Cynics masquerade as wise, but they ’re doing everyone a disservice | Torsten Bell
Their world-weary attitude deceives others into believing they ’re better at their jobs than they areBeing cynical about other people ’s motivations – assuming that everyone acts only out of self-interest – is all the rage these days. But, let’s be honest, people who are universally cynical are also tiresome and dull. No one wants a colleague, let alone a friend, who can’t really trust you because they think everyone’s out for themselves.Excellent ammunition for tackling this epidemic of cynicism comes via greatnew research that examines the perceived and actual competence of people who are more or less cynic...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 8, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Torsten Bell Tags: Work & careers Psychology Society Source Type: news

Preventable by Devi Sridhar review – inside the fog of war on Covid
A survey of the global response to coronavirus draws together fascinating data but fails to construct a compelling narrative about the spread of the virusAt the end of her wide-ranging analysis of the pandemic, Devi Sridhar, professor of global public health at the University of Edinburgh,Guardian columnist andGood Morning Britain contributor, raises the dark question of whether Covid-19 will “be the spark for the third world war”.Written before Russia ’s invasion of Ukraine, Sridhar’s book is the story of a global crisis that has since been supplanted, at least in the headlines, by another global crisis. This is t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 8, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Anthony Tags: History books Coronavirus Culture Infectious diseases Science Source Type: news

Sweden? Japan? UK? Debates over who had a ‘good’ Covid won’t end | Francois Balloux
The WHO has spoken but even its huge new report will not settle arguments about pandemic strategiesNational Covid death rates are, inevitably, political. How could they not be when they are viewed as evidence for good or bad government on matters of life or death? How did the UK fare compared with, say, Germany? Should both countries have been more like Sweden? However, when new data arrives, far from settling arguments over which pandemic mitigation strategies worked best, it tends to further inflame disagreements or harden pre-existing positions.So it is with themuch-anticipated report by the World Health Organization (W...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 8, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Francois Balloux Tags: Coronavirus Science Health Infectious diseases World news Source Type: news

Morgan Levine: ‘Only 10-30% of our lifespan is estimated to be due to genetics’
The Yale scientist explains her research into biological and chronological age – and why she’s joined a $3bn startup funded by the likes of Jeff BezosIt can be said we have two ages: a fixed chronological age based on when we were born and a malleable biological age – the age at which our body is functioning, which can be affected by our lifestyle choices. Dr Morgan Levine designs tools that measure the latter. In her new book,True Age, she argues that we should regularly measure our own biological age – giving us information we could use to monitor, and even gain control over, our own individual ageing process. Le...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 7, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Zo ë Corbyn Tags: Ageing Science Genetics Biology Science and nature books Source Type: news

Vaccine to stop Covid transmission should now be top priority, says leading UK scientist
Oxford University ’s Sir John Bell says sharp fall in death rate due to existing vaccines allows for a change in prioritiesIt is questionable how much longer current Covid-19 vaccines will be used as they have largely done their job in preventing mass deaths, and scientists should focus on developing a vaccine that stops transmission of the virus, according to leading scientist Sir John Bell.The huge success of Covid vaccines in countries able to get them has led tosharp declines in deaths and severe disease from the virus, even though the latest Covid variant, Omicron, has spread rapidly.Continue reading... (Source: Gua...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 7, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Julia Kollewe Tags: Pharmaceuticals industry Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus Health Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science UK news Business Source Type: news

Sir John Bell: ‘Most people who have had the Covid vaccine are completely safe’
The renowned immunologist remains as upbeat about jabs – and UK life science – as he was in the depths of the pandemicSir John Bell, the Canadian immunologist, is a familiar sight to locals along the stretch of the Thames near his home in Wallingford, just outside Oxford, where he and his wife can often be seen rowing in a double scull.During the pandemic, Bell ’s voice became familiar to millions of radio listeners too. As news broke that a viable Covid-19 vaccine was on its way, following successful trials by Pfizer and BioNTech, Bell was asked on BBC Radio 4 whether the world would now return to normal. His respon...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 7, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Julia Kollewe Tags: Biotechnology industry Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Business Health Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Society UK news Source Type: news

Anxiety can be good for you
It ’s never going to be fun, but it can be healthy – and facing up to it is always better than hidingDr Tracy Dennis-Tiwary was a professor of psychology, immersed in research – evaluating which mental health treatments worked and why – when she first became aware of an uptick in anxiety. This was some 15 years ago in New York City. ‘I work closely with practising clinicians and I remember one of them saying, ‘I’m seeing all these parents and kids coming in and they’re talking about anxiety the way we used to talk about stress,’’ she says. ‘Everything is about anxiety.’Back then, Dennis-Tiwary belie...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 7, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Kate Smith Tags: Anxiety Life and style Society Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Source Type: news

Climate hunger striker expresses shock at being ignored by ministers
Angus Rose starved himself for more than five weeks outside parliament until Green MP Caroline Lucas arranged compromiseThe climate hunger striker who starved himself for more than five weeks outside parliament has said he did not expect ministers would ignore his demands and potentially let him die.Angus Rose had said he would not eat until Greg Hands, the energy minister, arranged for Sir Patrick Vallance, the chief scientist, to give politicians and, via broadcast, the public, the climate change briefing he gave to Boris Johnson before the Cop26 climate summit.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 7, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Damien Gayle Tags: Climate crisis Environment Politics UK news Patrick Vallance Science Source Type: news

Studies on nature ’s mental health benefits show ‘massive’ western bias
Research focuses on rich, white populations, while indigenous peoples may have different views of natureSpending time in the great outdoors is good for your mental health, according to agrowing body of research. For example, getting out and about in forests and parks has been shown to increase happiness and alleviate symptoms of depression and anxiety. But are the benefits universal?Areview paper notes that most studies in this field look at rich, white, western populations, and scientists say this results in an incomplete picture of the health benefits.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 6, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Sofia Quaglia Tags: Indigenous peoples Science Environment World news Source Type: news

Man who received landmark pig heart transplant died of pig virus, surgeon says
David Bennett died two months after groundbreaking surgery in which a genetically modified pig ’s heart was transplanted into himThe 57-year-old patient who survived two months after undergoing a landmarkpig heart transplantdied of a pig virus, his transplant surgeon announced last month.In January, David Bennett, a handyman who suffered from heart failure, underwent a highly experimental surgery at the University of Maryland medical center in which doctors transplanted a genetically modified pig ’s heart into him.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 6, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Maya Yang Tags: Maryland US news Medical research Source Type: news

Eta Aquariids meteor shower 2022: how and when to watch it in Australia
With optimal viewing conditions this year, the annual event is set to peak on 7 May with viewing opportunities until 11 MayGet our free news app;get our morning email briefingStar gazers across Australia are in for a treat in the early hours of Saturday with the Eta Aquariid – one of the best meteor showers in the southern hemisphere – due to optimal viewing conditions.Named after Eta Aquarii, the brightest star in the Aquarius constellation, the annual meteor show is famed for its connection to Halley ’s comet.Sign up to receive an email with the top stories from Guardian Australia every morningContinue reading... (...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 6, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Stephanie Tran Tags: Australia news Astronomy Space Meteors Science Source Type: news

Vegan diet can help overweight people shed pounds, study shows
Eating vegan for 12 weeks also led to lower blood sugar levels in overweight people or with type 2 diabetesVegan diets can help people who are overweight or have type 2 diabetes lose weight and lower their blood sugar levels, research suggests.A meta analysis showed that adhering to a vegan diet over three months reduced body weight by about 4.1kg (9lb) on average compared with control diets, and cut blood sugar levels. There was little or no effect on blood pressure or levels of cholesterol or triglycerides, a type of fat.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 5, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Gregory Health editor Tags: Obesity Veganism Diabetes Diets and dieting Medical research Science Health Society Source Type: news

‘Medical tourists’ are travelling the world in search of the elixir of life | Peter Ward
There have always been charlatans offering a cure for ageing, and cheap travel and lax laws have made it even easier for themEvery year millions of people cross borders to undergo medical treatments that are either unavailable in their home country or too expensive. For many, this is a last resort to ease the pain of a debilitating disease or defy a terminal diagnosis; for others the goals are purely cosmetic. But in the past few years a new type of “medical tourist” has emerged: those seeking to radically extend their lives.There are more older people than ever before – and more people in search of longevity. In the...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 5, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Peter Ward Tags: Ageing Science Medical research Pharmaceuticals industry Stem cells Biology Health Healthcare industry Business Society Source Type: news

Treatment for finger-bending disease may be ‘gamechanger’
Clinical trial seems to show Dupuytren ’s disease reversed by rheumatoid arthritis drugResearchers have hailed a breakthrough in the treatment of a common, incurable disease that causes hand deformities by bending the fingers firmly into the palm.A clinical trial at Oxford and Edinburgh Universities found that a drug used for rheumatoid arthritis appeared to drive Dupuytren ’s disease into reverse when used early on, a result described as a potential “gamechanger” for patients.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 5, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Medical research Health Science UK news Source Type: news

Are nasal sprays the answer to stopping Covid transmission?
With the virus rampant despite jabs, trials are underway to create intranasal vaccines to block infections from the bodyThe roaring success of Covid vaccines – in countries able to obtain them – has led to deaths and severe disease from the infection plummeting even as the virus evolved to sidestep immunity and rip through populations more swiftly.But while the rapid development of Covid shots ranks as the finest achievement of the pandemic, scientists are not done yet. In a small number of labs around the world, teams are taking on a problem that cannot be ignored: that the virus remains rampant in the face of mass im...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 5, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus Health Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Society Science World news Source Type: news