Efficacy & Tolerance Of TAK-788: Patients Had Diarrhea, Nausea, Mild Rash, & Chemical Pancreatitis, Appears To Be More Potent & Specific In Pre-Clinical Studies
Joel Neal MD Of Stanford University Medical Center Discusses Efficacy & Tolerance Of TAK-788: Patients Had Diarrhea, Nausea, Mild Rash, & Chemical Pancreatitis, Appears To Be More Potent & Specific In... Author: Annual-Meeting Added: 06/05/2019 (Source: Oncology Tube)
Source: Oncology Tube - June 6, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: podcasts

"Bac-Trac" -- The Discovery Files
Bacteria's use of "swim and tumble" maneuvers and chemical secretions helps them move toward food or away from poisons as they encounter obstacles, such as those found in the human gastrointestinal tract. The research, which involved an "obstacle course" of microfluidic chambers to experiment on the bacteria, holds implications for not only biology and medicine, but also robotic search and rescue tactics. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - May 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 549: The church of protocadherin
Kartik and Rohit join the TWiV team to present their identification of protocadherin-1 as a cell receptor for New World hantaviruses. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Guests: Kartik Chandran and Rohit Jandra Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Einstein goes viral (TWiV 314) Michael Rossmann, 88 (virology blog) Protocadherin-1 essential for New World hantavirus entry (Nature) Image credit Timestamps by Jolene. Thanks! This episode is sponsored by the 2019 Chem/Bio Defense Science and...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - May 26, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 548: Mice, shrews, and caterpillars
Vincent travels to the European Congress of Virology in Rotterdam and with local co-host Marion Koopmans speak with Martin Beer, Stephan Gunther, and Vera Ross about their careers and their work on Lassa virus, Borna virus, and insect viruses. Hosts: Vincent Racanielloand Marion Koopmans Guests: Martin Beer, Stephan Gunther, and Vera Ros Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode ECV2019 Partnerships not parachutes (TWiV 413) Fatal Borna disease virus infection in transplant recipients (NEJM) Sequencing of 2018 Lassa virus ou...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - May 19, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

Nonstick chemicals that stick around and detecting ear infections with smartphones
The groundwater of Rockford, Michigan, is contaminated by per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, chemicals found in everything from nonstick pans to dental floss to —in the case of Rockford—waterproofing agents from a shoe factory that shut down in 2009. Science journalist Sara Talpos talks with host Meagan Cantwell about how locals found the potentially health-harming chemicals in their water, and how contamination from nonstick chemicals isn’t limited t o Michigan. Also this week, host Sarah Crespi talks with Shyamnath Gollakota of the University of Washington in Seattle about his work diagnosing ear inf...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - May 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 547: Upstate virology
Vincent travels to the University at Albany to speak with Cara, Rachel, and Alex about their careers and their work on stress granules, epitranscriptomics, and arboviruses. Host: Vincent Racaniello Guests: Cara Pager, Rachel Netzband, and Alex Ciota Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Five postdocs in North America (TWiV 194) Zika virus subverts stress granules (J Virol) DDX68 modulates miR-122 interaction with HCV RNA (Virol) (+) RNA virus epitranscriptome (Nucl Acids Res) Adaptation of Rabensburg virus to vertebrate ...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - May 12, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 546: Delta blues and chitlins
The un-encapsidated TWiV Humans discuss finding hepatitis D virus-related sequences in birds and snakes, and fatal swine acute diarrhoea syndrome caused by a coronavirus of bat origin. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode European Virus Archive ASV early bird registrationends 15 May FDA approves Dengvaxia Divergent hepatitis D-like agentin birds(Viruses) Novel deltavirus in snakes(mBio) SADS-coronavirusin piglets (Nature) Hosts and...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - May 5, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

"Lair Pollution" -- The Discovery Files
Cooking, cleaning and other routine household activities generate significant levels of volatile and particulate chemicals inside the average home, leading to indoor air quality levels on par with a polluted major city, University of Colorado Boulder researchers have found. In addition, airborne chemicals that originate inside a house don't stay there: Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from products such as shampoo, perfume and cleaning solutions eventually escape outside and contribute to ozone and fine particle formation, making up an even greater source of global atmospheric air pollution than cars and trucks do. (Sourc...
Source: The Discovery Files - March 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

"Screen Saver" -- The Discovery Files
Chemists have found a cheaper way to light up smartphone and TV screens -- using copper rather than iridium -- which could save manufacturers and consumers money without affecting visual quality. Iridium is one of the rarest elements on Earth, its origins possibly a millions-year-old asteroid; copper, on the other hand, is a plentiful metal worldwide. Therefore, substituting copper for iridium could help solve a major supply problem. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - March 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

07 February 2019: Massive chemical libraries, and CRISPR-CasX
This week, virtual drug discovery, and a new addition to the CRISPR toolkit. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - February 6, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

31 January 2019: Women of the periodic table, and harvesting energy from Wi-Fi
This week, the female chemists who helped build the periodic table, and harnessing the extra energy in Wi-Fi signals. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - January 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Pollution from pot plants, and how our bodies perceive processed foods
The “dank” smelling terpenes emitted by growing marijuana can combine with chemicals in car emissions to form ozone, a health-damaging compound. This is especially problematic in Denver, where ozone levels are dangerously high and pot farms have sprung up along two highways in the city. Host Sarah C respi talks with reporter Jason Plautz about researchers’ efforts to measure terpene emissions from pot plants and how federal restrictions have hampered them. Next, host Meagan Cantwell talks with Dana Small, a professor of psychiatry and psychology at Yale University, about how processed foods are perc...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - January 24, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

13 December 2018: The art of performing science, and chiral chemistry
This week, ‘performing’ experiments, and making mirrored molecules. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - December 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

"Leach Alternative" -- The Discovery Files
Researchers at University of California, Santa Cruz, have developed safer alternatives to phthalate plasticizers -- which can leach out of plastics into food water and the environment -- potentially preventing a variety of health problems. The alternatives can still enhance the suppleness, flexibility and longevity of plastics such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC), but they can't leach out of them because they are chemically bonded to the polymer chain. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - December 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

Mutant cells in the esophagus, and protecting farmers from dangerous pesticide exposure
As you age, your cells divide over and over again, leading to minute changes in their genomes. New research reveals that in the lining of the esophagus, mutant cells run rampant, fighting for dominance over normal cells. But they do this without causing any detectable damage or cancer. Host Sarah Crespi talks to Phil Jones, a professor of cancer development at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, about what these genome changes can tell us about aging and cancer, and how some of the mutations might be good for you. Most Western farmers apply their pesticides using drones and machinery, but in less developed...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - October 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 514: Staying below the ADAR
The TWiVumvirate reviews this years crop of Nobel Prizes, and how cells prevent leakage of mitochondrial double-stranded RNA into the cytoplasm, which would otherwise lead to the production of interferon. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, and Kathy Spindler Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Sea Phages program and application materials Plant biologists penalized by CNRS (The Scientist) 2018 Nobel Prize in Medicine (pdf) 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry (pdf) 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics (pdf) ...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - October 7, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

"Freeze-Dry" -- The Discovery Files
In a new study, a passive anti-frosting surface fashioned out of an aluminum sheet provides a proof of concept for keeping surfaces 90 percent dry and frost free indefinitely -- all without any chemicals or energy inputs. The material manages this thanks to "ice stripes" -- microscopic raised grooves on the surface -- and it could help prevent the kind of ice buildup that leads to power outages and flight delays, potentially reducing the billions of dollars spent on such events. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - September 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

Should we prioritize which endangered species to save, and why were chemists baffled by soot for so long?
We are in the middle of what some scientists are calling the sixth mass extinction and not all at-risk species can be saved. That ’s causing some conservationists to say we need to start thinking about “species triage.” Meagan Cantwell interviews freelance journalist Warren Cornwall about his story on weighing the costs of saving Canada’s endangered caribou and the debate among conservationists on new approaches to con servation. And host Sarah Crespi interviews Hope Michelsen, a staff scientist at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California, about mysterious origins of soot. The black du...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - September 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

"Wi-Fi Spy" -- The Discovery Files
Ordinary Wi-Fi could easily detect weapons, bombs and explosive chemicals in bags at museums, stadiums, theme parks, schools and other public venues, according to a new study. The study's research team employed a suspicious object detection system, which is easy to set up, reduces security screening costs and avoids invading privacy, such as when screeners open and inspect bags, backpacks and luggage. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - August 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

"Breaking Good" -- The Discovery Files
The discovery of a family of enzymes with an affinity for lignin -- components of plants that make them rigid and less susceptible to pathogens -- could represent a breakthrough in the recycling of plant waste and production of sustainable chemicals needed for nylon, fuels and plastics. Scientists have been trying for decades to more efficiently break down lignin into its basic chemical building blocks, and a U.S.-U.K. engineering team believes these enzymes could be engineered to be super effective at doing so. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - July 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

19 July 2018: DNA scaffolds, climate-altering microbes, and a robot chemist
This week, tougher DNA nanostructures, climate-altering permafrost microbes, and using a robot to discover chemical reactions. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - July 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

"Re-Makable" -- The Discovery Files
In recent years, environmentally friendly materials to replace plastics have become a focus for chemists, and the discovery of a new polymer by Colorado State University could be just what they've been looking for. The material has the same characteristics of plastics that we enjoy -- for example, light weight, heat resistance and durability -- but it can be converted back to a small-molecule state for complete chemical recyclability. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - May 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

29 March 2018: AI in chemistry, and liquid droplets in living cells.
This week, testing a neural network's chemistry skills, and what the physics of droplets is teaching us about the biology of cells. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - March 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nature Publishing Group Source Type: podcasts

"Chemical Combat-Ants" -- The Discovery Files
Researchers at University of California, Riverside, have confirmed that Argentine ants, aggressive ants which thrive in California urban areas, utilize chemical secretions as weapons against harvester ants, which are native to California. This advancement in knowledge could lead to chemicals to control Argentine ant populations and protect native species. (Source: The Discovery Files)
Source: The Discovery Files - February 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: National Science Foundation Source Type: podcasts

Happy lab animals may make better research subjects, and understanding the chemistry of the indoor environment
Would happy lab animals —rats, mice, even zebrafish—make for better experiments? David Grimm—online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about the potential of treating lab animals more like us and making them more useful for science at the same time. Sarah also interviews Jon Abbatt of the University o f Toronto in Canada about indoor chemistry. What is going on in the air inside buildings—how different is it from the outside? Researchers are bringing together the tools of outdoor chemistry and building sciences to understand what is happening in the air and on surfaces inside&mda...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - February 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 478: A pox on your horse
The TWiV team explains how infectious horsepox virus - likely the ancestor of smallpox vaccines - was recovered from chemically synthesized DNA fragments. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode ASV 2018: asv.org, asv2018.umd.edu Potential Zika virus related birth defects, USA (MMWR) Bordering on an outbreak (Tex Obs) Horsepox virus from synthesized DNA (PLoS One) Horsepox based smallpox vaccine (NEJM) Has horsepox become extinct? (Vet Rec) Evolutionary path of smallpox vaccines (Lancet Inf Dis) E...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - January 28, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 477: Raiders of the lost Arc
The TWiVodrome explains how a gag-like protein from a retrotransposon forms virus-like particles that carry mRNA  within vesicles across the synapse. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode ASV 2018: asv.org, asv2018.umd.edu Arc virus-like particles transport RNA across the synapse (mammalian, Drosophila) Chemical synapse (Wikipedia) 2 minute video on the neuron Image credit Letters read on TWiV 477 Weekly Science Picks Kathy - Ice cliffs form over the weekend Rich - The Courage To Invent: A NAS...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - January 20, 2018 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 465: Theodora the explorer
Theodora Hatziioannou joins the TWiV team to discuss a macaque model for AIDS, and how a cell protein that blocks HIV-1 infection interacts with double-stranded RNA. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Guest: Theodora Hatziioannou Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode ASU-UofA Joint Virology Symposium Laboratory of Retrovirology, Rockefeller University HIV-1-induced AIDS in monkeys (Science) APOBEC3H bound to duplex RNA (Nat Comm) Center for HIV RNA studies Image: Two molecules of APOBEC3H bound to dsRNA This...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - October 29, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 464: Boston baked viruses
At Tufts University Dental School in Boston, Vincent speaks with Katya Heldwein and Sean Whelan about their careers and their work on herpesvirus structure and replication of vesicular stomatitis virus. Host: Vincent Racaniello Guests: Katya Heldwein and Sean Whelan Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Crystal structure of HSV gB (Science) Crystal structure of HSV fusion regulator gH-gL (Nat Struct Mol Biol) Nuclear Exodus: Herpesviruses Lead the Way (Ann Rev Virol) VSV Pseudotypes Bearing gB, gD, gH, and gL (J Virol) Recovery of infectious VSV from cDNA clones (PNAS)...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - October 22, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 463: We haven't meth but these names ring Nobel
The TWiViridae review the 2017 Nobel Prizes for cryoEM and circadian rhythms, and discuss modulation of plant virus replication by RNA methylation. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Truth Wins by Jonathan Yewdell (epub or mobi) Gabriel Victora awarded MacArthur Prize Forty Years of mRNA Splicing (CSH) 2017 Chemistry Nobel: Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank, Richard Henderson 2017 Physiology or Medicine Nobel: Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash, Michael W. Young 2017 Nobel Prize in...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - October 15, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 462: Splicing RNA with Phillip A. Sharp
Vincent speaks with 1993 Nobel Laureate Phillip A. Sharp about his career and his seminal discovery of RNA splicing in mammalian cells, which changed our understanding of gene structure. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello Guest: Phillip A. Sharp Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Meet the Microbiologist Sharp Laboratory Spliced segments of adenovirus late mRNA (PNAS) Video of this interview (YouTube) This episode is brought to you by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. Part of the U.S. Department of Defense, the Agency’s Chemical and Biological Technologies Department hosts the 2017 Chem...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - October 7, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 461: Gotta trace them all!
The TWiVers discuss the declining readability of scientific texts, and review the use of self-inactivating rabies virus for tracing neural circuits. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Guest: Brianne Barker Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Meet the Microbiologist TWiV 1: West Nile Virus Decreasing readability of scientific texts (eLife) Measure text readability Tracing neural circuits with self-inactivating rabies virus (Cell) Cre driver network (NIH) Monosynaptic tracing with rabies virus (Neuron) Letters read on TWiV 461 This epi...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - September 30, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 460: Penn, a great sandbox for science
Vincent travels to the University of Pennsylvania and speaks with virologists Gary Cohen, Scott Hensley, Carolina Lopez, and Susan Weiss about their careers and their research. Host: Vincent Racaniello Guests: Gary Cohen, Scott Hensley, Carolina Lopez, and Susan Weiss Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Cohen Laboratory Hensley Laboratory Lopez Laboratory Weiss Laboratory This episode is brought to you by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. Part of the U.S. Department of Defense, the Agency’s Chemical and Biological Technologies Department hosts the 2017 Chemical and Biological D...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - September 24, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

The Four Kinds of Happiness
I have written previously about four major goals that one pursues in life: to recap they are Happiness, Success, Meaning and Morality. I have increasingly come to regard them as forming a stage wise progression- one moves from Happiness to Success to Meaning to Morality. Aristotle (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Its important to clarify here that by Happiness I mean here pleasure or the Pleasant life, as contrasted with the Successful life, the Meaningful life or the Virtuous life. Refer the Life Orientation Profile by Paul TP Wong. One can even say that initially as a child/ adolescent, one is primarily driven by pleasant life;...
Source: The Mouse Trap - September 20, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: sandygautam Tags: happiness Life goals meaning Morality success Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 459: Polio turns over a new leaf
The TWiV team reviews the first FDA approved gene therapy, accidental exposure to poliovirus type 2 in a manufacturing plant, and production of a candidate poliovirus vaccine in plants. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode ASM Conference on Viral Manipulation of Nuclear Processes ASM Public Outreach Fellowship Kymriah approved (PennMed) CAR T cells (NCBI) Cost of Kymriah (NYTimes) Accidental exposure to poliovirus type 2 (Eurosurveill) GAPIII (WHO) Poliovaccine candidate in plants (Nat Commun) Vertical v...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - September 17, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 458: Saliva of the fittest
The TWiVians present an imported case of yellow fever in New York City, and explain how a dengue virus subgenomic RNA disrupts immunity in mosquito salivary glands to increase virus replication. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode ASM Conference on Viral Manipulation of Nuclear Processes Roger W. Hendrix, 74 (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette) Roger Hendrix video on TWiV #135 Yellow fever in traveler returning from Peru (MMWR) Dengue subgenomic RNA in mosquito salivary gland (PLoS Path) Image credit Letters read&...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - September 9, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 457: The Red Queen meets the White Rabbit
Brianne returns to the TWiV Gang to discuss the distribution of proteins on the influenza viral genome, and the evolution of myxoma virus that was released in Australia to control the rabbit population. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, and Rich Condit Guest: Brianne Barker Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode First genetically engineered salmon sold in Canada Nucleoprotein on influenza virus RNA (Nucl Acids Res) Evolution of released myxoma virus in Australia (PNAS) Image credit Letters read on TWiV 457 This episode is brought to you by Blue Apron. Blue...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - September 3, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

Mysteriously male crocodiles, the future of negotiating AIs, and atomic bonding between the United States and China
This week we hear stories on involving more AIs in negotiations, tiny algae that might be responsible for killing some (not all) dinosaurs, and a chemical intended to make farm fish grow faster that may be also be causing one area ’s crocodile population to skew male—with Online News Editor David Grimm.   Sarah Crespi talks to Rich Stone about being on the scene for a joint U.S.-China mission to remove bomb-grade fuel from a nuclear reactor in Ghana.   Listen to previous podcasts.    [Image:Chad Sparkes; Music: Jef frey Cook] (Source: Science Magazine Podcast)
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - August 31, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 456: Be careful of canons
Brianne joins the TWiVMasters to explain how mutations in genes encoding RNA polymerase III predispose children to severe varicella, and detection of an RNA virus by a DNA sensor. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Rich Condit Guest: Brianne Barker Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode RNA pol III mutations underlie severe varicella (J Clin Inves) Dengue virus activates cGAS by release of mitochondrial DNA (Sci Rep) Dengue virus NS2B protein targets cGAS for degradation (Nat Micr) Image credit Letters read on TWiV 456 This episode is brought to you by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. ...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - August 27, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

TWiV 455: Pork and genes
Erin joins the TWiVirions to discuss a computer exploit encoded in DNA, creation of pigs free of endogenous retroviruses, and mutations in the gene encoding an innate sensor of RNA in children with severe viral respiratory disease. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Guest: Erin Garcia Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode DNA-based computer exploit (pdf) Inactivation of porcine endogenous retrovirus in pigs (Science) Severe viral respiratory infections in children with IFIH1 mutations (PNAS) IRF7 deficiency and severe respiratory infection...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - August 20, 2017 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Source Type: podcasts

The biology of color, a database of industrial espionage, and a link between prions and diabetes
This week we hear stories on diagnosing Alzheimer ’s disease in chimps, a potential new pathway to diabetes—through prions—and what a database of industrial espionage says about the economics of spying with Online News Editors David Grimm and Catherine Matacic. Sarah Crespi talks to Innes Cuthill about how the biology of color intersects wit h behavior, development, and vision. And Mary Soon Lee joins to share some of her chemistry haiku—one poem for each element in the periodic table. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: Zoltan Tasi/Unsplash; Music: Jeffrey Cook] (Source: Science Magazine Podcast)
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - August 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts