Fighting COVID-19 vaccine fears, tracking the pandemic ’s origin, and a new technique for peering under paint
Science Editor-in-Chief Holden Thorp joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss his editorial on preventing vaccine hesitancy during the coronavirus pandemic. Even before the current crisis, fear of vaccines had become a global problem, with the World Health Organization naming it as one of the top 10 worldwide health threats in 2019. Now, it seems increasingly possible that many people will refuse to get vaccinated. What can public health officials and researchers do to get ahead of this issue? Also this week, Sarah talks with Science Senior Correspondent Jon Cohen about his story on Chinese scientist Shi Zhengli, the bat resea...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - July 28, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

How Hiroshima survivors helped form radiation safety rules, and a path to stop plastic pollution
Contributing Correspondent Dennis Normile talks about a long-term study involving the survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings. Seventy-five years after the United States dropped nuclear bombs on the two cities in Japan, survivors are still helping scientists learn about the effects of radiation exposure. Also this week, Sarah talks with Winnie Lau, senior manager for preventing ocean plastics at Pew Charitable Trusts about her group’s paper about what it would take to seriously fight the flow of plastics into the environment. This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy. Listen to previou...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - July 21, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic, and taking the heat out of crude oil separation
Contributing Correspondent Gretchen Vogel talks about what can be learned from schools around the world that have reopened during the coronavirus pandemic. Unfortunately, few systematic studies have been done, but observations of outbreaks in schools in places such as France or Israel do offer a few lessons for countries looking to send children back to school soon. The United Kingdom and Germany have started studies of how the virus spreads in children and at school, but results are months away. In the meantime, Gretchen ’s reporting suggests small class sizes, masks, and social distancing among adults at schools ar...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - July 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

A fast moving megatrial for coronavirus treatments, and transferring the benefits of exercise by transferring blood
Contributing correspondent Kai Kupferschmidt talks with host Sarah Crespi about the success of a fast moving megatrial for coronavirus treatments. The United Kingdom ’s Recovery (Randomized Evaluation of COVID-19 Therapy) trial has enrolled more than 12,000 hospitalized coronavirus patients since early March and has released important recommendations that were quickly taken up by doctors and scientists around the world. Kupferschmidt discusses why such a large study is necessary and why other large drug trials like the World Health Organization’s Solidarity trial are lagging behind. Read Science’s c...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - July 8, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

An oasis of biodiversity a Mexican desert, and making sound from heat
First up this week, News Intern Rodrigo P érez-Ortega talks with host Meagan Cantwell about an oasis of biodiversity in the striking blue pools of Cuatro Ciénegas, a basin in northern Mexico. Researchers have published dozens of papers exploring the unique microorganisms that thrive in this area, while at the same time fighting large agri cultural industries draining the precious water from the pools. David Tatnell, a postgraduate researcher at the University of Exeter, talks with host Sarah Crespi about using heat to make sound, a phenomenon known as thermoacoustics. Just like the sound of fire or thunder, ...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - July 2, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Stopping the spread of COVID-19, and arctic adaptations in sled dogs
Kimberly Prather, an atmospheric chemist at the University of California, San Diego, who studies how ocean waves disperse virus-laden aerosols, joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about how she became an outspoken advocate for using masks to prevent coronavirus transmission. A related insight she wrote for Science has been downloaded more than 1 million times. Read Science’s coronavirus coverage. Mikkel Sinding, a postdoctoral fellow at Trinity College Dublin, talks sled dog genes with Sarah. After comparing the genomes of modern dogs, Greenland sled dogs, and an ancient dog jaw bone found on a remote Siberian island ...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - June 23, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Coronavirus spreads financial turmoil to universities, and a drone that fights mosquito-borne illnesses
Senior Correspondent Jeffrey Mervis joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about how universities are dealing with the financial crunch brought on by the coronavirus. Jeff discusses how big research universities are balancing their budgets as federal grants continue to flow, but endowments are down and so is the promise of state funding. Read all our coronavirus coverage. Mosquito-borne infections like Zika, dengue, malaria, and chikungunya cause millions of deaths each year. Nicole Culbert and colleges write this week in Science Robotics about a new way to deal with deadly mosquitoes—using drones. The drones are designe...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - June 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

The facts on COVID-19 contact tracing apps, and benefits of returning sea otters to the wild
Staff Writer Kelly Servick joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about the ins and outs of coronavirus contact tracing apps —what they do, how they work, and how to calculate whether they are crushing the curve. Read all our coronavirus coverage. Edward Gregr, a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Resources, Environment, and Sustainability at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, talks with Sarah about the controversial reintroduction of sea otters to the Northern Pacific Ocean—their home for centuries, before the fur trade nearly wiped out the apex predator in the late 1800s. Gregr brings a unique co...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - June 8, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Why men may have more severe COVID-19 symptoms, and using bacteria to track contaminated food
First up this week, Staff Writer Meredith Wadman talks with host Sarah Crespi about how male sex hormones may play a role in higher levels of severe coronavirus infections in men. New support for this idea comes from a study showing high levels of male pattern baldness in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Read all our coronavirus coverage. Next, Jason Qian, a Ph.D. student in the systems biology department at Harvard Medical School, joins Sarah to talk about an object-tracking system that uses bacterial spores engineered with unique DNA barcodes. The inactivated spores can be sprayed on anything f rom lettuce, to wood, to...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - June 3, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

A rare condition associated with coronavirus in children, and tracing glaciers by looking at the ocean floor
First up this week, Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel talks with host Sarah Crespi about a rare inflammatory response in children that has appeared in a number of COVID-19 hot spots. Next, Julian Dowdeswell, director of the Scott Polar Research Institute and professor of physical geography at the University of Cambridge, talks with producer Meagan Cantwell about tracing the retreat of Antarctica's glaciers by examining the ocean floor. Finally, Kiki Sanford interviews author Danny Dorling about his new book, Slowdown: The End of the Great Acceleration―and Why It’s Good for the Planet, the Economy, and Our Liv...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - May 26, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

How scientists are thinking about reopening labs, and the global threat of arsenic in drinking water
Online News Editor David Grimm talks with producer Joel Goldberg about the unique challenges of reopening labs amid the coronavirus pandemic. Though the chance to resume research may instill a sense of hope, new policies around physical distancing and access to facilities threaten to derail studies —and even careers. Despite all the uncertainty, the crisis could result in new approaches that ultimately benefit the scientific community and the world. Also this week, Joel Podgorski, a senior scientist in the Water Resources and Drinking Water Department at the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquat ic Science and Technology...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - May 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

How past pandemics reinforced inequality, and millions of mysterious quakes beneath a volcano
Contributing Correspondent Lizzie Wade talks with host Sarah Crespi about the role of inequality in past pandemics. Evidence from medical records and cemeteries suggests diseases like the 1918 flu, smallpox, and even the Black Death weren ’t indiscriminately killing people—instead these infections caused more deaths in those with less money or status. Also this week, Aaron Wech, a research geophysicist for the U.S. Geological Survey at the Alaska Volcano Observatory, joins Sarah to talk about recordings of more than 1 million ea rthquakes from deep under Hawaii’s Mauna Kea volcano, which hasn’t eru...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - May 12, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Making antibodies to treat coronavirus, and why planting trees won ’t save the planet
Staff Writer Jon Cohen joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about using monoclonal antibodies to treat or prevent infection by SARS-CoV-2. Many companies and researchers are rushing to design and test this type of treatment, which proved effective in combating Ebola last year.  See all of our News coverage of the pandemic here, and all of our Research and Editorials here. And Karen Holl, a professor of environmental studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz, joins Sarah to discuss the proper planning of tree-planting campaigns. It turns out that just putting a tree in the ground is not enough to stop climate cha...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - May 6, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Blood test for multiple cancers studied in 10,000 women, and is our Sun boring?
Staff Writer Jocelyn Kaiser joins Sarah to talk about a recent Science paper describing the results of a large study on a blood test for multiple types of cancer. The trial ’s results suggest such a blood test combined with follow-up scans may help detect cancers early, but there is a danger of too many false positives. And postdoctoral researcher Timo Reinhold of the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research joins Sarah to talk about his paper on how the Sun i s a lot less variable in its magnetic activity compared with similar stars—what does it mean that our Sun is a little bit boring? This week&rsquo...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - April 28, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

From nose to toes —how coronavirus affects the body, and a quantum microscope that unlocks the magnetic secrets of very old rocks
Coronavirus affects far more than just the lungs, and doctors and researchers in the midst of the pandemic are trying to catalog —and understand—the virus’ impact on our bodies. Staff Writer Meredith Wadman joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss what we know about how COVID-19 kills. See all of our News coverage of the pandemic here, and all of our Research and Editorials here. Also this week, Staff Writer Paul Voosen tal ks with Sarah about quantum diamond microscopes. These new devices are able to detect minute traces of magnetism, giving insight into the earliest movements of Earth’s tectonic p...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - April 22, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

How countries could recover from coronavirus, and lessons from an ancient drought
Contributing Correspondent Kai Kupferschmidt talks with host Sarah Crespi about countries planning a comeback from a coronavirus crisis. What can they do once cases have slowed down to go back to some sort of normal without a second wave of infection? See all of our News coverage of the pandemic here. See all of our Research and Editorials here. As part of a drought special issue of Science, Contributing Correspondent Lizzie Wade joins Sarah to talk about water management and the downfall of the ancient Wari state. Sometimes called the first South American empire, the Wari culture successfully expanded throughout the Per...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - April 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Does coronavirus spread through the air, and the biology of anorexia
On this week ’s show, Staff Writer Robert Service talks with host Sarah Crespi about a new National Academy of Sciences report that suggests the novel coronavirus can go airborne, the evidence for this idea, and what this means for the mask-wearing debate. See all of our News coverage of the pandemic here. See all of our Research and Editorials here. Also this week, Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel joins Sarah to talk about a burgeoning understanding of the biological roots of anorexia nervosa—an eating disorder that affects about 1% of people in the United States. From genetic links to brain scan s, scien...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - April 6, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

How COVID-19 disease models shape shutdowns, and detecting emotions in mice
On this week ’s show, Contributing Correspondent Kai Kupferschmidt talks with host Sarah Crespi about modeling coronavirus spread and the role of forecasts in national lockdowns and other pandemic policies. They also talk about the launch of a global trial of promising treatments. See all of our News coverage of the pandemic here. See all of our Research and Editorials here. Also this week, Nadine Gogolla, research group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology, talks with Sarah about linking the facial expressions of mice to their emotional states using machine learning. This week’s episod e was pr...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - March 31, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Why some diseases come and go with the seasons, and how to develop smarter, safer chemicals
On this week ’s show, host Joel Goldberg gets an update on the coronavirus pandemic from Senior Correspondent Jon Cohen. In addition, Cohen gives a rundown of his latest feature, which highlights the relationship between diseases and changing seasons—and how this relationship relates to a potential coronavir us vaccine. Also this week, from a recording made at this year’s AAAS annual meeting in Seattle, host Meagan Cantwell speaks with Alexandra Maertens, director of the Green Toxicology initiative at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, about the importance of incorporating nonanimal testing methods to ...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - March 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Ancient artifacts on the beaches of Northern Europe, and how we remember music
On this week ’s show, host Joel Goldberg talks with science journalist Andrew Curry about archaeological finds from thousands of years ago along the shores of Northern Europe. Curry outlines the rich history of the region that scientists, citizen scientists, and energy companies have helped dredge up. Also th is week, from a recording made at this year’s AAAS annual meeting in Seattle, host Meagan Cantwell speaks with Elizabeth Margulis, a professor at Princeton University, about musical memory. Margulis explains what research tells us about how our brains process music, and dives into her own study on how Wes...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - March 19, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Science ’s leading role in the restoration of Notre Dame, and the surprising biology behind how our body develops its tough skin
On this week ’s show, freelance writer Christa Lesté-Lasserre talks with host Sarah Crespi about the scientists working on the restoration of Notre Dame, from testing the changing weight of wet limestone, to how to remove lead contamination from four-story stained glass windows. As the emergency phase of work winds down, scientists are also starting to use the lull in tourist activity to investigate the mysteries of the cathedral’s construction. Also this week, Felipe Quiroz, an assistant professor in the biomedical engineering department at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, t al...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - March 9, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Dog noses detect heat, the world faces coronavirus, and scientists search for extraterrestrial life
On this week ’s show, Online News Editor David Grimm joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss how dogs’ cold noses may be able to sense warm bodies. Read the research. International News Editor Martin Enserink shares the latest from our reporters covering coronavirus. And finally, from a recording made at this y ear’s AAAS annual meeting, host Meagan Cantwell talks with Jill Tarter, chair emeritus at the SETI Institute, about the newest technologies being used to search for alien life, what a positive signal would look like, and how to inform the public if extraterrestrial life ever were detected. This w eek...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - March 2, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

An ancient empire hiding in plain sight, and the billion-dollar cost of illegal fishing
This week on the podcast, Contributing Correspondent Lizzie Wade joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss a turning point for one ancient Mesoamerican city: Tikal. On 16 January 378 C.E., the Maya city lost its leader and the replacement may have been a stranger. We know from writings that the new leader wore the garb of another culture —the Teotihuacan—who lived in a giant city 1000 kilometers away. But was this new ruler of a Maya city really from a separate culture? New techniques being used at the Tikal and Teotihuacan sites have revealed conflicting evidence as to whether Teotihuacan really held sway over a much...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - February 24, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Brickmaking bacteria and solar cells that turn ‘waste’ heat into electricity
On this week ’s show, Staff Writer Robert F. Service talks with host Sarah Crespi about manipulating microbes to make them produce building materials like bricks—and walls that can take toxins out of the air. Sarah also talks with Paul Davids, principal member of the technical staff in applied photonics& microsystems at Sandia National Laboratories, about an innovation in converting waste heat to electricity that uses similar materials to solar cells but depends on quantum tunneling. And in a bonus segment, producer Meagan Cantwell talks with Online News Editor David Grimm on stage at the AAAS annua...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - February 19, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

NIH ’s new diversity hiring program, and the role of memory suppression in resilience to trauma
On this week ’s show, senior correspondent Jeffrey Mervis joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss a new National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant program that aims to encourage diversity at the level of university faculty with the long-range goal of increasing the diversity of NIH grant recipients. Sarah also talk s with Pierre Gagnepain, a cognitive neuroscientist at INSERM, the French biomedical research agency, about the role of memory suppression in post-traumatic stress disorder. Could people that are better at suppressing memories be more resilient to the aftermath of trauma? This week’s episode was edited b...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - February 12, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Fighting cancer with CRISPR, and dating ancient rock art with wasp nests
On this week ’s show, Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about a Science paper that combines two hot areas of research—CRISPR gene editing and immunotherapy for cancer—and tests it in patients. Sarah also talks with Damien Finch, a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Earth S ciences at the University of Melbourne, about the Kimberly region of Australia and dating its ice age cave paintings using charcoal from nearby wasp nests. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast Download a transcript (PDF). (Source: Sci...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - February 5, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

A cryo –electron microscope accessible to the masses, and tracing the genetics of schizophrenia
Structural biologists rejoiced when cryo –electron microscopy, a technique to generate highly detailed models of biomolecules, emerged. But years after its release, researchers still face long queues to access these machines. Science’s European News Editor Eric Hand walks host Meagan Cantwell through the journey of a group of researche rs to create a cheaper, more accessible alternative. Also this week, host Joel Goldberg speaks with psychiatrist and researcher Goodman Sibeko, who worked with the Xhosa people of South Africa to help illuminate genetic details of schizophrenia. Though scientists have exami...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - January 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Getting bisphenol A out of food containers, and tracing minute chemical mixtures in the environment
As part of a special issue on chemicals for tomorrow ’s Earth, we’ve got two green chemistry stories. First, host Sarah Crespi talks with contributing correspondent Warren Cornwell about how a company came up with a replacement for the popular can lining material bisphenol A and then recruited knowledgeable critics to test its safety. Sarah is a lso joined by Beate Escher of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research and the University of Tübingen to discuss ways to trace complex mixtures of humanmade chemicals in the environment. They talk about how new technologies can help detect these mixtur...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - January 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Researchers flouting clinical reporting rules, and linking gut microbes to heart disease and diabetes
Though a law requiring clinical trial results reporting has been on the books for decades, many researchers have been slow to comply. Now, 2 years after the law was sharpened with higher penalties for noncompliance, investigative correspondent Charles Piller took a look at the results. He talks with host Sarah Crespi about the investigation and a surprising lack of compliance and enforcement. Also this week, Sarah talks with Brett Finlay, a microbiologist at the University Of British Columbia, Vancouver, about an Insight in this week’s issue that aims to connect the dots between noncommunicable diseases like heart ...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - January 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Squeezing two people into an MRI machine, and deciding between what ’s reasonable and what’s rational
Getting into an MRI  machine can be a tight fit for just one person. Now, researchers interested in studying face-to-face interactions are attempting to squeeze a whole other person into the same tube, while taking functional MRI (fMRI) measurements. Staff Writer Kelly Servick joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about the kinds of questions simultaneous fMRIs might answer. Also this week, Sarah talks with Igor Grossman, director of the Wisdom and Culture Lab at the University of Waterloo, about his group’s Science Advances paper on public perceptions of the difference between something being rational and somethin g...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - January 8, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Areas to watch in 2020, and how carnivorous plants evolved impressive traps
We start our first episode of the new year looking at future trends in policy and research with host Joel Goldberg and several Science News writers. Jeffrey Mervis discusses upcoming policy changes, Kelly Servick gives a rundown of areas to watch in the life sciences, and Ann Gibbons talks about potential advances in ancient proteins and DNA. In research news, host Meagan Cantwell talks with Beatriz Pinto-Goncalves, a postdoctoral researcher at the John Innes Centre, about carnivorous plant traps. Through understanding the mechanisms that create these traps, Pinto-Goncalves and colleagues elucidate what this could mean f...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - January 2, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Breakthrough of the Year, our favorite online news stories, and the year in books
As the year comes to a close, we review the best science, the best stories, and the best books from 2019. Our end-of-the-year episode kicks off with Host Sarah Crespi and Online News Editor David Grimm talking about the top online stories on things like human self-domestication, the “wood wide web,” and more. News Editor Tim Appenzeller joins Sarah to discuss Science’s 2019 Breakthrough of the Year, some of the contenders for breakthrough, also known as runners-up, and a breakdown—when science and politics just didn’t seem to mix this year. Finally, Science books ed itor Valerie Thompson bri...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - December 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Hunting for new epilepsy drugs, and capturing lightning from space
About one-third of people with epilepsy are treatment resistant. Up until now, epilepsy treatments have focused on taming seizures rather than the source of the disease and for good reason —so many roads lead to epilepsy: traumatic brain injury, extreme fever and infection, and genetic disorders, to name a few. Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel talks with host Sarah Crespi about researchers that are turning back the pages on epilepsy, trying to get to the beginning of the story w here new treatments might work. And Sarah also talks with Torsten Neurbert at the Technical University of Denmark’s National Spac...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - December 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Hunting for new epilepsy drugs, and capturing lightning from space
About one-third of people with epilepsy are treatment resistant. Up until now, epilepsy treatments have focused on taming seizures rather than the source of the disease and for good reason —so many roads lead to epilepsy: traumatic brain injury, extreme fever and infection, and genetic disorders, to name a few. Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel talks with host Sarah Crespi about researchers that are turning back the pages on epilepsy, trying to get to the beginning of the story w here new treatments might work. And Sarah also talks with Torsten Neurbert at the Technical University of Denmark’s National Spac...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - December 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Debating lab monkey retirement, and visiting a near-Earth asteroid
After their life as research subjects, what happens to lab monkeys? Some are euthanized to complete the research, others switch to new research projects, and some retire from lab life. Should they retire in place —in the same lab under the care of the same custodians—or should they be sent to retirement home–like sanctuaries? Online News Editor David Grimm joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss recently penned legislation that pushes for monkey retirements and a new collaboration between universities and s anctuaries to create a retirement pipeline for these primates. Sarah also talks with Dante Lauretta, pr...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - December 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Double dipping in an NIH loan repayment program, and using undersea cables as seismic sensors
The National Institutes of Health ’s largest loan repayment program was conceived to help scientists pay off school debts without relying on industry funding. But a close examination of the program by investigative correspondent Charles Piller has revealed that many participants are taking money from the government to repay their loans, while at the same time taking payments from pharmaceutical companies. Piller joins Host Sarah Crespi to talk about the steps he took to uncover this double dipping and why ethicists say this a conflict of interest.   Sarah also talks with Nate Lindsey, a Ph.D. candidate at the U...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - November 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Source Type: podcasts

Double dipping in an NIH loan repayment program, and using undersea cables as seismic sensors
The National Institutes of Health ’s largest loan repayment program was conceived to help scientists pay off school debts without relying on industry funding. But a close examination of the program by investigative correspondent Charles Piller has revealed that many participants are taking money from the government to repay their loans, while at the same time taking payments from pharmaceutical companies. Piller joins Host Sarah Crespi to talk about the steps he took to uncover this double dipping and why ethicists say this a conflict of interest.   Sarah also talks with Nate Lindsey, a Ph.D. candidate at the U...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - November 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Building a landslide observatory, and the universality of music
You may have seen the aftermath of a landslide, driving along a twisty mountain road —a scattering of rocks and scree impinging on the pavement. And up until now, that’s pretty much how scientists have tracked landslides—roadside observations and spotty satellite images. Now, researchers are hoping to track landslides systematically by instrumenting an entire national park in Taiwan. The park is riddled with landslides—so much so that visitors wear helmets. Host Sarah Crespi talks with one of those visitors—freelance science journalist Katherine Kornei—about what we can learn from landsl...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - November 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Building a landslide observatory, and the universality of music
You may have seen the aftermath of a landslide, driving along a twisty mountain road —a scattering of rocks and scree impinging on the pavement. And up until now, that’s pretty much how scientists have tracked landslides—roadside observations and spotty satellite images. Now, researchers are hoping to track landslides systematically by instrumenting an entire national park in Taiwan. The park is riddled with landslides—so much so that visitors wear helmets. Host Sarah Crespi talks with one of those visitors—freelance science journalist Katherine Kornei—about what we can learn from landsl...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - November 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

How to make an Arctic ship ‘vanish,’ and how fast-moving spikes are heating the Sun’s atmosphere
The Polarstern research vessel will spend 1 year locked in an Arctic ice floe. Aboard the ship and on the nearby ice, researchers will take measurements of the ice, air, water, and more in an effort to understand this pristine place. Science journalist Shannon Hall joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about her time aboard the Polarstern and how difficult these measurements are, when the researchers ’ temporary Arctic home is the noisiest, smokiest, brightest thing around. After that icy start, Sarah talks also with Tanmoy Samanta, a postdoctoral researcher at Peking University in Beijing, about the source of the extreme...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - November 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Unearthing slavery in the Caribbean, and the Catholic Church ’s influence on modern psychology
Most historical accounts of slavery were written by colonists and planters. Researchers are now using the tools of archaeology to learn more about the day-to-day lives of enslaved Africans —how they survived the conditions of slavery, how they participated in local economies, and how they maintained their own agency. Host Sarah Crespi talks with Contributing Correspondent Lizzie Wade about a Caribbean archaeology project based on St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands and launched by the founders of the Society for Black Archaeologists that aims to unearth these details. Watch a related video here. Sarah also talks wi...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - November 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Unearthing slavery in the Caribbean, and the Catholic Church ’s influence on modern psychology
Most historical accounts of slavery were written by colonists and planters. Researchers are now using the tools of archaeology to learn more about the day-to-day lives of enslaved Africans —how they survived the conditions of slavery, how they participated in local economies, and how they maintained their own agency. Host Sarah Crespi talks with Contributing Correspondent Lizzie Wade about a Caribbean archaeology project based on St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands and launched by the founders of the Society for Black Archaeologists that aims to unearth these details. Watch a related video here. Sarah also talks wi...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - November 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

How measles wipes out immune memory, and detecting small black holes
Measles is a dangerous infection that can kill. As many as 100,000 people die from the disease each year. For those who survive infection, the virus leaves a lasting mark —it appears to wipe out the immune system’s memory. News Intern Eva Fredrick joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about a pair of studies that looked at how this happens in children’s immune systems. Read the related studies in Science and Science Immunology. In our second segment this week, Sara h talks with Todd Thompson, of Ohio State University in Columbus, about his effort to find a small black hole in a binary pair with a red giant st...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - October 31, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

How measles wipes out immune memory, and detecting small black holes
Measles is a dangerous infection that can kill. As many as 100,000 people die from the disease each year. For those who survive infection, the virus leaves a lasting mark —it appears to wipe out the immune system’s memory. News Intern Eva Fredrick joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about a pair of studies that looked at how this happens in children’s immune systems. Read the related studies in Science and Science Immunology. In our second segment this week, Sara h talks with Todd Thompson, of Ohio State University in Columbus, about his effort to find a small black hole in a binary pair with a red giant st...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - October 31, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

A worldwide worm survey, and racial bias in a health care algorithm
Earthworms are easy … to find. But despite their prevalence and importance to ecosystems around the world, there hasn’t been a comprehensive survey of earthworm diversity or population size. This week in Science, Helen Philips, a postdoctoral fellow at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research and the Institute of Biology at Leipzig University, and colleagues published the results of their worldwide earthworm study, composed of data sets from many worm researchers around the globe. Host Sarah Crespi gets the lowdown from Philips on earthworm myths, collaborating with worm researchers, and links b...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - October 24, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts

Trying to find the mind in the brain, and why adults are always criticizing ‘kids these days’
We don ’t know where consciousness comes from. And we don’t know whether animals have it, or whether we can detect it in patients in comas. Do neuroscientists even know where to look? A new competition aims to narrow down the bewildering number of theories of consciousness and get closer to finding its biological signs by pitting different theories against each other in experimental settings. Freelance journalist Sara Reardon talks with host Sarah Crespi about how the competition will work. In our second segment, we talk about how we think about children. For thousands of years, adults have comp lained about t...
Source: Science Magazine Podcast - October 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Science Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: podcasts