Sunscreen facts and fictions: Breaking down the science of sun protection
A study in JAMA analyzed blood samples of 24 people who used sunscreen four times a day, for four days. Researchers found levels of four chemical ingredients that exceed the FDA ’s recommended limits. The authors caution that the health effects, if any, are unknown, and people should continue to apply sunscreen to protect against skin cancer. As we continue our coverage of Skin Cancer Awareness Month, Dr. Tara Narula joins "CBS This Morning" to separate sunscreen fact fro m fiction. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - May 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sunscreen Chemicals Enter Bloodstream at Potentially Unsafe Levels: Study
Title: Sunscreen Chemicals Enter Bloodstream at Potentially Unsafe Levels: StudyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 5/6/2019 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 5/7/2019 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Skin General)
Source: MedicineNet Skin General - May 7, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: news

Sunscreen Chemicals Enter Bloodstream at Potentially Unsafe Levels: Study
(Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer - May 7, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study: We Absorb High Level of Sunscreen Chemicals
Experts are quick to say the known risk from the sun's rays is greater than the potential risk posed by these chemicals. Keep using your sunscreen. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - May 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sunscreen enters bloodstream after just one day of use, study says
After just one day of use chemicals in sunscreens had entered the bloodstream at significant levels and continued to rise daily, a FDA pilot study finds. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - May 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Sunscreen Chemicals Can Get Into Your Blood
Here is what testing by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) scientists revealed. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - May 6, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Y. Lee, Contributor Source Type: news

Effects Of Surgery On A Warming Planet: Can Anesthesia Go Green?
Anesthesia revolutionized surgery by vanquishing patients' pain. But many of the chemicals are greenhouse gases. One Oregon doctor who has done the math says some are much less damaging to the planet.(Image credit: Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kristian Foden-Vencil Source Type: news

Sunscreen Enters Bloodstream After Just One Day Of Use, Study Says
This study is the FDA’s way of showing sunscreen manufacturers they need to do the studies to see if chemical absorption poses health risks.” The need to screen According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, more Americans are diagnosed with skin cancer each year than all other cancers combined. Around the world, melanoma ranks as the 19th most common cancer in both men and women, says the World Cancer Research Fund. In the United States, sunscreens were originally approved as an over-the-counter solution to sunburn. They came in two types: one using chemical combos to filter the sun, the other using minerals to bloc...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Sunscreen Source Type: news

Sunscreen Chemicals Enter Bloodstream at Potentially Unsafe Levels: & nbsp; Study
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - May 6, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Dermatology, Family Medicine, Oncology, News, Source Type: news

Sunscreen is absorbed into our blood at concentrations up to 419 TIMES above what is safe
A study by the US Food and Drug Administration found the chemical oxybenzone, which absorbs UVA and UVB rays, reaches plasma concentrations of up to 209.6ng/mL. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

At Least Three Dead in Illinois Factory Explosion
WAUKEGAN, Ill. (AP) — Search and recovery personnel found the body of another worker Sunday in the rubble of a northern Illinois silicone factory that exploded and burst into flames two days earlier, bringing the death toll to three employees with one more body believed to be in the debris, a fire official said. Photos: Waukegan, IL Factory Explosion Waukegan Fire Marshal Steve Lenzi told a news conference that the body was found as first responders resumed searching in hazardous conditions in the debris from the AB Specialty Silicones plant in Waukegan, about 50 miles (80 kilometers) north of Chicago. They were sear...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - May 6, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news

Sunscreen Chemicals Enter Bloodstream at Potentially Unsafe Levels: Study
MONDAY, May 6, 2019 -- For years, you've been urged to slather on sunscreen before venturing outdoors. But new U.S. Food and Drug Administration data reveals chemicals in sunscreens are absorbed into the human body at levels high enough to raise... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 6, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Bacteria causing infections can be detected more rapidly
(Pohang University of Science& Technology (POSTECH)) Prof. Young-Tae Chang, Dr. Nam Young Kang, Dr. Hwa-Young Kwon, and Xiao Liu of POSTECH Department of Chemistry developed a fluorescent probe, BacGo that can detect Gram-positive bacteria precisely and promptly. They published their research on the most renowned journal of the field of chemistry, Angewandte Chemie. The research team used bacterial sludge from wastewater for the demonstration experiment. They successfully monitored the proportion of bacteria in the process of wastewater treatment and confirmed the possible application to clinical diagnosis of keratitis...
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

CBD: On a real market high
Cannabidiol, a chemical compound extracted from hemp, is now at the center of a swiftly-growing industry which last year derived about $600 million in U.S. sales (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - May 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NC researchers circle on chemicals that disrupt hormones
The North Carolina group gains interest and numbers among researchers studying chemical effects on normal development and health. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - May 5, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

What Makes Two Materials “Identical”?
On April 26, FDA released a final guidance on Characterization of Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) Used in Orthopedic Devices1. The draft of this guidance was issued on February 12, 2016. The guidance addresses four different types of UHMWPE: conventional, highly crosslinked, highly crosslinked containing antioxidants, and non-conventional. The parameters of characterization include material description, sterility, biocompatibility, mechanical properties, and chemical properties. For the base material, FDA “recommends” the inclusion of information on starting ...
Source: MDDI - May 4, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: William A. Hyman Tags: Materials Source Type: news

The Scientology Cruise Ship Quarantined for Measles Has Set Sail. Here ’s How the Next Port Plans to Handle It
The Scientology cruise ship that was quarantined in St. Lucia is now sailing for the Dutch Caribbean island Curaçao, and officials say that they’re currently preparing for what’s next. The vessel, Freewinds, is scheduled to arrive at its homeport in Curaçao on Saturday morning, Dr. Izzy Gerstenbluth, the national epidemiologist for the island of 160,000 people, tells TIME. Freewinds set sail from St. Lucia on Thursday night, St. Lucia officials say. St. Lucia officials refused to allow the ship’s crew or passengers to disembark when the ship arrived at the island on Tuesday because the count...
Source: TIME: Health - May 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease onetime Travel Source Type: news

Shrimp From 5 U.K. Rivers Have One Thing in Common: Cocaine
A new study of chemicals in river wildlife found pesticides in many of its samples, and cocaine in all of them. The drug ’ s source remained a mystery. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PALKO KARASZ Tags: Water Pollution Hazardous and Toxic Substances Great Britain Cocaine and Crack Cocaine Drug Abuse and Traffic Rivers Pesticides Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Environment International (Journal) Source Type: news

Forensic investigation of incidents involving chemical threat agent: presentation of the operating procedure developed in Belgium for a field-exercise - Kummer N, Augustyns B, Van Rompaey D, De Meulenaere K.
The GIFT CBRN project (Generic Integrated Forensic Toolbox for chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear incidents), funded under the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Commission, has been set up to find solutions for investigating incidents... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

Study reveals amyloid clumps of a truncated p53 structure related to endometrial cancer
(Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Biologia Estrutural e Bioimagem (INBEB)) Brazilian scientists have discovered that a truncated variant of the tumor suppressor protein p53 is present as amyloid aggregates in endometrial cancer cells. Published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, the study points to new perspectives for treating tumors in which p53 variants are important components of these clusters, given that alterations in the p53 protein are associated with more aggressive versions of these tumors, with a high mortality rate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 3, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Industry-ready process makes plastics chemical from plant sugars
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) A team from the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center and the University of Wisconsin-Madison describe an efficient and economically feasible process for producing HMF, a versatile plant-derived chemical considered crucial for building a renewable economy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 3, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chemical Warfare: A Primer for First Responders and Receivers
Source: Alabama Department of Public Health. Published: 5/3/2019. The purpose of this one-hour webinar is to raise awareness of the dangers caused by single and dual use chemicals that have been used in warfare, such as arsenicals. It describes important historical and recent examples of chemical agents use in warfare; enumerates clinical components of major chemical toxidromes; and describes challenges in prevention and response for first responders and receivers in caring for victims of chemical exposure. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A Scientology Cruise Ship Has Been Quarantined for Measles. Here ’s What to Know
The Church of Scientology’s cruise ship Freewinds with 300 passengers aboard has been quarantined in port by the Caribbean nation of St. Lucia for measles after a female crew member was diagnosed with the highly contagious, preventable disease. MarineTraffic.com lists the vessel in port at St. Lucia as the Freewinds. A ship with that name is owned by a Panamanian company linked to the Church of Scientology. NBC News also reported that a St. Lucia coast guard official confirmed that the quarantined vessel belonged to the church. The Church of Scientology did not respond to TIME’s requests for comment. St. Luci...
Source: TIME: Health - May 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease onetime Travel Source Type: news

NC researchers circle on chemicals the disrupt hormones
The North Carolina group gains interest and numbers among researchers studying chemical effects on normal development and health. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - May 2, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

PFAS Senate hearing, Birnbaum ’ s expert scientific testimony
Linda Birnbaum told senators that chemicals known as PFAS persist in the environment and affect nearly every system in the human body. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - May 2, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

New method quickly screens chemicals for cancer-causing potential
National Toxicology Program scientists, NIEHS grantees, and colleagues developed a quick way to screen substances for carcinogenicity. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - May 2, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Health Tip: Chemical Peel
-- A chemical peel can reduce signs of aging and treat a variety of skin conditions, says the American Academy of Dermatology. Acne, discoloration, freckles and sun-damaged skin are some of the many conditions commonly treated with a peel. After... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 2, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Health Tip: Chemical Peel
Title: Health Tip: Chemical PeelCategory: Health NewsCreated: 5/2/2019 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 5/2/2019 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Skin General)
Source: MedicineNet Skin General - May 2, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: news

New digital filter approach aims to improve chemical measurements
(Purdue University) A Purdue University professor and expert in measurement science has led a team to design a new filter aimed at helping drug developers and researchers create more exact measurements early in the drug development stage, which can ultimately help move a drug to clinical trials faster. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chemical modifiers tag-team to regulate essential mechanism of life
(Gladstone Institutes) For decades, scientists thought that one modification, phosphorylation, ran the show. In a new study, researchers at the Gladstone Institutes discovered that another modification, called acetylation, also occurs on the regulatory tail of the polymerase during gene transcription in more complex organisms like mammals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New chemical probe for visualizing brain immune cells
(Duke-NUS Medical School) Researchers in South Korea and Singapore have, for the first time, developed a chemical probe that enables live-imaging of a type of immune cells in the brain, known as microglia, in a live animal brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What is pepper spray? (video)
(American Chemical Society) Whether it's walking down a dark street at night or fighting off grizzly bears on the trail, pepper spray is an effective tool to fend off an attacker and get safely away. This week on Reactions, we're taking a look at what's in these little canisters and why it inflicts so much pain. And for those times when you accidentally spray yourself, we'll also give you some tips on what to do: https://youtu.be/QFPxj4CcXp0. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Opportunistic cancer cells 'slip through the gaps' to spread through blood vessels
(University of Birmingham) Cancer cells may rely on opportunism, as well as chemical signalling, to spread through the body, according to new findings by mathematicians at the University of Birmingham. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 2, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The Chemico Group Earns Prestigious Honeywell Innovation Award
Award recognizes suppliers for innovative solutions in chemical management.(PRWeb May 02, 2019)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/the_chemico_group_earns_prestigious_honeywell_innovation_award/prweb16285872.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - May 2, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Electrical suppression of all nonradiative recombination pathways in monolayer semiconductors
Defects in conventional semiconductors substantially lower the photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY), a key metric of optoelectronic performance that directly dictates the maximum device efficiency. Two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), such as monolayer MoS2, often exhibit low PL QY for as-processed samples, which has typically been attributed to a large native defect density. We show that the PL QY of as-processed MoS2 and WS2 monolayers reaches near-unity when they are made intrinsic through electrostatic doping, without any chemical passivation. Surprisingly, neutral exciton recombination is ent...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Lien, D.-H., Uddin, S. Z., Yeh, M., Amani, M., Kim, H., Ager, J. W., Yablonovitch, E., Javey, A. Tags: Materials Science reports Source Type: news

In search of blue
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Kupferschmidt, K. Tags: Botany, Chemistry, Geochemistry, Geophysics Feature Source Type: news

How a highly driven reaction hits the brakes
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Dempsey, J. L. Tags: Chemistry perspective Source Type: news

Protons venture into the inverted region
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Spotlight on copper
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Concerted proton-electron transfer reactions in the Marcus inverted region
Electron transfer reactions slow down when they become very thermodynamically favorable, a counterintuitive interplay of kinetics and thermodynamics termed the inverted region in Marcus theory. Here we report inverted region behavior for proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET). Photochemical studies of anthracene-phenol-pyridine triads give rate constants for PCET charge recombination that are slower for the more thermodynamically favorable reactions. Photoexcitation forms an anthracene excited state that undergoes PCET to create a charge-separated state. The rate constants for return charge recombination show an inverted ...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Parada, G. A., Goldsmith, Z. K., Kolmar, S., Pettersson Rimgard, B., Mercado, B. Q., Hammarström, L., Hammes-Schiffer, S., Mayer, J. M. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Comment on "Quantifying hot carrier and thermal contributions in plasmonic photocatalysis"
Zhou et al. (Reports, 5 October 2018, p. 69) claim to have proven dominance of "hot" electrons over thermal effects in plasmonic photocatalysis. We identify experimental flaws that caused overestimation of the hot carrier contribution. As an alternative interpretation, we fully reproduce their data using a purely thermal Arrhenius law with a fixed activation energy and intensity-dependent heating. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sivan, Y., Baraban, J., Un, I. W., Dubi, Y. Tags: Chemistry, Physics t-comment Source Type: news

Response to Comment on "Quantifying hot carrier and thermal contributions in plasmonic photocatalysis"
Sivan et al. claim that the methods used to distinguish thermal from hot carrier effects in our recent report are inaccurate and that our data can be explained by a purely thermal mechanism with a fixed activation energy. This conclusion is invalid, because they substantially misinterpret the emissivity of the photocatalyst and assume a linear intensity–dependent temperature in their model that is unrealistic. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Zhou, L., Swearer, D. F., Robatjazi, H., Alabastri, A., Christopher, P., Carter, E. A., Nordlander, P., Halas, N. J. Tags: Chemistry t-comment Source Type: news

Coppers rapid ascent in visible-light photoredox catalysis
Visible-light photoredox catalysis offers a distinct activation mode complementary to thermal transition metal catalyzed reactions. The vast majority of photoredox processes capitalizes on precious metal ruthenium(II) or iridium(III) complexes that serve as single-electron reductants or oxidants in their photoexcited states. As a low-cost alternative, organic dyes are also frequently used but in general suffer from lower photostability. Copper-based photocatalysts are rapidly emerging, offering not only economic and ecological advantages but also otherwise inaccessible inner-sphere mechanisms, which have been successfully ...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hossain, A., Bhattacharyya, A., Reiser, O. Tags: Chemistry, Online Only review Source Type: news

Will Eaves wins Wellcome book prize for fictionalised take on Alan Turing
Murmur, which depicts the mathematician ’s ordeal after he was convicted for having a gay lover, is hailed by judges as ‘a future classic’Will Eaves ’s fictionalised account of the chemical castration of Alan Turing, Murmur, was hailed as “a future classic” as it won the £30,000 Wellcome book prize on Wednesday night, only the third novel to win the award for science-related writing.Published by Charles Boyle ’s one-man-band press CB Editions, Murmur was up against both fiction and non-fiction for the prize, which goes to the book that best “illuminate[s] the many ways ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alison Flood Tags: Wellcome book prize Science and nature books Culture Awards and prizes Fiction Alan Turing UK news Artificial intelligence (AI) Consciousness Publishing Source Type: news

A Device That Heats Tobacco, But Doesn ’t Burn It, Can Now Be Sold in the U.S. Here’s What to Know About IQOS
After a two-year wait, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Tuesday green-lit the sale of a new gadget that heats tobacco instead of burning it. The device, which is called IQOS (pronounced EYE-kose) and made by Philip Morris International, works by heating tobacco-filled sticks, called Heatsticks, to produce a nicotine-rich aerosol. The FDA’s decision means the device may now be marketed in the U.S. — but even though IQOS has been shown to produce fewer of the cancer-causing chemicals found in traditional cigarettes, the FDA has not yet approved a separate application to call IQOS a lower-risk alternative...
Source: TIME: Health - May 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Fast Company accidentally admits that plants thrive on carbon dioxide, the greenhouse gas that liberals claim will destroy the world... but it actually makes the world more GREEN
(Natural News) Even the mainstream media cannot deny scientific reality forever: Carbon dioxide (CO2) is essential for plant life. It is a key component of photosynthesis, the chemical process which plants depend on to stay alive. While it may not be well known, higher levels of CO2 are a key contributor to the massive global... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fixating on PEEK: The Implant Advantage
It’s difficult to talk about spinal devices today without mentioning the popularity of polyetheretherketone, the thermoplastic more commonly known as PEEK. It was originally introduced by Victrex PLC, then Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI) in the early 1980s. PEEK is based on the polyaryletherketone (PAEK) family and is commonly used in various engineering and medical applications. PEEK has been used for the development of medical devices as far back as the 1980s, but in 1999, Invibio Biomaterial Solutions developed the first implantable PEEK polymer: PEEK-OPTIMA. Invibio was the sole supplier of the imp...
Source: MDDI - May 1, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: John MacDonald Tags: Materials Source Type: news

U.S. environment agency says glyphosate weed killer is not a carcinogen
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) said on Tuesday that glyphosate, a chemical in many popular weed killers, is not a carcinogen, contradicting decisions by U.S. juries that found it caused cancer in people. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Environmental pollutants could impact cellular signs of aging
(American Chemical Society) Researchers have linked some environmental pollutants with diseases, a decreased life span and signs of premature aging, such as wrinkles and age spots. But can accelerated aging be detected at the cellular level in healthy people exposed to pollutants? Now, researchers in the ACS journal Environmental Science& Technology report that although pollutant exposure can affect two hallmarks of aging in people (mitochondrial DNA content and telomere length), the results are not so clear-cut. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers grow cells in 'paper organs'
(American Chemical Society) Long before scientists test new medicines in animals or people, they study the effects of the substances on cells growing in Petri dishes. However, a 2D layer of cells is a poor substitute for the much more complex 3D structure of tissues in organs. Now, researchers reporting in the ACS journalNano Letters have used a 3D printer to make paper organs, complete with artificial blood vessels, that they can populate with cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news