Stopping the spread of COVID-19, and arctic adaptations in sled dogs
Kimberly Prather, an atmospheric chemist at the University of California, San Diego, who studies how ocean waves disperse virus-laden aerosols, joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about how she became an outspoken advocate for using masks to prevent coronavirus transmission. A related insight she wrote for Science has been downloaded more than 1 million times. Read Science’s coronavirus coverage. Mikkel Sinding, a postdoctoral fellow at Trinity College Dublin, talks sled dog genes with Sarah. After comparing the genomes of modern dogs, Greenland sled dogs, and an ancient dog jaw bone found on a remote Siberian island ...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - June 23, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

30 April 2020: A sniff test for consciousness, and how to cut antibiotics use — with vaccines
This week, how the ‘sniff-response’ can help clinicians determine a patient's state of consciousness, and how vaccines could help drive down antibiotic use.In this episode:00:45 Sniffing out consciousnessResearchers have found that the sniff reflex can indicate whether a patient is in a vegetative state, and even the likelihood that they will recover consciousness. Research Article: Arzi et al.08:37 Research HighlightsThe stupefying effect of carbon dioxide, and a chameleon gemstone that tricks your eyes. Research Highlight: Rising carbon dioxide levels will make us stupider; Research H...
Source: Nature Podcast - April 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Matthew Cobb on "The Idea of the Brain" (BS 171
Matthew Cobb (click to play, R click to download This episode of Brain Science is an interview with neuroscientist Matthew Cobb author of "The Idea of the Brain: The Past and Future of Neuroscience."Cobb approaches the history of neuroscience from a different perspective than previous writers. He writes from the perspective of a working scientist with a deep interest in the history of ideas and the interaction between science and culture. This approach makes for a fascinating discussion.Through out history assumptions about the brain have been influenced by both culture a...
Source: the Brain Science Podcast and Blog with Dr. Ginger Campbell - April 24, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Ginger Campbell, MD Tags: Books Interviews Neuroscience Podcast Show Notes Source Type: podcasts

23 April 2020: Denisovan DNA in modern Europeans, and the birth of an unusual celestial object
This week, evidence of ancient hominin DNA in modern human genomes, and the origin of a snowman-shaped object at the edge of the solar system.In this episode:00:45 Intermixing of ancient homininsBy combing through the DNA of over 27,000 modern day Icelanders, researchers have uncovered new insights about the ancient hominin species who interbred with Homo sapiens. Research Article: Skov et al.08:05 Research HighlightsThe scent of lemur love, a hidden Viking trade route, and ‘gargantuan’ hail. Research Highlight: Lemurs’ love language is fragrance; Research Highlight: Vik...
Source: Nature Podcast - April 22, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Why some diseases come and go with the seasons, and how to develop smarter, safer chemicals
On this week ’s show, host Joel Goldberg gets an update on the coronavirus pandemic from Senior Correspondent Jon Cohen. In addition, Cohen gives a rundown of his latest feature, which highlights the relationship between diseases and changing seasons—and how this relationship relates to a potential coronavir us vaccine. Also this week, from a recording made at this year’s AAAS annual meeting in Seattle, host Meagan Cantwell speaks with Alexandra Maertens, director of the Green Toxicology initiative at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, about the importance of incorporating nonanimal testing methods to ...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - March 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

13 February 2020: The puzzling structures of muddled materials, and paving the way for the quantum internet
This week, uncovering the structure of materials with useful properties, and quantum entanglement over long distances.In this episode:00:45 Analysing Prussian bluesAnalogues of the paint pigment Prussian blue are used in a variety of chemical processes. Now, researchers have uncovered their atomic structure. Research Article: Simonov et al.; News and Views: Ordered absences observed in porous framework materials08:17 Research HighlightsTeenagers’ natural sleep cycles impact on academic performance, and an extinct, giant rodent with a surprisingly tiny brain. Research Highlight: A teenage...
Source: Nature Podcast - February 12, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Getting bisphenol A out of food containers, and tracing minute chemical mixtures in the environment
As part of a special issue on chemicals for tomorrow ’s Earth, we’ve got two green chemistry stories. First, host Sarah Crespi talks with contributing correspondent Warren Cornwell about how a company came up with a replacement for the popular can lining material bisphenol A and then recruited knowledgeable critics to test its safety. Sarah is a lso joined by Beate Escher of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research and the University of Tübingen to discuss ways to trace complex mixtures of humanmade chemicals in the environment. They talk about how new technologies can help detect these mixtur...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - January 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

01 January 2020: Our reporters ’ top picks of 2019
In this special round-up episode of the Nature Podcast, our reporters choose their favourite podcast piece of 2019.In this episode:00:33 A sole sensationA study of people who do and don't wear shoes looks into whether calluses make feet less sensitive. Nature Podcast: 26 June 2019; Research article: Holowka et al.; News and Views: Your sensitive sole08:56 The make up of the far side of the MoonInitial observations from the first lander to touch down on the far side of the Moon. Nature Podcast: 15 May 2019; Research article: Li et al.15:43 Growth MindsetHow a one hour course could improve academic achievement. Nature Podcas...
Source: Nature Podcast - January 1, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

14 November 2019: A rapid, multi-material 3D printer, and a bacterium ’s role in alcoholic hepatitis
This week, a new 3D printer allows quick shifting between many materials, and understanding the link between gut microbes and liver disease.00:46 A new dimension for 3D printersA new nozzle lets a 3D printer switch between materials at a rapid rate, opening the door to a range of applications. Research Article: Skylar-Scott et al.; News and Views: How to print multi-material devices in one go08:07 Research HighlightsThe slippery secrets of ice, and cells wrapping up their nuclei. Research Highlight: Viscous water holds the secret to an ice skater’s smooth glide; Research Highlight:&...
Source: Nature Podcast - November 13, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

10 October 2019: Estimating earthquake risk, and difficulties for deep-learning
This week, a method for predicting follow-up earthquakes, and the issues with deep learning systems in AI.In this episode:00:47 Which is the big quake?A new technique could allow seismologists to better predict if a larger earthquake will follow an initial tremor. Research Article: Real-time discrimination of earthquake foreshocks and aftershocks; News and Views: Predicting if the worst earthquake has passed07:46 Research HighlightsVampire bats transmitting rabies in Costa Rica, and why are some octopuses warty? Research Article: Streicker et al.; Research Article: Voight et al.10:03...
Source: Nature Podcast - October 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Podcast Extra: Q & A with Nobel Prize winner John B Goodenough
In this Podcast Extra, we speak to John B Goodenough, from the University of Texas at Austin, in the US. Today, John was announced as one of the joint winners of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Reporter Benjamin Thompson went along to the Royal Society in London to chat with him. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - October 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

22 August 2019: Combating online hate speech, and identifying early fossils
This week, the resilience of internet hate groups, and searching for early life.In this episode:00:46 Tackling internet hateResearchers have been modelling how hate groups interact online, and have come up with suggestions to combat this activity. Research article: Johnson et al.; News and Views: Strategies for combating online hate08:55 Research HighlightsGallstone growth, and the reproductive strategies of hitchhiking stick insects. Research Highlight: The ‘net’ that leads to excruciating stones in the belly; Research Highlight: The insect that lost its homeland — and its s...
Source: Nature Podcast - August 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Converting carbon dioxide into gasoline, and ‘autofocal’ glasses with lenses that change shape on the fly
Chemists have long known how to convert carbon dioxide into fuels —but up until now, such processes have been too expensive for commercial use. Staff Writer Robert Service talks with host Sarah Crespi about using new filters and catalysts to close the gap between air-derived and fossil-derived gasoline.   Also this week, host Sarah Crespi talks with Nitish Pad manaban of Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, about replacing bifocals with “autofocals.” These auto-focusing glasses track your eye position and measure the distance to the visual target before adjusting the thickness of their liqu...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - July 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Source Type: podcasts

Converting carbon dioxide into gasoline, and ‘autofocal’ glasses with lenses that change shape on the fly
Chemists have long known how to convert carbon dioxide into fuels —but up until now, such processes have been too expensive for commercial use. Staff Writer Robert Service talks with host Sarah Crespi about using new filters and catalysts to close the gap between air-derived and fossil-derived gasoline.   Also this week, host Sarah Crespi talks with Nitish Pad manaban of Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, about replacing bifocals with “autofocals.” These auto-focusing glasses track your eye position and measure the distance to the visual target before adjusting the thickness of their liqu...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - July 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Source Type: podcasts

Efficacy & Tolerance Of TAK-788: Patients Had Diarrhea, Nausea, Mild Rash, & Chemical Pancreatitis, Appears To Be More Potent & Specific In Pre-Clinical Studies
Joel Neal MD Of Stanford University Medical Center Discusses Efficacy & Tolerance Of TAK-788: Patients Had Diarrhea, Nausea, Mild Rash, & Chemical Pancreatitis, Appears To Be More Potent & Specific In... Author: Annual-Meeting Added: 06/05/2019 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - June 6, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

"Bac-Trac" -- The Discovery Files
Bacteria's use of "swim and tumble" maneuvers and chemical secretions helps them move toward food or away from poisons as they encounter obstacles, such as those found in the human gastrointestinal tract. The research, which involved an "obstacle course" of microfluidic chambers to experiment on the bacteria, holds implications for not only biology and medicine, but also robotic search and rescue tactics. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - May 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 549: The church of protocadherin
Kartik and Rohit join the TWiV team to present their identification of protocadherin-1 as a cell receptor for New World hantaviruses. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Guests: Kartik Chandran and Rohit Jandra Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Einstein goes viral (TWiV 314) Michael Rossmann, 88 (virology blog) Protocadherin-1 essential for New World hantavirus entry (Nature) Image credit Timestamps by Jolene. Thanks! This episode is sponsored by the 2019 Chem/Bio Defense Science and...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - May 26, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 548: Mice, shrews, and caterpillars
Vincent travels to the European Congress of Virology in Rotterdam and with local co-host Marion Koopmans speak with Martin Beer, Stephan Gunther, and Vera Ross about their careers and their work on Lassa virus, Borna virus, and insect viruses. Hosts: Vincent Racanielloand Marion Koopmans Guests: Martin Beer, Stephan Gunther, and Vera Ros Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode ECV2019 Partnerships not parachutes (TWiV 413) Fatal Borna disease virus infection in transplant recipients (NEJM) Sequencing of 2018 Lassa virus ou...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - May 19, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

Nonstick chemicals that stick around and detecting ear infections with smartphones
The groundwater of Rockford, Michigan, is contaminated by per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, chemicals found in everything from nonstick pans to dental floss to —in the case of Rockford—waterproofing agents from a shoe factory that shut down in 2009. Science journalist Sara Talpos talks with host Meagan Cantwell about how locals found the potentially health-harming chemicals in their water, and how contamination from nonstick chemicals isn’t limited t o Michigan. Also this week, host Sarah Crespi talks with Shyamnath Gollakota of the University of Washington in Seattle about his work diagnosing ear inf...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - May 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Nonstick chemicals that stick around and detecting ear infections with smartphones
The groundwater of Rockford, Michigan, is contaminated by per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, chemicals found in everything from nonstick pans to dental floss to —in the case of Rockford—waterproofing agents from a shoe factory that shut down in 2009. Science journalist Sara Talpos talks with host Meagan Cantwell about how locals found the potentially health-harming chemicals in their water, and how contamination from nonstick chemicals isn’t limited t o Michigan. Also this week, host Sarah Crespi talks with Shyamnath Gollakota of the University of Washington in Seattle about his work diagnosing ear inf...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - May 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 547: Upstate virology
Vincent travels to the University at Albany to speak with Cara, Rachel, and Alex about their careers and their work on stress granules, epitranscriptomics, and arboviruses. Host: Vincent Racaniello Guests: Cara Pager, Rachel Netzband, and Alex Ciota Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Five postdocs in North America (TWiV 194) Zika virus subverts stress granules (J Virol) DDX68 modulates miR-122 interaction with HCV RNA (Virol) (+) RNA virus epitranscriptome (Nucl Acids Res) Adaptation of Rabensburg virus to vertebrate ...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - May 12, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 546: Delta blues and chitlins
The un-encapsidated TWiV Humans discuss finding hepatitis D virus-related sequences in birds and snakes, and fatal swine acute diarrhoea syndrome caused by a coronavirus of bat origin. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode European Virus Archive ASV early bird registrationends 15 May FDA approves Dengvaxia Divergent hepatitis D-like agentin birds(Viruses) Novel deltavirus in snakes(mBio) SADS-coronavirusin piglets (Nature) Hosts and...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - May 5, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

"Lair Pollution" -- The Discovery Files
Cooking, cleaning and other routine household activities generate significant levels of volatile and particulate chemicals inside the average home, leading to indoor air quality levels on par with a polluted major city, University of Colorado Boulder researchers have found. In addition, airborne chemicals that originate inside a house don't stay there: Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from products such as shampoo, perfume and cleaning solutions eventually escape outside and contribute to ozone and fine particle formation, making up an even greater source of global atmospheric air pollution than cars and trucks do. (Sourc...
Source: The Discovery Files - March 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

"Screen Saver" -- The Discovery Files
Chemists have found a cheaper way to light up smartphone and TV screens -- using copper rather than iridium -- which could save manufacturers and consumers money without affecting visual quality. Iridium is one of the rarest elements on Earth, its origins possibly a millions-year-old asteroid; copper, on the other hand, is a plentiful metal worldwide. Therefore, substituting copper for iridium could help solve a major supply problem. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - March 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

07 February 2019: Massive chemical libraries, and CRISPR-CasX
This week, virtual drug discovery, and a new addition to the CRISPR toolkit. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - February 6, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

07 February 2019: Massive chemical libraries, and CRISPR-CasX
This week, virtual drug discovery, and a new addition to the CRISPR toolkit. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - February 6, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

31 January 2019: Women of the periodic table, and harvesting energy from Wi-Fi
This week, the female chemists who helped build the periodic table, and harnessing the extra energy in Wi-Fi signals. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - January 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

31 January 2019: Women of the periodic table, and harvesting energy from Wi-Fi
This week, the female chemists who helped build the periodic table, and harnessing the extra energy in Wi-Fi signals. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - January 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Pollution from pot plants, and how our bodies perceive processed foods
The “dank” smelling terpenes emitted by growing marijuana can combine with chemicals in car emissions to form ozone, a health-damaging compound. This is especially problematic in Denver, where ozone levels are dangerously high and pot farms have sprung up along two highways in the city. Host Sarah C respi talks with reporter Jason Plautz about researchers’ efforts to measure terpene emissions from pot plants and how federal restrictions have hampered them. Next, host Meagan Cantwell talks with Dana Small, a professor of psychiatry and psychology at Yale University, about how processed foods are perc...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - January 24, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Pollution from pot plants, and how our bodies perceive processed foods
The “dank” smelling terpenes emitted by growing marijuana can combine with chemicals in car emissions to form ozone, a health-damaging compound. This is especially problematic in Denver, where ozone levels are dangerously high and pot farms have sprung up along two highways in the city. Host Sarah C respi talks with reporter Jason Plautz about researchers’ efforts to measure terpene emissions from pot plants and how federal restrictions have hampered them. Next, host Meagan Cantwell talks with Dana Small, a professor of psychiatry and psychology at Yale University, about how processed foods are perc...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - January 24, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

13 December 2018: The art of performing science, and chiral chemistry
This week, ‘performing’ experiments, and making mirrored molecules. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - December 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

13 December 2018: The art of performing science, and chiral chemistry
This week, ‘performing’ experiments, and making mirrored molecules. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - December 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

"Leach Alternative" -- The Discovery Files
Researchers at University of California, Santa Cruz, have developed safer alternatives to phthalate plasticizers -- which can leach out of plastics into food water and the environment -- potentially preventing a variety of health problems. The alternatives can still enhance the suppleness, flexibility and longevity of plastics such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC), but they can't leach out of them because they are chemically bonded to the polymer chain. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - December 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

Mutant cells in the esophagus, and protecting farmers from dangerous pesticide exposure
As you age, your cells divide over and over again, leading to minute changes in their genomes. New research reveals that in the lining of the esophagus, mutant cells run rampant, fighting for dominance over normal cells. But they do this without causing any detectable damage or cancer. Host Sarah Crespi talks to Phil Jones, a professor of cancer development at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, about what these genome changes can tell us about aging and cancer, and how some of the mutations might be good for you. Most Western farmers apply their pesticides using drones and machinery, but in less developed...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - October 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Mutant cells in the esophagus, and protecting farmers from dangerous pesticide exposure
As you age, your cells divide over and over again, leading to minute changes in their genomes. New research reveals that in the lining of the esophagus, mutant cells run rampant, fighting for dominance over normal cells. But they do this without causing any detectable damage or cancer. Host Sarah Crespi talks to Phil Jones, a professor of cancer development at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, about what these genome changes can tell us about aging and cancer, and how some of the mutations might be good for you. Most Western farmers apply their pesticides using drones and machinery, but in less developed...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - October 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 514: Staying below the ADAR
The TWiVumvirate reviews this years crop of Nobel Prizes, and how cells prevent leakage of mitochondrial double-stranded RNA into the cytoplasm, which would otherwise lead to the production of interferon. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, and Kathy Spindler Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Sea Phages program and application materials Plant biologists penalized by CNRS (The Scientist) 2018 Nobel Prize in Medicine (pdf) 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry (pdf) 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics (pdf) ...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - October 7, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

"Freeze-Dry" -- The Discovery Files
In a new study, a passive anti-frosting surface fashioned out of an aluminum sheet provides a proof of concept for keeping surfaces 90 percent dry and frost free indefinitely -- all without any chemicals or energy inputs. The material manages this thanks to "ice stripes" -- microscopic raised grooves on the surface -- and it could help prevent the kind of ice buildup that leads to power outages and flight delays, potentially reducing the billions of dollars spent on such events. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - September 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

Should we prioritize which endangered species to save, and why were chemists baffled by soot for so long?
We are in the middle of what some scientists are calling the sixth mass extinction and not all at-risk species can be saved. That ’s causing some conservationists to say we need to start thinking about “species triage.” Meagan Cantwell interviews freelance journalist Warren Cornwall about his story on weighing the costs of saving Canada’s endangered caribou and the debate among conservationists on new approaches to con servation. And host Sarah Crespi interviews Hope Michelsen, a staff scientist at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California, about mysterious origins of soot. The black du...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - September 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Should we prioritize which endangered species to save, and why were chemists baffled by soot for so long?
We are in the middle of what some scientists are calling the sixth mass extinction and not all at-risk species can be saved. That ’s causing some conservationists to say we need to start thinking about “species triage.” Meagan Cantwell interviews freelance journalist Warren Cornwall about his story on weighing the costs of saving Canada’s endangered caribou and the debate among conservationists on new approaches to con servation. And host Sarah Crespi interviews Hope Michelsen, a staff scientist at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California, about mysterious origins of soot. The black du...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - September 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

"Wi-Fi Spy" -- The Discovery Files
Ordinary Wi-Fi could easily detect weapons, bombs and explosive chemicals in bags at museums, stadiums, theme parks, schools and other public venues, according to a new study. The study's research team employed a suspicious object detection system, which is easy to set up, reduces security screening costs and avoids invading privacy, such as when screeners open and inspect bags, backpacks and luggage. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - August 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

"Breaking Good" -- The Discovery Files
The discovery of a family of enzymes with an affinity for lignin -- components of plants that make them rigid and less susceptible to pathogens -- could represent a breakthrough in the recycling of plant waste and production of sustainable chemicals needed for nylon, fuels and plastics. Scientists have been trying for decades to more efficiently break down lignin into its basic chemical building blocks, and a U.S.-U.K. engineering team believes these enzymes could be engineered to be super effective at doing so. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - July 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

19 July 2018: DNA scaffolds, climate-altering microbes, and a robot chemist
This week, tougher DNA nanostructures, climate-altering permafrost microbes, and using a robot to discover chemical reactions. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - July 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

19 July 2018: DNA scaffolds, climate-altering microbes, and a robot chemist
This week, tougher DNA nanostructures, climate-altering permafrost microbes, and using a robot to discover chemical reactions. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - July 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

"Re-Makable" -- The Discovery Files
In recent years, environmentally friendly materials to replace plastics have become a focus for chemists, and the discovery of a new polymer by Colorado State University could be just what they've been looking for. The material has the same characteristics of plastics that we enjoy -- for example, light weight, heat resistance and durability -- but it can be converted back to a small-molecule state for complete chemical recyclability. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - May 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts