Plantwatch: the plants that kill their insect pollinators
Jack-in-the-pulpit plants lure in gnats, cover them in pollen and trap them. As they struggle to escape they pollenate female flowersThere are two plant species with the most brutal flowers in the world, which deliberately kill their insect pollinators. The flowers of jack-in the pulpit,Arisaema angustatum, and its close relativeArisaema peninsulae are hidden inside a bowl-shaped wrapper with a narrow entrance, with a tall hood standing above. The floral dungeon lures in male fungus gnats, possibly by imitating the sexy scent of female gnats to fool the males into finding a mate.When the plants are small they only develop ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 18, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Paul Simons Tags: Science Environment Source Type: news

NSW announces new inquiry into Kathleen Folbigg ’s conviction over her children’s deaths
Scientists had called for Folbigg ’s release after it was discovered two daughters had a genetic variant that can cause sudden deathFollow our Australia news live blog for the latest updatesGet our free news app;get our morning email briefingTheNew South Wales attorney general has ordered a second public inquiry into the conviction of the woman dubbed “Australia’s worst female serial killer”, amid claims that new scientific evidence could clear Kathleen Folbigg over the deaths of her four children.On Wednesday the NSW attorney general, Mark Speakman, announced the inquiry would consider whether there was “questio...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 18, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Michael McGowan Tags: New South Wales New South Wales politics Crime - Australia Australia news Science Genetics Source Type: news

Contact lens that can release drug could be used to treat glaucoma
Invention can deliver medication after detecting pressure in the eye from fluid buildup, scientists sayA contact lens that can release a drug if it detects high pressure within the eye has been created by scientists who say it could help treat glaucoma.Glaucoma is an eye disease that involves damage to the optic nerve, and can lead to blindness if not treated.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 17, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Medical research Blindness and visual impairment Health Science Society World news Source Type: news

How to trick your brain into better eating habits
Ditching the cutlery, scoffing a big first bite and discussing the carrots can help rewire our brains and make us more mindful of our mealsBefore diving in at a dinner party, my friend Lizzie always makes a point of asking the host to describe each dish they ’ve made. It’s a way of acknowledging their efforts – but, according to food psychology, she could also be helping herself and her fellow diners eat better by making them more mindful of their meal.Charles Spence is a professor of experimental psychology at Oxford University, who researches the factors that influence what we choose to eat and what we think about ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 17, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Clare Finney Tags: Psychology Food Health & wellbeing Food science Social trends Life and style Society Source Type: news

Women almost twice as likely to be trapped in crashed vehicle, study finds
Exclusive: Calls to improve car design and safety as females also found to have different injury patterns to menWomen are almost twice as likely as men to become trapped in a motor vehicle after a crash and they also sustain different patterns of injury, data suggests.The research – the first large UK study to compare sex differences in injury patterns and the likelihood of becoming trapped after a collision – could help vehicle manufacturers improve car design and safety features to reduce rates of injury in both sexes. It also strengthens calls for the inclusion of more biologically accurate crash test dummies in sim...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 17, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Science correspondent Tags: Gender Road transport Women Society UK news World news Source Type: news

Achoo! The hay fever season lasts longer than ever. Here ’s what we can do about it | Kate Ravilious
The climate crisis is giving trees a bigger window to spread their pollen, but cleaner air and better early warning forecasts can help protect usIf you have sneezed your way through the last few days, you are not alone. About aquarter of the UK population are thought to suffer from hay fever, with numbers continuing to grow. And thelatest researchsuggests that the climate crisis is going to make the hay fever season a whole lot longer and more intense, with up to three times as much pollen wafting around by the end of the century. Hold on to your antihistamines.For people with lung conditions such as asthma or chronic obst...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 17, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Kate Ravilious Tags: Hay fever Climate crisis Environment Allergies Society Source Type: news

Osteoporosis patients should not be afraid to exercise regularly, say experts
UK ’s first exercise guidance on bone disease affecting 3m in Britain encourages people to move moreMillions of people with osteoporosis should not be afraid to exercise regularly, experts have said in guidance aimed at boosting bone health, cutting the risk of falls and improving posture.The condition, which weakens bones and makes them more likely to break, affects more than 3 million people in the UK and more than 150 million worldwide.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 17, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Gregory health editor Tags: Osteoporosis Society Health NHS Medical research Science Source Type: news

Who owns Einstein? The battle for the world ’s most famous face
Thanks to a savvy California lawyer, Albert Einstein has earned far more posthumously than he ever did in his lifetime. But is that what the great scientist would have wanted?In July 2003, the physicist and Pulitzer-prize-nominated author Dr Tony Rothman received an email from his editor bearing unwelcome news. Rothman ’s new book was weeks from publication. An affable debunking of widely misunderstood stories from the history of science, the title, Everything’s Relative, was a playful nod to Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity. Rothman had asked his publisher, Wiley, to put a picture of history’s most famous sc...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 17, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Simon Parkin Tags: Advertising Albert Einstein Media Business Source Type: news

Is the world keeping Cop26 ’s climate promises?
Last November in Glasgow, countries agreed to limit the global temperature rise to 1.5C above pre-industrial averages. Six months on, the world has changed, with the war in Ukraine, high energy prices and the cost of living crisis threatening to derail us from achieving our climate goals. Ian Sample speaks to the Guardian ’s environment correspondent, Fiona Harvey, about what promises are still on the table and what else needs to be done to address the climate emergency as we approach the next conference, Cop27.Archive: Channel 4 News, Deutsche Welle, PBS News, 9 News Australia, ABC News, Euronews, COP26Continue reading....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 17, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Ian Sample with Fiona Harvey, produced by Madeleine Finlay, sound design by Rudi Zygadlo, and the executive producer was Isabelle Roughol Tags: Science Environment Climate crisis Cop26 Cop27 Source Type: news

Infertile men may be twice as likely to develop breast cancer, study suggests
Researchers find link between fertility issues and cancer risk, but say biological reason unclearInfertile men may be twice as likely to develop breast cancer than those without fertility issues, according to one of the largest ever studies of the disease.Breast cancer in males is less common than in females and its relation to infertility had previously been investigated only in small studies. The new research was published in the journal Breast Cancer Research.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 17, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Gregory Health editor Tags: Breast cancer Fertility problems Men Science Health Medical research Society UK news Source Type: news

New US lab to create versions of atoms never recorded on Earth
By studying isotopes scientists hope to gain insight into how elements within exploding stars came to beFrom carbon to uranium, oxygen to iron, chemical elements are the building blocks of the world around us and the wider universe. Now, physicists are hoping to gain an unprecedented glimpse into their origins, with the opening of a new facility that will create thousands of peculiar and unstable versions of atoms never before recorded on Earth.By studying these versions, known as isotopes, they hope to gain new insights into the reactions that created theelements within exploding stars, as well as testing theories about t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 16, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Science correspondent Tags: Particle physics Science Astronomy Space Source Type: news

Did you solve it? The funniest jokes in maths
The answers to today ’s rib-tickling riddlesEarlier today I set you the puzzles below, chosen by Irish mathematician Des MacHale, a prolific writer of joke and puzzle books. You can readsome of his jokes here.The puzzles were a mixture of word, number and lateral thinking puzzles. They all give some ‘haha’ with the ‘aha!’.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 16, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Education Science Source Type: news

E-cigarettes ‘as safe as nicotine patches’ for pregnant smokers trying to quit
Pregnant smokers were more likely to quit when using e-cigarettes than patches after four weeks, study showsE-cigarettes are as safe to use as nicotine patches for pregnant smokers trying to quit, and may be a more effective tool, researchers have revealed.Smoking in pregnancy can increase the risk of outcomes including premature birth, miscarriage and the baby having a low birth weight. But stubbing out the habit can be a struggle.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 16, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: E-cigarettes UK news Smoking Society Science Health Pregnancy Source Type: news

We need a definitive exit from our Covid-19 pandemic. Here ’s the roadmap | Eric Topol
Nasal or oral vaccines, more and better drugs, and a variant-proof coronavirus vaccine could catalyze a clear way outAs the virus accelerates its evolution, the humans capitulate. For two and a half years, Covid-19 has been outrunning our response, getting more and more transmissible, reaching a level of infectiousness that few pathogens have ever attained. Instead of taking a stance of getting ahead of the virus, and outsmarting it, people have succumbed.In recent months, we experienced a striking jump in transmissibility when the Omicron (BA.1) variant became dominant, with at least a threefold increase in reproductive n...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 16, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Eric Topol Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation US news World news Health Society Science Infectious diseases Source Type: news

Super flower blood moon – in pictures
Dramatic total lunar eclipse coincided with a super moon, when the moon is at its closest point to Earth and reflects a red and orange lightContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 16, 2022 Category: Science Tags: The moon Photography World news Space Science Source Type: news