What the Science Really Says About Grilled Meat and Cancer Risk
As backyard cookout season kicks into high gear, many people may be eyeing their sizzling burgers and dogs with suspicion. And for good reason: a number of studies published in the past two decades have turned up evidence that eating charred, smoked, and well-done meat could raise cancer risk—pancreatic, colorectal, and prostate cancers, in particular. A 2010 review of the evidence on cancer and “well-done” meat, conducted by researchers at Vanderbilt University, concluded that “the majority of these studies have shown that high intake of well-done meat and high exposure to meat carcinogens, particu...
Source: TIME: Health - June 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Cancer Diet & Fitness Nutrition Source Type: news

South Africa: Pharmaceuticals and Industrial Chemicals Found in Fish Caught Off Cape Town's Coast
[GroundUp] The ocean around Cape Town is so polluted that pharmaceutical and industrial chemical compounds are accumulating in the flesh of fish caught off the coast. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 25, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Banning dangerous chemicals could save the US billions | Leonardo Trasande
It ’s a myth that environmental regulations stifle economic productivity. Harmful chemicals cost the US $340bn a yearThe Trump administration has argued that environmental regulations hold back economic productivity. Yet history suggests that the opposite is the case.Look at phasing out lead in gasoline. To this day, the US receives a $200bn annual economic stimulus package each year because lead levels in children plummeted when the US Environmental Protection Agency moved to protect children.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Leonardo Trasande Tags: US news Environment Pollution Science Source Type: news

Lifelong ill-health after exposure to chemical weapons
(University of Gothenburg) People exposed to chemical warfare agents (CWAs) often incur chronic damage to their lungs, skin and eyes, for example. They also frequently succumb to depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts. This is shown by research on survivors from the 1988 gas attacks against Kurdish Halabja in Iraq. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ultrasmall nanoclusters and carbon quantum dots show promise for acute kidney injury
(Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging) Acute kidney injury (AKI) often complicates the treatment outcomes of hospitalized patients, resulting in dangerous levels of toxic chemicals accumulating in the blood and causing numerous deaths annually. Currently, only supportive treatment is available for AKI, but two related research studies presented at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging offer hope for effective treatment and prevention. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Flying salt shakers of death:' Fungal-infected zombie cicadas, explained by WVU research
(West Virginia University) Cicadas can carry a fungus containing chemicals similar to those found in hallucinogenic mushrooms, making them zombie-like fliers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Popular FDA-approved heart pill found to contain deadly, cancer-causing chemical
(Natural News) An online pharmacy company known as Valisure, which is currently licensed to operate in 37 states, has issued an urgent warning to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) about a cancer-causing chemical found in valsartan, a popular blood pressure pharmaceutical manufactured by Novartis and several other drug companies. As it turns out,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The potential neuroprotective properties of salidroside from Rhodiola rosea
(Natural News) Researchers from China investigated the potential neuroprotective properties of salidroside, a chemical compound found in the plant Rhodiola rosea. Their findings were published in The American Journal of Chinese Medicine. Microglial activation leads to increased production of pro-inflammatory enzymes and cytokines, which is considered to be a key factor in neurodegenerative diseases. Only a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health Tip: Protect Your Water Supply
-- Clean water is vital for the survival, while contaminated water can be harm human health, says MedlinePlus. To help protect your water supply, the government website urges: Do not pour household chemicals down the drain. Take paints,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 24, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Shedding light on rhodopsin dynamics in the retina
(Kobe University) Photoreceptor cells in our eyes can adjust to both weak and strong light levels, but we still don't know exactly how they do it. Emeritus Professor Fumio Hayashi of Kobe University and his colleagues revealed that the photoreceptor protein rhodopsin forms transient clusters within the disc membranes in retina. These clusters are concentrated in the center of disc membranes, and act as platforms in the process of light to chemical signal conversion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Award for Nicolas Plumer é
(Ruhr-University Bochum) Bochum-based chemist Professor Nicolas Plumer é has been awarded the Luigi Galvani Prize by the Bioelectrochemical Society. The prize is awarded every two years to a researcher who has made an outstanding contribution to the field of bioelectrochemistry. Plumer é has successfully optimised conductive hydrogels and polymers for bioelectrocatalytic systems. The prize was presented at the International Symposium on Bioelectrochemistry and Bioenergetics in Limerick in May 2019. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 24, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Big data says food is too sweet
(Monell Chemical Senses Center) New research from the Monell Center analyzed nearly 400,000 food reviews posted by Amazon customers to gain real-world insight into the food choices that people make. The findings reveal that many people find the foods in today's marketplace to be too sweet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New lab seeks supramolecular solutions for gene therapy
A new EU-funded laboratory in Romania has given researchers a head start in applying the insights of supramolecular chemistry to biomedical applications such as gene therapy, tissue engineering and drug delivery. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - June 24, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Do you need to clean your lungs? Natural ways to improve your respiratory health
(Natural News) The global population is booming, cities are expanding at a rapid pace, and there is no end in sight to the trend of urbanization. One of the results of all this growth and development is air pollution, where chemicals and other pollutants build up in the air and pose a serious danger to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Oil eating microbes are destroying sunken Nazi sub thanks to the Deepwater Horizon spill
(Natural News) Remember when British Petroleum (BP), Halliburton, and ConocoPhillips indiscriminately dumped tens of thousands of gallons of Corexit into the Gulf of Mexico to supposedly remedy the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil disaster? Well according to experts, this nasty chemical concoction is still floating around in that giant “bathtub,” and is actually now eating away... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Long-term outlooks: Australian farmers eliminate herbicide-resistant "superweeds" using natural non-herbicidal methods
(Natural News) Decades ago, Australian farmers stopped using glyphosate and other herbicides to get rid of superweeds and seeds in their plots. Instead, they used natural methods of weed control and management that worked much better than toxic chemicals. Farms in Western Australia raise wheat and barley as the main food crops. The biggest threat comes from ryegrass superweeds that... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

150 years of the periodic table – Science Weekly podcast
Nicola Davis invites Prof Brigitte Van Tiggelen and Dr Peter Wothers on to the podcast to look at how the periodic table took shape and asks whether it might now be in jeopardyContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Nicola Davis and produced by Graihagh Jackson Tags: Periodic table Chemistry History of science Source Type: news

'Nanoemulsion' gels offer new way to deliver drugs through the skin
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT chemical engineers have devised a new way to create nanoemulsions, very tiny droplets of one liquid suspended within another. They also developed a way to easily convert nanoemulsions to a gel when they reach body temperature, which could be useful for developing materials that can deliver medication when rubbed on skin or injected into the body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hydrogen-natural gas hydrates harvested by natural gas
(The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)) A recent study has suggested a new strategy for stably storing hydrogen, using natural gas as a stabilizer. The research proposed a practical gas phase modulator based synthesis of HNGB without generating chemical waste after dissociation for the immediate service. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A new drug target for chemically induced Parkinson's disease
(University of Pennsylvania) An enzyme that modifies chemicals formed in the body by alcohol, tobacco, and certain foods may be a new target for treating Parkinson's disease, according to a team led by University of Pennsylvania scientists. The altered compounds, the researchers found, may play a role in triggering the onset or advancing the progression of the neurodegenerative condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers discover traditional fluid flow observations may miss the big picture
(Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology) Before and after comparisons don't tell the full story of chemical reactions in flowing fluids, such as those in drug delivery systems, according to a new study from a collaboration between Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) and Nihon University based in Japan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The brains of pairs of animals synchronize during social interaction
FINDINGSUCLA researchers have observed that the brains of pairs of animals synchronize during social situations. The synchronized activity not only arose during various types of social behavior, but also the level of synchronization actually predicted how much the animals would interact. The team also found that brain synchrony arises from different subsets of neurons that encode the behavior of the self vs. the social partner, and that the dominant animal ’s behavior tends to drive synchronization more than behavior of the subordinate.BACKGROUNDConsiderable research has been devoted to studying brain activity in ind...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 20, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Is Plastic Pollution Depriving Us of Oxygen?
This article was originally published on JSTOR Daily. Read the original article here.   (Source: TIME: Science)
Source: TIME: Science - June 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Lina Zeldovich / JSTOR Daily Tags: Uncategorized climate Environment onetime syndication Source Type: news

Sweden & France commit to tackling EDCs
Both Sweden and France have updated their declarations on endocrine disruptors to achieve'optimal health outcomes while recognising the interconnection between people, animals, plants and their shared environment.'Chemical Watch (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - June 20, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Researchers develop a new, non-optical way to visualize DNA, cells, and tissues
(Cell Press) Researchers have come up with a new way to image cell populations and their genetic contents. Their study, appearing June 20 in the journal Cell, describes how a technique called DNA microscopy helps illuminate the spatial organization of genetic material within cells and tissues without specialized, expensive optical equipment. Using only the sample plus reagents delivered with pipettes, DNA microscopy prompts a specimen to provide spatial information about itself as part of a chemical reaction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 20, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Gold for silver: A chemical barter
(Tokyo University of Science) From effective medicines to molecular sensors to fuel cells, metal clusters are becoming fundamentally useful in the health, environment, and energy sectors. This diverse functionality of clusters arises from the variability in size and type. Professor Yuichi Negishi, from Tokyo University of Science, adds to this ongoing tale by explaining the dynamics of the metal cluster, thiolate-protected gold-silver alloy, in solution; this helps in understanding the stability, geometry, and tenability of these clusters for their applications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Advanced NMR at Ames Lab captures new details in nanoparticle structures
(DOE/Ames Laboratory) Advanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have revealed surprising details about the structure of a key group of materials in nanotechology, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), and the placement of their active chemical sites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Early brain 'signs of Parkinson's' found
Changes in a chemical called serotonin were found 15 to 20 years in advance of symptoms. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - June 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Photoexcitation of flavoenzymes enables a stereoselective radical cyclization
Photoexcitation is a common strategy for initiating radical reactions in chemical synthesis. We found that photoexcitation of flavin-dependent "ene"-reductases changes their catalytic function, enabling these enzymes to promote an asymmetric radical cyclization. This reactivity enables the construction of five-, six-, seven-, and eight-membered lactams with stereochemical preference conferred by the enzyme active site. After formation of a prochiral radical, the enzyme guides the delivery of a hydrogen atom from flavin—a challenging feat for small-molecule chemical reagents. The initial electron transfer oc...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Biegasiewicz, K. F., Cooper, S. J., Gao, X., Oblinsky, D. G., Kim, J. H., Garfinkle, S. E., Joyce, L. A., Sandoval, B. A., Scholes, G. D., Hyster, T. K. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Structural identification of a hotspot on CFTR for potentiation
Cystic fibrosis is a fatal disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Two main categories of drugs are being developed: correctors that improve folding of CFTR and potentiators that recover the function of CFTR. Here, we report two cryo–electron microscopy structures of human CFTR in complex with potentiators: one with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved drug ivacaftor at 3.3-angstrom resolution and the other with an investigational drug, GLPG1837, at 3.2-angstrom resolution. These two drugs, although chemically dissimilar, bind to the same si...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Liu, F., Zhang, Z., Levit, A., Levring, J., Touhara, K. K., Shoichet, B. K., Chen, J. Tags: Biochemistry reports Source Type: news

A metal-free route to PET probes
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Light teaches (co)enzymes new tricks
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Funk, M. A. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Mobile particles in colloidal crystals
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Szuromi, P. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Direct arene C-H fluorination with 18F- via organic photoredox catalysis
Positron emission tomography (PET) plays key roles in drug discovery and development, as well as medical imaging. However, there is a dearth of efficient and simple radiolabeling methods for aromatic C–H bonds, which limits advancements in PET radiotracer development. Here, we disclose a mild method for the fluorine-18 (18F)–fluorination of aromatic C–H bonds by an [18F]F– salt via organic photoredox catalysis under blue light illumination. This strategy was applied to the synthesis of a wide range of 18F-labeled arenes and heteroaromatics, including pharmaceutical compounds. These products can serv...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Chen, W., Huang, Z., Tay, N. E. S., Giglio, B., Wang, M., Wang, H., Wu, Z., Nicewicz, D. A., Li, Z. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Particle analogs of electrons in colloidal crystals
A versatile method for the design of colloidal crystals involves the use of DNA as a particle-directing ligand. With such systems, DNA-nanoparticle conjugates are considered programmable atom equivalents (PAEs), and design rules have been devised to engineer crystallization outcomes. This work shows that when reduced in size and DNA grafting density, PAEs behave as electron equivalents (EEs), roaming through and stabilizing the lattices defined by larger PAEs, as electrons do in metals in the classical picture. This discovery defines a new property of colloidal crystals—metallicity—that is characterized by the ...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Girard, M., Wang, S., Du, J. S., Das, A., Huang, Z., Dravid, V. P., Lee, B., Mirkin, C. A., Olvera de la Cruz, M. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Nearly HALF of young people do not use deodorant, poll finds
The data, from YouGov, fit neatly into the trend of 'natural deodorant' and the general rise in demand for natural, organic, authentic, and chemical-free products among the world's youngest. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

50 Sickened in Salt Lake City Chemical Spill
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — At least 50 people reported feeling sick after sulfur dioxide spilled out of a rail car in Salt Lake City. The Salt Lake City Fired Department said the leak occurred Wednesday morning at a chemical manufacturing plant called Thatcher Chemicals. Fire officials estimate that 300-400 gallons of sulfur dioxide leaked. At least two people were taken to the hospital for treatment. Their conditions were unknown. Most people reported feeling a burn in their throats or having trouble breathing. Fire officials say the spill is contained. The Utah Division of Water Quality sent crews to test for possible c...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - June 19, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Airway & Respiratory News Patient Care Source Type: news

50 Sickened in Salt Lake City Chemical Spill
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — At least 50 people reported feeling sick after sulfur dioxide spilled out of a rail car in Salt Lake City. The Salt Lake City Fired Department said the leak occurred Wednesday morning at a chemical manufacturing plant called Thatcher Chemicals. Fire officials estimate that 300-400 gallons of sulfur dioxide leaked. At least two people were taken to the hospital for treatment. Their conditions were unknown. Most people reported feeling a burn in their throats or having trouble breathing. Fire officials say the spill is contained. The Utah Division of Water Quality sent crews to test for possible c...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 19, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Airway & Respiratory News Patient Care Source Type: news

Brain death of an infant caused by a penetrating air gun injury - Simon G, Heckmann V, T óth D, Kozma Z.
Air guns are shooting projectiles (pellets) from the expansion of compressed air without involving any chemical reactions. Air guns are often regarded as harmless by the public, but these weapons can produce severe, sometimes lethal injuries, especially in... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Sulfur mustard exposure: review of acute, subacute, and long-term effects and their management - Wolfe GA, Petteys SM, Phelps JF, Wasmund JB, Plackett TP.
Sulfur mustard has been used in conflicts for more than a century. Despite international recognized bans on the use of chemical weapons, there continue to be reports of their use. The authors provide a contemporary overview of sulfur mustard injury and its... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) science and the CBRNE Science Medical Operations Science Support Expert (CMOSSE) - Coleman CN, Bader JL, Koerner JF, Hrdina C, Cliffer KD, Hick JL, James JJ, Mansoura MK, Livinski AA, Nystrom SV, DiCarlo-Cohen A, Marinissen MJ, Wathen L, Appler JM, Buddemeier B, Casagrande R, Estes D, Byrne P, Kennedy EM, Jakubowski AA, Case C, Weinstock DM, Dainiak N, Hanfling D, Garrett AL, Grant NN, Dodgen D, Redlener I, MacKAY TF, Treber M, Homer MJ, Taylor TP, Miller A, Korch G, Hatchett R.
A national need is to prepare for and respond to accidental or intentional disasters categorized as chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, or explosive (CBRNE). These incidents require specific subject-matter expertise, yet have commonalities. We ide... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

Pharmacy Tests Turn Up Another Cancer-Causing Compound In Heart Drugs
(CNN) — Tests by an online pharmacy turned up another cancer-causing compound in heart medications, and these drugs haven’t been recalled. Drugs containing valsaratan, losartan and irbesartan made by a variety of companies in a variety of countries have been taken off pharmacy shelves since July, when tests turned up chemicals in them that are considered carcinogens. The recalls of these angiotensin II receptor blockers or ARBs continue to expand. The US Food and Drug Administration keeps a regularly updated list of the drugs that have been recalled. In this case, it’s not a recall. Instead, Valisure, an ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Valsartan Source Type: news

France leads the world in mistrust of vaccines
For Marie-Claire Grime, who works in a pharmacy northeast of Paris, questions about vaccines are a daily challenge. They come mainly from parents who say they're worried about "a lot of chemicals" being put into their children, she says. She does her best to allay such fears. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Upcycling process brings new life to old jeans
(American Chemical Society) A growing population, rising standards of living and quickly changing fashions send mountains of clothing waste to the world's landfills each year. Although processes for textile recycling exist, they tend to be inefficient and expensive. Now, researchers have reported in ACS Sustainable Chemistry& Engineering an efficient, low-cost method that can convert waste denim into viscose-type fibers that are either white or the original color of the garment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fifty years after the Cuyahoga conflagration
(American Chemical Society) On June 22, 1969, the Cuyahoga River, which flows through Cleveland, Ohio, caught fire. Although firefighters extinguished the blaze within 30 minutes, the shocking event helped galvanize the US environmental movement. Fifty years later, the river is much healthier but still recuperating from a legacy of pollution, according to an article in Chemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mapping and measuring proteins on the surfaces of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cells
(Kanazawa University) Researchers from Kanazawa University on the development of a technique to closely track a specific protein on the surfaces of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cells. Their findings are published in Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 19, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Firefighter: Aqueous Foam Defendant's Dismissal Argument Is 'Without Merit'
COLUMBUS, Ohio - A firefighter who claims that he has been injured as a result of exposure to aqueous film forming foams (AFFF) used to fight chemical fires, which contain per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), on June 10 filed a brief in Ohio federal court contending that the motion to dismiss filed by one of the defendants should be denied because its argument is "without merit" (Kevin Hardwick v. 3M Company, et al., No. 18-1185, S.D. Ohio). (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - June 19, 2019 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

Another cancer-causing chemical found in blood-pressure pills
Online pharmacy tells FDA it found carcinogenic solvent in valsartan heart drugs made by companies including Novartis (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - June 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BREAKING: Big Pharma blood pressure drugs found laced with cancer-causing chemical; but FDA says don't stop taking them
(Natural News) For years, we’ve warned that Big Pharma’s business model is a “repeat business” racket that profits from sickness and disease. We also know that cancer is a multi-billion-dollar industry that generates huge profits from the repeat business of cancer “therapies” such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Now comes news that a popular blood pressure... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FOURTH carcinogen found in US blood pressure drugs as global pill-contamination scandal drags on
The US and Europe have faced severe shortages of heart medications since last summer, when it emerged that millions of people were taking pills made in China laced with cancer-causing chemicals. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news