Compiling C to WebAssembly and Running It - without Emscripten
ConclusionIt's now possible to compile C source files to WebAssembly with a stock LLVM toolchain devoid of Emscripten. With some extra effort, the C standard library can be included. Data can be passed into and out of a WebAssembly instance by treating pointers as indexes into a JavaScript typed array view.Unlike Emscripten, this approach to compiling WebAssembly introduces no glue JavaScript code. This means paying for only what's used. On the other hand, the approach does require some thought and work to supply the missing integration points. Fortunately, these are not too difficult to implement. (Source: Depth-First)
Source: Depth-First - October 17, 2019 Category: Chemistry Authors: Richard L. Apodaca Source Type: blogs

Kelsey Moody Presenting on the LysoClear Program at Ending Age-Related Diseases 2019
Kelsey Moody of Ichor Therapeutics presented on the LysoClear development program at the Ending Age-Related Diseases conference organized by the Life Extension Advocacy Foundation earlier this year. LysoClear is an example of the commercial development of a rejuvenation therapy, taken all the way from the starting point of the discovery of microbial enzymes capable of breaking down certain forms of harmful age-related molecular waste that contribute to aging and age-related diseases. The actual research is largely done, and the task now is to focus on manufacture, regulatory approval, and entry into the clinic. Take...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 14, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Like the Telephone Game, CDC's Lack of Clarity is Becoming Completely False Facts at the Local Level
Do you recall thetelephone game? Players sit in a circle and the first person whispers a phrase into the ear of the second person, who whispers it to the third person, and so forth, until it gets to the last player, who then repeats the phrase that they heard. Typically, the phrase changes substantially from the beginning because a series of small, progressive changes add up to a completely different phrase at the end.The only way to prevent this is for the first person to deliver such a clear message that it cannot be mistaken.In this commentary, I show how the lack of clarity by the CDC and other health groups in communi...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - October 14, 2019 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

87 Inspirational Quotes for Work (Motivation to Work Hard and Smart)
We are once again at the start of a workweek. So I thought this would be a good time to share 87 of the most inspirational work quotes. Quotes that will motivate you, help you to focus and work smarter and also reduce the stress and pressure you may feel at work (or in school). These quotes have helped me many times to re-ignite my own motivation on a rough or bad day and to find a calmer and less stressed focus so I could keep working consistently towards my own goals and dreams. I hope they will help you to do the same. Motivational Quotes for Work “Concentrate all your thoughts upon the work in hand. The sun's ra...
Source: Practical Happiness and Awesomeness Advice That Works | The Positivity Blog - October 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Henrik Edberg Tags: Personal Development Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 14th 2019
In conclusion, a polypharmacology approach of combining established, prolongevity drug inhibitors of specific nodes may be the most effective way to target the nutrient-sensing network to improve late-life health. Deletion of p38α in Neurons Slows Neural Stem Cell Decline and Loss of Cognitive Function in Mice https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/10/deletion-of-p38%ce%b1-in-neurons-slows-neural-stem-cell-decline-and-loss-of-cognitive-function-in-mice/ Researchers here provide evidence for p38α to be involved in the regulation of diminished neural stem cell activity with age. It is thought...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 13, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

News Headline Shows How Misinformation About Respiratory Disease Outbreak is Spreading
The featured headline of a newsarticle published yesterday atNorthJersey.com (theNorth Jersey Record) was: " Vaping with JUUL Damaged NJ Woman's Lungs, Left Her Hospitalized. "The headline of the article itself read: "'My Lungs Were Chemically Burned': NJ Victim Speaks Out Against Vaping. "These headlines certainly give the impression that this unfortunate 21-year-old woman developed acute respiratory failure due to her use of JUUL.If true, this would be an absolute disaster because there are an estimated 7 million JUUL users.This is no doubt going to contribute to the public's belief that electronic ci...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - October 11, 2019 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

Investigating the Superior DNA Defenses of Tardigrades
Tardigrades are extremely resilient to radiation induced DNA damage, and here researchers delve into some of the mechanisms involved. Mining other species for potential improvements to our own biochemistry, or the basis for therapies, is an expanding line of work in the life science community. Possible ways to improve mammalian defenses against damage to nuclear DNA are of interest for a range of reasons, not least of which is that it is the present consensus that stochastic mutation to nuclear DNA contributes to both cancer risk and aging itself, as mutations in stem cells or progenitor cells can spread throughout tissues...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 11, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

World Mental Health Day 2019: Letter to a Suicidal Person
By the time you read this blog, two or three people will have taken their lives. In fact, every 40 seconds someone completes suicide; Close to 800,000 die by suicide every year. According to the World Health Organization, there are more deaths from suicide than from war and homicide together. Suicide is the second leading cause of death between people ages 15 to 29. These statistics don’t surprise me since I’ve lost two family members and several friends to suicide, and about one third of the people I know have lost a loved one to suicide. I am familiar with the desperation and rationale that leads someone to t...
Source: World of Psychology - October 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Depression Suicide World Mental Health Day Suicidal Thoughts Source Type: blogs

An Interview with Amutha Boominathan of the SENS Research Foundation
Amutha Boominathan leads the mitochondrial research program at the SENS Research Foundation, focused on achieving allotopic expression of mitochondrial genes. This is the process of placing mitochondrial genes into the nuclear genome, suitably altered so that the proteins produced are transported back to mitochondria where they are needed. Every cell contains a herd of hundreds of mitochondria, the descendants of ancient symbiotic bacteria that contain a remnant circular genome. Mitochondria are responsible for packaging chemical energy store molecules, but are also deeply integrated into many other cellular processes. ...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 10, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

From Surgeries To Keeping Company: The Place Of Robots In Healthcare
Assisting surgeries, disinfecting rooms, dispensing medication, keeping company: believe it or not these are the tasks medical robots will soon undertake in hospitals, pharmacies, or your nearest doctor’s office. These new ‘colleagues’ will definitely make a difference in every field of medicine. Here’s our overview to understand robotics in healthcare better so that everyone can prepare for the appearance of mechanic helpers in medical facilities. Metallic allies for the benefit of the vulnerable While there are concerns for machines replacing people in the workforce, we believe there are adv...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 8, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: berci.mesko Tags: Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Robotics blood digital health future of hospital Healthcare medical medical robot nanorobot nanotechnology pharmacies social social companion social companion robot Surgery telemedical Source Type: blogs

How to Prevent Your Anxiety from Rubbing Off On Your Child
You're reading How to Prevent Your Anxiety from Rubbing Off On Your Child, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Sometimes, it seems like our kids aren’t learning anything from us—but that’s simply not the case. Kids absorb all the information around them and learn by example. While that can be a good thing, it can also be a problem if you don’t want to pass on certain behaviors you’re modeling for them, like anxiety. If you’re struggling with anxiety, first remember that...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - October 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SarahDaren Tags: depression family featured psychology self improvement Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 7th 2019
In conclusion, our findings link the calcification of the vascular tissue with the expression of FGF23 in the vessels and with the elevation of circulating levels this hormone. Permanently Boosting Levels of Natural Killer Cells in Mice to Increase Cancer Resistance https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/permanently-boosting-levels-of-natural-killer-cells-in-mice-to-increase-cancer-resistance/ Researchers here demonstrate a very interesting approach to immunotherapy: they introduce engineered stem cells in mice that will give rise to additional natural killer T cells, boosting the capability of the ...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 6, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Printing Custom Flexible Electronics Directly Onto Skin, Bandages, Medical Devices
Flexible electronics have the potential to help monitor, and even modulate, a number of physiological parameters. While stick-on heart monitors can be manufactured as one-size-fits-all, in applications such as electronic bandages that can monitor and treat a wound, it’s best to be able to create custom devices that suit each patient’s needs. Currently, making flexible electronics requires harsh processing, including chemical baths, hardening processes, and high temperature baking to purify the materials being used. Now, researchers at Duke University have come up with a way to directly print functional flexi...
Source: Medgadget - October 3, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiology Diagnostics Materials Medicine Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

New Mayo Clinic Study Further Implicates Contaminated THC Oils in Respiratory Disease Outbreaks and Refutes Claim that Store-Bought Nicotine E-Liquids are Involved
Astudy published yesterday in theNew England Journal of Medicine by a team of researchers at the Mayo Clinic provides further evidence that contaminated THC oils are likely playing a major role in the vaping-associated respiratory disease outbreak and makes it even less likely that store-bought nicotine e-liquids are playing any role at all. Here is the key evidence provided by the paper:1.The overwhelming majority of patients admitted to vaping THC oils.Approximately 76% of the patients studied who reported on product use admitted to vaping marijuana (13 out of 17 patients). Because urine THC testing was either not conduc...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - October 3, 2019 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

Help to Crowdfund the SENS Research Foundation Transgenic Mouse Project to Move a Mitochondrial Gene into the Cell Nucleus
The SENS Research Foundation science team is taking the next step in their work on moving mitochondrial genes into the cell nucleus, a process called allotopic expression. Having proven that they can carry out this task with the ATP8 gene in cells, they are now aiming at proof of principle in mice. This will require the production of transgenic mice, using a novel technology funded by the SENS Research Foundation called the maximally modifiable mouse. This mitochondrial project is being crowdfunded at Lifespan.io: you, I, and everyone else can contribute to advancing the state of the art one step further towards eliminatin...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 2, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Activism, Advocacy and Education Source Type: blogs

Mitochondria as a Form of Intracellular Signaling Important in the Aging Brain
Researchers in the field of neurodegeneration here provide evidence for supporting cells in the brain, specifically microglia, to use their own mitochondria as a form of signaling. Mitochondria are the power plants of the cell, responsible for packaging chemical energy store molecules. Their function declines with age for a range of poorly understood reasons, and this is important in numerous age-related conditions, particularly those in energy hungry tissues such as the brain. The researchers here report that microglia eject both whole and fragmentary mitochondria that other cells react to. Where the microglia are stresse...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 2, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Beefy Arguments for Libertarianism
This report has layers of flaws and is the most egregious abuse of evidence that I have ever seen,"said Walter Willett of Harvard. "Their recommendations are really irresponsible,"said Frank Hu of Harvard. A contrarian would immediately assume, therefore, that the study in question must be marvelous. Is it?Well, it represents part of a new wave in nutrition, in which a group of scientists who have no financial ties to the food industry set themselves up, like the justices of the Supreme Court, to adjudicate as a panel  on a field of research. And, again like the justices of the Supreme Court, they are n...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 1, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Terence Kealey Source Type: blogs

Nanoparticles for RNA Vaccine Delivery Help Stop Melanoma Tumor Growth
RNA vaccines are a promising way to harness the immune system to fight cancers and infections. Some are currently in clinical trials, but the technology is still in its early stages. A major impediment to the effectiveness of RNA vaccines is the difficulty in getting them into the correct immune cells to produce the desired proteins and guaranteeing that the immune system will respond with sufficient force. To help with this, chemists at MIT have created a range of lipid nanoparticles that can be used as delivery vesicles for RNA vaccines. These nanoparticles have already been shown to improve target protein production ...
Source: Medgadget - October 1, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Medicine Nanomedicine Oncology Public Health Source Type: blogs

If you have migraines, put down your coffee and read this
During medical school, a neurologist taught me that the number one cause of headaches in the US was coffee. That was news to me! But it made more sense when he clarified that he meant lack of coffee. His point was that for people who regularly drink coffee, missing an early morning cup, or even just having your first cup later than usual, can trigger a caffeine withdrawal headache. And considering how many daily coffee drinkers there are (an estimated 158 million in the US alone), it’s likely that coffee withdrawal is among the most common causes of headaches. Later in my neurology rotation, I learned that caffeine i...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Headache Health Source Type: blogs

Ask D'Mine: If You Live in a Meth House with Diabetes...
Our weekly DiabetesMine advice column explores the impact of chemicals from meth production on blood sugars with diabetes. (Source: Diabetes Mine)
Source: Diabetes Mine - September 28, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Authors: Wil Dubois Source Type: blogs

Light Activated Compound Kills Hypoxic Tumors
Photodynamic therapy is a technique that relies on photosensitizer chemicals to generate reactive species that kill cancer cells. These compounds can be delivered into tumors and then light is used to activate them. One of the main reasons for the slow adoption of this technology is that tumors are usually oxygen deprived and the photosensitizers developed to date require the presence of copious amounts of oxygen. Now, an international team of researchers has developed a new compound, based on iridium, that works in low oxygen environments and attacks an important metabolic process within cells. The capability, if confi...
Source: Medgadget - September 27, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Medicine Nanomedicine Oncology Source Type: blogs

New Fluorescent Tags Developed to Track Cause of Alzheimer ’s
Amyloid protein plaques, particularly ones made of beta-amyloid 42, are a prime suspect in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Soluble oligomers, in this case molecules with a few repeating peptide units, may turn out to be the main culprit. They’re known to be toxic to neurons and some recent studies have led researchers to focus more attention on them. To better understand the root causes of Alzheimer’s, researchers need a way to track oligomers in the lab, but Thioflavin T dyes that lab techs use to flag amyloid fibrils don’t work well with oligomers. To overcome this serious limitation, c...
Source: Medgadget - September 26, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Materials Neurology Source Type: blogs

Vitiligo: More than skin deep
Vitiligo (pronounced vit-uh-LIE-go) is a medical condition in which patches of skin lose their color. This occurs when melanocytes, the cells responsible for making skin pigment, are destroyed. Vitiligo can affect any part of the body, and it can occur in people of any age, ethnicity, or sex. Affecting approximately 1% of the population, vitiligo can be an emotionally and socially devastating disease. Particularly frustrating to many is its unpredictable progression, which can be slow or rapid. Thus far, there is no cure for vitiligo. But new hope is on the horizon, thanks to recent research that is improving our understan...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kristina Liu, MD, MHS Tags: Autoimmune diseases Health Skin and Hair Care Source Type: blogs

Massachusetts Governor's Emergency Order Protects Drug Dealers at the Expense of Hundreds of Life-Saving Small Businesses
In a move that is a huge victory for the state's drug dealers, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker has instituted a4-month ban on the sale of all vaping products in the state, including both nicotine-containing electronic cigarettes sold at retail stores and vape shops and cannabis vaping products sold at legal cannabis dispensaries. The ban, which was approved by the state Public Health Council on Tuesday, goes into effect immediately and was motivated by the recent emergence of an outbreak of vaping-associated respiratory illness (VARI) that has affected more than530 people across the United States and has resulted in n...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - September 25, 2019 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

Breathtaking: The Future Of Respiratory Care And Pulmonology
Smoke-measuring smart shirts, breath sound analyzing algorithms, and smart inhalers pave the way of pulmonology and respiratory care into the future. As the number of patients suffering from asthma, COPD, or lung cancer due to rising air pollution and steady smoker-levels will unfortunately not decrease any time soon, we looked around what technology can do to help both patients and caregivers. The results are breathtaking. Attacks of breathlessness are too common The diseases which pulmonologists and respiratory care specialists attempt to fight are among the most common conditions in the modern world – and t...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 25, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers AI asthma cancer cancer treatment care COPD diagnostics inhaler lung lung cancer management medical specialty pulmonology respiratory respiratory care Source Type: blogs

Self-Sterilizing Polymer to Reduce Healthcare-Acquired Infections
Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new nanostructured polymer that can kill many different strains of bacteria and viruses within minutes. Their work demonstrates that the unique chemical modifications on the polymer allow it to kill bacteria like E. coli, along with the “superbug” methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and that the polymer can be exposed to bacteria multiple times and still remain effective. This exciting development can be used as a method to actively disinfect surfaces to help reduce hospital-acquired infections, which kill over 25,000 Americans ea...
Source: Medgadget - September 23, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Siavash Parkhideh Tags: Materials Public Health Source Type: blogs

Drug Use: It's in the Water
Chemicals in wastewater can reveal a lot about drug use among large populations.  Read  More » (Source: NIDA Drugs and Health Blog)
Source: NIDA Drugs and Health Blog - September 23, 2019 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 23rd 2019
Discussion of Developmental Effects on Aging Microtubule Function and Longevity in Nematodes Quantifying the Correlation Between Poverty and Faster Pace of Aging Matthew O'Connor Presenting on Underdog Pharmaceuticals at Undoing Aging 2019 https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/matthew-oconnor-presenting-on-underdog-pharmaceuticals-at-undoing-aging-2019/ Here Matthew O'Connor of the SENS Research Foundation talks about the research that led to founding of Underdog Pharmaceuticals, a biotech startup incubated by the foundation to commercialize a means of targeting 7-ketocholesterol in atheroscleros...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 22, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Anti-Radiation Poison Pill Also Effective at Eliminating GBCAs from the Body
The chelator pill, a medication that was developed to rid the body of radioactive elements, has a 96 percent efficacy rate at preventinggadolinium from depositing in bodies of patients who have just undergone MRI, according to researchers from theU.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) are used in around a third of all MRI procedures. They ’ve been a controversial topic in recent years, and traces of the agent can remain in the brain for years after screenings. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has requiredhealthcare providers to issue ...
Source: radRounds - September 22, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Adult acne: Understanding underlying causes and banishing breakouts
“I’m not a teenager anymore, why do I still have acne?!” This is a question we hear from patients on a daily basis. The truth is, it is quite common to see acne persist into adulthood. Although acne is commonly thought of as a problem of adolescence, it can occur in people of all ages. Adult acne has many similarities to adolescent acne with regard to both causes and treatments. But there are some unique qualities to adult acne as well. What causes adult acne? Adult acne, or post-adolescent acne, is acne that occurs after age 25. For the most part, the same factors that cause acne in adolescents are at pl...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kristina Liu, MD, MHS Tags: Health Skin and Hair Care Source Type: blogs

6 Benefits of Practicing Yoga with Animals
You're reading 6 Benefits of Practicing Yoga with Animals, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. If you’ve ever thought about how to take your downward dog to a whole new level, then have you ever considered bringing your actual dog into your yoga practice? Yes. You read that right. Yoga with animals is a real thing! These days, people are practicing yoga with all kinds of animals—cats, dogs, goats, horses, even bunnies—because it turns out, there are legitimate benefits to being around ju...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - September 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SarahDaren Tags: featured health and fitness meditation animals stress yoga Source Type: blogs

Hydrogel Mimics of Heart Tissue to Study Cardiac Reshaping Following Aortic Valve Implantation
Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures have become a popular way of treating aortic valve stenosis, a condition in which the valve stiffens and worsens cardiac function. Following implantation of a prosthetic valve, the hearts of patients tend to undergo significant reconstruction around the treatment site, but the mechanics of this process are poorly understood. It is difficult to study the hearts of living people, so a novel laboratory solution was necessary. Researchers at University of Colorado Boulder and University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have come up with just the thing. They have d...
Source: Medgadget - September 19, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Materials Pathology Source Type: blogs

New medication advances treatment for chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps
Chronic rhinosinusitis is a long-lasting medical condition, usually caused by infection or exposure to irritants, such as allergies, that affects one in seven American adults. Symptoms include nasal obstruction, nasal congestion, nasal drainage, loss of smell and taste, and facial pain and pressure. Some people with chronic rhinosinusitis also develop additional symptoms, such as asthma and nasal polyps, that are exacerbated by underlying allergies. A nasal polyp is a noncancerous tumor that grows from the lining of the nose or sinuses and affects the drainage system of the sinuses. While chronic rhinosinusitis is not a li...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Maxfield, MD Tags: Allergies Cold and Flu Drugs and Supplements Ear, nose, and throat Health Source Type: blogs

Does Botox reduce the frequency of chronic migraine?
Doesn’t it seem like Botox is showing up everywhere as a medical treatment? Botox is a brand of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), a protein substance originally derived from the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. In its original form it was the toxin responsible for botulism, the paralyzing illness often caused by eating contaminated food. BoNT is now used to treat a number of medical conditions including muscle spasms, excessive sweating, overactive bladder, and some eye muscle conditions. However, one of its most common uses is in the preventive treatment of chronic migraine. Chronic migraine, defined as headache occurrin...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paul Rizzoli, MD Tags: Drugs and Supplements Headache Source Type: blogs

Security Theater and the Blockchain Project
ConclusionsImproving the security of sensitive scientific data is a worthwhile goal. Hash-based audit trails like the one proposed in the UCSF paper might offer some benefit in very limited cases. But claims of immutable and tamper proof data protection should be viewed with great skepticism. Bitcoin solved a very specific problem through a brilliant combination of existing technologies and economic incentives. Cherry picking Bitcoin's technologies neutralizes its hard-won security guarantees.Before committing valuable resources to a block chain project, consider discussing these questions with your team:What specific secu...
Source: Depth-First - September 18, 2019 Category: Chemistry Authors: Richard L. Apodaca Source Type: blogs

Bacterial Swarmbots to Produce Biologic Drugs
Biologics, being a group of drugs synthesized from biological sources, are often produced using bacteria. The manufacturing processes are usually slow and laborious, though they do benefit from economies of scale. Producing small quantities of biologics is typically limited to research labs, and even there it is limited in scope. Researchers at Duke University have now come up with an entirely new way to manufacture biologic drugs using engineered bacteria and tiny capsules. The bacteria, which the researchers have dubbed “swarmbots,” are programmed to know when their density inside the capsule is rising....
Source: Medgadget - September 17, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Materials Medicine Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

Matthew O'Connor Presenting on Underdog Pharmaceuticals at Undoing Aging 2019
Here Matthew O'Connor of the SENS Research Foundation talks about the research that led to founding of Underdog Pharmaceuticals, a biotech startup incubated by the foundation to commercialize a means of targeting 7-ketocholesterol in atherosclerosis and other conditions. Oxidized cholesterols, and largely 7-ketocholesterol, are the primary cause of dysfunction in the macrophage cells normally responsible for preventing the build up of fatty plaques in blood vessel walls. That dysfunction is the cause of atherosclerosis, and the fact that the presence of oxidized cholesterols increases with age is one of the reasons why ath...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 16, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

An Interview with Aubrey de Grey at Longevity.Technology
It is always pleasant to see new efforts to produce longevity-focused interest sites and publications; Longevity.Technology is a recent example, here publishing an interview with Aubrey de Grey of the SENS Research Foundation that touches on recent developments in the field of rejuvenation research. There have been many such news organization initiatives over the past ten to fifteen years, and all too few of them lasted. Hopefully that will change now that an industry of rejuvenation is forming, beginning with the development of senolytic therapies, and ever greater degrees of funding and attention are directed towards thi...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 16, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Getting Off the Emotional Carousel
We all have strong emotions from time to time. We have all had that experience of feeling “emotionally hijacked” in which we feel powerless against the influence our emotions have on our behavior, mood, and general perspective. Strong emotions can prompt powerful thoughts, and sometimes, repetitive thoughts. If we are struggling with a persistent emotion, it can be difficult to put the feeling down or let it go. We carry the worry with us day and night.  But if we can remove ourselves from the subjective experience of any given emotion, we might be able to size up its impact on our lives a little more real...
Source: World of Psychology - September 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bonnie McClure Tags: Mindfulness Personal Self-Help anxiety Fear Rumination stress reduction Worry Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: September 14, 2019
Let’s dive into this week’s Psychology Around the Net for some perspective on how we decide to trust the news we trust, new research on a hormone we secrete when we’re panicked, a survey that shows happy people don’t just ignore the social issues around them, and more. Substance Use in the Food Service Industry: The American Addiction Centers recently conducted a survey that sheds some light on substance use among workers in the food service industry, an industry that is often stereotyped for drug and alcohol use. Among some of the findings: 10% of workers report they work while under the influence...
Source: World of Psychology - September 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net Adhd food service Forgetfulness Happiness Hormones Inattention osteocalcin Pollyanna hypothesis sexism Social Issues Stress Substance Use women Source Type: blogs

Does marijuana really relieve pain? Here ’s what anesthesiologists say.
A guest column by the  American Society of Anesthesiologists, exclusive to KevinMD.com. Marijuana is made from the dried flowers of the cannabis plant. Made of more than 500 chemicals, including over 100 compounds called cannabinoids, the primary active compounds in the plant are tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannab idiol (CBD). THC acts on specific brain cell receptors that react to natural […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 13, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/padma-gulur-and-amanda-nelli" rel="tag" > Padma Gulur, MD and Amanda Nelli, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Meds Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Multicolor Activated Fluorescent Dyes Thanks to Single Atom Replacement
Fluorescent dyes have transformed biomedical science. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2008, for example, was given for the discovery and development of green fluorescent protein, GFP. Ever since GFP became available, scientists have been working on improving fluorescent dyes to better study dynamic processes within biological tissues. Typically, ultraviolet light is used to activate such dyes, but this can be damaging to cells and even trigger them to behave in a certain way, potentially affecting experimental data. Moreover, many long-term experiments are not possible since the cells end up dying before the results c...
Source: Medgadget - September 12, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Materials Medicine News Pathology Source Type: blogs

CDC's Obfuscation of Link Between Illicit THC Carts and Lung Disease Outbreak is Worsening the Situation and Probably Leading to More Cases
Instead of simply acknowledging that a large number of cases in the recent outbreak of severe, acute respiratory failure are due to black market THC vape carts, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is undermining that key information and continuing to do everything it can to pin the outbreak on the use of traditional, nicotine-containing electronic cigarettes. Today, I provide three examples to show how the CDC's fraudulent conduct is causing state officials to issue inappropriate warnings that are almost certainly worsening the situation and leading to more cases of disease.1.Montana: Today, health officia...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - September 9, 2019 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

The Most Telling Sign that CDC is Protecting Illicit Marijuana Drug Dealers While Doing Everything it Can to Pin this Outbreak on Traditional E-Cigarettes
It is clear to me that in its investigation of more than 400 cases of acute respiratory failure tied to the vaping of certain products, the CDC is doing everything it can to undermine the proven connection between most of these cases and illicit marijuana vape carts, while exaggerating a potential, but completely unproven connection with traditional electronic cigarettes.This was highlighted last Friday with the complete split between the FDA and CDC with respect to their public communications and warnings regarding the disease outbreak.The CDC is undermining the observed connection between black market THC/CBD oils and th...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - September 8, 2019 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 9th 2019
We examined human lung tissue from COPD patients and normal control subjects, and found a substantial increase in p16-expressing alveolar cells in COPD patients. Using a transgenic mouse deficient for p16, we demonstrated that lungs of mice lacking p16 were structurally and functionally resistant to CS-induced emphysema due to activation of IGF1/Akt regenerative and protective signaling. Fat Tissue Surrounds Skeletal Muscle to Accelerate Atrophy in Aging and Obesity https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/fat-tissue-surrounds-skeletal-muscle-to-accelerate-atrophy-in-aging-and-obesity/ Researchers her...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 8, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

ALERT: Major Breakthrough in Investigation of " Mysterious " Lung Disease Outbreak
There has been a major breakthrough in the investigation of the outbreak of more than 300 cases of a " mysterious " lung disease that the CDC and many other health agencies have told the public is due to the vaping of electronic cigarettes. And now, everything is starting to make some sense.Illicit THC vape carts that were obtained from a number of case patients that were tested in federal and state laboratories havetested positive for vitamin E acetate, an oil that just started to be usedlate last year as a thickening agent in bootleg THC vape carts. Apparently, forevery single case in New York State for which t...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - September 5, 2019 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

Can vaping damage your lungs? What we do (and don ’t) know
The rising popularity of vaping has been dramatic, especially among teenagers. According to a recent study, about 37% of high school seniors reported vaping in 2018, up from 28% the year before. An estimated 2.1 million middle school and high school students reported using e-cigarettes in 2017; that number jumped to 3.6 million in 2018. Certainly, age restrictions — it’s illegal to sell e-cigarettes to anyone under 21 (18 or 19 in some states) — aren’t preventing use among teens and young adults. And nearly seven million adults 18 or older use e-cigarettes, according to a 2017 survey by the CDC. E-c...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Addiction Adolescent health Lung disease Men's Health Smoking cessation Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Gold Nanoclusters Power a Simple Cancer Urine Test
Researchers at Imperial College London and MIT have developed a simple cancer urine test based on injected gold nano-clusters which enter the urine only in the presence of cancer. So far, the researchers have used the test to detect colon cancer in mice. A positive result is indicated through a simple color change, meaning that the test could be ideal for rapid diagnosis in the field. Finding cancer at an early stage can have a massive impact on treatment outcomes. However, many tests to achieve this can be invasive, expensive, and time consuming, and require a visit to a hospital or clinic. This makes routine screening...
Source: Medgadget - September 4, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Medicine Nanomedicine Oncology Pathology Source Type: blogs

Nanoscale Light Manipulation for Detection of Tiny Pathogens
Viruses are so small that to be able to detect them using light you need instruments that work on the nanoscale. Sensors so perfect are very hard to make, as most manufacturing processes disrupt nanoscale structures. Now, a team at Purdue University has developed a way to combine 3D plasmonic nanoarrays, special light manipulation devices, with peelable films that can be applied to just about anything. They were then able to successfully combine the new stickers with conventional imaging systems to detect extremely small optical signals. Since the manufacturing process is performed in distilled water, at room tem...
Source: Medgadget - September 3, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Diagnostics Materials Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs

VA Pathologist Indicted for Multiple and Continuing Errors, Resulting in Deaths
In what can only be described as a disaster due to organizational failure, a pathologist working at theVeterans Health Care System of the Ozarks has been charged with involuntary manslaughter (see:Former Arkansas VA Doctor Charged With Involuntary Manslaughter In 3 Deaths). Below is an excerpt from the article with the details: A former pathologist at an Arkansas veterans hospital was charged with three counts of involuntary manslaughter in the deaths of three patients whose records he allegedly falsified to conceal his misdiagnoses. According to federal prosecutors, Dr. Robert Morris Levy, 53, is also charg...
Source: Lab Soft News - September 3, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Diagnostics Hospital Executive Management Lab Processes and Procedures Lab Standards Medical Ethics Quality of Care Surgical Pathology Source Type: blogs