Perfume makers seek natural, sustainable scents
(American Chemical Society) In 1921, perfumer Ernest Beaux discovered that adding synthetic aldehydes to natural rose and jasmine scents produced just the right fragrance combination for the iconic CHANEL ® No. 5 perfume. Today, perfume makers have more than 3,000 synthetic scent molecules in their palettes. However, according to an article in Chemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, consumer demand for natural ingredients has challenged perfumers to find natural, yet sustainable, scents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

York University chemists invent new Lewis acidity test using fluorescence
(York University) York University chemists have invented a new fluorescence-based method for accurately determining the strength of a range of Lewis acids, which could one day be used to help purify pharmaceutical drugs, improve industrial processes and explore next-generation technologies, according to a new chemistry study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists are world's firsts to reproduce complete copy of 'anti-tumor antibiotic'
(University of Lincoln) After 20 years of dedicated research, scientists have cracked the chemical code of an incredibly complex 'anti-tumor antibiotic' known to be highly effective against cancer cells as well as drug-resistant bacteria, and have reproduced it synthetically in the lab for the first time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 24, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Increasing Resilience to Weapon Contamination through Behaviour Change
Source: International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC). Published: 4/24/2019. These guidelines have been produced to help the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement better manage the risks associated with weapon contamination resulting from conventional weapons and/or chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear hazards. The 98-page document covers developing and conducting risk awareness and safer behavior interventions to reduce the likelihood of casualties among staff, volunteers, and the civilian population. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UAB receives $35M for two NIH grants
UAB has received two major grants from the National Institutes of Health totaling $35 million. The first is an $18 million grant to identify medical countermeasures for treatment against chemical terrorist attacks, as well as to discover pathways in which arsenicals can damage the body.  The grant itself funds the UAB Research Center of Excellence in Arsenicals, through the Countermeasure s Against Chemical Threats or CounterACT program, an NIH measure against chemical terrorism. This is a five-year… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 23, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tyler Patchen Source Type: news

Meet Robert Berg, a 2019 CFO of the Year honoree
Robert Berg Chief financial officer CoreRx Pharma What inspired you to become a finance executive? I started in college as a chemistry major but was exposed to a business/economics course which I really enjoyed, so eventually switched majors with the hope to work on Wall Street. My first job out of college was a junior accountant and I have worn many financial hats since then. What drives you to succeed? When I was younger I was very competitive and used to be a pole vaulter. I always worked… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 23, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Chris Erickson Source Type: news

Health Tip: Understanding Kidney Stones
-- One in ten people will have a kidney stone at some point in their lives, says the National Kidney Foundation. Kidney stones are hard objects that are produced from chemicals in urine. Symptoms can range from lower back pain, bloody urine,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 23, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

To stop global catastrophe, we must believe in humans again | Bill McKibben
We have the technology to prevent climate crisis. But now we need to unleash mass resistance too – because collective action does workBecause I am concerned about inequality and about the environment, I am usually classed as a progressive, a liberal. But it seems to me that what I care most about is preserving a world that bears some resemblance to the past: a world with some ice at the top and bottom and the odd coral reef in between; a world where people are connected to the past and future (and to one another) instead of turned into obsolete software.And those seem to me profoundly conservative positions. Meanwhil...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Bill McKibben Tags: Geoengineering Climate change Environment Science Technology World news Source Type: news

Toward fire safety without chemical risk - de Boer J, Stapleton HM.
Halogenated flame retardants are used widely in consumer products such as carpets, textiles, and electronics to reduce the risk of fire. It has been known for more than 20 years that these compounds can leach into the environment, with particularly high... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Controlling instabilities gives closer look at chemistry from hypersonic vehicles
(University of Illinois College of Engineering) While studying the chemical reactions that occur in the flow of gases around a vehicle moving at hypersonic speeds, researchers at the University of Illinois used a less-is-more method to gain greater understanding of the role of chemical reactions in modifying unsteady flows that occur in the hypersonic flow around a double-wedge shape. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 23, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Carbon dioxide from Silicon Valley affects the chemistry of Monterey Bay
(Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute) Elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide in air flowing out to sea from Silicon Valley and the Salinas Valley could increase the amount of carbon dioxide dissolving in Monterey Bay waters by about 20 percent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 23, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

There ’s a Real-Life Inspiration for Game of Thrones’ Valyrian Steel. Here’s How Its Long-Lost Secrets Were Revealed
Warning: This post contains spoilers for Game of Thrones. As the Game of Thrones saga winds down, Valyrian steel has never been more important. It’s one of the few substances known to kill White Walkers, but only about a half-dozen known characters currently wield weapons made from the magical material — and it’s not possible to make more. That’s because, according to the lore of the show and A Song of Ice and Fire books, the secret for forging the metal was lost long before the Game of Thrones story starts. Valyrian steel is also one more way in which Game of Thrones, fantastical though it is, has ...
Source: TIME: Science - April 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Lily Rothman Tags: Uncategorized onetime Television Source Type: news

Corneal endothelial decompensation after ocular chemical burn: description of a new finding - Steinemann A, Blaser F, Livny E, Baenninger P, Marti M, Gerber-Hollbach N, Eggenschwiler L, Gatzioufas Z, Goldblum D.
We present a retrospective st... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Scientists Dig Into Hard Questions About The Fluorinated Pollutants Known As PFAS
PFAS are a family of chemicals accumulating in the soil, rivers, drinking water and the human body. How much exposure to these substances in clothes, firefighting foam and food wrap is too much?(Image credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Hersher Source Type: news

Catalyst renders nerve agents harmless
(DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory) A team of scientists has studied a catalyst that decomposes nerve agents, eliminating their harmful and lethal effects. The research was published Friday, April 19, in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Neurobiology and Chemistry of Pain and Addiction Symposium
(University of Arizona Health Sciences) April 24, 2019 in Tucson, Arizona: World-renowned neurobiologists and leaders in chemistry will discuss the brain circuits underlying acute and chronic pain, reward, motivation and addiction, as well as the development of chemical probes as potential novel therapies. The symposium is co-sponsored by the University of Arizona College of Medicine -- Tucson Department of Pharmacology and Interim Dean Irving Kron, M.D. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wristband samplers show similar chemical exposure across three continents
(Oregon State University) After Oregon State University researchers deployed chemicals to individuals on three continents, they found that no two wristbands had identical chemical detections. But the same 14 chemicals were detected in more than 50 percent of the wristbands returned from the United States, Africa and South America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A sugar found in leafy greens promotes gut health, new study concludes
(Natural News) Leafy green vegetables are a staple in healthy diets because they are full of many vitamins and minerals. According to a study, leafy greens can even boost your gut health. The study, which was published in the journal Nature Chemical Biology, was conducted by researchers from Australian and the U.K. Data from the study suggests that a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Neurotoxicity associated with traumatic brain injury, blast, chemical, heavy metal and quinoline drug exposure - Marshall TM, Dardia GP, Colvin KL, Nevin R, Macrellis J.
Chronic, excessive exposure, and accumulation of neurotoxic agents such as heavy metals (lead, mercury, cadmium), mefloquine (Lariam), and food additives such as monosodium glutamate and aspartame cause neurotoxicity and brain damage. This chemical-induced... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

The mushroom toxins: chemistry and toxicology - Yin X, Yang A, Gao JM.
Mushroom consumption is a global tradition that is still gaining popularity. However, foraging for wild mushrooms and accidental ingestion of toxic mushrooms can result in serious illness and even death. The early diagnosis and treatment of mushroom poison... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Home and Consumer Product Safety Source Type: news

Recall Of Blood Pressure Drug Losartan Expanded
(CNN) — If you take blood pressure medicine, you’ll want to double-check your bottle. Torrent Pharmaceuticals Ltd. has expanded its recall of losartan potassium and losartan potassium/hydrochlorothiazide tablets. Tests found trace amounts of a potentially cancer-causing impurity called N-methylnitrosobutyric acid in some of these drugs. The company is recalling 36 additional lots, it said Thursday. A full list of recalled drugs is available on the US Food and Drug Administration website. Some of the recalled blood pressure medication (Image credit: FDA) The company hasn’t had any reports of users getting ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News losartan Source Type: news

E-Cigarettes by Laura Uselding, MD
Laura Uselding, MDE-cigarettes are the MOST COMMON tobacco product used by adolescents. According tothe 2018 Monitoring the Future (MTF) survey conducted by the University of Michigan, the prevalence of vaping increased by approximately 1.3 million teens from 2017 to 2018. It found that 37% of 12th graders and 10% of 8th graders reported using e-cigarettes in the last 12 months.  The use of e-cigarettes is likely putting a new generation of teens at risk of nicotine dependence. Here are some important things to know about e-cigarettes: E-cigarettes are electronic devices that heat a liquid containi...
Source: Pediatric Health Associates - April 19, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Stunning new material invented in Turkey: "Metallic wood" is 5 times stronger than titanium, but lighter
(Natural News) Turkish inventors have created a new building material that is five times stronger than titanium and has the density of wood planks. Most remarkably, this new “Metallic wood” is lighter than titanium and still has the chemical stability of metal for use in manufacturing applications. The new material is made out of nickel-based... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cancer-causing chemical taints water after California blaze
Officials say the drinking water in Paradise, California, is contaminated with the cancer-causing chemical benzene after a deadly wildfire last year (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - April 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Premium New Zealand honey producer admits adding chemicals: media
A New Zealand company pleaded guilty on Thursday to charges of adding artificial chemicals to its premium manuka honey, media reported, in a flagship prosecution over a product that is high-value export for the country. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Next frontier in study of gut bacteria: mining microbial molecules
Using the chemical screening technology PRESTO-Tango, Yale researchers have identified specific gut bacteria that impact various aspects of human biology. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 18, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Nigeria: Phytonutrients for Disease Prevention
[Guardian] The heart is one organ that has benefitted tremendously from the phytochemicals. I intend to highlight those phytonutrients that have helped to prevent heart diseases. Phytochemicals are plant components that we eat as food. They can also be sourced from water we drink and from supplements. Also referred to phytonutrients, the phytochemicals are plant chemicals, which protect the plants against insects, bacteria, fungi and Ultra Violet (UV) radiation. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 18, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Proctor Gamble, whose products are full of toxic chemicals linked to cancer, demands Facebook enforce "brand safety" for advertisers
(Natural News) Procter & Gamble is one of Facebook’s most important advertisers, so when they demanded that the social media platform enforce “brand safety” for its advertisers, it drew a lot of attention to the issue. However, there’s one aspect of the story that seems to be getting lost in the mainstream media’s coverage of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bioengineers program cells as digital signal processors
(Rice University) Synthetic biologists have added high-precision analog-to-digital signal processing to the genetic circuitry of living cells. The research, described online today in the journal Science, dramatically expands the chemical, physical and environmental cues engineers can use to prompt programmed responses from engineered organisms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Light and peptides: New method diversifies natural building blocks of life
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) EPFL chemists have developed a new, light-based method for modifying peptides at the C-terminal position. The method introduces the structural diversity needed for drug design in this class of bioactive compounds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is it really 'dry clean only'? (video)
(American Chemical Society) Knowing the do's and don'ts of washing your clothes can be difficult, but chemistry has got your back. With a quick lesson in textile chemistry, you'll be able to understand the different fabrics that make up your clothes. This week on Reactions, we'll explore whether it's safe to wash your favorite new shirt at home or if you really need to take it to the dry cleaner's: https://youtu.be/FFhBaBXJEuk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fish under threat release chemicals to warn others of danger
(University of Saskatchewan) Fish warn each other about danger by releasing chemicals into the water as a signal, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Toward fire safety without chemical risk
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: de Boer, J., Stapleton, H. M. Tags: Chemistry perspective Source Type: news

Three-orders-of-magnitude variation of carrier lifetimes with crystal phase of gold nanoclusters
We report a three-orders-of-magnitude variation of carrier lifetimes in exotic crystalline phases of gold nanoclusters (NCs) in addition to the well-known face-centered cubic structure, including hexagonal close-packed (hcp) Au30 and body-centered cubic (bcc) Au38 NCs protected by the same type of capping ligand. The bcc Au38 NC had an exceptionally long carrier lifetime (4.7 microseconds) comparable to that of bulk silicon, whereas the hcp Au30 NC had a very short lifetime (1 nanosecond). Although the presence of ligands may, in general, affect carrier lifetimes, experimental and theoretical results showed that the drasti...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Zhou, M., Higaki, T., Hu, G., Sfeir, M. Y., Chen, Y., Jiang, D.-e., Jin, R. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Deconstructing waters diffuse OH stretching vibrational spectrum with cold clusters
The diffuse vibrational envelope displayed by water precludes direct observation of how different hydrogen-bond topologies dictate the spectral response of individual hydroxy group (OH) oscillators. Using cold, isotopically labeled cluster ions, we report the spectral signatures of a single, intact water (H2O) molecule embedded at various sites in the clathrate-like cage structure adopted by the Cs+·(D2O)20 ion. These patterns reveal the site-dependent correlation between the frequencies of the two OH groups on the same water molecule and establish that the bound OH companion of the free OH group exclusively account...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Yang, N., Duong, C. H., Kelleher, P. J., McCoy, A. B., Johnson, M. A. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Wet surface sightings in clusters
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Atomic packing controls exciton lifetime
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Szuromi, P. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Risk assessment of lithium-ion battery explosion: chemical leakages - Park YJ, Kim MK, Kim HS, Lee BM.
Use of lithium-ion batteries has raised safety issues owing to chemical leakages, overcharging, external heating, or explosions. A risk assessment was conducted for hydrofluoric acid (HF) and lithium hydroxide (LiOH) which potential might leak from lithium... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Dynamic simulation of the group behavior under fire accidents based on system dynamics - Song J, Zhang M, Zheng F, Chen F.
In order to study the group behavior under severe fire accidents in chemical industrial park, a model of the group behavior was built based on the epidemic model and the system dynamics (SD) theory and method. The influencing factors were selected through ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Most ancient type of molecule in universe detected in space
Helium hydride is thought to have played starring role in early universeThe most ancient type of molecule in our universe has been detected in space, scientists have revealed, backing up theories of how the early chemistry of the universe developed after the big bang.The positively charged molecule known as helium hydride is believed to have played a starring role in the early universe, forming when a helium atom shared its electrons with a hydrogen nucleus, or proton. Not only is it thought to be the first molecular bond, and first chemical compound, to have appeared as the universe cooled after the big bang, but it also ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Space Particle physics Science Astronomy Chemistry World news Source Type: news

Medical News Today: House dust microbes degrade cancer-causing chemical
A new study finds that the microbes in our household dust can break down cancer-causing environmental chemicals. However, this benefit comes at a cost. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Public Health Source Type: news

New PFASs discovered in Cape Fear River, though levels are declining
(American Chemical Society) In 2015, a fluorosurfactant known by the trade name 'GenX' made headlines when researchers discovered it and related compounds in the Cape Fear River of North Carolina, a source of drinking water for many residents of the area. Now, researchers report in ACS' journal Environmental Science& Technology that they have detected the same per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in the river, as well as some new ones, but their overall levels are decreasing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cannabidiol could help deliver medications to the brain
(American Chemical Society) Cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive compound in cannabis, is being touted as beneficial for many health conditions, ranging from anxiety to epilepsy. Although much more research is needed to verify these claims, scientists have now shown that CBD could have a different use as a 'Trojan horse': helping slip medications across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and into mouse brains. The researchers report their results in the ACS journal Molecular Pharmaceutics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Biosensor 'bandage' collects and analyzes sweat
(American Chemical Society) Like other biofluids, sweat contains a wealth of information about what's going on inside the body. However, collecting the fluid for analysis, usually by dripping or absorbing it from the skin's surface, can be time-consuming and messy. Now, researchers have developed a bandage-like biosensor that both collects and -- in conjunction with a smart phone -- analyzes sweat. The device, which could someday help diagnose diseases, is reported in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A light-activated remote control for cells
(American Chemical Society) What if doctors had a remote control that they could use to steer a patient's own cells to a wound to speed up the healing process? Although such a device is still far from reality, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Nano Letters have taken an important first step: They used near-infrared light and an injected DNA nanodevice to guide stem cells to an injury, which helped muscle tissue regrow in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Russian scientists investigate thermodynamic properties of an energy metabolism stimulator
(Lobachevsky University) A group of researchers led by Professor Alexander Knyazev at the Faculty of Chemistry of Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod has been studying the thermodynamic properties of L-carnitine for several years. There is only a limited number of substances that have proven their effectiveness and safety in the course of long-term observation and at the same time offer such advantages as acceleration of recovery after exercise or the ability to eliminate body dysfunctions associated with intense exercise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study shows people used natural dyes to color their clothing thousands of years ago
(Martin-Luther-Universit ä t Halle-Wittenberg) Even thousands of years ago people wore clothing with colourful patterns made from plant and animal-based dyes. Chemists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have created new analytical methods to examine textiles from China and Peru that are several thousand years old. In the scientific journal " Scientific Reports " they describe their new method that is able to reconstruct the spatial distribution of dyes, and hence the patterns, in textile samples. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Improving quantum computers
(American Chemical Society) For decades, experts have predicted that quantum computers will someday perform difficult tasks, such as simulating complex chemical systems, that can't be done by conventional computers. But so far, these machines haven't lived up to their potential because of error-prone hardware. That's why scientists are working to improve the qubit -- the basic hardware element of quantum computers, according to an article in Chemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

10 Biggest Myths About Sleeping, According To Researchers
(CNN) — Hey, sleepyheads. What you believe about sleep may be nothing but a pipe dream. Many of us have notions about sleep that have little basis in fact and may even be harmful to our health, according to researchers at NYU Langone Health’s School of Medicine, who conducted a study published Tuesday in the journal Sleep Health. “There’s such a link between good sleep and our waking success,” said lead study investigator Rebecca Robbins, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone Health. “And yet we often find ourselves debunking myths, whether ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch News CNN Sleep Source Type: news

New algorithm allows for faster, animal-free chemical toxicity testing
(Rutgers University) The use of animals to test the toxicity of chemicals may one day become outdated thanks to a low-cost, high-speed algorithm developed by researchers at Rutgers and other universities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news