Rewilding with wolves: can they help rebuild ecosystems? | podcast
After wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone national park in 1995, researchers noticed some big ecological changes, leading to the regeneration of the landscape. It ’s an argument used to justify the return of apex predators – but it’s increasingly being challenged. Phoebe Weston talks to Ian Sample about whether wolves really have the power to shape ecosystems, and what that means for the debate about bringing them back to the UKArchive: Good Morning BritainContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 23, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Ian Sample, produced by Anand Jagatia, sound design by Tony Onuchukwu and the executive producer was Lorna Stewart Tags: Rewilding Wildlife Science Environment Source Type: news

Mites that mate on our faces at night face extinction threat
Study of tiny parasites points to gene loss from adaptation putting them on dead-end evolutionary courseGliding through grease, and protected by our pores, tinyDemodex folliculorummites lead a secretive life within our skin, only emerging at night to mate on our foreheads, noses and nipples. Successful as these sexual encounters are, their days as independent parasites may be numbered.The first ever genome sequencing study of these mites appears to have caught them in the process of transitioning to internal symbionts, entirely dependent on us for their existence. Eventually, this process may even lead to their extinction....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 22, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Science correspondent Tags: Zoology Science Biology Evolution Genetics World news Source Type: news

Bionic robo-fish able to remove microplastics from seas revealed by scientists – video
Scientists have designed a tiny robot fish that is programmed to remove microplastics from seas and oceans by swimming around and adsorbing them. Microplastics are the billions of tiny plastic particles which fragment from bigger plastic things used every day. They are one of the 21st century ’s biggest environmental problems because once they are dispersed into the environment they are very hard to get rid of, harming the environment and animal and human health.Scientists unveil bionic robo-fish to remove microplastics from seasContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 22, 2022 Category: Science Tags: Science Source Type: news

Female scientists less likely to be given authorship credits, analysis finds
Disparities extend to lower chance of being named on patents and to areas such as healthcare where women dominateFemale scientists are less likely to receive authorship credit or to be named on patents related to the work they do compared with their male counterparts – including in fields such as healthcare, where women dominate – data suggests.This gender gap may help to explain well-documented disparities in the apparent contributions of male and female scientists – such as that ofRosalind Franklin, whose pivotal contribution to the discovery of the structure of DNA initially went unrecognised because she was not c...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 22, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Science correspondent Tags: UK news Science Women Society Medical research Academics Work & careers Source Type: news

Half in UK back genome editing to prevent severe diseases
Survey also finds younger generations far more in favour of designer babies than older people areMore than half the UK backs the idea of rewriting the DNA of human embryos to prevent severe or life-threatening diseases, according to a survey.Commissioned by theProgress Educational Trust (PET), a fertility and genomics charity, the Ipsos poll found that 53% of people support the use of human genome editing to prevent children from developing serious conditions such as cystic fibrosis.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 22, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Gene editing Cystic fibrosis IVF Genetics Biology Science Society UK news Source Type: news

Scientists unveil bionic robo-fish to remove microplastics from seas
Tiny self-propelled robo-fish can swim around, latch on to free-floating microplastics and fix itself if it gets damagedScientists have designed a tiny robot-fish that is programmed to remove microplastics from seas and oceans by swimming around and adsorbing them on its soft, flexible, self-healing body.Microplastics are the billions of tiny plastic particles which fragment from the bigger plastic things used every day such as water bottles, car tyres and synthetic T-shirts. They are one of the 21st century ’s biggest environmental problems because oncethey are dispersed into the environment through the breakdown of lar...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 22, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Sofia Quaglia Tags: Plastics Oceans Pollution Environment World news Science Source Type: news

Bi by Julia Shaw review – the past and present of a maligned minority
A tour of the science, culture and history of bisexuality that ranges from the vehemently political to the charmingly weirdAccording to periodic reports in the media, bisexuality has been a brand-new fad since at least the 1890s. It was all the rage in 1974, for example, when the US magazine Newsweek discovered “Bisexual Chic: Anyone Goes”. A generation later, in 1995, the same magazine published a cover story declaring it “A new sexual identity”. In 2021, the Daily Telegraph parodied itself with a letter from an “Anonymous Dad”complaining about his bisexual daughter. “My daughter doesn’t like girls and boy...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 22, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Katy Guest Tags: Science and nature books Sexuality Psychology Culture Society History books Life and style Source Type: news

Covid reinfections in the UK: how likely are you to catch coronavirus again?
Covid reinfections have become increasingly common, due to decline in antibodies and the evolution of the virusWith recent UK data suggesting that the BA.4 and BA.5 Covid variants are kicking off a new wave of infections, experts answer the key questions about reinfection and prevention.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 22, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Source Type: news

Terrawatch: saltier oceans could have prevented Earth from freezing
Study may have solved paradox of the faint young Sun – which shone 20% less bright in Archean timesThe Sun shone 20% less brightly on early Earth, and yet fossil evidence shows that our planet had warm shallow seas where stromatolites – microbial mats – thrived. Now a study may have solved the “faint young Sun paradox”, showing that saltier oceans could have prevented Earth from freezing over during Archean times, 3bn years ago.We all know that the composition of the atmosphere (particularly the abundance of greenhouse gases) plays a crucial role in tempering Earth ’s climate, but what about the composition of ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 22, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Kate Ravilious Tags: The sun Science Oceans Source Type: news

Wrist-worn trackers can detect Covid before symptoms, study finds
Sensor tech can alert wearer to Covid early, helping to prevent onward transmissionHealth trackers worn on the wrist could be used to spot Covid-19 days before any symptoms appear, according to researchers.Growing numbers of people worldwide use the devices to monitor changes in skin temperature, heart and breathing rates. Now a new study shows that this data could be combined with artificial intelligence (AI) to diagnose Covid-19 even before the first tell-tale signs of the disease appear.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 21, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Gregory Health editor Tags: Coronavirus Health Medical research Infectious diseases World news Liechtenstein Europe Wearable technology Science Source Type: news

UK flight schools hire instructors for electric aircraft as fuel prices bite
Pilot schools are recruiting instructors to meet demand for more sustainable and cheaper trainingPilot training schools in the UK are actively looking for instructors who can teach on electric-powered aeroplanes, as the surging price of fuel gives a boost to the country ’s emerging zero-emissions market.The global electric aviation industry remains in its infancy, with the Slovenian-madePipistrel Velis Electro, a two-seater training aircraft powered by lithium-ion batteries, only certified in the UK last year.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 21, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Oliver Holmes Tags: Technology Aeronautics Aerospace industry Science Business Environment Source Type: news

UK scientists urge higher uptake of Covid boosters among elderly
Fifth of people over 75 in England have not had fourth vaccine, raising concern as case rate rises againAround a fifth of people aged 75 and over in England have yet to have a fourth Covid jab, data suggests, leading to calls for a renewed push for vaccination of the vulnerable amid rising infections and hospitalisations.According to figures from theOffice for National Statistics (ONS), in the week ending 11 June an estimated one in 50 people in England had Covid – about 1.13 million people – a rise from 1 in 70 the week before. Upticks have also been seen in the rest of the UK, while hospitalisations are also rising.C...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 21, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Health NHS Health policy Science UK news England Source Type: news

If we want to fight cancer, we should tax the companies that cause it | Jon Whelan and Alexandra Zissu
We tax cigarettes and sodas because they ’re bad for you. We should tax companies that put carcinogens in the environment​​Americans don’t agree on much of anything lately. Except taxes – who doesn’t hate taxes? And also cancer: everyone hates cancer.Maybe hating cancer was on President Joe Biden ’s mind when, earlier this month, he shared plans to reduce the cancer death rate by at least 50% over the next 25 years – a lofty goal for his Cancer Moonshot program.Industrial facilities, like those identified in a recentProPublica report analyzing five years of data from the Environmental Protection Agency. The...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 21, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Jon Whelan and Alexandra Zissu Tags: US news Cancer Joe Biden Health Science Cancer research Medical research World news Society Source Type: news

Life will find a way: could scientists make Jurassic Park a reality?
Just a few years from now, herds of woolly ‘mammoths’ could be roaming the Siberian tundra. Are dodos and dinosaurs next for de-extinction?What Alida Bailleul saw through the microscope made no sense. She was examining thin sections of fossilised skull from a young hadrosaur, a duck-billed, plant-eating beast that roamed what is now Montana 75m years ago, when she spotted features that made her draw a breath.Bailleul was inspecting the fossils, from a collection at the Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman, Montana, to understand how dinosaur skulls developed. But what caught her eye should not, the textbooks said, be there...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 21, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Tags: Cloning Biotechnology industry Gene editing Genetics Science Dinosaurs Extinct wildlife Conservation Environment Fossils Source Type: news

When stressed, we ‘catastrophize’ – but we can learn to calm our irrational fears | Sophie Brickman
Our primitive brains summon up worst-case scenarios to protect us from danger. In today ’s world, that can be debilitatingThe first day I returned to work after maternity leave, I walked to the office racked with a fear I knew to be highly unlikely: that our new, and loving, caregiver would push the stroller across the street at the precise moment a reckless driver ran the light. I imagined the sound of tires screeching, the sickening crunch. I started to sweat, and my heart rate quickened. And then, when I got to the office, I took a deep breath, told myself to pull it together, and did.What I was doing, I later learned...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 21, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Sophie Brickman Tags: Health Psychology Source Type: news