Chemical risk and safety awareness, perception, and practices among research laboratories workers in Italy - Papadopoli R, Nobile CGA, Trovato A, Pileggi C, Pavia M.
INTRODUCTION: Exposure to chemical compounds occurs in numerous occupational settings, among which the research and healthcare laboratories have not been adequately investigated. These settings are characterized by an extreme variability of the used... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Occupational Issues Source Type: news

Translation of exposure and epidemiology for risk assessment: a shifting paradigm - LaKind JS, Naiman J, Burns CJ.
Risk assessment is a well-established process used for various types of public health decision-making, such as setting chemical site clean-up levels, developing limits on exposures to chemicals in soil, water, air and food, and determining occupational exp... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Please don't call it medical marijuana unless it is; but it probably isn't - Witek TJ.
The drug development process of demonstrating an agent is safe, effective and pure has, with rare exception, proven an exemplary path in translational research. The basic science, the clinical trials and the chemistry, manufacturing and control have served... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Fluorocarbon bonds are no match for light-powered nanocatalyst
(Rice University) Rice University engineers have created a light-powered catalyst that can break the strong chemical bonds in fluorocarbons, a group of synthetic materials that includes persistent environmental pollutants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 22, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Like oil and water
(University of Pittsburgh) Lei Li, associate professor of chemical and petroleum engineering at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering, has received $110,000 from the American Chemical Society (ACS) Petroleum Research Fund (PRF) for his work developing 3D-printed membranes that will aid in oil-water separation. The development could help convert the oily wastewater into purified, usable water. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 22, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Empirical gas explosion models for onshore plant structures: review and comparative analysis - Ree S, Kang THK, Lee H, Shin M.
In the onshore and offshore chemical industries, a gas explosion is a major accident in terms of damage scale and frequency. To prevent disastrous damages, the Task Committee on Design of Blast Resistant Buildings in Petrochemical Facilities of the ASCE su... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

App determines COVID-19 disease severity using artificial intelligence, biomarkers
COVID-19 severity score, built with data from china and new york city, can help clinicians identify the most at-risk patientsNew York UniversityA new mobile app can help clinicians determine which patients with the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) are likely to have severe cases. Created by researchers at NYU College of Dentistry, the app uses artificial intelligence (AI) to assess risk factors and key biomarkers from blood tests, producing a COVID-19 " severity score. "Current diagnostic tests for COVID-19 detect viral RNA to determine whether someone does or does not have the virus--but they do not provide clues as...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - June 20, 2020 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Toxic Ghosts
My father and I worked for years at a factory that became a Superfund hazardous-waste site. We ’re still feeling the repercussions. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dana Jennings Tags: Water Pollution Hazardous and Toxic Substances Chemicals Factories and Manufacturing Waste Materials and Disposal Air Pollution Colitis Superfund PCB (Polychlorinated Biphenyls) Prostate Gland Digestive Tract Source Type: news

How tear gas affects your body (video)
(American Chemical Society) 2-Chlorobenzalmalononitrile, better known as CS gas, is one of the most common tear gases used in the United States today, but did you know it's not actually a gas? We break down how it works, a bit of its history and the best ways to recover if you're hit with it. A reminder: We're not doctors! Please contact yours with any concerns: https://youtu.be/agXnXHfGc3k. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Adolescents from disadvantaged neighborhoods show gene regulation differences
(Duke University) An 18-year study of 2,000 children born in England and Wales found that young adults raised in communities marked by more economic deprivation, physical dilapidation, social disconnection, and danger display differences in the epigenome -- the proteins and chemical compounds that regulate the activity of their genes. The findings suggest that gene regulation may be one biological pathway through which neighborhood disadvantage 'gets under the skin' to engender long-term health disparities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fungal pathogen disables plant defense mechanism
(Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology) Cabbage plants defend themselves against herbivores and pathogens by deploying a defensive mechanism called the mustard oil bomb. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology and the University of Pretoria have now been able to show that this defense is also effective against the widespread fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. However, the pathogen uses at least two different detoxification mechanisms that enable the fungus to successfully spread on plants defended in this way. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

US drops planned limit for toxin that damages infant brains
The Trump administration has rejected imposing federal drinking-water limits for a chemical used in fireworks and other explosives and linked to brain damage in newborns (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - June 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Announces Winners of 2020 Women in STEM2D Scholars Award
(New Brunswick, N.J. – June 18) – Johnson & Johnson today announced the six winners of the third annual Johnson & Johnson Women in STEM2D (WiSTEM2D) Scholars Award. Each recipient, representing each of the STEM2D disciplines: Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, Manufacturing and Design, will receive a grant of $150,000 and three years of mentorship. Launched in June 2017, the Johnson & Johnson WiSTEM2D Scholars Award seeks to fuel development of future female STEM2D leaders and feed the STEM2D talent pipeline by awarding and sponsoring women at critical points in their careers. The goal is to su...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - June 18, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

How cancer drugs find their targets could lead to a new toolset for drug development
(Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research) Cellular processes such as transcription often take place in tiny cellular droplets called condensates. A new study shows the mechanism by which small molecules, including cancer drugs, are concentrated in these droplets -- a finding that could have implications for the development of new cancer therapeutics. If researchers could tailor a chemical to seek out and concentrate in one kind of droplet in particular, it might have a positive effect on the delivery efficiency of the drug. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 18, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Closing the radical gap in chemical synthesis
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 18, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Liu, J.-Q., Shatskiy, A., Kärkäs, M. D. Tags: Chemistry perspective Source Type: news

Information arms race explains plant-herbivore chemical communication in ecological communities
Plants emit an extraordinary diversity of chemicals that provide information about their identity and mediate their interactions with insects. However, most studies of this have focused on a few model species in controlled environments, limiting our capacity to understand plant-insect chemical communication in ecological communities. Here, by integrating information theory with ecological and evolutionary theories, we show that a stable information structure of plant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can emerge from a conflicting information process between plants and herbivores. We corroborate this information "arms ...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 18, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Zu, P., Boege, K., del-Val, E., Schuman, M. C., Stevenson, P. C., Zaldivar-Riveron, A., Saavedra, S. Tags: Ecology, Evolution reports Source Type: news

Microfluidic electrochemistry for single-electron transfer redox-neutral reactions
Electrochemistry offers opportunities to promote single-electron transfer (SET) redox-neutral chemistries similar to those recently discovered using visible-light photocatalysis but without the use of an expensive photocatalyst. Herein, we introduce a microfluidic redox-neutral electrochemistry (μRN-eChem) platform that has broad applicability to SET chemistry, including radical-radical cross-coupling, Minisci-type reactions, and nickel-catalyzed C(sp2)–O cross-coupling. The cathode and anode simultaneously generate the corresponding reactive intermediates, and selective transformation is facilitated by the rapid ...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 18, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Mo, Y., Lu, Z., Rughoobur, G., Patil, P., Gershenfeld, N., Akinwande, A. I., Buchwald, S. L., Jensen, K. F. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Cutting it close for radical coupling
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 18, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Adhesive film turns smartwatch into biochemical health monitoring system
UCLA engineers have designed a thin adhesive film that could upgrade a consumer smartwatch into a powerful health monitoring system. The system looks for chemical indicators found in sweat to give a real-time snapshot of what ’s happening inside the body. Astudy detailing the technology was published inthe journal  Science Advances.Smartwatches can already help keep track of how far you ’ve walked, how much you’ve slept and your heart rate. Newer models even promise to monitor blood pressure. Working with a tethered smartphone or other devices, someone can use a smartwatch to keep track of those heal...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 17, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Epidemiological analysis of patients with burns in third-line hospitals in Turkey - Bah çe Z, Öztaş T.
In this study, epidemiological data o... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Benefits of convalescent plasma for COVID-19 are still unclear
(American Chemical Society) With vaccines and therapeutic drugs for COVID-19 still under development, doctors are wondering whether antibody-rich plasma infusions from the blood of recovered patients could be a more immediate way to keep hospitalized patients alive and off ventilators. However, an article inChemical& Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, indicates that, despite some anecdotal evidence, scientists still don't have high-quality data showing that the treatment actually works. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 17, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cellular nanosponges could soak up SARS-CoV-2
(American Chemical Society) Scientists are working overtime to find an effective treatment for COVID-19, the illness caused by the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2. Many of these efforts target a specific part of the virus, such as the spike protein. Now, researchers reporting inNano Letters have taken a different approach, using nanosponges coated with human cell membranes -- the natural targets of the virus -- to soak up SARS-CoV-2 and keep it from infecting cells in a petri dish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 17, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Adhesive film turns smartwatch into biochemical health monitoring system
(University of California - Los Angeles) UCLA engineers have designed a thin adhesive film that could upgrade a consumer smartwatch into a powerful health-monitoring system. The system looks for chemical indicators found in sweat to give a real-time snapshot of what's happening inside the body. A study detailing the technology was published in the journal of Science Advances. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIST adds new 'fingerprints' to chemical identification database
(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has updated its database of chemical fingerprints, called mass spectra, that are used to identify unknown chemical compounds. The NIST Mass Spectral Library and its new version, called NIST20, is used in health care, drug discovery, foods and fragrances, oil and natural gas, environmental protection, forensic science and almost every other industry that manufactures or measures physical stuff. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How Toxoplasma parasites glide so swiftly (video)
(American Chemical Society) If you're a cat owner, you might have heard ofToxoplasma gondii, a protozoan that sometimes infects humans through contact with contaminated feces in litterboxes. Although harmless to most people,T. gondii can cause serious illness or death in immunocompromised individuals or fetuses of infected pregnant women. Now, researchers reporting inACS Nano have studied how the microorganism glides so swiftly through mammalian tissues during an infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH-funded study links endometriosis to DNA changes
(NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) DNA from uterine cells of women with endometriosis has different chemical modifications, compared to the DNA of women who do not have the condition, according to researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health. The changes involve DNA methylation--the binding of compounds known as methyl groups to DNA--which can alter gene activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researcher named a Top Young Innovator by MIT Technology Review
(NYU Tandon School of Engineering) Miguel Modestino, an assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, has been named among the MIT Technology Review " Innovators Under 35 " for his work to integrate renewable-energy processes into the chemical industry and develop a path to environmentally sound chemical production. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 17, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bayer scraps U.S. plans to produce crop chemical blocked by court
Bayer AG said on Tuesday it will scrap a nearly $1 billion project to produce the chemical dicamba in the United States, but said the move is unrelated to a federal court decision that blocked sales of weed killers based on the product. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Premature epigenomic aging acts like a 'sleeper cell' that is awaken by Western-style diet
(Baylor College of Medicine) Exposure to certain chemicals early in life can reprogram the liver epigenome so that the organism becomes more vulnerable to diet-triggered metabolic problems later in life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 16, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A sugar hit to help destroy cancer cells
(University of Southern California) Like any cells in the body, cancer cells need sugar ­ -- namely glucose -- to fuel cell proliferation and growth. However, researchers from USC Viterbi's Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science have unlocked a weakness in a common type of cancer cell: sugar inflexibility. That is, when cancer cells are exposed to a different type of sugar - galactose - the cells can't adapt, and will die. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 16, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

High-throughput dynamic BH3 profiling may quickly and accurately predict effective therapies in solid tumors
Despite decades of effort, the sensitivity of patient tumors to individual drugs is often not predictable on the basis of molecular markers alone. Therefore, unbiased, high-throughput approaches to match patient tumors to effective drugs, without requiring a priori molecular hypotheses, are critically needed. Here, we improved upon a method that we previously reported and developed called high-throughput dynamic BH3 profiling (HT-DBP). HT-DBP is a microscopy-based, single-cell resolution assay that enables chemical screens of hundreds to thousands of candidate drugs on freshly isolated tumor cells. The method identifies ch...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - June 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Bhola, P. D., Ahmed, E., Guerriero, J. L., Sicinska, E., Su, E., Lavrova, E., Ni, J., Chipashvili, O., Hagan, T., Pioso, M. S., McQueeney, K., Ng, K., Aguirre, A. J., Cleary, J. M., Cocozziello, D., Sotayo, A., Ryan, J., Zhao, J. J., Letai, A. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Building a circular chemical economy
(University of Pittsburgh) Carbon dioxide is essential to plant and animal life, but in excess it negatively impacts the environment by absorbing and radiating heat in the atmosphere, contributing to global warming.But what if we could recycle carbon dioxide by converting it into useful fuels and chemicals? The University of Pittsburgh's James McKone is tackling this idea and was selected as a Beckman Young Investigator (BYI) by the Arnold& Mabel Beckman Foundation for this work. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 15, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nurses Worried About PPE Shortage, Second Coronavirus Surge
BOSTON (CBS) – Some hospitals and nurses are worried about a second surge of coronavirus and whether there’s enough protective equipment to handle it. Nurses are concerned about the messages they’re getting from management. Some are being told to re-use masks or buy their own. Nurses at Signature Healthcare Brockton Hospital says the facility is rationing PPE and telling workers to reuse their masks. Some have concerns that a chemical decontamination process could be making them sick. “We haven’t had time to do long term studies on reprocessing,” said Kim Hollon, CEO of Signature Health...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Health Healthwatch Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local brockton hospital Brockton News Coronavirus South Shore Hospital Source Type: news

Airbnb hosts struggle with how far to go to make properties safe during pandemic
Donna Lyerly and her team now spend four hours or more each week disinfecting Airbnb properties with strong chemicals. They drain and clean outdoor hot tubs, wipe board game pieces and remove items that are harder to sanitize, such as throw pillows and decorative bedspreads. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cleaning and Disinfectant Chemical Exposures and COVID-19 Cleaning and Disinfectant Chemical Exposures and COVID-19
With increased usage of cleaning and disinfection products due to COVID-19, there has been a significant increase in the number of calls to poison centers due to their improper use.Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Public Health & Prevention Journal Article Source Type: news

Statistical analyses of plant metabolites allow solid testing of plant defense theories
(Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology) High-throughput analyses of small substances in Nicotiana attenuata reveal that plants re-organize their metabolism to produce highly-specific defense metabolites after insect attack. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, and at the CNRS Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, France, combined extensive measurements of known and unknown plant metabolites using mass spectrometry with statistical measures derived from information theory and demonstrated that plants regulate their metabolism directionally to produce effective defenses. (Source: ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 12, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chemicals supplied by China play a big role in America’s illegal drug trade
(Natural News) Coronavirus isn’t the only deadly epidemic that can be traced to China; factories in the country have also been involved in supplying huge amounts of precursor chemicals to Mexican super labs to produce methamphetamines and other drugs that end up on American streets. Precursor chemicals are used for the illegal manufacture of narcotics... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

DIY antibody tests are STILL not available for Britons
The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) pulled the home testing kits, which check if someone has previously had the disease, from UK chemists on May 26. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eating Before Bedtime Might Pack on the Pounds
THURSDAY, June 11, 2020 -- If you have a late dinner and then head to bed, beware: You may gain weight while you sleep, a new study suggests. That's most likely because your metabolism slows, boosting blood sugar and other chemicals that contribute... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 11, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Warburg effect: Sugar-tagging helps drug compounds to target human prostate cancer cells
(Far Eastern Federal University) Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), together with German and Russian colleagues, have developed a lead compound to fight chemotherapy-resistant prostate cancer. The original design comes out as scientists combine biologically active molecules from the chemically modified pigment of sea urchins with glucose molecules to deliver the active drug substance inward the tumor cells. A related article recently was published in Marine Drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

To help West Virginia reopen safely, WVU researchers develop new COVID-19 tests
(West Virginia University) COVID-19 tests are in short supply. The companies that make the necessary chemicals -- called reagents -- can't keep up with demand. But researchers at West Virginia University are developing new tests on their own to identify who has COVID-19 now and who had it in the past but recovered. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 11, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

India lifts export ban on Trump-touted drug hydroxychloroquine
"Department of Pharmaceuticals has approved the lifting of ban on Export of Hydroxychloroquine API as well as formulations," India's minister for chemicals and fertilizers, Sadananda Gowda, said on Twitter. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - June 11, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Far-field excitation of single graphene plasmon cavities with ultracompressed mode volumes
Acoustic graphene plasmons are highly confined electromagnetic modes carrying large momentum and low loss in the mid-infrared and terahertz spectra. However, until now they have been restricted to micrometer-scale areas, reducing their confinement potential by several orders of magnitude. Using a graphene-based magnetic resonator, we realized single, nanometer-scale acoustic graphene plasmon cavities, reaching mode volume confinement factors of ~5 x 1010. Such a cavity acts as a mid-infrared nanoantenna, which is efficiently excited from the far field and is electrically tunable over an extremely large broadband spectrum. ...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Epstein, I., Alcaraz, D., Huang, Z., Pusapati, V.-V., Hugonin, J.-P., Kumar, A., Deputy, X. M., Khodkov, T., Rappoport, T. G., Hong, J.-Y., Peres, N. M. R., Kong, J., Smith, D. R., Koppens, F. H. L. Tags: Physics reports Source Type: news

Electrification of the chemical industry
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Barton, J. L. Tags: Chemistry perspective Source Type: news

A precise polyrotaxane synthesizer
We report the assembly line–like emergence of poly[n]rotaxanes with increasingly higher energies by harnessing artificial molecular pumps to deliver rings in pairs by cyclical redox-driven processes. This programmable strategy leads to the precise incorporation of two, four, six, eight, and 10 rings carrying 8+, 16+, 24+, 32+, and 40+ charges, respectively, onto hexacationic polymer dumbbells. This strategy depends precisely on the number of redox cycles applied chemically or electrochemically, in both stepwise and one-pot manners. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Qiu, Y., Song, B., Pezzato, C., Shen, D., Liu, W., Zhang, L., Feng, Y., Guo, Q.-H., Cai, K., Li, W., Chen, H., Nguyen, M. T., Shi, Y., Cheng, C., Astumian, R. D., Li, X., Stoddart, J. F. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Chloride-mediated selective electrosynthesis of ethylene and propylene oxides at high current density
Chemicals manufacturing consumes large amounts of energy and is responsible for a substantial portion of global carbon emissions. Electrochemical systems that produce the desired compounds by using renewable electricity offer a route to lower carbon emissions in the chemicals sector. Ethylene oxide is among the world’s most abundantly produced commodity chemicals because of its importance in the plastics industry, notably for manufacturing polyesters and polyethylene terephthalates. We applied an extended heterogeneous:homogeneous interface, using chloride as a redox mediator at the anode, to facilitate the selective...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Leow, W. R., Lum, Y., Ozden, A., Wang, Y., Nam, D.-H., Chen, B., Wicks, J., Zhuang, T.-T., Li, F., Sinton, D., Sargent, E. H. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Charging into epoxides
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Ten rings on one axle
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Chocolate, Dairy And Fatty Foods Can Cause Acne, Study Finds
(CNN) — If you’re an acne sufferer who has long thought chocolate, sweets, dairy and other fatty foods made your acne worse — even though your doctor said it was all in your head, not your face — you’ve been vindicated. Consumption of milk, sugary drinks, and fatty and sugary foods does appear to be associated with breakouts of acne, according to a new study of nearly 25,000 French adults. The research was published Wednesday in the journal JAMA Dermatology. “This is an important study, and it adds to the body of evidence which has found that certain eating patterns may be one factor pla...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Source Type: news

How is electricity being used in wound care?
Some wounds just don't seem to heal. Now, pioneering medical research has come up with some promising new treatments that employ electricity to speed recovery, killing bacteria more effectively than traditional bandages or antibiotics. Here's a brief summary of these dramatic new developments in healthcare.  Medical research is providing revolutionary new wound care treatments that use electricity to speed healing. The problem: slow-healing or no-healing wounds Physicians and emergency room specialists have long been stymied by chronic wounds that resist most efforts to treat them using conventional antibio...
Source: Advanced Tissue - June 10, 2020 Category: Dermatology Authors: AdvancedTissue Tags: Wound Care Wound healing Wound Infection Source Type: news