlooked.The use of emotional support animals has boomed in recent years, with myriad cases hitting the headlines,from the peacock denied a seat on a United Airlines plane, to thecat banned from Sainsbury ’s.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 3, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Animal welfare World news Animals Pets Life and style Science Society Air transport Mental health Source Type: news

The week in wildlife – in pictures
The best of this week ’s wildlife pictures, including a rock goby, a fox-chasing crow and a frolicking Icelandic horseContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 3, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Pejman Faratin Tags: Wildlife Animals Zoology World news Environment Photography Biology Source Type: news

Keep talking, try toys and trust yourself: how to have fantastic sex in old age
Just because you ’re getting on a bit, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be getting some. You just might have to work on a few things. Couples and experts reveal the secret to later-life sexMidlife and beyond is a good time for re-evaluation, and it ’s especially true for your sex life. Do you wish you had one? Do you still like it when your partner does that? Do you still like … your partner?“In therapy it’s not unusual to come across couples where the sexual relationship has gone off the boil completely for years, for various reasons,” saysAmmanda Major, head of service quality and clinical practice atRelate. ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 3, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Emine Saner Tags: Sex Older people Relationships Health & wellbeing Life and style Society Ageing Psychology Source Type: news

Women in UK ‘seldom’ told drug used in surgery can impede contraception
Study at NHS trust finds no patients were informed of risk of unplanned pregnancy from sugammadexWomen undergoing NHS operations are not being routinely informed that a drug commonly used in anaesthesia may make their contraception less effective, putting them at risk of an unplanned pregnancy, doctors have warned.Administered at the end of surgery before patients wake up, sugammadex reverses the action of drugs that are given earlier in the procedure to relax the patient ’s muscles. The drug is known to interact with the hormone progesterone and may reduce the effectiveness of hormonal contraceptives, including the prog...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 2, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Gregory Health editor Tags: Women's health Contraception and family planning Medical research NHS Drugs UK news Pregnancy Science Source Type: news

More skin infection, less heart disease: study reveals how being tall affects health
Study of 250,000 people sought to remove confounding factors such as socioeconomic statusTaller people have an increased risk ofperipheral neuropathy, as well as skin and bone infections, but a lower risk of heart disease, high blood pressure and high cholesterol, according to the world ’s largest study of height and disease.A person ’s height raises and reduces their risk of a variety of diseases, according to the research led by Sridharan Raghavan of the Rocky Mountain Regional VA Medical Center in the US. The findings arepublished in the journal PLOS Genetics.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 2, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Gregory Health editor Tags: Genetics Health Biology Heart disease Science World news Source Type: news