17 October 2019: Mapping childhood mortality, and evolving ‘de novo’ genes
This week, investigating child mortality rates at a local level, and building genes from non-coding DNA.In this episode:00:43 A regional view of childhood mortalityResearchers map countries' progress towards the UN’s Sustainable Developmental Goals. Research Article: Burstein et al.; World View: Data on child deaths are a call for justice; Editorial: Protect the census07:22 Research HighlightsAstronomers identify a second visitor from beyond the solar system, and extreme snowfall stifles animal breeding in Greenland. Research Highlight: The comet that came in from interstellar ...
Source: Nature Podcast - October 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

10 October 2019: Estimating earthquake risk, and difficulties for deep-learning
This week, a method for predicting follow-up earthquakes, and the issues with deep learning systems in AI.In this episode:00:47 Which is the big quake?A new technique could allow seismologists to better predict if a larger earthquake will follow an initial tremor. Research Article: Real-time discrimination of earthquake foreshocks and aftershocks; News and Views: Predicting if the worst earthquake has passed07:46 Research HighlightsVampire bats transmitting rabies in Costa Rica, and why are some octopuses warty? Research Article: Streicker et al.; Research Article: Voight et al.10:03...
Source: Nature Podcast - October 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Podcast Extra: Q & A with Nobel Prize winner John B Goodenough
In this Podcast Extra, we speak to John B Goodenough, from the University of Texas at Austin, in the US. Today, John was announced as one of the joint winners of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Reporter Benjamin Thompson went along to the Royal Society in London to chat with him. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - October 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Podcast Extra: Q & A with Nobel Prize winner Didier Queloz
In this Podcast Extra, we speak to physicist Didier Queloz, who was announced today as one of the joint winners of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics. Shortly after the winners were announced, Didier took part in a press conference to talk about his award. Reporter Benjamin Thompson went along to chat with him. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - October 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

03 October 2019: Leapfrogging speciation, and migrating mosquitoes
This week, how new species may form by sexual imprinting, and a previously unknown way for mosquitoes to migrate.In this episode:00:43 New species by sexual imprinting?A Central American frog chooses mates resembling its parents, a possible route for new species to form. Research Article: Yang et al.; News and Views: Leapfrog to speciation boosted by mother’s influence09:58 Research HighlightsA light-based pacemaker, and the mathematics of the best place to park. Research Article: Mei et al.; Research Highlight: Maths tackles an eternal question: where to park?11:43 Gone with t...
Source: Nature Podcast - October 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Nature PastCast, September 1963: Plate tectonics – the unifying theory of Earth sciences
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.Earthquakes, volcanoes, the formation of mountains; we understand all these phenomena in terms of plate tectonics (large-scale movements of the Earth’s crust). But when a German geologist first suggested that continents move, in the 1910s, people dismissed it as a wild idea. In this podcast, we hear how a ‘wild idea’ became the unifying theory of Earth sciences. In the 1960s, data showed that the sea f...
Source: Nature Podcast - September 27, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

26 September 2019: Mysteries of the ancient mantle, and the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy
This week, diamond-containing rocks may help uncover secrets of the Earth’s mantle, and a reflection on science since the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy was published.In this episode:00:46 Earth’s EvolutionExplosive eruptions have allowed researchers to study Earth’s mysterious mantle. Research Article: Woodhead et al.; News and Views: Enigmatic origin of diamond-bearing rocks revealed06:08 Research HighlightsSupersonic cork popping, and the timing of vaccines. Research Highlight: An uncorked champagne bottle imitates a fighter jet; Research Highlight: Why midday m...
Source: Nature Podcast - September 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Podcast Extra: Absurd scientific advice
How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems is the new book from XKCD cartoonist Randall Munroe. In this Podcast Extra, Randall talks about the book, its inspiration and the bizarre thought experiments it contains. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - September 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Backchat: Covering Climate Now
In this episode:00:44 A global media collaborationThis week, Nature is taking part in the Covering Climate Now project. What is it, and why has Nature joined? Editorial: Act now and avert a climate crisis05:49 ‘Climate change’ vs ‘climate emergency’In early 2019, The Guardian changed the wording they use when covering climate stories. Our panel discusses the importance of phrasing, and how it evolves. The Guardian: Why the Guardian is changing the language it uses about the environment13:40 Choosing climate imagesWhat makes a good image for a climate change story? What do they add to a written news ...
Source: Nature Podcast - September 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

19 September 2019: XKCD, and Extinction Rebellion
This week, absurd advice from XKCD’s Randall Munroe, and a conversation with climate lawyer turned activist Farhana Yamin.In this episode: 00:46 How to, with XKCDCartoonist Randall Munroe tell us about his new book: How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems.08:21 Research HighlightsHow insemination makes honeybee queens lose their way, and ‘toe maps’ in the brain. Research Highlight: Sex clouds queen bees’ vision; Research Highlight: ‘Toe maps’ in the brain guide painters born without hands10:31 From climate lawyer to climate activistAfter three decades of clim...
Source: Nature Podcast - September 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

12 September 2019: Modelling early embryos, and male-dominated conferences
This week, modelling embryonic development, and an analysis of male dominated conferences.In this episode:00:44 Imitating implantationResearchers have created a system that uses stem cells to model the early stages of pregnancy. Research article: Zheng et al.; News and Views: Human embryo implantation modelled in microfluidic channels08:03 Research HighlightsTraces of baby turtle tracks, and Titan’s explosive past. Research Highlight: A baby sea turtle’s ancient trek is captured in a fossil; Research Highlight: Giant explosions sculpted a moon’s peculiar scenery09:3...
Source: Nature Podcast - September 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

05 September 2019: Persistent antibiotic resistance, and modeling hot cities
This week, Salmonella spreading antibiotic resistance, and the drivers of urban heat islands.In this episode: 00:46 Antibiotic resistance reservoirsResearchers have identified how Salmonella ‘persister’ cells can spread antibiotic resistance genes in mice intestines.Research article: Bakkeren et al.08:12 Research HighlightsBright barn owls stun prey, and the evolution of dog brains. Research Highlight: Zip-lining owls reveal what really scares their prey; Research Highlight: A dog’s breed is a window onto its brain10:13 Urban heatingCities are generally hotter than ...
Source: Nature Podcast - September 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Nature PastCast, August 1975: Antibodies ’ ascendency to blockbuster drug status
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.They’re found in home-testing kits for pregnancy, hospital tests for MRSA, and in six out of ten of the best-selling drugs today. But monoclonal antibodies have kept a surprisingly low profile since their debut in a Nature paper in 1975. This podcast follows them from that time through patent wars, promising drug trials and finally to blockbuster status today.This episode was first broadcast in August 2013.From the archive:Continuous...
Source: Nature Podcast - August 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

29 August 2019: Carbon-based computing, and depleting ancient-human genomes
This week, a computer chip based on carbon nanotubes, and the potential pitfalls of sequencing ancient-human remains.In this episode: 00:45 A nanotube microprocessorScientists are looking beyond silicon, by constructing a computer chip using carbon nanotubes.Research article: Shulaker et al. News and Views: Nanotube computer scaled up 08:38 Research HighlightsWeighing neutrinos, and discovering a hidden Zika epidemic.Research Highlight: Lightest neutrino is at least 6 million times lighter than an electron; Research Highlight: Cuba’s untold Zika outbreak uncovered 10:29 Using ancient-human remains...
Source: Nature Podcast - August 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

22 August 2019: Combating online hate speech, and identifying early fossils
This week, the resilience of internet hate groups, and searching for early life.In this episode:00:46 Tackling internet hateResearchers have been modelling how hate groups interact online, and have come up with suggestions to combat this activity. Research article: Johnson et al.; News and Views: Strategies for combating online hate08:55 Research HighlightsGallstone growth, and the reproductive strategies of hitchhiking stick insects. Research Highlight: The ‘net’ that leads to excruciating stones in the belly; Research Highlight: The insect that lost its homeland — and its s...
Source: Nature Podcast - August 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

15 August 2019: Atomic espionage in the Second World War, and exploring the early Universe
This week, spilling nuclear secrets, and a mysterious period in the Universe’s history.In this episode:00:46 "The most dangerous spy in history"We hear the story of Klaus Fuchs, who gave away the details of building an atomic bomb. Books and Arts: The scientist-spy who spilt secrets of the bomb08:00 Research HighlightsEnvironmental impacts of electric scooters, and the Goliath frog engineers. Research Highlight: Trendy e-scooters might not be as green as they seem; Research Highlight: Enormous frogs heave rocks to build tadpole ‘nests’10:33 Signals from the ancient ...
Source: Nature Podcast - August 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

08 August 2019: A mindset for success, and mercury in fish
This week, a mindset to improve school performance, and the complex story of how mercury accumulates in fish.In this episode:00:46 Growth MindsetHow a one hour course could improve academic achievement. Research article: Yeager et al.11:47 Research HighlightsAn extinct giant parrot, and hacking Manhattan’s traffic. Research Highlight: Polly wants many crackers: fossils reveal first known giant parrot; Research Article: Vivek et al.13:42 Toxic TunaMethylmercury levels in fish may increase due to climate change and overfishing, despite declines in emissions. Research Article:&nbs...
Source: Nature Podcast - August 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

01 August 2019: The  placental microbiome, and advances in artificial intelligence
This week, whether the placenta is lacking microbes, and new hardware for artificial intelligence.In this episode:00:43 Microbe-free placentas?New research suggests that the placenta is sterile. Research article: de Goffau et al.; News and Views: No bacteria found in healthy placentas07:12 Research HighlightsAntacids and allergies, and the source of unexplained radioactivity. Research Article: Jordakieva et al.; Research Article: Masson et al.09:13 AI hardwareMaking technology for AI can be challenging, so scientists try a new solution. Research Article: Pei et al.15:54 News ChatA wo...
Source: Nature Podcast - July 31, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Nature PastCast, July 1942: Secret science in World War 2
This episode was first broadcast in July 2013.This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.During the Second World War, scientists worked on secret projects such as the development of radar. Their efforts were hinted at in the pages of Nature but the details, of course, couldn't be published. In this episode, historian Jon Agar explains how war work gave physicists a new outlook and led to new branches of science. We also hear from the late John Westcott, whose wartime job was to des...
Source: Nature Podcast - July 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

25 July 2019: The history of climate change, and making vaccines mandatory
This week, how the climate has changed throughout history, and why enforcing vaccination should be done with care.In this episode:00:39 Climate through timeResearchers have modelled how climate has changed throughout the past 2000 years. Research article: Neukom et al.; Research article:Neukom et al.; News and Views: The aberrant global synchrony of present-day warming06:45 Research HighlightsMaking a self-propelling liquid, and the benefit of laugh tracks. Research Highlight: How to make water flow uphill; Research Highlight: To make lame jokes funnier, cue the laugh track08:35...
Source: Nature Podcast - July 24, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Backchat July 2019: Breaking news, audience-led journalism and human gene editing
In this episode:01:01 Breaking NewsThe first image of a black hole took the world by storm, but what was it like reporting such a quickly developing story? News: Black hole pictured for first time — in spectacular detail; Video: The first image of a black hole: A three minute guide; Video: How scientists reacted to the first-ever image of a black hole09:01 Digital JournalismWhen a new research paper came to light about pig brains being revived, we asked our audience what they wanted to know, and got a big response. Could this be the future of journalism? News: Pig brains kept a...
Source: Nature Podcast - July 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

18 July 2019: Quantum logic gates in silicon, and moving on from lab disasters
This week, a new advance in silicon based quantum computing and experiences of how to recover when disaster strikes.In this episode:00:45 Quantum logicA fast and accurate two-qubit logic gate has been designed in silicon. Research article: Simmons et al.07:52 Research HighlightsTeaching a computer to solve a Rubik’s cube and immigration in Chichén Itzá. Research Highlight: AI solves the Rubik’s cube; Research Highlight: Death as a human sacrifice awaited some travellers to a Mayan city10:43 Coping with calamityResearchers share how they are recovering from catastrophe...
Source: Nature Podcast - July 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

11 July 2019: The moon, past, present, and future
This week, an extended chat about all things lunar with Alex Witze.Instead of a regular edition of the Nature Podcast, this week we’re celebrating the 50th anniversary of humans walking on the Moon. Nick Howe catches up with planetary science reporter, Alex Witze. They discuss the latest US plans to land people on the moon by 2024, the history of the Apollo missions, and what’s next for the lunar exploration.News: Can NASA really return people to the Moon by 2024?Books and Arts: Propulsive reading: books on the MoonNews Feature: These young scientists will shape the next 50 years of Moon res...
Source: Nature Podcast - July 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

04 July 2019: Machine learning in materials science, and sand ’s sustainability
This week, using an algorithm to find properties in materials science, and the global consequences of sand-mining.In this episode:00:47 Predicting propertiesA word-association algorithm is reading millions of abstracts to discover new properties of materials. Research article: Tshitoyan et al.; News and Views: Text mining facilitates materials discovery08:28 Research HighlightsTiny robot-jellyfish, and genome mutation hot-spots. Research Article:Multi-functional soft-bodied jellyfish-like swimming; Research Highlight:How DNA ‘hotspots’ snarl the search for cancer genes10:48 Sand un...
Source: Nature Podcast - July 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

04 July 2019: Machine learning in materials science, and sand ’s sustainability
This week, using an algorithm to find properties in materials science, and the global consequences of sand-mining.In this episode:00:47 Predicting propertiesA word-association algorithm is reading millions of abstracts to discover new properties of materials. Research article: Tshitoyan et al.; News and Views: Text mining facilitates materials discovery08:28 Research HighlightsTiny robot-jellyfish, and genome mutation hot-spots. Research Article:Multi-functional soft-bodied jellyfish-like swimming; Research Highlight:How DNA ‘hotspots’ snarl the search for cancer genes10:48 Sand un...
Source: Nature Podcast - July 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Nature PastCast, June 1876: Gorillas, man-eating monsters?
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.According to the fables of early explorers, the gorilla was a terrible, man-eating monster. It was also thought to be man’s closest relative in the animal kingdom. Naturally, scientists and the public alike wanted to see these fierce beasts for themselves. But in the mid-nineteenth century, as the evolution debate heated up, getting a live gorilla to Europe from Africa was extremely difficult. In 1876, the pages of Nature report the ...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast, June 1876
This year,Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we ’re rebroadcasting episodes from ourPastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.According to the fables of early explorers, the gorilla was a terrible, man-eating monster. It was also thought to be man ’s closest relative in the animal kingdom. Naturally, scientists and the public alike wanted to see these fierce beasts for themselves. But in the mid-nineteenth century, as the evolution debate heated up, getting a live gorilla to Europe from Africa was extremely difficult. In 1876, the pages ofNature report the a...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

27 June 2019: Callused feet, and protein-based archaeology
This week, how going barefoot affects what your feet can feel, and uncovering history with ancient proteins.In this episode:00:44 A sole sensationA study of people who do and don't wear shoes looks into whether calluses make feet less sensitive. Research article: Holowka et al.; News and Views: Your sensitive sole08:50 Research HighlightsMagma moving quickly, and twice-transforming 4D materials. Research Highlight: Volcano’s magma hit top speed; Research Article: Wang et al.11:09 Dating fossils with proteinsArchaeologists turn to proteins to answer questions DNA cannot. News Feature: Move over, DNA: ancient protei...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

27 June 2019: Callused feet, and protein-based archaeology
This week, how going barefoot affects what your feet can feel, and uncovering history with ancient proteins.In this episode:00:44 A sole sensationA study of people who do and don't wear shoes looks into whether calluses make feet less sensitive.Research article:Holowka et al.;News and Views:Your sensitive sole08:50 Research HighlightsMagma moving quickly, and twice-transforming 4D materials.Research Highlight:Volcano ’s magma hit top speed;Research Article:Wang et al.11:09 Dating fossils with proteinsArchaeologists turn to proteins to answer questions DNA cannot.News Feature:Move over, DNA: ancient proteins are st...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

20 June 2019: Non-native species, and a blood-inspired robot battery
This week, what makes birds invasive, and a robotic fish powered by a blood-like battery.In this episode:00:44 How do alien bird species establish themselves?Researchers have been looking at how bird species settle in non-native locations. Research article: Redding et al.08:22 Research HighlightsCrafting the perfect crêpe, and anti-fungal wasp eggs. Research Highlight: Physicists tackle a delicate challenge: making the ideal crêpe; Research article: Strohm et al.10:09 Robot bloodMultipurpose battery fluid both moves and powers a robot fish. Research article: Aubin et al.;...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

20 June 2019: Non-native species, and a blood-inspired robot battery
This week, what makes birds invasive and a robotic fish powered by a blood-like battery. For information regarding your data privacy, visitacast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - June 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

13 June 2019: Mighty magnets, and aerosols in the atmosphere
This week, a record-breaking magnetic field, and aerosols’ potential effects on the atmosphere.In this episode:00:45 Making massive magnetsResearchers have created the world’s strongest direct current magnetic field. Research article: S. Hahn et al.08:38 Research HighlightsMacaques’ musicality and human consumption of microplastics. Research Article: Divergence in the functional organization of human and macaque auditory cortex revealed by fMRI responses to harmonic tones; Research Highlight: What a bottled-water habit means for intake of ‘microplastics’10:55 Aero...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

13 June 2019: Mighty magnets, and aerosols in the atmosphere
This week, a record-breaking magnetic field, and aerosols ’ potential effects on the atmosphere.In this episode:00:45 Making massive magnetsResearchers have created the world ’s strongest direct current magnetic field. Research article: S. Hahn et al.08:38 Research HighlightsMacaques ’ musicality and human consumption of microplastics. Research Article: Divergence in the functional organization of human and macaque auditory cortex revealed by fMRI responses to harmonic tones; Research Highlight: What a bottled-water habit means for intake of ‘microplastics’10:55 A...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

06 June 2019: Microbes modifying medicine and kickstarting plate tectonics
This week, how gut microbes might be affecting drugs, and a new theory on the beginning of plate tectonics.In this episode:00:45 Microbes metabolising drugsResearchers are investigating whether the gut microbiota can alter the activity of medicinal drugs.Research article: Zimmermann et al. 06:40 Research HighlightsElephants counting with smell, and audio activity monitoring.Research Highlight: Elephants have a nose for portion sizeResearch Highlight: Deep learning monitors human activity based on sound alone08:57 The origin of plate tectonics?A new theory suggests that sediment may have lubricated the Earth’s te...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

06 June 2019: Microbes modifying medicine and kickstarting plate tectonics
This week, how gut microbes might be affecting drugs, and a new theory on the beginning of plate tectonics.In this episode:00:45 Microbes metabolising drugsResearchers are investigating whether the gut microbiota can alter the activity of medicinal drugs.Research article:Zimmermann et al. 06:40 Research HighlightsElephants counting with smell, and audio activity monitoring.Research Highlight:Elephants have a nose for portion sizeResearch Highlight:Deep learning monitors human activity based on sound alone08:57 The origin of plate tectonics?A new theory suggests that sediment may have lubricated the Earth ’s tect...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Nature PastCast May 1983: Discovering the ozone layer hole
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.The discovery of the ozone hole in the mid-1980s was a shock. Scientists suspected that man-made gases called CFCs were damaging the ozone layer, but they didn’t expect to see such a dramatic decline. Nor did they expect the discovery to be made by a small group of British scientists in Antarctica. In this podcast, we hear from the ‘little voice’ in the background whose persistence led to the reporting of the reduced ozon...
Source: Nature Podcast - May 31, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast May 1983
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we ’re rebroadcasting episodes from ourPastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.The discovery of the ozone hole in the mid-1980s was a shock. Scientists suspected that man-made gases called CFCs were damaging the ozone layer, but they didn ’t expect to see such a dramatic decline. Nor did they expect the discovery to be made by a small group of British scientists in Antarctica. In this podcast, we hear from the ‘little voice’ in the background whose persistence led to the reporting of the reduced ozo...
Source: Nature Podcast - May 31, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

30 May 2019: Cold fusion, gender parity in universities, and studying wildfires
This week, looking back at cold fusion, a ranking of gender balance in universities, and measuring the impact of wildfires. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - May 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

30 May 2019: Cold fusion, gender parity in universities, and studying wildfires
This week, looking back at cold fusion, a ranking of gender balance in universities, and measuring the impact of wildfires. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - May 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

23 May 2019: Pre-industrial plankton populations, European science, and ancient fungi.
This week, how climate change has affected plankton, the future of European science, and evidence of an ancient fungus. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - May 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

23 May 2019: Pre-industrial plankton populations, European science, and ancient fungi.
This week, how climate change has affected plankton, the future of European science, and evidence of an ancient fungus. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - May 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

16 May 2019: Recoding genomes, and material from the Moon's far side
This week, rewriting the script of life, and a trip to the far side of the Moon. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - May 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

16 May 2019: Recoding genomes, and material from the Moon's far side
This week, rewriting the script of life, and a trip to the far side of the Moon. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - May 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

09 May 2019: Urban vs Rural BMI, and the health of rivers
This week, body mass increases around the world, and river connections in decline. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - May 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

09 May 2019: Urban vs Rural BMI, and the health of rivers
This week, body mass increases around the world, and river connections in decline. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - May 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

02 May 2019: China's growing science network, and talking brain signals
This week, China’s Belt and Road Initiative, and translating brain patterns into speech. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - May 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

02 May 2019: China's growing science network, and talking brain signals
This week, China ’s Belt and Road Initiative, and translating brain patterns into speech. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - May 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Nature PastCast April 1953: The other DNA papers
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.Over 60 years ago, James Watson and Francis Crick published their famous paper proposing a structure for DNA. Everyone knows that story – but fewer people know that there were actually three papers about DNA in that issue of Nature. In this podcast, first broadcast in April 2013, we uncover the evidence that brought Watson and Crick to their conclusion, discuss how the papers were received at the time, and hear from one scientist ...
Source: Nature Podcast - April 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast April 1953
This year,Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we ’re rebroadcasting episodes from ourPastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.Over 60 years ago , James Watson and Francis Crick published their famous paper proposing a structure for DNA. Everyone knows that story – but fewer people know that there were actually three papers about DNA in that issue ofNature. In this podcast, first broadcast in April 2013, we uncover the evidence that brought Watson and Crick to their conclusion, discuss how the papers were received at the time, and hear from one scientist w...
Source: Nature Podcast - April 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

25 April 2019: Tiny earthquakes, the genetics of height, and how US-China politics is affecting research
This week we’ve got an extended News Chat between presenter Benjamin Thompson and Nature's European Bureau Chief Nisha Gaind. They discuss a new way to identify tiny earthquakes, new insights into the heritability of height, and how political tensions between the US and China are affecting scientists and research. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - April 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts