New findings shed light on selective therapeutics for IDH1-mutated glioma
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) Findings of a new study led by Prof. XU Guowang from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Prof. YANG Chunzhang from the National Cancer Institute shed light on the selective therapeutics for IDH1-mutated glioma by targeting glutathione synthesis pathway. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 13, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study finds remdesivir effective against a key enzyme of coronavirus that causes COVID-19
(University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine& Dentistry) Scientists at the University of Alberta have shown that the drug remdesivir is highly effective in stopping the replication mechanism of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, according to new research published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.The paper follows closely on research published by the same lab in late February that demonstrated how the drug worked against the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) virus, a related coronavirus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 13, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cell membrane proteins imaged in 3D
(DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory) A team of scientists including researchers at the National Synchrotron Light Source II have demonstrated a new technique for imaging proteins in 3D with nanoscale resolution. Their work, published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, enables researchers to identify the precise location of proteins within individual cells, reaching the resolution of the cell membrane and the smallest subcellular organelles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Foxglove plants produce heart medicine; can science do it better?
(University at Buffalo) Wang's research investigates how foxgloves create medicinal compounds, with an eye toward improving the process. Specifically, her lab is investigating the chemical processes the plants use to create cardiac glycosides: what steps are taken, what genes are turned on, and what enzymes are deployed. Farming foxgloves for medicine is time-consuming and labor-intensive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Discovery of a drug to rescue winter depression-like behavior
(Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM), Nagoya University) A group of animal biologists and chemists at the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (WPI-ITbM), Nagoya University, has used a chemical genomics approach to explore the underlying mechanism of winter depression-like behavior and identified a drug that rescues winter depression-like behavior in medaka fish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

OSU research program awarded $12.7 million grant for Superfund research
(Oregon State University) An Oregon State University-led research program has been awarded a $12.7 million grant to serve the Pacific Northwest by studying harmful chemicals found at federally designated hazardous waste sites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Occupational health and safety in China: from emergency response to Jiangsu chemical explosion to long-term governance improvement - Zhang M, Kim R.
On 21 March 2019 an explosion in a chemical plant rocked China ’s Jiangsu Province and shocked the rest of the world. By 25 March 2019 the death toll reached 78 with 566 more hospitalized, many with severe injuries [1]. Unfortunately, industrial ac... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Failure analysis of leaf spring suspension system for heavy load truck vehicle - Nataraj M, Thillikkani S.
The failure of leaf spring suspension system used in heavy load truck vehicle TATA LPT 1613TCIC model was investigated in the research reported in this paper. In order to analyse the variations in the chemical composition, micro-structural analysis along w... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

The Coronavirus Outbreak Keeps Humans from Touching. Here ’s Why That’s So Stressful
With people around the world practicing social distancing and self-isolation to curb the further spread of coronavirus, some are starting to feel the effects of a lack of human touch. Whether it’s shaking a coworker’s hand or hugging a friend, most people are accustomed to some level of platonic physical touch on a daily basis. But for those who are quarantining alone or with people with whom they don’t have physical contact, loneliness and social isolation are growing health concerns. Now, in the wake of President Donald Trump’s March 30 announcement that he was extending national social distancing...
Source: TIME: Health - April 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Megan McCluskey Tags: Uncategorized clickmonsters COVID-19 feature Science Source Type: news

Smoking Marijuana Even Occasionally Raises Risk Of Coronavirus Complications, Experts Say
(CNN) — If you’re smoking weed to ease your stress during the coronavirus pandemic, experts say it’s time to think twice. Smoking marijuana, even occasionally, can increase your risk for more severe complications from Covid-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. “What happens to your airways when you smoke cannabis is that it causes some degree of inflammation, very similar to bronchitis, very similar to the type of inflammation that cigarette smoking can cause,” said pulmonologist Dr. Albert Rizzo, chief medical officer for the American Lung Association. “Now you have some air...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Coronavirus Marijuana Source Type: news

Hope for a COVID-19 vaccine — a conversation with David Spiegel
Spiegel, professor of chemistry and pharmacology, discusses some of the approaches being explored for a COVID-19 vaccine and why he ’s hopeful of the future. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 9, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Exposure to Plastic Chemicals Before Conception Tied to Premature Births
Pregnant women exposed to phthalates, found in plastic toys, soaps and food packaging, may be at increased risk of preterm delivery. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nicholas Bakalar Tags: Premature Babies Pregnancy and Childbirth Chemicals Source Type: news

Plastics Still Manage to Reach the End of the World. One Organization Is Trying to Make Sure Polluters Are Held Responsible
As a penguin researcher working in some of the most remote regions of Antarctica, conservation biologist Alex Borowicz documents colonies on coastlines and islands that have rarely, if ever, been visited by other people. That doesn’t mean they are free from human impact. Walking through a beach teeming with newly hatched chicks on Snow Island, Borowicz spots a white plastic milk jug. Farther along he picks up a tangle of bright green rope, then a faded fishing buoy. “We like to think of Antarctica as a pristine wilderness, but it clearly isn’t,” he says. Over the course of a six-week expedition aboa...
Source: TIME: Science - April 9, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Aryn Baker/Snow Island Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Covid-19 & its Impact on the Work of Disarmament
Credit: United NationsBy Izumi NakamitsuUNITED NATIONS, Apr 9 2020 (IPS) Humanity has faced no challenge greater than COVID-19 since the Second World War. As this rapidly developing global health emergency places unprecedented strain on our medical, economic and social systems, we must work hard to prevent new risks for instability, unrest and conflict. The pandemic arrived as our frameworks to prevent catastrophic confrontation are crumbling. Countries are building faster and more accurate nuclear arms, developing new weapon technologies with unpredictable implications and pouring more resources into militaries than at a...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Izumi Nakamitsu Tags: Armed Conflicts Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Peace TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Designer drugs: mechanism of action and adverse effects - Luethi D, Liechti ME.
Psychoactive substances with chemical structures or pharmacological profiles that are similar to traditional drugs of abuse continue to emerge on the recreational drug market. Internet vendors may at least temporarily sell these so-called designer drugs wi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Helping the homeless of Rome combat COVID-19
Credit: Martina Martelloni / INTERSOSBy Elena L. PasquiniROME, Apr 9 2020 (IPS-Partners) Behind the Tiburtina Station, in the East of Rome, with just a small covered area protecting from the inclemency of the weather, sleeping close to each other is the only way to stay warm. A boy of Ivorian origin is alone, far from everyone, in the centre of the sidewalk, exposed to a freezing wind. ‘He told me he preferred to die of cold than to get infected, because he was very scared and he knew that it was not safe for him to be close to the others’, Dr. Antonella Torchiaro told Degrees of Latitude. She is a physician o...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Elena Pasquini Tags: Aid Health Humanitarian Emergencies Source Type: news

ERC Advanced Grant for Edward Lemke for the engineering of designer organelles in cells
(Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz) Biophysical chemist receives prestigious EU research funding for work on membraneless organelles that construct synthetic proteins in cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 9, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bentham Book Series, Frontiers in Natural Product Chemistry, indexed in Scopus
(Bentham Science Publishers) Frontiers in Natural Product Chemistry [ISSN / E-ISSN: 1574-0897 / 2212-3997], has been accepted for inclusion in Scopus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New isomer separation method a boon for research on protein oxidation
(University of California - Santa Cruz) Oxidation of the sulfur atom in methionine is an important biomolecular reaction that can have a wide range of biological consequences depending on the context and the protein involved. Chemists at UC Santa Cruz have reported a new method for separation of methionine sulfoxide diastereomers that opens up new opportunities for studying their roles in biological processes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 9, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Intravital imaging of mouse embryos
In this study, we implanted a window to the mouse uterus to visualize the developing embryo from embryonic day 9.5 to birth. This removable intravital window allowed manipulation and high-resolution imaging. In live mouse embryos, we observed transient neurotransmission and early vascularization of neural crest cell (NCC)–derived perivascular cells in the brain, autophagy in the retina, viral gene delivery, and chemical diffusion through the placenta. We combined the imaging window with in utero electroporation to label and track cell division and movement within embryos and observed that clusters of mouse NCC-derive...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 9, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Huang, Q., Cohen, M. A., Alsina, F. C., Devlin, G., Garrett, A., McKey, J., Havlik, P., Rakhilin, N., Wang, E., Xiang, K., Mathews, P., Wang, L., Bock, C., Ruthig, V., Wang, Y., Negrete, M., Wong, C. W., Murthy, P. K. L., Zhang, S., Daniel, A. R., Kirsch, Tags: Development, Engineering reports Source Type: news

Scientists create mutant enzyme that recycles plastic bottles in hours
Bacterial enzyme originally found in compost can be used to make high-quality new bottlesA mutant bacterial enzyme that breaks down plastic bottles for recycling in hours has been created by scientists.The enzyme, originally discovered in a compost heap of leaves, reduced the bottles to chemical building blocks that were then used to make high-quality new bottles. Existing recycling technologies usually produce plastic only good enough for clothing and carpets.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 8, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Plastics Recycling Waste Environment Science Source Type: news

Revolutionary new method for dating pottery sheds new light on prehistoric past
A team at the University of Bristol has developed a new method of dating pottery which is allowing archaeologists to date prehistoric finds from across the world with remarkable accuracy. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - April 8, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Chemistry; Press Release Source Type: news

What are the environmental impacts of cancer drugs?
(Wiley) Chemotherapeutic drugs, also known as antineoplastic agents, that are prescribed to treat a range of cancer types, enter the aquatic environment via human excretion and wastewater treatment facilities. A review published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry indicates that very few studies have characterized the effects of antineoplastic agents that are released into aquatic environments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Putting remdesivir to the test for COVID-19
(American Chemical Society) As the coronavirus pandemic claims lives and overwhelms health care systems throughout the world, scientists are closely watching several late-stage trials of the antiviral drug remdesivir. Developed to treat Ebola, remdesivir is now being tested against COVID-19. However, many infectious disease experts caution that the trials are unlikely to yield clear-cut results, according to an article inChemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers share perspectives on coronavirus pandemic
(American Chemical Society) As COVID-19 ravages the globe, researchers are working tirelessly to develop new diagnostics, vaccines and therapeutics. The question on the minds of scientists in many diverse fields is how they can help. Now, some researchers are publishing their thoughts on this topic in the form of editorials, perspectives and viewpoints in various ACS journals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Harnessing the power of electricity-producing bacteria for programmable 'biohybrids'
(American Chemical Society) Someday, microbial cyborgs -- bacteria combined with electronic devices -- could be useful in fuel cells, biosensors and bioreactors. But first, scientists need to develop materials that not only nurture the microbes, but also efficiently and controllably harvest the electricity or other resources they make. Now, researchers reporting inACS Applied Materials& Interfaces have developed one such material that enabled them to create a programmable 'biohybrid' system that conducts electrons from electricity-producing (exoelectrogenic) bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lobster digestion of microplastics could further foul the food chain
(American Chemical Society) Tiny fragments of plastic waste are dispersed throughout the environment, including the oceans, where marine organisms can ingest them. However, the subsequent fate of these microplastics in animals that live near the bottom of the ocean isn't clear. Now, researchers report in ACS'Environmental Science& Technology that lobsters can eat and break down some of this microplastic material, releasing even smaller fragments into the water that other deep-sea organisms could ingest. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Rice chemist wins grant to simplify drug design
(Rice University) Rice University chemist L á szl ó K ü rti and his lab have received a prestigious National Institutes of Health grant to speed drug design by simplifying the synthesis of essential precursors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Advance in understanding actin sheds light on cell function
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A tiny chemical modification on one of the most abundant and important proteins in cells, actin, has long been somewhat mysterious, its function not fully understood, but scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have now taken a big step towards clearing up the mystery. The scientists, who report their discovery on the post-translational modification of actin in Science Advances, believe their discovery sheds light on the foundational construction of life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 8, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Wallflowers could lead to new drugs
(Boyce Thompson Institute) Plant-derived chemicals called cardenolides - like digitoxin - have long been used to treat heart disease, and have shown potential as cancer therapies. But the compounds are very toxic, making it difficult for doctors to prescribe a dose that works without harming the patient. Researchers now show that the wormseed wallflower could be used as a model species to elucidate how plants biosynthesize cardenolides, knowledge that could aid the discovery and development of safer drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 8, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Covid-19 impact: Drugs essential, ancillaries not so, means supplies take a hit
National chemists and druggists association and industry lobby groups have urged the government to put all ancillary goods required for medicine production in the essential services category as they fear major supply disruptions in the days to come. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - April 8, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Insights & Outcomes: Cardiac lag times and chemistry that ’s off the scale
In a challenging season for science and for humanity, Yale ’s recent research continues to expand our knowledge of the world in diverse fields of inquiry. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 7, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Analysis of severe industrial accidents caused by hazardous chemicals in South Korea from January 2008 to June 2018 - Jung S, Woo J, Kang C.
This study investigates chemical accidents that occurred between January ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Risk hotspot of chemical accidents based on spatial analysis in Ulsan, South Korea - Yu H, Lee WK, Sohn JR.
The chemical industry is one of the major industries driving the Korean economy. However, increased chemical use accompanied by obsolete equipment and careless management has promoted the occurrence of chemical accidents. Therefore, to develop a preventive... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

India Partially Lifts Export Ban on Potential Coronavirus Treatment After Trump Call
India partially lifted a ban on the exports of a malaria drug after President Donald Trump sought supplies for the U.S., according to government officials with knowledge of the matter. Exports of hydroxychloroquine and paracetamol will be allowed depending on availability of stock after meeting domestic requirements and existing orders, said the government officials, who asked not to be identified citing rules. Shipments will be restricted and permission will be on humanitarian ground, they added. The spokesman for the trade ministry was not immediately available for comment. Normally used to treat malaria, hydroxychloroqu...
Source: TIME: Health - April 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Archana Chaudhary / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight wire Source Type: news

Investigating association between preconception exposure to plastics, risk of preterm birth
(JAMA Network) Researchers used urinary measures of biomarkers of phthalates (a group of chemicals used in plastics) and phthalate substitutes from couples undergoing fertility care and examined if higher concentrations prior to conception were associated with an increased risk of preterm birth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is the answer for coronavirus already on chemists' shelves?
Scientists the world over are working round the clock to find a cure for the deadly coronavirus. With little time, they are testing drugs currently used to treat other conditions. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BPA substitutes may increase blood pressure
BPA substitute chemicals may increase blood pressure in developing foetuses and lead to cardiovascular complications later in life, according to a study published in theJournal of the Endocrine Society.Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - April 6, 2020 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Global characteristics of chemical, biological, and radiological poison use in terrorist attacks - Aydin B.
BACKGROUND: Chemical, biological, and radiological (CBR) terrorism continues to be a global threat. Studies examining global and historical toxicological characteristics of CBR terrorism are lacking. METHODS: Global Terrorism Database (GTD) and RAN... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

How the chemical industry can meet the climate goals
(ETH Zurich) ETH researchers analysed various possibilities for reducing the net CO2 emissions of the chemical industry to zero. Their conclusion? The chemical industry can in fact have a carbon-neutral future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 6, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Texas A & M chemists working on drugs To treat COVID-19
(Texas A&M University) In the wake of the novel coronavirus pandemic, Texas A&M University chemist Wenshe Ray Liu and his research team have focused their lab solely on searching for drugs to treat COVID-19. The Liu group was the first to identify the antiviral drug remdesivir as a viable medicine to treat COVID-19 in a research study published in late January. The drug was originally developed in response to the 2014 Ebola pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UK ministers struggle to keep promise of 100k coronavirus tests by end of April
Frustrated NHS staff and scientists say they have labs ready but cannot get the materialsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe UK government ’s pledge to carry out 100,000 coronavirus tests a day by the end of the month is unravelling, with NHS laboratory staff and scientists warning they do not have the test kits, chemicals and components they need to scale up.Boris Johnson is personally calling the major companies that make test kits to try to secure the UK supply, it has emerged, in competition withprime ministers and presidents from around the world.Continue reading... (Source: Gua...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 3, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley and Lisa O'Carroll Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Science UK news NHS Hospitals Health Society Source Type: news

There are still NHS staff without proper PPE – their lives are at risk | Jessica Potter
Full PPE is crucial in the fight against coronavirus. Public Health England ’s advice has not gone far enoughCoronavirus latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageJust before the ICU unit where I work dealt with its first case of Covid-19, I was tested to ensure the FFP-3 masks I would need fitted safely. This involved walking up and down while a bitter chemical was sprayed to ensure there were no leaks in this suffocating face-covering. These masks are in short supply internationally, yet I ’ve seencelebrities posing for selfies wearing them. Two weeks down the line and I am well into the routine of donnin...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 3, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jessica Potter Tags: NHS Coronavirus outbreak Health Society Infectious diseases Medical research Science World news Conservatives Politics Source Type: news

Chemical used in fracking may cause male infertility
According to a study published in theJournal of the Endocrine Society, a chemical used in hydraulic fracturing may cause disruption to the function of testosterone and increase chances of infertility in men.Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - April 3, 2020 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Coronavirus Vaccine: Where are we and what's next? (video)
(American Chemical Society) You might have heard that COVID-19 vaccine trials are underway in Seattle. What exactly is being tested? How much longer will these tests take? And when can we expect a vaccine against the novel coronavirus? We chat with Benjamin Neuman, Ph.D., one of the world's experts on coronavirus, and Daniel Wrapp, one of the scientists who mapped the structure of the protein that the coronavirus uses to infect your cells, to help us answer these questions: https://youtu.be/gDY8pH6OWBc. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 3, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

An antibiotic masquerading as a natural compound in the Giant Madeiran Squill
(Uppsala University) A previous study has shown that a type of squill growing in Madeira produces a chemical compound that may be useful as a medicinal drug. But a new study from researchers at Uppsala University has shown that this is probably not true: instead, the plant had likely accumulated antibiotics from contaminated soil. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New family of molecules to join altered receptors in neurodegenerative diseases
(University of Barcelona) An article published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry shows a new family of molecules with high affinity to join imidazoline receptors, which are altered in the brain of those patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's. According to the preclinical study, the merge of these specific ligands to I2 receptors improves cognitive skills and some biomarkers which are indicators of brain neurodegenerative processes in murine models. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

IRB Barcelona collaborates with Amazon in the development of a computational tool
(Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)) The tool is based on Chemical Checker technology, developed by the Structural Bioinformatics and Network Biology Laboratory at IRB Barcelona.The aim is to use artificial intelligence to generate a drug database that includes all the published scientific results related to the treatment of COVID-19.This open access database will provide researchers from around the world with an expanded portfolio of molecules with the potential to fight COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 3, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Jones and Van Aken to receive funding for Fairfax water quality monitoring work
(George Mason University) R. Christian Jones, Professor/Director, Potomac Environmental Research and Education Center, Environmental Science and Policy, and Benoit Van Aken, Associate Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry, are set to receive funding from the City of Fairfax to conduct water monitoring. The goal of their work is to provide city officials with data on pollutants of concern (POCs) during wet weather events at six sites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 3, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Demand surge for 'game changer' COVID-19 drug hydroxychloroquine despite lack of clinical evidence
Though there have been no large-scale clinical trials of the drug's efficacy in treating coronavirus, chemists all over say they are facing a shortage of the medicine, not so long ago known mainly to those who had malaria or were prescribed it for arthritis pain. While the demand for hydrochloroqine has seen a rapid uptick, the safety and effectiveness of the drug in treating COVID-19 still remains a concern. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - April 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news