Dr Suzie Sheehy: ‘The eureka moment may come once in your career, or never’
The Australian physicist on why research is an investment, forgotten female scientists, and the impact of the Ukraine war on scienceBorn in Australia in 1984, Dr Suzie Sheehy is an accelerator physicist who runs research groups at the universities of Oxford and Melbourne, where she is developing new particle accelerators for applications in medicine. As a science communicator, she received the Lord Kelvin award in 2010 for presenting science to school and public audiences. Her first book isThe Matter of Everything: Twelve Experiments that Changed Our World.How did you first become interested in physics?At university [in Me...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 16, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Killian Fox Tags: Particle physics Science and nature books Cern Higgs boson Large Hadron Collider Culture Source Type: news

After my sister died I didn ’t know what to do with my furious pain – but poets and horses led the way
I was heartbroken and angry but horse riding and medieval poetry revealed the quest I was onThis April, I will be older than my elder sister Nell. She died of cancer in December 2019. She was 46 when she died, two years older than me. This year I will be 47. Nell will always be 46. Writing “Nell died” still disturbs me as it did in the months after her death. She was my older sister. She wasn’t supposed to die. As little girls we learned to talk lying in beds beside one another. We sat in the same bath water, shared the same toothbrush, wore the same knickers, fought over the sa me toys.Her prognosis had been good. D...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 16, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Clover Stroud Tags: Bereavement Society Life and style Horses Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Books Culture Source Type: news

How archery was vital to the survival of early humans
Remains found in the Rh ône Valley, dating back 54,000 years, are earliest discovered outside AfricaIt is a weapon whose effectiveness was overtaken centuries ago by the gun and rifle. Yet the bow and arrow may deserve a prize place in the history of our species, say scientists. They believe archery could have been critical toHomosapiens’ conquest of the planet, helping modern humans emerge from their African homeland tens of thousands of years ago.Early archers would have been able to kill their prey at a considerable distance while at the same time giving their diets a protein boost without endangering themselves, say...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 16, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Science Editor Tags: Archaeology Science France Society Neanderthals Europe World news Source Type: news

Clinical trials: how taking the pills may pay those bills
Volunteering to test new treatments can net up to £7,000 – enough to help offset the cost of living riseFancy a relaxing two-week getaway where you get your travel expenses paid, plus your own en suite room with all mod cons including a TV, PlayStation games console and free wifi? What ’s more, it won’t cost you anything – in fact, they are so keen for you to come that you’ll be paid £4,200.If that sounds appealing, then you might want to think about booking a stay atFluCamp. However, as the name suggests, there ’s a catch to this “holiday”: FluCamp runs residential clinical trials in the UK to test poten...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 16, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Rupert Jones Tags: Money Medical research Consumer affairs Pharmaceuticals industry Business Science UK news Source Type: news

Space mice may offer clues to why astronauts get kidney stones
Test subjects from International Space Station may shed light on link between space travel and high incidence of painful conditionWhen astronauts travel into space they can expect some extraordinary new experiences. But they may also face a more mundane and potentially mission-ending one: kidney stones.According to Nasa, kidney stones have been reportedmore than 30 times by astronauts upon returning to earth. Now researchers are beginning to unpick why space travel is linked to the painful condition.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 15, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Space Kidney stones Animals UK news Medical research International Space Station Science Source Type: news

If we can farm metal from plants, what else can we learn from life on Earth? | James Bridle
There is so much intelligence on this planet other than ours. Realising that will be key to adapting to climate breakdownFor the past couple of years, I ’ve been working with researchers in northern Greece who are farming metal. In a remote, beautiful field, high in the Pindus mountains in Epirus, they are experimenting with a trio of shrubs known to scientists as “hyperaccumulators”: plants which have evolved the capacity to thrive in natural ly metal-rich soils that are toxic to most other kinds of life. They do this by drawing the metal out of the ground and storing it in their leaves and stems, where it can be ha...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 15, 2022 Category: Science Authors: James Bridle Tags: Plants Wildlife Animals World news Environment Science Biology Climate crisis Source Type: news

Paella that is out of this world: Spain ’s top chefs take space food to next level
Michelin-starred chefs see opportunities and creative challenge in catering for commercial space travelWhen a trio of paying customers and their astronaut chaperone were blasted off to the International Space Station, their voyage was touted as a milestone for the commercialisation of spaceflight.For the Michelin-starred Spanish chef Jos é Andrés, however, therecently departed mission ushered in another – albeit more niche – breakthrough: the first time paella was sent into orbit.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 15, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Ashifa Kassam Tags: Spain Food Space Nasa Europe Science Source Type: news

TV tonight: watch out dinosaurs, that big asteroid is coming – and so is David Attenborough
The most soothing voice on the box tells an apocalyptic tale in Dinosaurs: The Final Day. Plus: a killer on the loose in Grantchester. Here ’s what to watch this eveningContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 15, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Ammar Kalia, Hannah Verdier, Graeme Virtue, Ali Catterall and Simon Wardell Tags: Television & radio Culture Dinosaurs Fossils Biology Source Type: news

‘Extraordinary’: ancient tombs and statues unearthed beneath Notre Dame Cathedral
Archaeological dig also finds body-shaped lead sarcophagus buried at the heart of the fire-ravaged monumentAn archaeological dig under Notre Dame Cathedral has uncovered an extraordinary treasure of statues, sculptures, tombs and pieces of an original rood screen dating back to the 13th century.The find included several ancient tombs from the middle ages anda body-shaped lead sarcophagus buried at the heart of the fire-ravaged monument under the floor of the transept crossing.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 14, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Kim Willsher in Paris Tags: Notre Dame Paris Archaeology France Europe Science World news Source Type: news

Valneva approved to be UK ’s sixth Covid vaccine
Medicines regulator says it is first in world to approve Valneva productA Covid-19 vaccine developed by the French pharmaceutical company Valneva has been given regulatory approval by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, bringing the total number of jabs approved for use in the UK to six.As the Covid pandemic swept the world, scientists began developing vaccines against it, with the Pfizer/BioNTech jab being the first in the UK tobe authorised for emergency use by the MHRA in 2020. Since then the MHRA has approved the Moderna, Oxford/AstraZeneca, Janssen and Novavax vaccines, although, according to NHS ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 14, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Coronavirus UK news Vaccines and immunisation Health Pharmaceuticals industry Science Society Infectious diseases Source Type: news

Does China need to rethink its zero-Covid policy? – podcast
To slow down a surge in Covid cases, last week Chinese authorities put Shanghai into lockdown. But with a population of 26 million there have been difficulties providing residents with basic necessities, and videos have appeared on social media showing protests and scrambles over food supplies. Now, authorities plan to start easing the lockdown in some areas on Monday, despite reporting a record of more than 25,000 new Covid cases.Madeleine Finlay talks to the Guardian ’s China affairs correspondent,Vincent Ni, about what ’s been happening in Shanghai, whether the Omicron variant may spell the end of China’s zero-Cov...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 14, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Presented and produced by Madeleine Finlay with Vincent Ni, additional production by Anand Jagatia, sound design by Tony Onuchukwu, and the executive producer was Max Sanderson Tags: Science Coronavirus China Infectious diseases Source Type: news

‘Historic’: global climate plans can now keep heating below 2C, study shows
But goal of limiting global heating to 1.5C will fail without immediate action, scientists warnFor the first time the world is in a position to limit global heating to under 2C, according to the first in-depth analysis of the net zero pledges made by nations at the UN Cop26 climate summit in December.Before these pledges it was more than likely that at the peak of the climate crisis there would be atemperature rise above 2C, bringing more severe impacts for billions of people. Now it is more likely that the peak temperature rise will be about 1.9C.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 13, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Climate crisis Greenhouse gas emissions Cop26 Environment World news Science Fossil fuels Renewable energy Source Type: news

Microfossils may be evidence life began ‘very quickly’ after Earth formed
Scientists believe specimen shows life existed earlier than is widely assumed – increasing chances of life elsewhereScientists believe they have found evidence of microbes that were thriving near hydrothermal vents on Earth ’s surface just 300m years after the planet formed – the strongest evidence yet that life began far earlier than is widely assumed.If confirmed, it would suggest the conditions necessary for the emergence of life are relatively basic.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 13, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Science correspondent Tags: Fossils Evolution Science Source Type: news

Young and depressed? Try Woebot! The rise of mental health chatbots in the US
Schools are encouraging students to use mental health chatbots to address a surge in depression and anxiety. Critics worry they ’re a Band-Aid solution unsupported by evidenceFifteen-year-old Jordyne Lewis was stressed out.The high school sophomore from Harrisburg, North Carolina, was overwhelmed with schoolwork, never mind the uncertainty of living in a pandemic that has dragged on for two long years. Despite the challenges, she never turned to her school counselor or sought out a therapist.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 13, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Mark Keierleber Tags: Psychology Young people Mental health Technology US news Source Type: news

iPhone maker Pegatron halts Shanghai production due to Covid lockdown
Operations stopped in Chinese cities of Shanghai and Kunshan as global supply chains feel pinch of Beijing's zero-Covid measuresKey iPhone maker Pegatron has halted operations at two subsidiaries in the Chinese cities of Shanghai and Kunshan, as global supply chains feel the pinch of Beijing ’s strict zero-Covid measures.The business hub of Shanghai has become the heart of China ’s biggest Covid-19 outbreak since the virus surfaced more than two years ago.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 13, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse Tags: China Coronavirus Asia Pacific World news Infectious diseases Science Apple Technology Source Type: news