Cutting shipping air pollution may cause water pollution, and keeping air clean with lightning
News Staff Writer Erik Stokstad joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss possible harms from how the shipping industry is responding to air pollution regulations —instead of pumping health-harming chemicals into the air, they are now being dumped into oceans. Also this week, William Brune, professor of meteorology and atmospheric science at Pennsylvania State University, University Park, talks about flying a plane into thunderstorms and how measurements f rom research flights revealed the surprising amount of air-cleaning oxidants created by lightning. In a sponsored segment from the Science/AAAS Custom Publishing Office...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - May 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Chernobyl ’s ruins grow restless, and entangling macroscopic objects
Rich Stone, former international news editor at  Science and current senior science editor at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Tangled Bank Studios, joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about concerning levels of fission reactions deep in an inaccessible area of the site of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster. Though nothing is likely to come of it anytime soon, scientists must decide what—if anything—they should do tamp down reactions in this hard-to-reach place. Also on this week’s show, Shlomi Kotler, an assistant professor in the department of applied physics at the Hebrew University of Je...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - May 3, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Storing wind as gravity, and well-digging donkeys
Contributing Correspondent Cathleen O ’Grady joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about a company that stores renewable energy by hoisting large objects in massive “gravity batteries.” Also on this week’s show, Erick Lundgren, a postdoctoral researcher at Aarhus University, talks about how water from wells dug by wild horses and fer al donkeys provides a buffer to all different kinds of animals and plants during the driest times in the Sonora and Mojave deserts. This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy. Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast Download a transcript ...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - April 26, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Rebuilding Louisiana ’s coast, and recycling plastic into fuel
Host Sarah Crespi talks with Contributing Correspondent Warren Cornwall about a restoration project to add 54 square kilometers back to the coast of Louisiana by allowing the Mississippi River to resume delivering sediment to sinking regions. Also on this week’s show, Dion Vlachos, a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the University of Delaware, Newark, and director of the Delaware Energy Institute, joins Sarah to talk about his Science Advances paper on a low-temperature process to convert different kinds of plast ic to fuels, like gasoline and jet fuel. This week’s episode was produced w...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - April 19, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Why muon magnetism matters, and a count of all the < em > Tyrannosaurus rex < /em > that ever lived
Host Sarah Crespi talks with Staff Writer Adrian Cho about a new measurement of the magnetism of the muon —an unstable cousin of the electron. This latest measurement and an earlier one both differ from predictions based on the standard model of particle physics. The increased certainty that there is a muon magnetism mismatch could be a field day for theoretical physicists looking to add new particles or forces to the standard model. Also on this week’s show, Charles Marshall, director of the University of California Museum of Paleontology and professor of integrative biology, joins Sarah to talk about his tea...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - April 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Magnetar mysteries, and when humans got big brains
Host Sarah Crespi talks with Contributing Correspondent Joshua Sokol about magnetars —highly magnetized neutron stars. A recent intense outburst of gamma rays from a nearby galaxy has given astronomers a whole new view on these mysterious magnetic monsters. Also on this week’s show, Christoph Zollikofer, a professor of anthropology at the University of Zurich, talks about the e volution of humanlike brains. His team’s work with brain-case fossils suggests the complex brains we carry around today were not present in the early hominins to leave Africa, but later developed in the cousins they left behind. ...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - April 2, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Fighting outbreaks with museum collections, and making mice hallucinate
Podcast Producer Meagan Cantwell talks with Pamela Soltis, a professor and curator with the Florida Museum of Natural History at the University of Florida and the director of the University of Florida Biodiversity Institute, about how natural collections at museums can be a valuable resource for understanding future disease outbreaks. Read the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report Biological Collections: Ensuring Critical Research and Education for the 21st Century. This segment is part of our coverage of the 2021 AAAS Annual Meeting. Also on this week’s show, Katharina Schmack, a researc...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - March 31, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Social insects as models for aging, and crew conflict on long space missions
Most research on aging has been done on model organisms with limited life spans, such as flies and worms. Host Meagan Cantwell talks to science writer Yao-Hua Law about how long-living social insects —some of which survive for up to 30 years—can provide new insights into aging.  Also in this episode, host Sarah Crespi talks with Noshir Contractor, the Jane S.& William J. White Professor of Behavioral Sciences at Northwestern University, about his AAAS session on keeping humans in harmony during long space missions and how mock missions on Earth are being applied to plans for a crewed mission to Mars. ...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - March 24, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

COVID-19 treatment at 1 year, and smarter materials for smarter cities
Science Staff Writer Kelly Servick discusses how physicians have sifted through torrents of scientific results to arrive at treatments for SARS-CoV-2. Sarah also talks with Wesley Reinhart, of Pennsylvania State University’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute for Computational and Data Science, about why we should be building smart cities from smart materials, such as metamaterials that help solar panels chase the Su n, and living materials like self-healing concrete that keep buildings in good shape. This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy. Listen to previous podca...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - March 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Next-generation gravitational wave detectors, and sponges that soak up frigid oil spills
Science Staff Writer Adrian Cho joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about plans for the next generation of gravitational wave detectors —including one with 40-kilometer arms. The proposed detectors will be up to 10 times more sensitive than current models and could capture all black hole mergers in the observable universe. Sarah also talks with Pavani Cherukupally, a researcher at Imperial College London and the University of Tor onto, about her Science Advances paper on cleaning up oil spills with special cold-adapted sponges that work well when crude oil gets clumpy. This week’s episode was produced with help f...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - March 5, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

The world ’s oldest pet cemetery, and how eyeless worms can see color
Science ’s Online News Editor David Grimm joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about a 2000-year-old pet cemetery found in the Egyptian city of Berenice and what it can tell us about the history of human-animal relationships. Also this week, Dipon Ghosh, a postdoctoral fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, talks about how scientists missed that the tiny eyeless roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans, which has been intensively studied from top to bottom for decades, somehow has the ability to detect colors. This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy. Listen to previous podcasts. About the S...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - March 3, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Measuring Earth ’s surface like never before, and the world’s fastest random number generator
First up, science journalist Julia Rosen talks with host Sarah Crespi about a growing fleet of radar satellites that will soon be able to detect minute rises and drops of Earth ’s surface—from a gently deflating volcano to a water-swollen field—on a daily basis. Sarah also talks with Hui Cao, a professor of applied physics at Yale University, about a new way to generate enormous streams of random numbers faster than ever before, using a tiny laser that can fit on a computer chip. This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy. Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast Downl...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - February 22, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

All your COVID-19 vaccine questions answered, and a new theory on forming rocky planets
Science Staff Writer Jon Cohen joins host Sarah Crespi to take on some of big questions about the COVID-19 vaccines, such as: Do they stop transmission? Will we need boosters? When will life get back to “normal.” Sarah also talks with Anders Johansen, professor of planetary sciences and planet formation at the University of Copenhagen, about his Science Advances paper on a new theory for the formation of rocky planets in our Solar System. Instead of emerging out of ever-larger collisions of pr otoplanets, the new idea is that terrestrial planets like Earth and Mars formed from the buildup of many small pebbles...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - February 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Building Africa ’s Great Green Wall, and using whale songs as seismic probes
Science journalist Rachel Cernansky joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about progress on Africa ’s Great Green Wall project and the important difference between planting and growing a tree. Sarah also talks with Václav Kuna, a postdoctoral researcher at the Institute of Geophysics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, about using loud and long songs from fin whales to image structures under th e ocean floor. This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy. Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast Download a transcript (PDF). (Source: Science Magazine Podcast)
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - February 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Looking back at 20 years of human genome sequencing
This week we ’re dedicating the whole show to the 20th anniversary of the publication of the human genome. Today, about 30 million people have had their genomes sequenced. This remarkable progress has brought with it issues of data sharing, privacy, and inequality. Host Sarah Crespi spoke with a number of res earchers about the state of genome science, starting with Yaniv Erlich, from the Efi Arazi School of Computer Science and CEO of Eleven Biotherapeutics, who talks about privacy in the age of easily obtainable genomes. Next up Charles Rotimi, director of the Center for Research on Genomics and Glob al Heal...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - February 1, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Calculating the social cost of carbon, and listening to mole rat chirps
On its first day, the new Biden administration announced plans to recalculate the social cost of carbon —a way of estimating the economic toll of greenhouse gases. Staff Writer Paul Voosen and host Sarah Crespi discuss why this value is so important and how it will be determined.  Next up, Alison Barker, a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, talks with Sarah about the sounds of naked mole rats. You may already know naked mole rats are pain and cancer resistant—but did you know these eusocial mammals make little chirps to identify themselves as colony members? Ca...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - January 22, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Calculating the social cost of carbon, and listening to mole-rat chirps
On its first day, the new Biden administration announced plans to recalculate the social cost of carbon —a way of estimating the economic toll of greenhouse gases. Staff Writer Paul Voosen and host Sarah Crespi discuss why this value is so important and how it will be determined.  Next up, Alison Barker, a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, talks with Sarah about the sounds of naked mole-rats. You may already know naked mole-rats are pain and cancer resistant—but did you know these eusocial mammals make little chirps to identify themselves as colony members? Ca...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - January 22, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Counting research rodents, a possible cause for irritable bowel syndrome, and spitting cobras
Online News Editor David Grimm joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss a controversial new paper that estimates how many rodents are used in research in the United States each year. Though there is no official number, the paper suggests there might be more than 100 million rats and mice housed in research facilities in the country —doubling or even tripling some earlier estimates. Next, Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel talks with Sarah about a new theory behind the cause of irritable bowel syndrome—that it might be a localized allergic reaction in the gut. Sarah also chats with Taline Kazandjian, a postdoctora...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - January 19, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

An elegy for Arecibo, and how our environments change our behavior
Science  Senior Correspondent Daniel Clery regales host Sarah Crespi with tales about the most important work to come from 57 years of research at the now-defunct Arecibo Observatory and plans for the future of the site. Sarah also talks with Toman Barsbai, an associate professor in the school of economi cs at the University of Bristol, about the influence of ecology on human behavior—can we figure out how many of our behaviors are related to the different environments where we live? Barsbai and colleagues took on this question by comparing behaviors around finding food, reproduction, and social h ierarchy...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - January 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

The uncertain future of North America ’s ash trees, and organizing robot swarms
Freelance journalist Gabriel Popkin and host Sarah Crespi discuss what will happen to ash trees in the United States as federal regulators announce dropping quarantine measures meant to control the emerald ash borer —a devastating pest that has killed tens of millions of trees since 2002. Instead of quarantines, the government will use tiny wasps known to kill the invasive beetles in hopes of saving the ash. Sarah also talks with Pavel Chvykov, a postdoctoral researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Tech nology, about the principles for organizing active matter—things like ant bridges, bird flocks, or litt...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - January 4, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Areas to watch in 2021, and the living microbes in wildfire smoke
We kick off our first episode of 2021 by looking at  future trends in policy and research with host Meagan Cantwell and several Science news writers. Ann Gibbons talks about upcoming studies that elucidate social ties among ancient humans, Jeffrey Mervis discusses relations between the United States and China, and Paul Voosen gives a rundown of t wo Mars rover landings. In research news, Meagan Cantwell talks with Leda Kobziar, an associate professor of wildland fire science at the University of Idaho, Moscow, about the living component of wildfire smoke—microbes. The bacteria and fungi that...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - December 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Breakthrough of the Year, top online news, and science book highlights
Our last episode of the year is a celebration of science in 2020. First, host Sarah Crespi talks with Online News Editor David Grimm about some of the top online news stories of the year —from how undertaker bees detect the dead to the first board game of death. (It’s not as grim as it sounds.) Sarah then talks with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic about the Breakthrough of the Year, scientific breakdowns, and some of the runners-up—amazing accomplishments in science achi eved in the face of a global pandemic. Finally, Book Review Editor Valerie Thompson joins Sarah to discuss highlights from the bo...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - December 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Making ecology studies replicable, and a turnaround for the Tasmanian devil
The field of psychology underwent a replication crisis and saw a sea change in scientific and publishing practices, could ecology be next? News Intern Cathleen O ’Grady joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about the launch of a new society for ecologists looking to make the field more rigorous. Sarah also talks with Andrew Storfer, a professor in the School of Biological Sciences at Washington State University, Pullman, about the fate of the Tasmanian devil. S ince the end of the last century, these carnivorous marsupials have been decimated by a transmissible facial tumor. Now, it looks like—despite many predictio...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - December 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

How the new COVID-19 vaccines work, and restoring vision with brain implants
Staff Writer Meredith Wadman and host Sarah Crespi discuss what to expect from the two messenger RNA –based vaccines against COVID-19 that have recently released encouraging results from their phase III trials and the short-term side effects some recipients might see on the day of injection. Sarah also talks with researcher Xing Chen, a project co-leader and postdoctoral scientist at the Netherl ands Institute for Neuroscience, about using brain stimulation to restore vision. Researchers have known for about 70 years that electrical stimulation at certain points in the brain can lead to the appearance of a phosphene...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - November 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Keeping coronavirus from spreading in schools, why leaves fall when they do, and a book on how nature deals with crisis
Many schools closed in the spring, during the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic. Many opened in the fall. Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about what was learned in spring about how coronavirus spreads in schools that might help keep children safe as cases surge once again. Also this week: What makes leaves fall off deciduous trees when they do—is it the short, cold nights? Or is the timing of so-called “leaf senescence” linked to when spring happens? Sarah talked to Constantin Zohner, a lead scientist at the Institute of Integrative Biology at ETH Zurich, abou t...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - November 23, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Fish farming ’s future, and how microbes compete for space on our face
These days, about half of the protein the world ’s population eats is from seafood. Staff Writer Erik Stokstad joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about how brand-new biotech and old-fashioned breeding programs are helping keep up with demand, by expanding where we can farm fish and how fast we can grow them. Sarah also spoke with Jan Claesen, an assistant professor at the Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute, about skin microbes that use their own antibiotic to fight off harmful bacteria. Understanding the microbes native to our skin and the molecules they produce could lead to treatments for skin disorde...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - November 18, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

How the human body handles extreme heat, and improvements in cooling clothes
This week the whole show focuses on keeping cool in a warming world. First up, host Sarah Crespi talks with Senior News Correspondent Elizabeth Pennisi about the latest research into how to stay safe when things heat up —whether you’re running marathons or fighting fires.  Sarah also talks with Po-Chun Hsu, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Duke University, about the future of cooling fabrics for everyday use. It turns out we can save a lot of energy and avoid carbon dioxi de emissions by wearing clothing designed to keep us cool in slightly warmer buildings than we&rs...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - November 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

What we can learn from a mass of black hole mergers, and ecological insights from 30 years of Arctic animal movements
First up, host Sarah Crespi talks with Staff Writer Adrian Cho about new gravitational wave detections from the first half of 2019 —including 37 new black hole mergers. With so many mergers now recorded, astrophysicists can do different kinds of research into things like how new pairs of black holes come to be and how often they merge. Sarah also talks with Sarah Davidson, data curator at the Max Planck Institute of Animal B ehavior, about results from an Arctic animal tracking project that includes 3 decades of location information on many species, from soaring golden eagles to baby caribou taking their first steps...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - November 3, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Taking the politicians out of tough policy decisions; the late, great works of Charles Turner; and the science of cooking
First up, host Sarah Crespi talks to News Intern Cathleen O ’Grady about the growing use of citizens’ assemblies, or “minipublics,” to deliberate on tough policy questions like climate change and abortion. Can random groups of citizens do a better job forming policy than politicians? Next, we feature the latest of a new series of insight pieces that revisit landmark Science papers. Sarah talks with Hiruni Samadi Galpayage Dona, a Ph.D. student at Queen Mary University of London, about Charles Turner, a Black zoologist who published multiple times in Science in the early 1900s. Despite being far ahe...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - October 27, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Early approval of a COVID-19 vaccine could cause ethical problems for other vax candidates, and ‘upcycling’ plastic bags
First up, host Sarah Crespi talks with Staff Writer Jon Cohen about some tricky ethical questions that may arise after the first coronavirus vaccine is authorized for use in the United States. Will people continue to participate in clinical trials of other vaccines? Will it still be OK to give participants placebo vaccines? Next, producer Meagan Cantwell talks with Bert Weckhuysen, a professor at Utrecht University, about a process for taking low-value plastic like polyethylene (often used for packaging and grocery bags) and “upcycling” it into biodegradable materials that can be used for new purposes. This ...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - October 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Making sure American Indian COVID-19 cases are counted, and feeding a hungry heart
First up, host Meagan Cantwell speaks with Abigail Echo-Hawk, director of the Urban Indian Health Institute and chief research officer for the Seattle Indian Health Board. Echo-Hawk shares what inspired her journey in public health and explains the repercussions of excluding native people from health data. This story was originally reported by Lizzie Wade, who profiled Echo-Hawk as part of Science ’s “voices of the pandemic” series. Next, host Sarah Crespi interviews Danielle Murashige, a Ph.D. student at the University of Pennsylvania, about her Science paper that attempts to quantify how much fuel a he...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - October 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Visiting a once-watery asteroid, and how buzzing the tongue can treat tinnitus
First up, Staff Writer Paul Voosen talks with host Sarah Crespi about the Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission to the asteroid Bennu. After OSIRIS-REx ’s up-close surveys of the surface revealed fewer likely touchdown points than expected, its sampling mission has been rejiggered. Paul talks about the prospects for a safe sampling in mid-October and what we might learn when the craft returns to Earth in 2023. Sarah also talks with Hubert Lim, f rom the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, and Neuromod Devices Limited, about his Science Translati...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - October 7, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

FDA clinical trial failures, and an AI that can beat curling ’s top players
Investigative journalist Charles Piller joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss his latest Science exclusive: a deep dive into the Food and Drug Administration ’s protection of human subjects in clinical trials. Based on months of data analysis and interviews, he uncovered long-term failures in safety enforcement in clinical trials and potential problems with trial data used to make decisions about drug and device approvals. Sarah also talks with Klaus -Robert Müller, a professor of machine learning at the Technical University of Berlin, about an artificial intelligence (AI) trained in the sport of curling&mdas...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - September 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

How Neanderthals got human Y chromosomes, and the earliest human footprints in Arabia
Contributing Correspondent Ann Gibbons talks with host Sarah Crespi about a series of 120,000-year-old human footprints found alongside prints from animals like asses, elephants, and camels in a dried-up lake on the Arabian Peninsula. These are the earliest human footprints found so far in Arabia and may help researchers better understand the history of early hominin migrations out of Africa. Continuing on the history of humanity theme, Sarah talks with Janet Kelso of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, about her team’s efforts to fish the elusive Y chromosome out of Neanderthal and Denisovan DN...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - September 22, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Performing magic for animals, and why the pandemic is pushing people out of prisons
Staff Writer Kelly Servick joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss how jail and prison populations in the United States have dropped in the face of coronavirus and what kinds of scientific questions about public health and criminal justice are arising as a result. Also this week, Elias García-Pelegrín, a Ph.D. student at the University of Cambridge, talks with Sarah about his article on watching animals watch magic tricks. Do animals fall for the same illusions we do? What does it say about the way their minds work? This week’s episode was produced wit h help from Podigy. Listen to previous podcasts. Ab...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - September 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Alien hunters get a funding boost, and checking on the link between chromosome ‘caps’ and aging
First up this week, Senior Correspondent Daniel Clery talks with host Sarah Crespi about how Breakthrough Listen —a privately funded initiative that aims to spend $100 million over 10 years to find extraterrestrial intelligent life—has changed the hunt for alien intelligence.  And as part of a special issue on the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project, Brandon Pierce, a professor in the Departments of Public Health Sciences and Human Genetics at the University of Chicago, joins Sarah to discuss his group’s work on variation in the protective caps at the end of our chromosomes. The gradual s...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - September 9, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Fighting Europe ’s second wave of COVID-19, and making democracy work for poor people
First up this week, Contributing Correspondent Kai Kupferschmidt talks with host Sarah Crespi about rising numbers of coronavirus cases in Europe. Will what we ’ve learned this summer about how the virus is transmitted and treated help prevent a second peak? Read all of our coronavirus news coverage. And as part of a special issue on democracy, Rohini Pande, a professor in the department of economics at Yale University, joins Sarah to discuss her revie w that asks the question: Can democracy work for poor people? Read more from the special issue on democracy. This week’s episode was produced with help from P...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - August 31, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Arctic sea ice under attack, ancient records that can predict the future effects of climate change, and Carl Bergstrom's < em > Calling Bullshit < /em >
Staff Writer Paul Voosen talks with host Sarah Crespi about how Arctic sea ice is under attack from above and below —not only from warming air, but also dangerous hot blobs of ocean water. Next, Damien Fordham, a professor and global change ecologist at the University of Adelaide, talks about how new tools for digging into the past are helping catalog what happened to biodiversity and ecosystems during differe nt climate change scenarios in the past. These findings can help predict the fate of modern ecosystems under today’s human-induced climate change. And in our books segment, Kiki Sanford talks with autho...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - August 27, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Arctic sea ice under attack, and ancient records that can predict the future effects of climate change
Staff Writer Paul Voosen talks with host Sarah Crespi about how Arctic sea ice is under attack from above and below —not only from warming air, but also dangerous hot blobs of ocean water. Next, Damien Fordham, a professor and global change ecologist at the University of Adelaide, talks about how new tools for digging into the past are helping catalog what happened to biodiversity and ecosystems during differe nt climate change scenarios in the past. These findings can help predict the fate of modern ecosystems under today’s human-induced climate change. And in our books segment, Kiki Sanford talks with autho...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - August 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Wildlife behavior during a global lockdown, and electric mud microbes
Staff Writer Erik Stokstad joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about how wildlife biologists are taking advantage of humanity ’s sudden lull. Scientists are launching studies of everything from sea turtles on suddenly quiet beaches to noise-averse birds living near airports to see how animal behavior changes when people are a little less obtrusive. Read all of our coronavirus coverage here. Next, as part of our special issue on mud—yes, wet dirt—Senior Correspondent Elizabeth Pennisi talks about her story on electric microbes that were first found in mud and are now found pretty much everywhere. Why do...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - August 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

A call for quick coronavirus testing, and building bonds with sports
Staff Writer Robert Service talks with host Sarah Crespi about a different approach to COVID-19 testing that might be useful in response to the high numbers of cases in the United States. To break chains of transmission and community spread, the new strategy would replace highly accurate but slow polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests with cheaper, faster tests that are less accurate but can be administered frequently. Such tests cost between $1 and $3 compared with more than $100 for diagnostic PCR tests and give results in less than 30 minutes instead of days. Read all of our coronavirus coverage here. Also this week, ...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - August 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Why COVID-19 poses a special risk during pregnancy, and how hair can split steel
Staff Writer Meredith Wadman joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the risk of the novel coronavirus infection to pregnant women. Early data suggest expectant women are more likely to get severe forms of the infection and require hospitalization. Meredith describes how the biology of pregnancy —such as changes to the maternal immune system and added stress on the heart and lungs—might explain the harsher effects of the virus. Also this week, Sarah talks with Gianluca Roscioli about his experiments with commercial razor blades and real human hair. By using a scanning electron microsco pe, he was able to show how s...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - August 3, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Fighting COVID-19 vaccine fears, tracking the pandemic ’s origin, and a new technique for peering under paint
Science Editor-in-Chief Holden Thorp joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss his editorial on preventing vaccine hesitancy during the coronavirus pandemic. Even before the current crisis, fear of vaccines had become a global problem, with the World Health Organization naming it as one of the top 10 worldwide health threats in 2019. Now, it seems increasingly possible that many people will refuse to get vaccinated. What can public health officials and researchers do to get ahead of this issue? Also this week, Sarah talks with Science Senior Correspondent Jon Cohen about his story on Chinese scientist Shi Zhengli, the bat resea...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - July 28, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

How Hiroshima survivors helped form radiation safety rules, and a path to stop plastic pollution
Contributing Correspondent Dennis Normile talks about a long-term study involving the survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings. Seventy-five years after the United States dropped nuclear bombs on the two cities in Japan, survivors are still helping scientists learn about the effects of radiation exposure. Also this week, Sarah talks with Winnie Lau, senior manager for preventing ocean plastics at Pew Charitable Trusts about her group’s paper about what it would take to seriously fight the flow of plastics into the environment. This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy. Listen to previou...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - July 21, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic, and taking the heat out of crude oil separation
Contributing Correspondent Gretchen Vogel talks about what can be learned from schools around the world that have reopened during the coronavirus pandemic. Unfortunately, few systematic studies have been done, but observations of outbreaks in schools in places such as France or Israel do offer a few lessons for countries looking to send children back to school soon. The United Kingdom and Germany have started studies of how the virus spreads in children and at school, but results are months away. In the meantime, Gretchen ’s reporting suggests small class sizes, masks, and social distancing among adults at schools ar...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - July 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

A fast moving megatrial for coronavirus treatments, and transferring the benefits of exercise by transferring blood
Contributing correspondent Kai Kupferschmidt talks with host Sarah Crespi about the success of a fast moving megatrial for coronavirus treatments. The United Kingdom ’s Recovery (Randomized Evaluation of COVID-19 Therapy) trial has enrolled more than 12,000 hospitalized coronavirus patients since early March and has released important recommendations that were quickly taken up by doctors and scientists around the world. Kupferschmidt discusses why such a large study is necessary and why other large drug trials like the World Health Organization’s Solidarity trial are lagging behind. Read Science’s c...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - July 8, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

An oasis of biodiversity a Mexican desert, and making sound from heat
First up this week, News Intern Rodrigo P érez-Ortega talks with host Meagan Cantwell about an oasis of biodiversity in the striking blue pools of Cuatro Ciénegas, a basin in northern Mexico. Researchers have published dozens of papers exploring the unique microorganisms that thrive in this area, while at the same time fighting large agri cultural industries draining the precious water from the pools. David Tatnell, a postgraduate researcher at the University of Exeter, talks with host Sarah Crespi about using heat to make sound, a phenomenon known as thermoacoustics. Just like the sound of fire or thunder, ...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - July 2, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Stopping the spread of COVID-19, and arctic adaptations in sled dogs
Kimberly Prather, an atmospheric chemist at the University of California, San Diego, who studies how ocean waves disperse virus-laden aerosols, joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about how she became an outspoken advocate for using masks to prevent coronavirus transmission. A related insight she wrote for Science has been downloaded more than 1 million times. Read Science’s coronavirus coverage. Mikkel Sinding, a postdoctoral fellow at Trinity College Dublin, talks sled dog genes with Sarah. After comparing the genomes of modern dogs, Greenland sled dogs, and an ancient dog jaw bone found on a remote Siberian island ...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - June 23, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Coronavirus spreads financial turmoil to universities, and a drone that fights mosquito-borne illnesses
Senior Correspondent Jeffrey Mervis joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about how universities are dealing with the financial crunch brought on by the coronavirus. Jeff discusses how big research universities are balancing their budgets as federal grants continue to flow, but endowments are down and so is the promise of state funding. Read all our coronavirus coverage. Mosquito-borne infections like Zika, dengue, malaria, and chikungunya cause millions of deaths each year. Nicole Culbert and colleges write this week in Science Robotics about a new way to deal with deadly mosquitoes—using drones. The drones are designe...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - June 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

The facts on COVID-19 contact tracing apps, and benefits of returning sea otters to the wild
Staff Writer Kelly Servick joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about the ins and outs of coronavirus contact tracing apps —what they do, how they work, and how to calculate whether they are crushing the curve. Read all our coronavirus coverage. Edward Gregr, a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Resources, Environment, and Sustainability at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, talks with Sarah about the controversial reintroduction of sea otters to the Northern Pacific Ocean—their home for centuries, before the fur trade nearly wiped out the apex predator in the late 1800s. Gregr brings a unique co...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - June 8, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts