Monkeypox is truly an emergency. The WHO was right to raise the highest alarm | Devi Sridhar
Supporting the people most at-risk of this awful disease is the only way to reduce its impact and stop its spreadProbably the last thing you want to hear is that the World Health Organization hasdeclared another disease – this time monkeypox – to be a public health emergency of international concern.Monkeypox is a virus similar to smallpox that causes fever, swollen lymph nodes and distinctive rashes on the face, palms, the soles of the feet and genitalia. Gay and bisexual men are most at risk, as are other men who have sex with men. It can be a serious disease with the case fatality rate around 3-6%, although the vast...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 25, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Devi Sridhar Tags: Monkeypox Infectious diseases Science World news Vaccines and immunisation World Health Organization Medical research Source Type: news

The big idea: should we be using data to make life ’s big decisions?
Faced with tough choices, people usually fall back on gut instinct or seek the advice of friends. Now, there ’s an alternativeWhom should you marry? Where should you live? How should you spend your time? For centuries, people have relied on their gut instincts to figure out the answers to these life-changing questions. Now, though, there is a better way. We are living through a data explosion, as vast amounts of information about all aspects of human behaviour have become more and more accessible. We can use this big data to help determine the best course to chart.There has long been overwhelming – and often surprising...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 25, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Seth Stephens-Davidowitz Tags: Books Happiness indices Artificial intelligence (AI) Psychology Society Source Type: news

Can you solve it? Blockbusters!
Can I have a P please Bob?In the much-missed student quiz show Blockbusters, teenagers would ask host Bob Holness for a letter from a hexagonal grid. How we laughed when a contestant asked for a P!Holness would reply with a question in the following style:What P is …Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 25, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Education Science Source Type: news

Low pay and damp housing driving UK lung disease deaths, study finds
Researchers say 55% of COPD patients suffering two or more acute attacks a year earn under £20,000, with the poorest five times more likely to die from the conditionPoorer people are much more likely to die from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) than wealthier patients due to damp housing and low pay, researchers have found.A survey of nearly 6,000 people living with COPD, one of Britain ’s most common lung conditions, found that structural inequalities had a significant bearing on whether a patient would survive.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 25, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Josh Halliday Tags: UK news Health Inequality Science Poverty Bronchitis Source Type: news

Starwatch: Delta Aquariid meteors reach peak this week
Practise meteor-watching skills in preparation for August ’s Perseid shower in days up to 30 JulyPractise your meteor-watching skills this week in preparation for next month ’s main event: the August Perseid meteor shower.This week, it is the turn of the fainter Delta Aquariid meteors to reach its peak. Nominally expected on 30 July, the truth is that they are consistent for days surrounding the crescendo. This year is a good one to look because the Delta Aquariids tend to be faint, yet the new moon occurs on 28 July meaning that it will be long gone from the sky around midnight when the meteors become most visible.Con...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 25, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: Science Source Type: news

Monkeypox: Schiff demands to know why US does not have more vaccines
Ashish Jha, coronavirus response coordinator, defends Biden administration response but California Democrat wants answersExperience: my two weeks of monkeypox hellThe California Democrat Adam Schiff, a leading critic of the US response to the monkeypox outbreak, said on Sunday: “I don’t know why there aren’t more vaccines available.”Speaking a day after the World Health Organization director-general, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said the rapidly spreading outbreak was a global health emergency, Schiff said he wanted “to light a fire under the administration”.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 24, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Guardian staff and agencies Tags: Monkeypox Infectious diseases Science Medical research World news Source Type: news

Readers reply: which species exhibits the most diverse physical characteristics?
The long-running series in which readers answer other readers ’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific and philosophical conceptsWhich species exhibits the most diverse physical characteristics? I can ’t think of a more varied example than the domestic dog (Canis familiaris).Teri Robertson, NorthamptonSend new questions tonq@theguardian.com.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 24, 2022 Category: Science Tags: Life and style Animals Pets Dogs Plants Science Source Type: news

Want to stop feeling hurt when someone says no? Take the rejection therapy challenge
It ’s easy to inure yourself to fear of rejection, all you have to do is be rejected every single dayIn 2012, 30-year-old Jia Jiang walked up to a stranger and asked if he could borrow $100. “No” was the response from the baffled man sitting in a hotel lobby. He wanted to know why he was being asked, but Jiang didn’t explain; he just said thanks then walked away. This was Jiang’s first day of rejection therapy, a concept created by Canadian entrepreneur Jason Comely that challen ged people to approach strangers with weird requests to build their resilience against rejection.Jiang ’s fear of rejection centred on...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 24, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Lloyd Tags: Life and style Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Source Type: news

Puzzle of prized white truffle finally yields to science
No one has been able to farm the rare, expensive fungus on a commercial scale – until nowThey emit intense aromas of garlic, fermented cheese and methane, and are so rare that theycan fetch up to £9,000 a kilogram. Now, the puzzle that has confounded experts for more than half a century, of how to cultivate the elusive white truffle on a commercial scale, appears to have been solved.This week, scientists from France ’s National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and the Environment (INRAE), will reveal that, at a secret location in Nouvelle-Aquitaine, western France, they have cultivated 26 white truffles.Contin...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 24, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Nic Fleming Tags: Food Fungi UK news Biology Science Agriculture Vegetables World news France Europe Source Type: news

‘We’re all tired’: the everyday exhaustion of Australia’s third Covid winter
After enduring more than two years of pandemic, we ’re facing yet another fresh wave. How can we push through the malaise?Follow our Australia news live blog for the latest updatesGet ourfree news app,morning email briefing anddaily news podcastWhen Angie attended a funeral last week, she wore a mask. “I was very much a minority,” she says. As a close family member of the deceased, the musician from Victoria wrestled with feeling disrespectful for wearing it, so she didn’t put the mask on at the gravesite or the wake. Now she’s waiting to see if she, or anyone else at the funeral, has Cov id. It’s just the late...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 23, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Sophie Black Tags: Society Coronavirus Australia news Omicron variant Psychology Mental health Source Type: news

If our datacentres cannot take the heat, the UK could really go off the rails | John Naughton
It is understandable that railway infrastructure could not cope with last week ’s temperatures, but why did Google and Oracle’s facilities go offline?One of the unexpected delights of the heatwavewas the sound of a Conservative transport secretary talking sense. Grant Shapps was on theToday programme on Tuesday morning explaining a basic principle of good engineering design: get the specifications right. When you ’re creating a new piece of public infrastructure you need to be able to specify the constraints under which the design is expected to function.Shapps explained that the railway system over which he currentl...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 23, 2022 Category: Science Authors: John Naughton Tags: Technology Technology sector Google Oracle Science Source Type: news

Monkeypox declared global health emergency by WHO as cases surge
Declaration is strongest call to action agency can make, with most recent such announcement being for CovidThe global monkeypox outbreak has been declared a public health emergency of international concern by the World Health Organization (WHO) – the strongest call to action the agency can make.It is the seventh time such a declaration has been made since 2009, the most recent being for Covid-19, which was giventhe same label by the WHO in 2020, and follows a meeting of a committee of experts on Thursday.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 23, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent and Miranda Bryant Tags: Monkeypox Epidemics World Health Organization World news Society Science Infectious diseases Source Type: news

‘I’m very pleased we’ve got the same name’: Brian Cox meets Brian Cox
The actor Brian Cox used to be irked by the success of his upstart namesake. Now, for the first time, he and Prof Brian Cox talk science, Succession and what Shakespeare and black holes have in commonWhen anyone mentions Brian Cox, the first question invariably asked is: which Brian Cox are you talking about? Do you mean Prof Brian Cox, physicist, or actor Brian Cox, from Succession? So imagine how annoying it must be for professor Brian and actor Brian Cox! Which got us thinking: what would happen if we invited both Brians to sit down together for a lengthy chat – something they’ve never done before?Oldham-born partic...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 23, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Rich Pelley Tags: Brian Cox Culture Physics Succession Science Astronomy Particle physics Space People in science Television & radio Source Type: news

Why do the minority who haven ’t had Covid account for most new infections?
About 15% of people in England have somehow never had Covid, yet 55% of new cases are from this groupHaving somehow dodged Covid since the pandemic kicked off, the proportion of people who have never seen the red line appear on a rapid test are a steadily shrinking minority.On Thursday, the White House announced that the US president, Joe Biden, hadtested positive for Covid, becoming the most high-profile figure yet to join the increasingly exclusive club of people who are only now, in the third year of rife disease, notching up their first infection.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 22, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Coronavirus Health Infectious diseases Science Society Medical research UK news Source Type: news

‘Weird, wonderful’: rare dig at Arthur’s Stone writes new story of neolithic site
Visitors flock to Herefordshire burial plot that inspired CS Lewis amid excitement at what is being foundHigh above one of western Britain ’s loveliest valleys, the silence is broken by the sound of gentle digging, scraping and brushing, along with bursts of excited chatter as another ancient feature is revealed or a curious visitor stops by to find out what is going on.This summer archaeologists have been granted rare permission to excavate part of theArthur ’s Stone site, a neolithic burial plot with soaring views across the Golden Valley in Herefordshire and the Black Mountains of south-east Wales.Continue reading.....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 22, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Steven Morris Tags: Archaeology Heritage England Culture Science UK news Source Type: news