How We Got Love All Wrong
Our romanticized idea of love made us believe that love is a feeling. That high we experience when we feel we can't be without the other. When we can't stop thinking about them. That is an obsession, and the chemical and neurological state of the feeling described is both what we experience in the honeymoon stage and obsessive-compulsive disorder. When we call it being in love instead of a mental health condition, it's mainly because the object of the obsession is a person and that it's a temporary state. In that lies the key. It's temporary and does not last, and that is a good thing because if it did, you ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - November 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Thomas Westenholz Tags: family featured psychology relationships love pickthebrain self improvement Source Type: blogs

Mistletoe and no wine
Kiss and tell news just in. For the first time in more than two decades at our home, we finally have a female in our rowan tree, having had a male parasite hanging around for years. European mistletoe – Viscum album The scientific name – Viscum album – basically means “sticky white”. Birds such as blackbirds and thrushes eat the sticky white berries. They get nutrition from the flesh, but chemicals and undigested sticky berry flesh causes them irritation on the way out, which gives them the urge to scratch their cloaca against the bark of a tree to remove the irritation. Flesh and seed are the...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - November 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 30th 2020
We examined specific aspects of metabolism in male PolG+/mut mice at 6 and 12 months of age under three dietary conditions: normal chow (NC) feeding, high-fat feeding (HFD), and 24-hr starvation. We performed mitochondrial proteomics and assessed dynamics and quality control signaling in muscle and liver to determine whether mitochondria respond to mtDNA point mutations by altering morphology and turnover. In the current study, we observed that the accumulation of mtDNA point mutations failed to disrupt metabolic homeostasis and insulin action in male mice, but with aging, metabolic health was likely preserved by counterme...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 29, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

5 Tips for Sustainable Living on a Budget
Many people have a goal to live more sustainably. Unfortunately, it's not always easy to find inexpensive, eco-friendly options. It almost always costs more to create ethically-made products — and those steep price tags can turn away prospective buyers. But did you know certain environmental practices can fit within your budget? Here are a few tips to help you build an environmental-centric lifestyle on a budget. 1. Walk or Bike More Often Here's a simple way to start on your green journey. Let's say you want to grab a beverage at a nearby coffee shop. You could drive a few blocks, but why not walk or bike i...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - November 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Landis Tags: featured happiness productivity tips self-improvement budgeting clean living pickthebrain sustainable living Source Type: blogs

Excessive Mitochondrial Point Mutations Do Not Lead to Obvious Metabolic Dysfunction
We examined specific aspects of metabolism in male PolG+/mut mice at 6 and 12 months of age under three dietary conditions: normal chow (NC) feeding, high-fat feeding (HFD), and 24-hr starvation. We performed mitochondrial proteomics and assessed dynamics and quality control signaling in muscle and liver to determine whether mitochondria respond to mtDNA point mutations by altering morphology and turnover. In the current study, we observed that the accumulation of mtDNA point mutations failed to disrupt metabolic homeostasis and insulin action in male mice, but with aging, metabolic health was likely preserved by counterme...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 25, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Pass the Salt: Sodium ’s Role in Nerve Signaling and Stress on Blood Vessels
Most of the mouthwatering dishes in a Thanksgiving feast share a vital ingredient: salt! Though the words “salt” and “sodium” are often used interchangeably, table salt is actually a compound combining the elements sodium and chloride. Table salt is the most common form that sodium takes on Earth. Many other sodium compounds are also useful to us. For instance, you might use baking soda, also known as sodium bicarbonate, in preparing Thanksgiving treats. Sodium compounds are also used in soaps and cosmetics and in producing paper, glass, metals, medicines, and more. The best-known sodium co...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - November 25, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacology Cellular Processes Source Type: blogs

The Common Toxins That Damage IQ (M)
The two largest chemical contributors to IQ loss. → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - November 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Intelligence subscribers-only Source Type: blogs

Inhibiting Protein Glycation as an Approach to Reduce the Contribution of AGEs to Aging
In today's open access paper, researchers propose the use of sodium 4-phenylbutyrate to inhibit protein glycation, reducing the creation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) in the body, and thus limit the contribution of this class of compounds to aging and disease. AGEs are quite varied and comparatively poorly studied; it is still the case that new ones are being found, and there is considerable room for debate on which AGEs are more or less important to aging and outcomes of metabolic diseases such as diabetes. Short-lived AGEs, easily broken down, are inflammatory via the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), and this may be ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 23, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Highly Realistic 3D Printed Human Hearts
Physical models of organs and tissues have many uses in clinical medicine, particularly when preparing for challenging surgeries. Naturally, the heart is commonly modeled using 3D printing to most closely mimic the nuances of unique patient anatomies. This is useful when preparing for procedures such as mitral valve repairs, but typically this is accomplished using printers that lay down layers of hard plastic or rubber that mostly only replicate the shape of the heart. The elasticity, on the other hand, is very much unlike that of real human hearts. A team at Carnegie Mellon University has now managed to print a 3D mod...
Source: Medgadget - November 23, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Materials Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 23rd 2020
In conclusion, the study indicates that HBOT may induce significant senolytic effects that include significantly increasing telomere length and clearance of senescent cells in the aging populations. Data on the Prevalence of Liver Fibrosis in Middle Age https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/11/data-on-the-prevalence-of-liver-fibrosis-in-middle-age/ Fibrosis is a consequence of age-related disarray in tissue maintenance processes, leading to the deposition of scar-like collagen that disrupts tissue structure and function. It is an ultimately fatal issue for which there are only poor treatment options a...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 22, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Senescent Cells Contribute to Lowered NAD+ Levels in Aging
Mitochondria are the power plants of the cell, packaging the chemical energy store molecule adenosine triphosphate that is used to power cellular processes. NAD+ is important to mitochondrial function, but levels fall with age for reasons that have yet to be fully explored. The outcome is less efficient mitochondria, a decline that is implicated in the onset and progression of numerous age-related diseases. Reduced mitochondrial function means less functional cells, tissues, and organs, and particularly so in energy-hungry parts of the body such as the brain and muscles. The research and development community has be...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 18, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

AMR – what it is and why you should know about it
  Today marks the beginning of World Antimicrobial Awareness Week, driven by the World Health Organisation to improve global knowledge of antibiotic drugs. Running from the 18th to the 24th of November, the awareness initiative is focused on uniting to preserve effective antimicrobials and reduce or prevent the spread of Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR), which is becoming an increasing concern across the world. Before we jump deeper into the AMR and the global impact it will have if not addressed, let’s briefly cover the history of antimicrobials in medicine.  1910, the first breakthrough in antimicrobial tre...
Source: GIDEON blog - November 18, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Events News Source Type: blogs

What is antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and why you should know about it
  Today marks the beginning of World Antimicrobial Awareness Week, driven by the World Health Organisation to improve global knowledge of antibiotic drugs. Running from the 18th to the 24th of November, the awareness initiative is focused on uniting to preserve effective antimicrobials and reduce or prevent the spread of Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR), which is becoming an increasing concern across the world. Before we jump deeper into the AMR and the global impact it will have if not addressed, let’s briefly cover the history of antimicrobials in medicine.  1910, the first breakthrough in antimicrobial tre...
Source: GIDEON blog - November 18, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Events News Source Type: blogs

Why Romanticized Love is Destroying Relationships
Divorce rates are currently at 40-50% in the US and even higher for subsequential marriages. Marriage satisfaction is 58%, so something is not working. What has gone wrong? Love is the top reason for people getting married in the USA. But where did this come from? We have to start with a history lesson, so buckle up. Throughout history, marriage used to be an arrangement created to promote the family unit's survival and safety. The industrial age changed all that. As safety increased and resources became independent of the tribal collective to survive, individuality took form. They didn't rely on...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - November 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Thomas Westenholz Tags: featured happiness psychology relationships self-improvement love marriage relationship advice self improvement Source Type: blogs

Q & A With Nobel Laureate and CRISPR Scientist Jennifer Doudna
Jennifer Doudna, Ph.D. Credit: University of California, Berkeley. The 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Jennifer Doudna, Ph.D., and Emmanuelle Charpentier, Ph.D., for the development of the gene-editing tool CRISPR. Dr. Doudna shared her thoughts on the award and answered questions about CRISPR in a live chat with NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. Here are a few highlights from the interview. Q: How did you find out that you won the Nobel Prize? A: It’s a little bit of an embarrassing story. I slept through a very important phone call and finally woke up when a reporter called me. I was just c...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - November 18, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Being a Scientist Genes Tools and Techniques Cool Tools/Techniques CRISPR DNA Gene Editing Nobel Prize Source Type: blogs

Postdoc Fellowship Opportunity: Naval Research Laboratory
Postdoctoral Opportunity at Naval Research Laboratory: Microbiology and Synthetic Biology The Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington DC invites applications for a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in microbiology. By participating DoD and NASA funded research programs, the successful candidate will be responsible for (1) investigating microorganisms (particularly fungi) responsive and adaptive to radiation in nature and the space environment, and identifying the responding biomarkers with genetic, and –omic (transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic) metho...
Source: Fungal Genomes and Comparative Genomics - November 18, 2020 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Jason Stajich Tags: postdoc black fungi National Research Council Postdoc Program Naval Research Laboratory Washington DC Source Type: blogs

Migraine headaches: Could nerve stimulation help?
Are you one of the 20 million to 40 million people in the US suffering with migraine headaches? If so, here’s news worth noting: The FDA has just approved an over-the-counter nerve stimulation device that delivers mild electrical shocks to the forehead as a way to prevent or treat migraine headaches. This might seem like an unlikely way to treat migraines, so how did we get here? And what’s the evidence that it works? Is this a game changer? Hype? Or a treatment that falls somewhere in between? Our changing understanding of what causes migraines Blood vessels throughout the body, including those near the brain,...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Headache Health Migraines Pain Management Prevention Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 9th 2020
In this study, young adult mice were submitted to endurance exercise training and the function, differentiation, and metabolic characteristics of satellite cells were investigated in vivo and in vitro. We found that injured muscles from endurance-exercised mice display improved regenerative capacity, demonstrated through higher densities of newly formed myofibres compared with controls (evidenced by an increase in embryonic myosin heavy chain expression), as well as lower inflammation (evidenced by quantifying CD68-marked macrophages), and reduced fibrosis. Enhanced myogenic function was accompanied by an increased ...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 8, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Improving the Structure of Tissue Engineered Heart Patches
It remains challenging to produce large or thick sections of engineered tissue because there is no widely adopted, feasible approach to creating sufficient dense and structured blood vessel networks. A capillary network is needed to supply the inner sections of larger blocks of tissue, and without this networking cells die due to lack of nutrients and oxygen. While some very promising lines of work exist, such as that under development at Volumetric, they are not yet broadly employed in the research community. This state of affairs limits the applications of tissue engineering to cases in which thin sheets of tissue can be...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 4, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Freezing a Moment in Time: Snapshots of Cryo-EM Research
To get a look at cell components that are too small to see with a normal light microscope, scientists often use cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). As the prefix cryo- means “cold” or “freezing,” cryo-EM involves rapidly freezing a cell, virus, molecular complex, or other structure to prevent water molecules from forming crystals. This preserves the sample in its natural state and keeps it still so that it can be imaged with an electron microscope, which uses beams of electrons instead of light. Some electrons are scattered by the sample, while others pass through it and through magnetic lenses to l...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - November 4, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Molecular Structures Tools and Techniques Cellular Imaging Cellular Processes Cool Tools/Techniques Cryo-Electron Microscopy Research Roundup Source Type: blogs

Some Other Ballot Measures To Watch
Walter OlsonVoters will face the usual wide array ofstate and local ballot measures tomorrow, and my colleagues have already done an excellent job reviewing many of the highlights. In particular, you should check out Chris Edwards ’s posts onincome,sales, andproperty tax measures, andwho contributes, as well as onmarijuana legalization measures under consideration in four states, Arizona, Montana, New Jersey, and South Dakota.Michael Tanner has looked at California measures related to poverty, including important votes on rent control andfreelance work.Amid a host of generally dispiriting propositions before San...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 2, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Walter Olson Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 2nd 2020
In conclusion, the circulating antibody repertoire has increased binding to thousands of peptides in older donors, which can be represented as an immune age. Increased immune age is associated with autoimmune disease, acute inflammatory disease severity, and may be a broadly relevant biomarker of immune function in health, disease, and therapeutic intervention. The immune age has the potential for wide-spread use in clinical and consumer settings. In Vivo Reprogramming Improves Cognitive Function in Old Mice https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/10/in-vivo-reprogramming-improves-cognitive-function-in-old-mic...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 1, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Towards Restoration of Mitophagy to Reverse Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Alzheimer's Disease
Mitochondria are the power plants of the cell, a herd of bacteria-like organelles responsible for packaging energy store molecules used to power the chemistry of life. With age, mitochondria become dysfunctional throughout the body, for reasons that are not yet fully understood, but which clearly contribute to the onset of age-related declines and diseases. There is certainly stochastic damage to mitochondrial DNA that can lead to a small but significant number of pathological cells dumping oxidizing molecules into the surrounding tissue, but the general malaise of mitochondria is more sweeping than this. One impor...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 29, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Ending Constipation from Suboxone and Buprenorphine
Constipation is one of the few potential side effects caused by buprenorphine medications, including Suboxone Film and Zubsolv. Fortunately, ‘binding up’ can be managed by making minor changes to your lifestyle. Constipation from buprenorphine is caused by activation of mu opioid receptors in the small and large intestine, reducing the sequential squeezing and relaxation (called peristalsis) that pushes bowel contents forward. All opioids have similar effects, mimicking our natural endorphins throughout the body. Endorphins are released during trauma to naturally block pain and to divert blood flow to areas ...
Source: Suboxone Talk Zone - October 28, 2020 Category: Addiction Authors: admin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Another New Senolytic Prodrug is Demonstrated to Reverse Frailty and Cognitive Function in Old Mice
Today's open access paper reports on the use of a prodrug senolytic strategy to reverse aspects of aging in mice via the selective destruction of senescent cells. A prodrug is a small molecule, usually innocuous, that can be converted into an active drug molecule by the action of specific proteins in the body. For example a drug can be made into a prodrug by the addition of further chemical structure that (a) renders it inert, and (b) is cleaved away by an enzyme inside cells. Ideally, the inactive prodrug is designed such that this conversion to an active drug molecule only takes place where and when the drug is needed. ...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 28, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Another New Senolytic Prodrug is Demonstrated to Reverse Frailty and Loss of Cognitive Function in Old Mice
Today's open access paper reports on the use of a prodrug senolytic strategy to reverse aspects of aging in mice via the selective destruction of senescent cells. A prodrug is a small molecule, usually innocuous, that can be converted into an active drug molecule by the action of specific proteins in the body. For example a drug can be made into a prodrug by the addition of further chemical structure that (a) renders it inert, and (b) is cleaved away by an enzyme inside cells. Ideally, the inactive prodrug is designed such that this conversion to an active drug molecule only takes place where and when the drug is needed. ...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 28, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Can You Say “ Chemputer ” ?
By KIM BELLARD I learned a new word this week: “chemputer.”   It’s not a new word – it’s been around since at least 2012 — but chances are, unless you are a chemist or maybe a synthetic biologist, it’s not a word you knew it either.   Even if you don’t care about chemistry, biology, or, for that matter, etymology, this is something you might want to pay attention to, because it may end up revolutionizing healthcare.  The term is credited to Professor Lee Cronin of the University of Glascow.  Back in 2012, when he was first discussing th...
Source: The Health Care Blog - October 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Tech chemputer Kim Bellard Source Type: blogs

Mind-body medicine in addiction recovery
As someone who struggled with a miserable opiate addiction for 10 years, and who has treated hundreds of people for various addictions, I am increasingly impressed with the ways in which mind-body medicine can be a critical component of recovery from addiction. Mind-body medicine is the use of behavioral and lifestyle interventions, such as meditation, relaxation, yoga, acupuncture, and mindfulness, to holistically address medical problems. Mind-body treatments can be integrated with traditional medical treatments, or used as standalone treatments for certain conditions. Mind-body medicine is now being studied by the Natio...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Peter Grinspoon, MD Tags: Addiction Alcohol Complementary and alternative medicine Mind body medicine Source Type: blogs

What your skin should expect when you ’re expecting
Are you pregnant or thinking of becoming pregnant? You’re probably prepared for morning sickness, weight gain, and an expanding belly. But did you know your skin can also undergo a variety of changes when you’re expecting? These changes are due to normal alterations in hormones that occur during pregnancy. Rest assured, most skin conditions that develop or worsen during pregnancy are benign, and tend to improve following delivery. Darkening of the skin A large majority of women experience darkening of their skin due to hormone shifts that occur during pregnancy. You may notice that the areas around your thighs,...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kristina Liu, MD, MHS Tags: Pregnancy Skin and Hair Care Source Type: blogs

A Workbench for Machine Learning in Chemistry
Kick the tires on a short, hackable aqueous solubility predictor built from a DeepChem graph convolutional network. (Source: Depth-First)
Source: Depth-First - October 26, 2020 Category: Chemistry Authors: Richard L. Apodaca Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 26th 2020
In conclusion, all NAFLD histological stages were associated with significantly increased overall mortality, and this risk increased progressively with worsening NAFLD histology. Most of this excess mortality was from extrahepatic cancer and cirrhosis, while in contrast, the contributions of cardiovascular disease and HCC were modest. BMP6 as a Target for Pro-Angiogenic Therapies https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/10/bmp6-as-a-target-for-pro-angiogenic-therapies/ Today's research materials are focused on the fine details of angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, and point to BMP6 as a po...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 25, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

I will be a doctor because I was once a patient
I found out I was pregnant the night before a chemistry exam. I had taken a break from stoichiometry to take a very different kind of test, one I bought from the nearest Walmart to avoid any indiscretion on the family Amazon account. After the second pink line appeared, clear as day, I got up […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 24, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/shira-fishbach" rel="tag" > Shira Fishbach < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician OB/GYN Source Type: blogs

Tariffs, Michigan, and the Perils of “Political Protectionism”
Scott LincicomeConventional wisdom among the D.C. punditocracy is that protectionism, while likely bad economics, is good politics because it can boost critical “Rust Belt” swing states that have large manufacturing sectors and have been hit hard by globalization. A new St. Louis Fed study, however, shows why this rudimentary calculus is misguided.Examining the effect of President Trump ’s “trade wars” (i.e., tariffs and foreign retaliation) on U.S. manufacturing industries and states that are disproportionately dependent on imports or exports, authors Ana Maria Santacreu and Makenzi...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 23, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Scott Lincicome Source Type: blogs

Not Just Faxes
By KIM BELLARD I missed it when it was first announced in Japan, but fortunately the U.S. mainstream media has finally picked up on the story, with articles in both The Washington Post and The Wall Street Journal: Japan’s new Administrative Reform Minister Taro Kono has “declared war” on fax machines, among other paper-based traditions.  Wait, what?  “Administrative Reform Minister?”  The U.S., or at least the U.S. healthcare system, has to hear about this.  Mr. Kono is a well known Japanese politician, including stints as Defense Minister and Foreign Minister....
Source: The Health Care Blog - October 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Tech faxes Kim Bellard Source Type: blogs

Smartphone Dongle for Cancer Biomarker Measurement
Researchers at McMaster and Brock universities in Canada have developed a hand-held device that can provide rapid measurements of cancer biomarkers in blood samples. Termed an electrochemical bio‐barcode assay, the device could be used to measure a variety of health markers at home, and is similar to the devices used by patients with diabetes to measure blood glucose levels. Monitoring and detecting disease using blood-based biomarkers typically requires a blood sample to be sent to a laboratory and potentially days or weeks before a result is available. Moreover, such labs are packed with expensive and bulky equipmen...
Source: Medgadget - October 20, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Genetics Oncology Urology Source Type: blogs

Wanted: Program Director, Pharmacological and Physiological Sciences Branch
We’re recruiting for an accomplished scientist with interest and experience in sepsis, critical illness, and/or polytraumatic injury join the Pharmacological and Physiological Sciences (PPS) Branch of the Division of Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry (PPBC). The successful applicant will be responsible for scientific and administrative management of a portfolio of research, career development, and training grants. Opportunities also exist for Small Business Innovation and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) grants. The PPS Branch of PPBC supports both basic and clinical researc...
Source: NIGMS Feedback Loop Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - October 19, 2020 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Job Announcements Source Type: blogs

Targeting NAD+ Metabolism for the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease
Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is important to mitochondrial function, the supply of chemical energy store molecules to power cellular processes, and thus to cell and tissue function. Levels of NAD+ decline with age, a part of the deterioration of mitochondrial function throughout the body:. Too little NAD+ is created, too little NAD+ is recycled after use. This downturn occurs for reasons in which the proximate causes are fairly clear, meaning which of the other molecules required for NAD+ synthesis and recycling come to be in short supply in old tissues, but a map of the deeper connections to the known root cau...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 19, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

SMILES Reading Performance: RDKit vs ChemCore
Rust and C++/Python cheminformatics toolkits face off on a core task. (Source: Depth-First)
Source: Depth-First - October 19, 2020 Category: Chemistry Authors: Richard L. Apodaca Source Type: blogs

Acute coronary occlusion seen in paced *and* non-paced ECGs
This was written by Brooks Walsh@BrooksWalsh, an emergency physician in Connecticut.A paced ECGThe family of a very elderly person called EMS when they became short of breath. The patient had a number of comorbidities, including a pacemaker.EMS obtained a number of ECGs, including this one:Could a cath lab activation be justified with this ECG?Well, yes, it should be!The classic- and modified-Sgarbossa criteria for determining acute MI in the context of a paced rhythm are likely already well appreciated by readers of this blog. This ECG is a great illustration of those rules, particularly the criterion that ST elevation th...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - October 19, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Brooks Walsh Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 19th 2020
In conclusion, we found that regardless of the presence of multimorbidity, engaging in a healthier lifestyle was associated with up to 6.3 years longer life for men and 7.6 years for women; however, not all lifestyle risk factors equally correlated with life expectancy, with smoking being significantly worse than others. A Hydrogel Scaffold to Encourage Peripheral Nerve Regeneration https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/10/a-hydrogel-scaffold-to-encourage-peripheral-nerve-regeneration/ The nervous system of mammals is poorly regenerative at best. The use of implantable scaffold materials is one of the...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 18, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Big Pharma Senolytics Programs are Getting Underway
Biotech startups working in a new and credible field of clinical development only have a few years before large pharmaceutical companies take notice and begin to enter the arena. This shift in the competitive landscape is a good thing for patients, as a great deal more funding will be deployed to expand the space of possible therapies. Further, small companies with viable approaches are more likely to be acquired, increasing the odds that specific programs will continue through to clinical trials. It doesn't solve the problem of the burdensome regulatory system that slows all progress, but it does improve the odds of pushi...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 15, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Longevity Industry Source Type: blogs

Developing a Culture of Safety in Biomedical Research Training
NIGMS is committed to supporting safety in the nation’s biomedical research and training environments. Last April, we shared with you resources for enhancing lab safety in biomedical research training environments. Now, in a perspective in the current issue of Molecular Biology of the Cell (MBoC), we focus on strategies for improving laboratory safety. Some of these strategies are also applicable to other forms of safety including the prevention of harassment, intimidation, and discrimination. We frame the problem of laboratory safety using a number of recent examples of tragic accidents, highlight some of the lesson...
Source: NIGMS Feedback Loop Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - October 15, 2020 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Director’s Messages News Resources Training/Fellowships/Career Development Research Resources Science Education Webinars Source Type: blogs

A Hydrogel Scaffold to Encourage Peripheral Nerve Regeneration
The nervous system of mammals is poorly regenerative at best. The use of implantable scaffold materials is one of the strategies under development in the tissue engineering community to encourage greater degrees of regrowth following nerve damage. Such materials can be infused with chemical cues to guide cell activity, or provided with other useful properties such as conductivity. The work noted here is an example of this field of research and development, quite similar to many other studies conducted over the past decade or more. As for all medical research in this heavily regulated environment, it is slow to make it to t...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 14, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

How Well Do You Know Yourself? Research On Self-Insight, Digested
By Emma Young “There are three things extremely hard: steel, a diamond, and to know one’s self.” – Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard’s Almanac, 1750. Franklin was writing over 250 years ago. Surely we humans have learned strategies since then to aid self-insight — and avoid well-known pitfalls. Most of us are familiar, for example, with the better-than-average effect, the finding that most of us rank ourselves above average at everything from driving ability to desirable personality traits (even though of course we can’t all be right). So armed with this kind of knowledge,...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - October 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Cognition Feature The self Source Type: blogs

TWiV 671: Prizes, polio, and a pandemic puzzle
Daniel Griffin provides a clinical report on COVID-19, then Amy joins us to discuss the 2020 Chemistry Nobel Prize for gene editing using CRISPR/Cas9, continuing circulation of poliovirus in Afghanistan, inborn errors of interferon in patients with severe COVID-19, and listener questions. Click arrow to playDownload TWiV 671 (102 MB .mp3, 170 min)Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - October 12, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology coronavirus COVID-19 diagnostic test inborn errors interferon lateral flow assay pandemic polio eradication poliomyelitis SARS-CoV-2 SNIP vaccine viral viruses Source Type: blogs

Start Seeing Valence and Core Electrons
Inexpensive molecular validation through simple integer arithmetic. (Source: Depth-First)
Source: Depth-First - October 12, 2020 Category: Chemistry Authors: Richard L. Apodaca Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 12th 2020
We report that FMT from aged donors led to impaired spatial learning and memory in young adult recipients, whereas anxiety, explorative behaviour, and locomotor activity remained unaffected. This was paralleled by altered expression of proteins involved in synaptic plasticity and neurotransmission in the hippocampus. Also, a strong reduction of bacteria associated with short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) production (Lachnospiraceae, Faecalibaculum, and Ruminococcaceae) and disorders of the CNS (Prevotellaceae and Ruminococcaceae) was observed. Finally, the detrimental effect of FMT from aged donors on the CNS was confir...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 11, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Large Family Beset by Schizophrenia
In today’s show, Gabe talks with Robert Kolker, author of the New York Times bestselling — and Oprah’s book club pick — book Hidden Valley Road. This non-fiction biography is the true story of a mid-century American family besieged by schizophrenia. Of their 12 children, 6 struggled with the severe mental disorder.  Join us for the incredible story of the family who became science’s greatest hope in the quest to understand schizophrenia. SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW   Guest information for ‘Robert Kolker- Large Family Schizophrenia’ Podcast Episode Robert Kolker is th...
Source: World of Psychology - October 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: Family General Interview Schizophrenia The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

The Evolution Of COVID-19 Rapid Tests Paves The Way For At-Home Lab Tests
In January of this year, oblivious of the fact that we were about to engage in a twisted round of real-life Jumanji, we released our annual digital health trends e-book. Among one of our 12 forecasts for 2020 was that at-home blood tests would gain traction and become the new direct-to-consumer DNA testing in terms of adoption and availability. While the pandemic threw everyone off guard and messed up regular forecasts, we might have been onto something with our predicted trend. With the need to limit physical contact and trace COVID-positive individuals rapidly, public health authorities worldwide are finding rapid, po...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 6, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Healthcare Design Healthcare Policy fda testing outbreak covid19 at-home tests WHO point-of-care POC antibodies virus nasal swab test PCR Abbot Source Type: blogs

Senolytics as an Arm of Regenerative Medicine for the Elderly
Senolytic therapies are those that selectively destroy the senescent cells that accumulate in tissues with age. These cells secrete a potent mix of signals that produce chronic inflammation and degrade tissue function, particularly the ability of tissues to maintain and repair themselves. While many well known interventions that improve long-term health - exercise, calorie restriction, and so forth - are likely to modestly lower the burden of senescent cells over time, by increasing the pace of destruction or lowering the pace of creation, the senolytic label is reserved for therapies that can be applied to very quickly de...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 5, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs