Mother roundworms have ultra-protective instincts
(University of Iowa) University of Iowa biologists have learned animals can alert future offspring of dangers they will encounter when born. In studies with roundworms and mouse cells, researchers showed how mothers pass chemical signals to their unfertilized eggs, where the warning is stored in the egg cells and passed to offspring after birth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Aluminum may affect lead levels in drinking water
(Washington University in St. Louis) Until recently, researchers have not inspected the interplay between three common chemicals found in drinking water. Research from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis has found they all affect each other and a closer look is needed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What Are Potential Complications of Tattooing?
Discussion “Tattooing of skin via deposition of pigment particles and ink ingredients in the dermis changes normal skin into abnormal skin. Fortunately, this often causes no harm and no disease, although with important exceptions.” Tattoos can be inadvertent from road dirt, gunpowder, pencil graphite etc., but most are desired. Tattoos are common in many cultures and over time..They have been increasing in popularity in the United States over the past few years particularly with a younger, wider and more diverse population. Newsweek reported an 18-country study in 2018 which showed 46% of Americans have a tat...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - May 18, 2020 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Some studies raise concerns about sunscreen chemicals. But if you dig deeper, evidence is still lacking, experts say.
Despite what can seem like alarming research, a dermatologist says the products are not necessarily dangerous. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - May 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Sohn Source Type: news

Parkinson’s disease: Feeling this sensation in your muscles is a warning
PARKINSON'S disease involves certain nerve cells in the brain to gradually break down or die. Many of the symptoms of Parkinson's disease are due to a loss of neurons which produces a chemical messenger in the brain known as dopamine. When dopamine levels decrease, abnormal brain activity ensues. The brain is not the only organ to be affected and feeling this sensation in your muscles could mean early Parkinson's. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Humpback Whales Have Made a Remarkable Recovery, Giving Us Hope for the Planet
In the depths of the ocean, and out of sight for most of us, there’s a quiet miracle happening. Many humpback whale populations, previously devastated by commercial whaling, are making a comeback. And no, before you ask, this has nothing to do with the coronavirus. A recent study on humpbacks that breed off the coast of Brazil and call Antarctic waters home during the summer has shown that these whales can now be found in the sort of numbers seen before the days of whaling. Records suggest that in the 1830s there were around 27,000 whales but, after heavy hunting, by the mid-1950s only 450 remained. It is reassuring...
Source: TIME: Science - May 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Dr. Kirsten Thompson Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

5-Day, 5-step nic-quit: The five basic steps to quitting nicotine forever
(Natural News) Are you ready to do the 5-step “nic” quit? It’s easy. It’s scientifically proven to help you kick the cravings for nicotine without any drugs or chemical prescriptions. In America, there are 35 million smokers, 10 million vape connoisseurs, plus over 5 million smokeless tobacco users (think chew or dip). That’s 50 million... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

An innovative quantitative analysis methodology for Natech events triggered by earthquakes in chemical tank farms - Huang K, Chen G, Yang Y, Chen P.
Natech events triggered by earthquakes are one of the major threats in chemical clusters. Earthquake can not only cause serious damage to equipment, but also hinder the rescue operations and exacerbate the evolution and escalation of accidents. In order to... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Chemical industry in China: the current status, safety problems, and pathways for future sustainable development - Chen C, Reniers G.
This study investigates chemical safety in China in order to... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Study on safety behavior planning theory and control strategies for coal chemical workers - Min Y, Yexiang F, Weilin T, Jiajie Z.
As a new industry, coal chemical industry is a high-risk industry with large investment scale, long process and complex technology. Its personnel come from coal mine, petroleum and petrochemical industry, and their quality and safety perception are differe... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Could Certain Chemicals Trigger Celiac Disease?
FRIDAY, May 15, 2020 -- Toxic chemicals in a wide range of products are associated with an increased risk of celiac disease in children and young adults, researchers say. People with celiac disease -- an immune disorder -- can't tolerate foods that... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 15, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

A Vaccine Against COVID-19 Would Be the Latest Success in a Long Scientific History
Here’s betting you wouldn’t want anyone blowing smallpox scabs up your nose. But you might feel differently if you lived in 15th century China. Long ago, the Chinese recognized that people who had contracted smallpox once were immune to reinfection. They came up with the idea of preserving scabs from individuals who had suffered mild cases, drying them out, crushing them to a powder and blowing them up the nostril. For boys it was the right nostril, for girls it was the left because, well, 15th century. That is how the story of vaccines usually begins, though that version is decidedly incomplete. For one thing,...
Source: TIME: Science - May 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer health Source Type: news

PET Drug Applications - Content and Format for NDAs and ANDAs: Attachment I: Sample formats for chemistry, manufacturing, and controls (CMC) sections_2011
Procedural; Modernization Act (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - May 15, 2020 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: FDA Source Type: news

McMaster chemists develop foolproof new test to track the fats we eat
(McMaster University) A team of researchers at McMaster University has developed a reliable and accurate blood test to track individual fat intake, a tool that could guide public health policy on healthy eating. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Deadly gas leak in India, grim wake-up call for global chemical industry: UN rights expert
Last week’s deadly toxic gas leak at a Korean-owned polymer plant in south-eastern India, is a grim wake up call for the chemical industry to acknowledge and fulfil its responsibility to respect human rights, the UN independent expert who monitors the issue, said on Thursday. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ERLEADA ® (apalutamide) Significantly Improved Overall Survival in Patients with Non-Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer
RARITAN, NJ, May 13, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today results from the final analysis of the pivotal Phase 3 SPARTAN study demonstrating ERLEADA® (apalutamide) in combination with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) significantly improved overall survival (OS), compared to ADT alone, in patients with non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (nmCRPC) who were at high risk of developing metastases.[i] Results will be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Virtual Scientific Program (Abstract #5516) beginning May 29th. ERLEADA® ...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - May 14, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

New Chemical Entity Exclusivity Determinations for Certain Fixed-Combination Drug Products
Procedural (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - May 14, 2020 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: FDA Source Type: news

Emails: Trump nominee involved in shelving CDC virus guide
A former chemical industry executive nominated to be the nation’s top consumer safety watchdog was involved in sidelining detailed guidelines to help communities reopen during the coronavirus pandemic (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - May 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Quantum interference in H + HD -> H2 + D between direct abstraction and roaming insertion pathways
Understanding quantum interferences is essential to the study of chemical reaction dynamics. Here, we provide an interesting case of quantum interference between two topologically distinct pathways in the H + HD -> H2 + D reaction in the collision energy range between 1.94 and 2.21 eV, manifested as oscillations in the energy dependence of the differential cross section for the H2 (v' = 2, j' = 3) product (where v' is the vibrational quantum number and j' is the rotational quantum number) in the backward scattering direction. The notable oscillation patterns observed are attributed to the strong quantum interference bet...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Xie, Y., Zhao, H., Wang, Y., Huang, Y., Wang, T., Xu, X., Xiao, C., Sun, Z., Zhang, D. H., Yang, X. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

How interference reveals geometric phase
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Aoiz, F. J. Tags: Chemistry perspective Source Type: news

Speeding up borylation
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Intriguing interference mechanism
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Suleymanov, Y. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Diverse functionalization of strong alkyl C-H bonds by undirected borylation
We report an iridium catalyst ligated by 2-methylphenanthroline with activity that enables, with the substrate as limiting reagent, undirected borylation of primary C–H bonds and, when primary C–H bonds are absent or blocked, borylation of strong secondary C–H bonds. Reactions at the resulting carbon-boron bond show how these borylations can lead to the installation of a wide range of carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds at previously inaccessible positions of organic molecules. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Oeschger, R., Su, B., Yu, I., Ehinger, C., Romero, E., He, S., Hartwig, J. Tags: Chemistry r-articles Source Type: news

Comment on "Dry reforming of methane by stable Ni-Mo nanocatalysts on single-crystalline MgO"
Song et al. (Reports, 14 February 2020, p. 777) ignore the reported efficient Ni/MgO solid-solution catalysts and overstate the novelty and importance of the Mo-doped Ni/MgO catalysts for the dry reforming of methane. We show that the Ni/MgO solid-solution catalyst that we reported in 1995, which is efficient and stable for the dry reforming, is superior to the Mo-doped Ni/MgO catalyst. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Hu, Y. H., Ruckenstein, E. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science t-comment Source Type: news

Response to Comment on "Dry reforming of methane by stable Ni-Mo nanocatalysts on single-crystalline MgO"
Hu and Ruckenstein state that our findings were overclaimed and not new, despite our presentation of evidence for the Nanocatalysts on Single Crystal Edges (NOSCE) mechanism. Their arguments do not take into account fundamental differences between our Ni-Mo/MgO catalyst and their NiO/MgO preparations. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Song, Y., Ozdemir, E., Ramesh, S., Adishev, A., Subramanian, S., Harale, A., Albuali, M., Fadhel, B. A., Jamal, A., Moon, D., Choi, S. H., Yavuz, C. T. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science t-comment Source Type: news

Purdue startup wins recognition, investments for technology on waste algae disposal
(Purdue University) A Purdue University-affiliated startup focusing on technology to turn municipal wastewater algae into specialty chemicals has received its second financial award in just two weeks. Gen3Bio Inc. has proprietary technology that redirects waste algae from an environmental hazard into profitable environmentally friendly products fully integrated into the circular economy. The startup has gained a $20,000 investment through the Elevate Nexus Regional Pre-Seed competition and a $20,000 pilot plant grant from The Water Council, with both announcements coming within weeks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 13, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A new, highly sensitive chemical sensor uses protein nanowires
(University of Massachusetts Amherst) Writing in NanoResearch, a team at UMass Amherst reports that they have developed bioelectronic ammonia gas sensors that are among the most sensitive ever made. It uses electric-charge-conducting protein nanowires derived from the bacterium Geobacter to provide biomaterials for electrical devices. They grow hair-like protein filaments that work as nanoscale " wires " to transfer charges for their nourishment and to communicate with other bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chemistry job seekers face tough outlook during pandemic
(American Chemical Society) Even though it's been over a decade, the 2008 recession and its effects still loom over the chemistry enterprise. And now with the COVID-19 pandemic shutting down labs and universities across the world, chemistry students and professionals are again facing hiring freezes, reduced pay and other career obstacles.Chemical& Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, spoke with chemists about how they're navigating the current economic downturn. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Expandable foam for 3D printing large objects (video)
(American Chemical Society) It's a frustrating limitation of 3D printing: Printed objects must be smaller than the machine making them. Huge machines are impractical for printing large parts because they take up too much space and require excessive time to print. Now, a new material reported in ACS Applied Materials& Interfaces can be used to 3D print small objects that expand upon heating. The foam could find applications in architecture, aerospace and biomedicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ronald Reagan ’s Secret Cancer Cure
There’s no faster way to purify your body of viruses, bacteria and fungi — and at the same time ramp up your immune system — than a 125-year-old “cure” banned by the FDA. I’m talking about ozone therapy — and it’s not just good for cleansing your body. You see, ozone — a special “energized” kind of oxygen — can help heal almost any condition. Despite being banned by the FDA back in the 1940s, after more than 60 years of successful use, ozone therapy has saved millions of lives in countries where it has become a commonplace medical treatment. In count...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - May 12, 2020 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Dr.A.Sears Tags: Health Source Type: news

Accidental Poisonings Increased After President Trump ’s Disinfectant Comments
President Trump’s April 23 musing that injections of disinfectant could help defeat the coronavirus did not do much for his reputation as a reliable arbiter of public health. What’s harder to determine is how many people—if any—took his advice and in some way ingested the toxic chemicals. The most recent bulletin from the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC), which aggregates data from its state counterparts, does offer some clues, however. ( function() { var func = function() { var iframe = document.getElementById('wpcom-iframe-fb3956e8555b52a9f378efca562a3451') ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Accidental Poisonings Increased After President Trump ’s Disinfectant Comments
President Trump’s April 23 musing that injections of disinfectant could help defeat the coronavirus did not do much for his reputation as a reliable arbiter of public health. What’s harder to determine is how many people—if any—took his advice and in some way ingested the toxic chemicals. The most recent bulletin from the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC), which aggregates data from its state counterparts, does offer some clues, however. ( function() { var func = function() { var iframe = document.getElementById('wpcom-iframe-fb3956e8555b52a9f378efca562a3451') ...
Source: TIME: Science - May 12, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Uganda: Uganda's Cipla Takes Bold Step to Make 'Unpopular' Malaria Drug
[East African] Uganda pharmaceutical firm, Cipla Quality Chemicals Industries Ltd (CiplaQCIL), is taking a big bet in the war against global Covid-19 pandemic. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - May 12, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Celiac disease linked to common chemical pollutants
(NYU Langone Health / NYU School of Medicine) Elevated blood levels of toxic chemicals found in pesticides, nonstick cookware, and fire retardants have been tied to an increased risk for celiac disease in young people, new research shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 12, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researcher explores disinfectant strength, contact time against viruses
(Penn State) Cleaning products, alcohol-based sanitizers and other common chemicals are all being used on surfaces to try to kill the virus that causes COVID-19, but knowing how much to use and how long to use it for is unknown, according to Craig Meyers, distinguished professor of microbiology and immunology and obstetrics and gynecology, College of Medicine, Penn State, who is looking at testing these chemicals to find out. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Elsevier announce new publishing partnership
(Elsevier) The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) and Elsevier, a global information analytics business specializing in science and health, are delighted to announce a new partnership to publish the ASBMB's Journal of Biological Chemistry (JBC), Molecular& Cellular Proteomics (MCP) and Journal of Lipid Research (JLR). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dogs can detect traces of gasoline down to one billionth of a teaspoon
(University of Alberta) Trained dogs can detect fire accelerants such as gasoline in quantities as small as one billionth of a teaspoon, according to new research by University of Alberta chemists. The study provides the lowest estimate of the limit of sensitivity of dogs' noses and has implications for arson investigations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 12, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chemical evidence of dairying by hunter-gatherers in highland Lesotho in the first millennium AD
After analysing organic residues from ancient pots, a team of scientists led by the University of Bristol has uncovered new evidence of dairying by hunter-gatherers in the landlocked South African country of Lesotho in the mid-late first millennium AD. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - May 11, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Arts, Faculty of Arts, School of Arts, Faculty of Arts, School of Arts, Archaeology and Anthropology, Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Chemistry; Press Release Source Type: news

UCLA scientists create first roadmap of human skeletal muscle development
An interdisciplinary team of researchers at theEli and Edythe Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA has developed a first-of-its-kind roadmap of how human skeletal muscle develops, including the formation of muscle stem cells.The study, published May 11 in the peer-reviewed journal Cell Stem Cell, identified various cell types present in skeletal muscle tissues, from early embryonic development all the way to adulthood. Focusing on muscle progenitor cells, which contribute to muscle formation before birth, and muscle stem cells, which contribute to muscle formation after birth and to re...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 11, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Exploring why some COVID-19 patients lose their sense of smell
(American Chemical Society) Doctors have reported that partial or total loss of the sense of smell is often an early symptom of infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Chemical Neuroscience have shown that in mice, two proteins required for SARS-CoV-2 entry are produced by cells of the nasal cavity that contribute to odor detection. Moreover, larger amounts of the proteins are made in older animals than in younger ones. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 11, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Neural logic
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Everything we do comes down to a series of neural signals that translate into physical behaviors. We receive information through our senses, sensory neurons convert this information into electrical and chemical signals that are processed by other neurons in our brains and ultimately, motor neurons fire muscles that move our limbs. But how these signals complete their circuits -- and how these circuits compete -- is not completely understood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genomics and Machine Learning for In Vitro Sensitization Testing of...
In this free webinar, the featured speakers will discuss how genomics and machine learning can provide a highly accurate method for both skin and respiratory sensitization assessment of chemicals,...(PRWeb May 11, 2020)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/genomics_and_machine_learning_for_in_vitro_sensitization_testing_of_challenging_chemicals_upcoming_webinar_hosted_by_xtalks/prweb17110235.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - May 11, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Risk analysis and last route finding of road transport based on uncertainty principle - Du LZ, Mi J.
Most of China's chemicals are transported to destination by accessing to long-distance roads. It is more likely to cause dangerous accidents such as leakage, explosion and fire during transportation of hazardous articles, leading to personal injuries or ev... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Chemicals found in kitchenware can DOUBLE your risk of obese grandchildren, research shows
The Public Health Institute in California found that obesity was up to 2.3 times higher among 20-year-old women whose grandmothers had been exposed to syn chemicals. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why do people with depression usually suffer from gastrointestinal distress? Study
(Natural News) Patients with depression often experience gastrointestinal distress, a group of digestive disorders marked by lingering symptoms, such as constipation, bloating, diarrhea, abdominal pain and cramping. According to a study published in the journal Gastroenterology, the two disorders are connected by a common cause: low levels of serotonin, also known the “happy chemical.” Depression and gastrointestinal distress go hand... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Biodynamic preparations could have a positive effect on the chemical compounds of mulberry leaves
(Natural News) White mulberry (Morus alba) is a small tree native to Northern China that produces white-colored berries. Its leaves are well-known not only for their medicinal uses, but also for serving as food for silkworms. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), the different parts of white mulberry are used to treat a variety of illnesses.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Human Urine Could Help Make Concrete on the Moon, Says European Space Agency
(Berlin) — The European Space Agency said Friday that human urine could one day become a useful ingredient in making concrete to build on the Moon. The agency said researchers in a recent study it sponsored found that urea, the main organic compound in urine, would make the mixture for a “lunar concrete” more malleable before it hardens into its sturdy final form. It noted that using only materials available on site for a Moon base or other construction would reduce the need to launch supplies from Earth. The main ingredient in “lunar concrete” would be a powdery soil found on the Moon’s...
Source: TIME: Science - May 8, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized News Desk TIME100 Talks wire Source Type: news

More evacuations near Indian factory after fatal gas leak
Indian authorities are evacuating more people from villages near a South Korean-owned chemical factory where a gas leak killed 12 people and left about 1,000 struggling to breathe (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - May 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Chemical leak at LG plant in India kills 11, about 1,000 ill
A gas leak at a chemical factory owned by a South Korean company in southern India has left at least 11 people dead and about 1,000 struggling to breathe (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - May 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Global Tracker: U.K., India, Russia
Poland has postponed its presidential election amid debate over how to conduct voting safely. In India, a lethal gas leak may have resulted from a rush to reopen a chemical plant. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Source Type: news