New Tools to Explore the Biology of Bacterial Polysaccharides
NIH Common Fund Glycoscience Program (CF-GSP) workshop " New Tools to Explore the Biology of Bacterial Polysaccharides " This workshop is being Co-chaired by Dr. Catherine Leimkuhler Grimes, Chair, CF-GSP Tools Group& Professor, Department of Chemistry& Biochemistry, University of Delaware& Dr. Danielle Dube, ACS CARB Division Secretary& Professor of Chemistry& Biochemistry, Bowdoin College. Presentations will highlight the latest findings of NIH supported researchers who are developing new methods and tools for the study of microbes and applying these tools to understand bacterial metabolism,...
Source: Videocast - All Events - July 30, 2020 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

New Tools for Finding Glycans in the PDB & Using the Information to Model 3D Structures of Glycans and GlycoProteins
Glycans play a critical role in nearly all aspects of biology, ranging from how our bodies recognize and fight viruses and bacteria to how proteins are moved throughout our cells to perform different tasks. The Common Fund ’ s Glycoscience program (CF-GSP) is creating new resources, tools, and methods to make the study of glycans (sugars) more accessible to the broader research community. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) contains more than 160,000 3D structures of biological macromolecules 20% of which contain carbohydrates as ligands or as chemical modifications. Unfortunately, much of the PDB's carbohydrate structural d...
Source: Videocast - All Events - July 28, 2020 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

NIH COVID-19 Lecture: SARS-CoV-2 T Cell Responses in Exposed and Non-Exposed Subjects
NIH COVID-19 Lecture Series Dr. Sette will review data examining the nature and specificity of T cell responses to SARS-CoV-2 from convalescent and acute donors, and in non-exposed subjects. Over the past three decades, the Sette lab has defined in chemical terms the specific structures that the immune system recognizes, and it has capitalized on this knowledge to measure and understand immune responses. This approach uses epitopes as specific probes to define the immune signatures associated with productive/protective immunity versus deficient immunity/immunopathology. Turning to SARS-CoV-2, Dr. Sette and his colleagues a...
Source: Videocast - All Events - July 27, 2020 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Electron microscope images showing 32 nanorods
Researchers at PennState University have developed a simple modular chemical approach that could produce over 65,000 different types of complex nanorods. Here, electron microscope images are shown for 32 of these nanorods, which form with various combinations of materials. Each color represents a ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - June 27, 2020 Category: Science Source Type: video

Commercial fishing nets, lines, and ropes contribute to about half of all plastic waste
that ends up in our oceans. But, developing a degradable plastic with the mechanical strength comparable to commercial materials remains a difficult challenge.   Chemists at Cornell University, with funding from ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - June 8, 2020 Category: Science Source Type: video

Chemical compounds in male orchid bee ’ s perfume analyzed
Researchers at the University of California, Davis, used gas chromatography and mass spectrometry to separate and analyze each chemical compound in a male orchid bee’s (pictured) enticing perfume. [Research supported by National Science Foundation grant DEB 1457753.] Learn more in the ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - May 21, 2020 Category: Science Source Type: video

Male orchid bee
Researchers at the University of California, Davis, found that orchid bees, like this male, are easier to tell apart by the chemical differences of their perfumes than by their physical appearance. [Research supported by National Science Foundation grant DEB 1457753.] Learn more in the ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - May 21, 2020 Category: Science Source Type: video

Investigating anti-viral chemicals that can be safely built into masks
This is an interview with Jiaxing Huang, professor of materials science and engineering at Northwestern University, and Birgit Schwenzer, a program director in NSF’s Division of Materials Research. Huang has received a rapid response research (RAPID) grant to investigate anti-viral chemicals that ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - May 8, 2020 Category: Science Source Type: video

' Green' process promises pristine graphene in bulk using waste food, plastic and other materials
A new process introduced by the Rice University lab of chemist James Tour can turn bulk quantities of just about any carbon source into valuable graphene flakes. Tour said the “flash graphene” technique can convert a ton of coal, food waste or plastic into graphene for a fraction of the cost used ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - April 3, 2020 Category: Science Source Type: video

Improbable Research and the Ig Nobel Prizes
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Marc Abrahams founded the annual Ig Nobel Prize ceremony, in 1991. He is editor of the magazine Annals of Improbable Research, and former editor of the Journal of Irreproducible Research. He has written 24 mini-operas (about heart repair, bacterial space exploration, atomic/human romance, species mixing, coffee chemistry, the Atkins Diet, human/sheep cloning, cockroaches, incompetence, and much else). He invents ways to make people curious about things they might otherwise avoid.For more information go tohttps://oir.nih.gov/wals/2019-2020/improbable-research-ig-nobel-prizes...
Source: Videocast - All Events - February 11, 2020 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Tiny mealworms may hold part of the solution to the world's giant plastics problem.
Not only are mealworms able to consume various forms of plastic, new research from Stanford shows they can eat Styrofoam containing a common toxic chemical additive and still be safely used as protein-rich feedstock for other animals.This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - January 16, 2020 Category: Science Source Type: video

Poly-Aneuploid Cancer Cells: Actuators of Cancer Resistance
NCI ’ s Center for Cancer Research (CCR) Grand Rounds Dr. Pienta is a Professor of Urology, Oncology, Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering as well an American Cancer Society Clinical Research Professor. Between 1995 and 2013, Dr. Pienta served as the Director of the Prostate Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) at the University of Michigan and has served as co-PI of the Johns Hopkins Prostate SPORE from 2013-2018. He has a proven, peer-reviewed track record in organizing and administering a translational research program that successfully incorporates bench rese...
Source: Videocast - All Events - January 6, 2020 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

An NSF-supported small business is expanding on ways to make everything from biopesticides to...
In Middleton, Wisconsin, an NSF-supported small business is expanding on ways to make everything from biopesticides to vaccines – all on the surface of leaves! How does this innovative approach to chemical manufacturing help us use the greenest, most renewable chemical factories on earth? Ryan and ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - November 19, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

Chemist in the Nagib Laboratory at Ohio State
Researcher Sean Rafferty in the Nagib Laboratory at The Ohio State University, where chemists develop new molecules for drug development. [Research supported in part by National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award CHE 1654656.] To learn more about this research, ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - November 18, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

This research and outreach program is partially funded by an NSF CAREER Award.
When Scott Daly entered college after serving in the military, he wanted to take an introductory chemistry class. His academic advisor tried to dissuade him, encouraging him to avoid science classes because they are harder. But Scott refused to listen. Today, Scott is an assistant professor in the ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - November 18, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

Director's Seminar: Harnessing Intrinsic Fluorophore Chemistry to Build Better Imaging Agents
Director's Seminar Series Existing fluorescent probes derive from a small set of core scaffolds initially developed for various abiological dye applications, and subsequently applied for biomedical research with minimal synthetic modification. Consequently, there exists a significant opportunity to develop molecules specifically tailored for use in modern imaging applications. Cyanine fluorophores are among the most broadly used fluorescent probes, despite poor chemical stability and modest photon output. To address these limitations, we develop new synthetic transformations that modify the core polymethine chromophore uni...
Source: Videocast - All Events - November 5, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Innovation by evolution: bringing new chemistry to life
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Marshall W. Nirenberg Lecture Not satisfied with nature ’ s vast catalyst repertoire, we want to create new protein catalysts and expand the space of genetically encoded enzyme functions. I will describe how we can use the most powerful biological design process, evolution, to optimize existing enzymes and invent new ones, thereby circumventing our profound ignorance of how sequence encodes function. Using mechanistic understanding and mimicking nature ’ s evolutionary processes, we can generate whole new enzyme families that catalyze synthetically important rea...
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 10, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Scalable platforms for generating RNA sensors and controllers
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series DeWitt Stetten, Jr. Lecture Biosensors are key components in engineered biological systems that interface with the large biochemical space in living cells and their environment. Aptamers, functional nucleic acid molecules that bind ligands, provide a powerful sensing element for many classes of molecules of interest. Although procedures such as SELEX have been quite successful in generating individual aptamers that bind proteins, generating small molecule aptamers has been more challenging due to the need to chemically modify the ligand to permit the recovery of binding seq...
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 10, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Chemogenetic Innovations in the Manipulation & Monitoring of Labeled Neurons Workshop
The purpose of this BRAIN Initiative workshop is to bring together chemists, cell biologists, and neuroscientists to discuss what is needed to improve and apply chemogenetics to drive neuroscience forward. The goal will be to inform participants about areas of pressing need for neuroscience and limitations of current methods to manipulate neuronal activity or label neurons.For more information go tohttps://braininitiative.nih.gov/Air date: 12/10/2019 8:00:00 AM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - September 23, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Camera brings unseen world to light
Researchers have developed a highly compact, portable camera that can image polarization in a single shot. The miniature camera -- about the size of a thumb -- could find a place in the vision systems of autonomous vehicles, on board planes or satellites to study atmospheric chemistry, or be used ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - August 29, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

4 Awesome Discoveries You Probably Didn  ’ t Hear About This Week  — Episode 31
A Squishy Rubik’s Cube® that Chemists Built from Polymers Holds Promise for Data Storage The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology The ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - August 26, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

Magnetic kit simulates molecular self-assembly
University at Buffalo chemist Timothy Cook is working with K-12 science teachers in Buffalo to design 3D-printed structures made from magnetic parts that self-assemble when shaken. These models help kids visualize processes similar to those occurring in real life when scientists design ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - August 20, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

DNA's helix may have arisen with startling ease (Image 4)
A model of an RNA helix. A new study led by Nicholas Hud, a Regents Professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, suggests the rotation in DNA and RNA may have occurred with ease billions of years ago when RNA’s chemical ancestors casually spun into spiraled strands. [Image 4 ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - August 19, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

DNA's helix may have arisen with startling ease (Image 3)
A new study led by Nicholas Hud, a Regents Professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, suggests the rotation in DNA and RNA may have occurred with ease billions of years ago when RNA’s chemical ancestors casually spun into spiraled strands. This artwork, produced for the ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - August 19, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

DNA's helix may have arisen with startling ease (Image 2)
For research on the possible origins of life chemicals on early Earth, Georgia Tech researchers used a base molecule called a proto-nucleobase (seen here next to a nucleobase), highly suspected to be precursors of nucleobases, the main components that transport genetic code in today’s RNA. [Image ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - August 19, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

DNA's helix may have arisen with startling ease (Image 1)
Nicholas Hud researches the possible origins of life chemicals on early Earth, when many of them may have formed in puddles. He has produced good candidates for precursors of RNA in easy reactions and in plentiful quantities using triaminopyrimidine, Cyanuric acid, barbituric acid and melamine. ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - August 19, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

Microbes inside a fracking well
Illustration of microbes inside a fracking well. Research by Ohio State University found that microbes actually consume some of the chemical ingredients commonly used in the fracking process, creating new compounds that in turn support microbial communities below ground. [Research supported by ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - August 19, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

Newly announced mineral Navrotskyite
Navrotskyite, a newly announced mineral found in a single mine in Utah and named for distinguished National Science Foundation-supported chemist Alexandra Navrotsky of the University of California, Davis. (Date of image: 2019; Date added to Multimedia Gallery: July 2019) This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - July 25, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

Brilliant glow of paint-on semiconductors (Image 3)
Laser light in the visible range is processed for use in testing of quantum properties in materials in the lab of Carlos Silva, a professor at Georgia Tech’s School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and co-lead on a recent study where researchers uncovered eccentric physics behind next-generation ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - June 20, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

Brilliant glow of paint-on semiconductors (Image 2)
Laser light in the visible range is processed for use in the testing of quantum properties in materials in the lab of Carlos Silva, a professor at Georgia Tech’s School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and co-lead on a recent study where researchers uncovered eccentric physics behind next-generation ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - June 20, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

Brilliant glow of paint-on semiconductors (Image 1)
Carlos Silva (left), a professor at Georgia Tech’s School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and graduate research assistant Félix Thouin examine a setup to process laser light in the visible range for the testing of quantum properties in a halide organic-inorganic perovskite. Silva was co-lead ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - June 20, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

Integrative Omics Approaches to Identify New Therapeutic Cancer Targets
CCR Grand Rounds Kimberly Stegmaier, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and the Ted Williams Chair at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, has advanced the application of genomics to drug and protein target discovery for pediatric cancers. She is the Vice Chair for Pediatric Oncology Research, co-director of the Pediatric Hematologic Malignancy Program and an attending physician providing clinical care in Pediatric Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Boston Children ’ s Hospital. Dr. Stegmaier is also an Institute Member of the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT. She has served as a Council...
Source: Videocast - All Events - June 17, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

SFAz+8: Building Capacity for STEM Pathways in Rural Arizona
A summer science camp at Arizona Western College, sponsored by SFAz+8: Building Capacity for STEM Pathways in Rural Arizona, introduces rural middle school students to chemistry principles with discovery-based lab activities. Learn more about SCATE and all the Advanced Technological Education ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - June 14, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

Advanced Technology Environmental and Education Center (Image 2)
In collaboration with colleges and industry, the Advanced Technology Environmental and Education Center located at Eastern Iowa Community Colleges in Davenport, Iowa, developed curriculum that prepares chemical lab technicians for environmental occupations. [Image 2 of 2 related images. Back to (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - June 12, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

" " Blue Sun Flower, " " by Devin Brown
An optical microscope image of liquid droplet residue from water-based chemicals. The width of the entire residue is 1/2 millimeter. The droplets on the outer edges are 10 microns in diameter, seven times smaller than the diameter of a human hair. This image, titled "Blue Sun Flower," ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - June 12, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

Workin' out the bugs? No, these bacterial bugs are getting a workout
Bacteria's use of "swim and tumble" maneuvers and chemical secretions helps them move toward food or away from poisons as they encounter obstacles, such as those found in the human gastrointestinal tract. The research, which involved an "obstacle course" of microfluidic chambers to experiment on ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - May 30, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

Watch Your Step, There Is New Chemistry Everywhere
NCCIH Integrative Medicine Research Lecture Series The National Center for Complementary and Integrative health (NCCIH) presents the Integrative Medicine Research Lecture Series. The series provides overviews of the current state of research and practice involving complementary health approaches and explores perspectives on the emerging discipline of integrative medicine. Dr. Sean Brady is Tri-Institutional Professor and Evnin Professor Head, Laboratory of Genetically Encoded Small Molecules at the Rockefeller University. Dr. Brady has developed culture-independent methods to circumvent this discovery bottleneck. He will d...
Source: Videocast - All Events - May 23, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Removing radioactive waste from water: 5 not-so-easy steps
Chemists at the University of Iowa, led by Tori Forbes, are using National Science Foundation funding to investigate how to remove radioactive substances from water. Forbes' team creates and tests various chemical compounds to find candidates that can isolate and capture radioactive elements, such ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - May 17, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

ICCVAM Public Forum 2019
ICCVAM ’ s goals include promotion of national and international partnerships between governmental and nongovernmental groups, including academia, industry, advocacy groups, and other key stakeholders. To foster these partnerships ICCVAM holds annual public forums to share information and facilitate direct communication of ideas and suggestions from stakeholders. The upcoming meeting will include presentations by NICEATM and ICCVAM members on current activities related to the development and validation of alternative test methods and approaches, including activities relevant to implementation of the strategic roadmap...
Source: Videocast - All Events - May 10, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Systems Biology Interest Group: Learning to rewire cells
Systems Biology Interest Group Traditionally, biology has focused on deconstructing and mapping the molecular systems that carryout complex regulatory functions. We still lack, however, a more global understanding of the design principles governing how cells solve problems and make regulatory decisions. To address this problem, we have been complementing deconstructionist approaches with synthetic approaches in which we ask how to build molecular systems that can execute particular regulatory tasks. Are there a limited number of molecular algorithms that evolution can use to solve common physiological tasks? If so, can we ...
Source: Videocast - All Events - May 1, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Sounds in Silence: How the Cochlea Promotes Refinement of Auditory Circuits before Hearing Onset
NIH Neuroscience Seminar Series Robert Wenthold Memorial Lecture Dr. Bergles lab is interested in understanding the mechanisms by which neurons and glial cells interact to support normal communication in the nervous system. Neurons transmit information at specialized synaptic junctions, points of contact where action potentials elicit the release of a chemical neurotransmitter. Neurotransmission at excitatory synapses involves the vesicular release of glutamate, diffusion and binding of glutamate to various receptors, and uptake of glutamate by transporters. Transporters are critical for ensuring that receptors are availab...
Source: Videocast - All Events - April 26, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Special Tuesday Lecture, NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series
Julie Theriot is the Benjamin D. Hall Endowed Chair in Basic Life Sciences and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator in the Department of Biology at the University of Washington. Her lab explores the mechanics and dynamics of how cells organize themselves to create their own structures and shapes. She studies an unusually wide variety of cell types and model systems in order to gain a broad conceptual understanding of the organizational rules that give rise to cell structure and coordinated movement. This work has important implications for understanding host-pathogen interactions, the function of immune cells, a...
Source: Videocast - All Events - April 24, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

The biosynthesis of lipoic acid: a saga of death, destruction, and rebirth
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Research in the Booker Lab focuses on understanding how Nature harnesses the power of radicals to effect kinetically challenging enzymatic reactions, many of which are critical to proper cellular functioning. Much of the lab ’ s work has centered around the enzymatic use of S-adenosylmethionine and iron-sulfur clusters to generate a 5 ’ -deoxyadenosyl 5 ’ -radical, used as a key intermediate by members of the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) superfamily to catalyze over 60 different reaction types. One major interest of the Booker Lab is the use of radic...
Source: Videocast - All Events - April 24, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

This study gives the phrase " stuffy house " whole new meaning
Cooking, cleaning and other routine household activities generate significant levels of volatile and particulate chemicals inside the average home, leading to indoor air quality levels on par with a polluted major city, University of Colorado Boulder researchers have found. In addition, airborne ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - March 21, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

Translating Cancer Genomics to Clinical Care
NCI Center for Cancer Research Eminent Lecture Series Elaine Mardis, Ph.D., is co-Executive Director of the Institute for Genomic Medicine at Nationwide Children ’ s Hospital and the Nationwide Foundation Endowed Chair of Genomic Medicine. She also is Professor of Pediatrics at The Ohio State University College of Medicine. Dr. Mardis joined Nationwide Children ’ s Hospital in 2016. Educated at the University of Oklahoma with a B.S. in Zoology and a Ph.D. in Chemistry and Biochemistry, Dr. Mardis did postgraduate work in industry at BioRad Laboratories. She was a member of the faculty of Washington University S...
Source: Videocast - All Events - March 20, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

A cheaper way to light up smartphones and TVs, no asteroid required
Chemists have found a cheaper way to light up smartphone and TV screens -- using copper rather than iridium -- which could save manufacturers and consumers money without affecting visual quality. Iridium is one of the rarest elements on Earth, its origins possibly a millions-year-old asteroid; ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - March 4, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

NSF-funded engineer Etosha Cave and her team at Opus 12
Carbon dioxide converted into cost-competitive fuels and chemicals? NSF-funded engineer Etosha Cave and her team at Opus 12 have developed technology to do just that, in the size of a small suitcase. We highlight their breakthrough -- and celebrate black history in the making.This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - February 28, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

NIDCR Grand Rounds: Mechanoregeneration via Biomaterials
NIDCR Clinical Research Fellowship Grand Rounds Dr. David Mooney ’ s research is based on the question, “ How do mammalian cells receive information from the materials in their environment? ” By using the tools of bioengineering and cell and molecular biology, he studies the mechanisms by which chemical or mechanical signals are sensed by cells, and how these signals alter cellular proliferation and specialization to either promote tissue growth or destruction. His research results inform the design and synthesis of new biomaterials that regulate the gene expression of interacting cells for a variety of t...
Source: Videocast - All Events - February 25, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

NCCIH Lecture: Watch Your Step, There Is New Chemistry Everywhere
NCCIH Integrative Medicine Research Lecture The characterization of biologically active small molecules (natural products) produced by easily cultured bacteria has been a rewarding avenue for identifying novel therapeutics. The characterization of biologically active small molecules (natural products) produced by easily cultured bacteria has been a rewarding avenue for identifying novel therapeutics, as well as gaining insights into how bacteria interact with the world around them. Large-scale sequencing of bacterial genomic and metagenomic DNA indicates that the traditional pure culture – based approach to studying ...
Source: Videocast - All Events - February 21, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Everything you wanted to know about microtubules but were afraid to ask
NIH Director's Seminar Series Dr. Roll-Mecak will discuss the research of the Laboratory of Cell Biology and Biophysics Section, NINDS. The title of her talk is " Everything you wanted to know about microtubules but were afraid to ask " . In addition to providing structural support, microtubules form a complex and dynamic intracellular " highway " that delivers molecular cargo from one end of the cell to another - which in the case of neuronal cells can span several feet. Given the continually changing cell physiology, this delivery system undergoes constant remodeling as cargo is transported to differe...
Source: Videocast - All Events - January 31, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video