Did you solve it? Are you smart enough to work for Elon Musk?
The answers to today ’s planetary perplexitiesEarlier todayI set you the following problem, which was Elon Musk ’s favourite interview question for engineers applying to work at SpaceX (according to his biographer Ashlee Vance).You ’re standing on the surface of the Earth. You walk one mile south, one mile west and one mile north. You end up exactly where you started. Where are you?Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 27, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Education Science Source Type: news

Possible link between blood clots and Covid symptoms investigated
UK studies will look into whether blood thinners may help people who have ongoing symptomsA possible link between blood clots and ongoing symptoms of Covid is under scrutiny by researchers in the UK.While Covid can cause a period of acute illness, it can also lead to longer-term problems. Research has suggestedfewer than a third of patients who have ongoing Covid symptoms after being hospitalised with the disease feel fully recovered a year later.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 27, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Long Covid Coronavirus Medical research Health Science UK news World news Source Type: news

‘You get goosebumps from the data’: hopes rise for new malaria vaccine
The disease is a leading killer of under fives across Africa. But trials for a new vaccine suggest an end to the death toll could be in sightWhen Annah Kadhenghi had her first child last year, she named him Brighton Ushindi Baraka:baraka meaning “blessing” in Swahili,ushindi meaning victory. Last month, at the age of seven months, Brighton fought his first battle against an enemy that plagues millions of the world ’s poorest: malaria.“His temperature was very high; he was vomiting. I took him to the hospital,” says Kadhenghi, a schoolteacher in Kilifi, eastern Kenya. Brighton defeated the mosquito-borne disease, ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 27, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Lizzy Davies in Kilifi. Photography by Luis Tato for the Guardian Tags: Malaria Global development Kenya Africa World news Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Health Medical research Source Type: news

Can you solve it? Are you smart enough to work for Elon Musk?
The favourite interview question of the world ’s richest manIn the early years of rocket company SpaceX, CEO Elon Musk liked to set job applicants the following problem:You ’re standing on the surface of the Earth. You walk one mile south, one mile west and one mile north. You end up exactly where you started. Where are you?Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 27, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Education Science Elon Musk Source Type: news

Viruses survive in fresh water by ‘hitchhiking’ on plastic, study finds
Intestinal viruses such as rotavirus were found to be infectious for up to three days by attaching to microplastics, research showsDangerous viruses can remain infectious for up to three days in fresh water by hitchhiking on plastic, researchers have found.Enteric viruses that cause diarrhoea and stomach upsets, such as rotavirus, were found to survive in water by attaching to microplastics, tiny particles less than 5mm long. They remain infectious, University of Stirling researchers found, posing a potential health risk.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 27, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Karen McVeigh Tags: Plastics Environment Health Oceans Pollution Society Biology Science Microbiology Source Type: news

Starwatch: Libra is visible all evening but wait until midnight to do it justice
Often depicted as a set of scales, the zodiacal constellation is worth seeing in context between Virgo and ScorpiusThis week you can track down one of the fainter zodiacal constellations. Libra, the scales, is located in the southern celestial hemisphere, and so never rises that high in northern skies, but it is most visible from the northern hemisphere at this time of year.The chart shows the view looking south-west at midnight tonight. Although Libra will be visible all evening, it is worth waiting until midnight to see it in the correct context. It sits between the zodiacal constellations of Virgo, the virgin, to the we...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 27, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: Astronomy Space Science Source Type: news

Gold miner in Canada finds mummified 35,000-year-old baby woolly mammoth
Discovery in the Klondike ranks as the most complete mummified mammal found in the AmericasIt was a young miner, digging through the northern Canadian permafrost in the seemingly aptly named Eureka Creek, who sounded the alarm when his front-end loader struck something unexpected in the Klondike gold fields.What he had stumbled upon would later be described by the territory ’s palaeontologist as “one of the most incredible mummified ice age animals ever discovered in the world”: a stunningly preserved carcass of a baby woolly mammoth thought to be more than 35,000 years old.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 26, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Ashifa Kassam Tags: Canada World news Archaeology Science Americas Source Type: news

Gold miner in Canada finds mummified 35,000-year-old woolly mammoth
Discovery in the Klondike ranks as the most complete mummified mammal found in the AmericasIt was a young miner, digging through the northern Canadian permafrost in the seemingly aptly named Eureka Creek, who sounded the alarm when his front-end loader struck something unexpected in the Klondike gold fields.What he had stumbled upon would later be described by the territory ’s palaeontologist as “one of the most incredible mummified ice age animals ever discovered in the world”: a stunningly preserved carcass of a baby woolly mammoth thought to be more than 35,000 years old.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 26, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Ashifa Kassam Tags: Canada World news Archaeology Science Americas Source Type: news

Frogs that lay eggs on land – new genus named after WA teacher whose lab was a campervan
Anstisia biological group named after Marion Antsis, who wrote an acclaimed book on amphibians after retiring as a music teacherFollow our Australia news live blog for the latest updatesGet our free news app;get our morning email briefingFour frog species in Western Australia that lay their eggs on land have been identified as a new genus and named after a retired high school music teacher-turned-scientist.Researchers have classified the frogs into the distinct biological groupAnstisia. Their tadpoles develop entirely on land and never contact the water of a creek or pond before becoming adults. Instead, they swim around i...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 26, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Donna Lu Tags: Western Australia Amphibians Wildlife Environment Australia news Science Zoology Biology Endangered species Endangered habitats Animals Conservation Source Type: news

Can our mitochondria help to beat long Covid?
Mitochondria are the body ’s power plants, fuelling our cells. New research shows they play a role in many aspects of keeping us healthy – and could be the key to unlocking treatments for chronic diseases, including Parkinson’sAt Cambridge University ’s MRC Mitochondrial Biology Unit, Michal Minczuk is one of a growing number of scientists around the world aiming to find new ways of improving mitochondrial health. This line of research could help provide much-needed treatments for people with long Covid, as well as revolutionising our understa nding of everything from neurodegenerative illnesses such as Parkinson...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 26, 2022 Category: Science Authors: David Cox Tags: Medical research Biology Long Covid Coronavirus Infectious diseases Genetics Society Science Microbiology Source Type: news

How I cope with feelings of envy by saying the Arabic word ‘mashallah’
How the phrase ‘what God has willed has happened’ helped me shift feelings of jealousy towards admiration and respectI don ’t feel envy very often and that isn’t because I don’t know anyone who is worthy of it. The people in my life are nothing short of brilliant. My friends and family are talented writers whose books and magazines I display proudly on my shelves. They are erudite psychologists, driven designers, artists and poets whose work moves me deeply. It is easy to celebrate their most recent successes, to which I say, “Mashallah.”Being raised Muslim, mashallah is an Arabic phrase that I use often, if ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 26, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Yasmina Floyer Tags: Friendship Life and style Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Source Type: news

Johnson faces possible legal action over delay to Covid public inquiry
Campaigners say they will seek judicial review amid fears delay could lead to loss of evidenceBoris Johnson is facing possible legal action over a delay to the start of the Covid-19 public inquiry, which campaigners fear could lead to evidence being destroyed.The prime minister pledged in parliament that the statutory inquiry into the UK ’s handling of the pandemic, which has so far resulted in 196,977 fatalities with Covid on the death certificate, would begin by spring. But Downing Street has yet to finalise the terms of reference.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 26, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Robert Booth Social affairs correspondent Tags: Coronavirus Health Boris Johnson Infectious diseases Medical research Politics UK news World news Society Science Source Type: news

Brain damage claim leads to new row over electroshock therapy
Experts divided on effectiveness of ECT and concerned by overuse in women and the elderlyIt is one of the most dramatic techniques employed in modern psychology. An electric shock is administered directly to the brains of individuals who are suffering from depression.Butelectroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is controversial among some psychologists and is now the focus of a huge row – which erupted last week – over claims that it can trigger brain damage, that guidelines covering its use are weak and that it isused disproportionately on women and the elderly.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 26, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Science editor Tags: Mental health Depression Psychiatry Psychology Women Ageing Science UK news Source Type: news

Vaccinologist Sarah Gilbert: ‘We need to be better prepared for a new pandemic’
The woman who co-developed the AstraZeneca vaccine on reassuring doubters, her new book and having a baby penguin named after herDame Sarah Gilbert, 60, is a professor of vaccinology at Oxford ’s Jenner Institute and author, with Catherine Green, head of Oxford University’s clinical biomanufacturing facility, ofVaxxers– a gripping narrative about developing the AstraZeneca vaccine that is wonderfully accessible and illuminating without dumbing down the science. She lives in Oxford with her husband and grownup triplets.Another wave of Covid-19 is reported to be on its way. To what extent are you able to anticipate wha...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 26, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Kate Kellaway Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Health Society Science Coronavirus Source Type: news

First of three Nasa rockets to take off from Northern Territory space centre
Rocket carrying instruments to study the evolution of the universe will be Nasa ’s first launch from commercial port outside USGet our free news app;get our morning email briefingThe first ofthree Nasa rockets scheduled to launch from the Northern Territory is due to take off on Sunday night, carrying precision instruments that will give scientists new data on the evolution of the cosmos.If all goes according to plan, the rocket will take off from the Arnhem Space Centre on the Dhupuma plateau, near Nhulunbuy, at 10.44pm local time on Sunday.Sign up to receive an email with the top stories from Guardian Australia every m...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 26, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Australian Associated Press Tags: Northern Territory Space Nasa Australia news Source Type: news