For haemophiliacs, most of the world is still living in the dark ages
A sufferer explains how the differences in treatment between the UK and his native India highlight a global medical apartheidLike the Hindu deity Krishna, I was born with blue skin. My body bruised at the trauma of simply being held. And so the family arranged for a ritual to appease the gods.Haemophilia is a genetic blood disorderthat makes it very hard for the body to stop bleeding. If your haemophilia is severe like mine, you bleed spontaneously, without an injury or known cause. A handshake once took me to A&E.To stop bleeding, you need clotting injections. In much of the developing world, these injections are avai...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 14, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Tarun Gidwani Tags: Health Global development Genetics Women NHS Science Society Pharmaceuticals industry Business Source Type: news

How much does smoking damage our mental health?
According to some estimates smoking causes one in 10 deaths worldwide. A lesser known side-effect of cigarettes is the damage they cause to our mental health. Yet, the rates of smoking among people with mental health conditions are much higher than the rest of the population.Last week, the UK government published the Khan review, an independent report looking at how England could become smoke free by 2030. One of the recommendations was to tackle the issue of mental health and smoking. Madeleine Finlay speaks to epidemiologist Dr Gemma Taylor about how significant this link is, what we can do to break it, and how to dispel...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 14, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Presented and produced by Madeleine Finlay, sound design by Tony Onuchukwu and the executive producer was Lorna Stewart Tags: Science Smoking Health Mental health Source Type: news

Seals use whiskers to track prey in deep ocean, study shows
Scientists analysed footage from small video cameras with infrared night-vision attached to the animalsWhen they are in the deep, dark ocean, seals use their whiskers to track down their prey, a study has confirmed after observing the sea mammals in their natural habitat.It ’s hard for light to penetrate the gloom of the ocean’s depths, and animals have come up with a variety of adaptations in order to live and hunt there. Whales and dolphins, for example,use echolocation– the art of sending out clicky noises into the water and listening to their echo as they bounce off possible prey, to locate them. But deep-diving ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 13, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Sofia Quaglia Tags: Marine life Animal behaviour Biology Wildlife Oceans Science World news Source Type: news

Did you solve it? When Wordle curdles
The solution to today ’s word puzzlesEarlier today I set you a bulging girdleof post-Wordle word puzzles. Here they are with the answers.1. Old horseContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 13, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Education Science Source Type: news

Improved disease control in public buildings ‘could save UK billions a year’
Measures such as improved ventilation would boost economy by helping prevent ill health, says reportMandating improved ventilation and other forms of disease control in public buildings could save the UK economy billions of pounds each year through the prevention of ill health and its societal impacts, according to a report.It is the first study to comprehensively evaluate the health, social and economic costs ofairborne infections, including Covid. Even without a pandemic, seasonal respiratory diseases cost the UK about £8bn a year in disruption and sick days, said thereport by the Royal Academy of Engineering and the Ch...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 13, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Science correspondent Tags: Health Infectious diseases Health policy Politics Public services policy Society UK news Science Hospitals Planning policy Infrastructure Source Type: news

Real age versus biological age: the startups revealing how old we really are
Mail-order tests promise an estimate of how well you ’re ageing but the results can be just one more thing to worry aboutAt the end of last year, Jay Chan, a 30-year-old marine engineer, bought his mother a biological age test from Elysium, a New York-based biotech and health supplements start-up founded in 2014. The test was simple – it required only a saliva sample – and it helped that it was being offered for half off the usual $499 (£400) price.For fans of the self-described “longevity movement” like Chan, the concept of biological age is liberating. Rather than simply measure the passage of time, biological...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 13, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Wilfred Chan Tags: Ageing Science Source Type: news

Gaia probe reveals stellar DNA and unexpected ‘starquakes’
The robotic spacecraft unravels the history of the our galaxy ’s evolution – and could identify habitable regions of the Milky WayAstronomers have unveiled the most detailed survey of the Milky Way, revealing thousands of “starquakes” and stellar DNA, and helping to identify the most habitable corners of our home galaxy.The observations from the European Space Agency ’s Gaia probe cover almost two billion stars – about 1% of the total number in the galaxy – and are allowing astronomers to reconstruct our home galaxy’s structure and find out how it has evolved over billions of years.Continue reading... (Sour...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 13, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Space European Space Agency Source Type: news

Don ’t be complacent, another Covid wave is coming. Here’s how we can manage it | Devi Sridhar
A spike in infections every three months seems to be the pattern, but the UK has the power to beat this if we act wiselyAs we move into summer, more than two years since the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic, the words “new wave” are probably the last thing anyone wants to hear. Yet it is true that recent UK data (as well as data from Florida and other places) indicates that sublineages of the Omicron variant, BA.4 and BA.5, are kicking off anew wave of cases. With the pandemic no longer dominating the news in the way it once did, it ’s worth taking stock of where we are and what needs to be done.After all, these var...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 13, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Devi Sridhar Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Science UK news World news Source Type: news

Can you solve it? When Wordle curdles
New word puzzlesWe all love Wordle. But don ’t you also crave new challenges? Today’s column is a post-Wordle girdle, strapping tightly together four word-based puzzles, three of which were sent in by readers of this column.1. Old horseContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 13, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Education Science Source Type: news

Starwatch: cop the keystone shape of Hercules
Although not extremely bright, Hercules will cover a large area of sky this summerThe Hercules constellation is well placed for viewing from the northern hemisphere at this time of year. Although it does not have any really bright stars, the central four make a keystone shape that is easy to recognise.Hercules is also easy to spot because it covers a large area of sky; it is the fifth largest of the 88 modern constellations. The chart shows the view looking south from London at midnight tonight.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 13, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: Space Astronomy Science Source Type: news

Monkeys favour music over screen time, say researchers
In the study at a zoo in Helsinki, white-faced sakis could trigger audio or visual stimuli on demandMonkeys given their own “primate-focused” versions ofSpotify andNetflix were more likely to choose audio stimuli over screen time, a study has found.Researchers at the University of Glasgow and Aalto University in Finland set out to explore how a group of three white-faced saki monkeys at Korkeasaari zoo in Helsinki would respond to being able to trigger audio or visual stimuli on demand.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 12, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Haroon Siddique Tags: Wildlife Zoos Animals Science World news Primatology Source Type: news

Simple eye examination could predict heart attack risk, says study
Researchers find that patterns of blood vessels in the retina could help identify those likely to experience cardiac problemsA simple non-invasive eye examination may be able to predict risk ofheart attack when combined with other information, according to a study.Researchers found that combining information about the pattern of blood vessels in the retina with traditional clinical factors enabled them to better identify participants ’ risk of an attack, compared with established models that only included demographic data.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 12, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Haroon Siddique Tags: Heart attack Medical research Science Health Source Type: news

‘I’m certainly open to criticism’: David Wengrow and the trouble with rewriting human history
Wengrow and his late co-author David Graeber caused a sensation with their revisionist view of humankind ’s development. But then came the attacks…Last year a book calledThe Dawn of Everything announced that most of what we think we know about human history is wrong. Its co-authors, David Graeber and David Wengrow, took aim at the established story that has been repeated by brand writers such as Jared Diamond, Yuval Noah Harari and Steven Pinker – the one that says that for most of prehistory, we lived in small egalitarian bands of hunter-gatherers, and it was only with the agricultural revolution about 12,000 years ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 12, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Anthony Tags: Anthropology Archaeology Evolution Science History books Science and nature books Source Type: news

How finding balance helped a father support his troubled daughter | Gaynor Parkin
Figuring out how to support a loved one – without getting so caught up that we end up struggling ourselves – can feel like walking a tightropeThe modern mind is a column where experts discuss mental health issues they are seeing in their workIn a world fraught with unpredictability we are all seeing an increase in reported mental illness. For those of us working on themental health frontline, we are also noticing more people who may not have a mental illness but are feeling distressed and grappling with difficult life challenges. When the person who is distressed is a loved one, figuring out how to help them can be a s...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 12, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Gaynor Parkin Tags: Mental health Psychology Parents and parenting Family Source Type: news

Malaysia ’s ‘mystery hybrid monkey’ could be result of habitat loss
Researcher says proboscis monkey may have mated with silver langur when unable to reach female of own speciesThe emergence of a “mystery monkey”, believed to be a rare hybrid of two distantly related primates, highlights the importance of protecting habit connectivity, according to a researcher who studied the animal.The female monkey first attracted attention in 2017, when photographs taken of it along the Kinabatangan River in Sabah, Malaysia, were uploaded to social media wildlife photography groups.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 12, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Rebecca Ratcliffe in Bangkok Tags: Zoology Conservation Malaysia Asia Pacific Biology Science World news Environment Source Type: news