What the atomic structure of enamel tells us about tooth decay
On this week’s podcast, how the molecular structure of tooth enamel may impact decay, and a mysterious planetary core from a half-formed gas giant.In this episode:00:46 Unravelling tooth enamelResearchers have been looking into the structure and composition of enamel in an effort to better understand tooth decay. Research Article: DeRocher et al.07:02 Research HighlightsAn adhesive patch to help heal heart-attacks, and a new technique to inspect the structure of 2D ‘wonder materials’. Research Highlight: A healing patch holds tight to a beating heart; Research Highlight: A sn...
Source: Nature Podcast - July 1, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Coronapod: The state of the pandemic, six months in
In a few weeks, we’ll be wrapping up Coronapod in its current form. Please fill out our short survey to let us know your thoughts on the show.In this episode:03:13 What have we learnt?We take a look back over the past six months of the pandemic, and discuss how far the world has come. It’s been a period of turmoil and science has faced an unprecedented challenge. What lessons can be learned from the epidemic so far to continue the fight in the months to come?Financial Times: Coronavirus tracked: the latest figures as countries start to reopenWellcome Open Research: What settings have been linked to SARS-CoV-2 t...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 26, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

How playing poker can help you make decisions
On this week’s podcast, life lessons from poker, and keeping things civil during peer review.In this episode:00:44 Deciding to play pokerWhen writer Maria Konnikova wanted to better understand the human decision making process, she took a rather unusual step: becoming a professional poker player. We delve into her journey and find out how poker could help people make better decisions. Books and Arts: What the world needs now: lessons from a poker player09:12 Research HighlightsA sweaty synthetic skin that can exude useful compounds, and Mars’s green atmosphere. Research Highlight: An artific...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 24, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Coronapod: Dexamethasone, the cheap steroid that could cut coronavirus deaths
In this episode:00:37 Lessons from the Ebola outbreakWe get an update on the pandemic response in the African countries still reeling from the 2014 Ebola crisis. Resource strapped and under pressure – can the lessons learned from Ebola help keep the coronavirus under control?15:32 Dexamethasone, a breakthrough drug?A UK-based drugs trial suggests that a cheap steroid could cut deaths by a third among the sickest COVID patients. We discuss what this could mean for the pandemic.News: Coronavirus breakthrough: dexamethasone is first drug shown to save lives20:06 One good thingOur hosts pick out things that have mad...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 19, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Incest in the elite of Neolithic Ireland
This week, researchers make diamonds tough, and evidence of incest in a 5,000 year old tomb.In this episode:00:51 Tough versus hardDiamonds are famed for their hardness, but they are not so resistant to fracture. Now, researchers have toughened up diamonds, which could open up new industrial applications. Research Article: Yue et al.06:07 Research HighlightsA spacecraft helps physicists work out the lifespan of a neutron, and the icy hideaway of an endangered whale. Research Highlight: The vanishing-neutron mystery might be cracked by a robot in outer space; Research Highlight: A secluded icy ...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Long Read Podcast: Enigmatic neutron stars may soon give up their secrets
An instrument on the International Space Station is providing new insights into some of the Universe’s most baffling objects.Neutron stars have puzzled scientists for decades. It’s known that these ultra-dense objects are born from the remnants of supernovae, yet what’s under their surface, and what processes that go on within them, remain a mystery.Now, an instrument called the Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer is providing new information to help answer these questions, ushering in a new era of research into these strange stars.This is an audio version of our feature: The golden age of neu...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Coronapod: The Surgisphere scandal that rocked coronavirus drug research
In this episode:00:52 Testing disparitiesAs testing capacities increase, it is clear that not everyone has equal access. But grassroots organisations are trying to correct this inequity. We hear about one researcher’s fight to get testing to those below the poverty line in California.09:04 The hydroxychloroquine saga continuesAs a high profile study in the Lancet is retracted, the first data from clinical trials is coming in and it is not encouraging. We discuss the murky future of hydroxychloroquine as a COVID drug.News: High-profile coronavirus retractions raise concerns about data oversight12:31 Will the Surg...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 12, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

The quantum space lab
This week, the spaceborne lab that allows investigation of quantum states, and the debate surrounding how mountain height is maintained.Shutdown StemOn the tenth of June, Nature joined #ShutdownStem #strike4blacklives.Podcast: #ShutDownSTEM and the Nature Podcasthttps://www.shutdownstem.com/Editorial: Systemic racism: science must listen, learn and changeNews: Thousands of scientists worldwide to go on strike for Black livesIn this episode:01:18 Space labScientists have built a lab on the international space station, allowing them to remotely investigate quantum phenomena in microgravity. Research Artic...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

#ShutDownSTEM and the Nature Podcast
On the tenth of June, Nature will be joining #ShutdownStem #strike4blacklives. We will be educating ourselves and defining actions we can take to help eradicate anti-Black racism in academia and STEM . Please join us.https://www.shutdownstem.com/Editorial: Systemic racism: science must listen, learn and changeNews: Thousands of scientists worldwide to go on strike for Black lives  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - June 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Coronapod: The heavy toll on people of colour
In this episode:00:45 Black Lives MatterThe killing of George Floyd, a black man, by police in Minnesota has sent a shockwave of anger around the globe. As unrest continues, we discuss the protests in Washington DC and ask how scientists are reacting.04:01 The outsized toll of covid-19 on people of colourReports from around the globe are showing that ethnic minorities are at much higher risk of infection and death from the coronavirus. But why might that be? And what can be done about it?News: How to address the coronavirus’s outsized toll on people of colourWorld View: How environmental racism is fuelling ...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 5, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Lab-made skin grows its own hair
This week, a new method to grow hairy skin in a dish, and new research takes aim at the RNA world hypothesis.In this episode:00:45 Hairy SkinResearchers may have developed a way to make skin that can grow hair in the lab, paving the way for treatment of a variety of skin disorders, and perhaps even baldness. Research Article: Lee et al.; News and Views: Regenerative medicine could pave the way to treating baldness08:56 Research HighlightsHow mercury moved during the ‘Great Dying’, and the link between mobile phones and gender equality. Research Highlight: Giant eruptions belched to...
Source: Nature Podcast - June 3, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Coronapod: The divisive hydroxychloroquine study that's triggering mass confusion
00:59 Chloroquine on rocky groundPresident Trump's preferred coronavirus treatment is the focus of a new study suggesting it could cause more harm than good, but not everybody agrees. We discuss the fallout as trials around the world are paused and countries diverge over policy advice.News: India expands use of controversial coronavirus drug amid safety concernsNews: Safety fears over hyped drug hydroxychloroquine spark global confusion12:12 Are we rushing science?Coronavirus papers are being published extremely quickly, while normally healthy scientific debate is being blown up in the world’s press. Is there a ...
Source: Nature Podcast - May 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Super-efficient catalyst boosts hopes for hydrogen fuel
This week, perfecting catalysts that split water using light, and the mystery of missing matter in the Universe.In this episode:00:44 Water splittingAfter decades of research scientists have managed to achieve near perfect efficiency using a light-activated catalyst to separate hydrogen from water for fuel. Research Article: Takata et al.; News and Views: An almost perfectly efficient light-activated catalyst for producing hydrogen from water05:37 Research HighlightsThe hidden water inside the earth’s core, and how working memory ‘works’ in children. Research Highlight: Our p...
Source: Nature Podcast - May 27, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Coronapod: Hope and caution greet vaccine trial result, and Trump vs the WHO
01:38 Trump vs the WHOPresident Trump has given the WHO an ultimatum in a tweet, threatening to pull out of the organisation within 30 days unless unclear demands are met. We discuss what this means for the pandemic, the USA and the future of international health cooperation.12:06 Where are we with vaccines?The first results from vaccine trials are in and they are encouraging, but scientists are still urging caution. We hear the lowdown on the types of vaccines being developed and what hope there is of rolling them out any time soon. News: Coronavirus vaccine trials have delivered their first results — but ...
Source: Nature Podcast - May 22, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

A synthetic eye that'sees' like a human
This week, crafting an artificial eye with the benefits of a human's, and understanding how disk-galaxies formed by peering back in time.In this episode:00:45 Biomimetic eyeResearchers fabricate an artificial eye complete with a human-like retina. Research Article: Gu et al.; News and Views: Artificial eye boosted by hemispherical retina09:27 Research HighlightsDazzling elephant seals to avoid predation, and helping blind people ‘see’ through brain stimulation. Research Highlight: Mighty seals humbled by prey that flickers and flashes; Research Highlight: Blind people &ls...
Source: Nature Podcast - May 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Coronapod: The misinformation pandemic, and science funding fears
With questionable coronavirus content flooding airwaves and online channels, what’s being done to limit its impact? In this episode: 00:57 The epidemiology of misinformationAs the pandemic spreads, so does a tidal wave of misinformation and conspiracy theories. We discuss how researchers' are tracking the spread of questionable content, and ways to limit its impact.News: Anti-vaccine movement could undermine efforts to end coronavirus pandemic, researchers warnNature Video: Infodemic: Coronavirus and the fake news pandemic 17:55 One good thingOur hosts pick out things that have made them smile in the l...
Source: Nature Podcast - May 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

The super-sleuth who spots trouble in science papers, and the puzzle of urban smog
This week, Elisabeth Bik tells us about her work uncovering potential image manipulation, and a new route for particulate pollution formation.In this episode:00:45 Seeing doubleElisabeth Bik spends her days identifying duplicated images in science papers. She tells us about her efforts, and why they’re important. Feature: Meet this super-spotter of duplicated images in science papers; News: Publishers launch joint effort to tackle altered images in research papers08:11 Research HighlightsNew insights on the mysterious Tully Monster, and how football fans can stoke air pollution. Research High...
Source: Nature Podcast - May 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Coronapod: The dangers of ignoring outbreaks in homeless shelters, plus coronavirus and drug abuse
Outbreaks among those unable to isolate are spreading under the radar. We hear about the researchers scrambling to get a handle on the situation.In this episode:01:02 How is coronavirus spreading in group settings?In order to successfully stop the coronavirus pandemic, researchers have to understand how the virus is spreading among groups unable to isolate. We hear about efforts to uncover levels of infection among homeless populations in the US, and the challenges associated with doing so.News: Ignoring outbreaks in homeless shelters is proving perilous16:49 One good thingOur hosts pick out things that have made them smil...
Source: Nature Podcast - May 8, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

07 May 2020: Galileo and the science deniers, and physicists probe the mysterious pion
This week, a new way to study elusive subatomic particles - pions, and the story of Galileo remains relevant in a time of modern science denialism.In this episode:00:46 Probing pionsPions are incredibly unstable and difficult-to-study subatomic particles. Now researchers have come up with a clever way to examine them - by sticking them into helium atoms. Research Article: Hori et al.08:28 Research HighlightsA colourful way to cool buildings, and the rapid expansion of cities. Research Highlight: A rainbow of layered paints could help buildings to keep their cool; Research Highlight: Urban spra...
Source: Nature Podcast - May 6, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Coronapod: What use are contact tracing apps? And new hopes for coronavirus drug remdesivir
The Coronapod team pick through the latest news, plus we hear from the researchers making lemonade out of lockdown lemons.In this episode:01:10 Can contact-tracing apps help?Governments around the world are banking on smartphone apps to help end the spread of the coronavirus. But how effective might these apps might be? What are the risks? And how should they fit into wider public health strategies?Editorial: Show evidence that apps for COVID-19 contact-tracing are secure and effective13:30 Antiviral remdesivir shows promiseEarly results from a US trial of the antiviral drug remdesivir suggest it shortens recovery time for...
Source: Nature Podcast - May 1, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

30 April 2020: A sniff test for consciousness, and how to cut antibiotics use — with vaccines
This week, how the ‘sniff-response’ can help clinicians determine a patient's state of consciousness, and how vaccines could help drive down antibiotic use.In this episode:00:45 Sniffing out consciousnessResearchers have found that the sniff reflex can indicate whether a patient is in a vegetative state, and even the likelihood that they will recover consciousness. Research Article: Arzi et al.08:37 Research HighlightsThe stupefying effect of carbon dioxide, and a chameleon gemstone that tricks your eyes. Research Highlight: Rising carbon dioxide levels will make us stupider; Research H...
Source: Nature Podcast - April 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Coronapod: The race to expand antibody testing
Benjamin Thompson, Noah Baker, and Amy Maxmen discuss the role of antibody tests in controlling the pandemic, and how public-health spending could curtail an economic crisis. Also on the show, the open hardware community's efforts to produce medical equipment.In this episode:02:08 Betting on antibodiesAntibody tests could play a key role in understanding how the virus has spread through populations, and in ending lockdowns. We discuss concerns over their reliability, how they could be used, and the tantalising possibility of immunity.News: The researchers taking a gamble with antibody tests for coronavirus10:25 Economy vs ...
Source: Nature Podcast - April 24, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

23 April 2020: Denisovan DNA in modern Europeans, and the birth of an unusual celestial object
This week, evidence of ancient hominin DNA in modern human genomes, and the origin of a snowman-shaped object at the edge of the solar system.In this episode:00:45 Intermixing of ancient homininsBy combing through the DNA of over 27,000 modern day Icelanders, researchers have uncovered new insights about the ancient hominin species who interbred with Homo sapiens. Research Article: Skov et al.08:05 Research HighlightsThe scent of lemur love, a hidden Viking trade route, and ‘gargantuan’ hail. Research Highlight: Lemurs’ love language is fragrance; Research Highlight: Vik...
Source: Nature Podcast - April 22, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Coronapod: Troubling news
Benjamin Thompson, Noah Baker, and Amy Maxmen discuss Trump withholding funds from the WHO, and how COVID-19 kills. We also hear about controlling misinformation while communicating risk.In this episode:01:15 Understanding bottlenecksAfter listening to last week's episode of Coronapod, researchers in the USA were inspired to start collecting data about the challenges facing labs carrying out testing. After more than 4,000 responses to their online survey, we discuss their goals.03:08 A hole in the WHO’s fundingUS President Donald Trump has announced plans to withhold funding for the WHO, pending a review of the organ...
Source: Nature Podcast - April 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Coronapod: An untapped resource
Benjamin Thompson, Noah Baker, and Amy Maxmen discuss the labs struggling to get involved in diagnostic testing, and should you be wearing a mask?In this episode:02:07 A drive to diagnoseMany research labs are pivoting from their normal work to offer diagnostic testing for COVID-19. We discuss how to go about retooling a lab, the hurdles researchers are facing and why, in some cases, tests are not being taken up.News: Thousands of coronavirus tests are going unused in US labs14:18 Masking the issue?There has been conflicting advice on whether people should wear masks to protect themselves during the pandemic. We look at so...
Source: Nature Podcast - April 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

09 April 2020: A plastic-recycling enzyme, and supercooled molecules
This week, a new enzyme speeds up the breakdown of plastic bottles, and a method to cool molecules to a fraction above absolute zero.In this episode:01:18 A PET recycling enzymeResearchers have engineered an enzyme that effectively breaks down the plastic PET into its constituent monomers. This could allow for more complete recycling of bottles and clothes. Research Article: Tournier et al.06:41 Research HighlightsThe shocking lengths humans will go to to satisfy their curiosity, and the reasons for elevated methane emissions at Oktoberfest. Research Highlight: Humans opt to brave electric shock to satisfy their curiosity;...
Source: Nature Podcast - April 8, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Coronapod: Ramping up responses
Benjamin Thompson, Noah Baker, and Amy Maxmen discuss the latest on the British response, and what low- and middle-income countries have done to prepare for the pandemic.In this episode:01:33 Testing in the UKThis week, the UK health secretary announced plans to further ramp up testing for COVID-19, with the aim of preforming 100,000 tests a day in England by the end of April. We discuss these plans and why testing remains a key weapon in the fight against the virus.11:37 Pandemic preparation in poorer countriesCOVID-19 cases have started to be reported in many low- and middle-income countries. We hear how a few of these n...
Source: Nature Podcast - April 3, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

02 April 2020: Dating an ancient hominid skull, and an ancient Antarctic rainforest
This week, reassessing the age of the ‘Broken Hill skull’, and unearthing evidence of an ancient forest near the South Pole.In this episode:01:25 A skull’s place in historyAfter nearly a century scientists believe they’ve finally pinned down an age for the ‘Broken Hill skull’ hominid specimen. Research Article: Grun et al.07:44 Research HighlightsA simple way to detect early signs of cancer, and 3D printed soft brain implants. Research Highlight: A blood test finds deadly cancers before symptoms start; Research Article: Yuk et al.09:51 Ancient Antarctic rain...
Source: Nature Podcast - April 1, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Coronapod: Old treatments and new hopes
Benjamin Thompson, Noah Baker, and Amy Maxmen discuss efforts to develop treatments for COVID-19.In this episode:02:00 A push for plasmaIn New York, hospitals are preparing to infuse patients with the antibody-rich blood plasma of people who have recovered from COVID-19. This approach has been used during disease outbreaks for over a century and we discuss how it works, and how effective is might be.We also talk about how drug trials for potential treatments are progressing, how scientists are pulling together, and what COVID-19 outbreaks on cruise ships are telling epidemiologists.News article: How blood from coronavirus ...
Source: Nature Podcast - March 27, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

25 March 2020: Ultra-fast electrical switches, and computing heart health
This week, a speedy, yet simple switch, and a video-based AI helps assess heart health.In this episode:01:57 Speedy switchesResearchers have developed an ultra-fast electrical switch that they hope can be used in communication and imaging applications. Research Article: Nikoo et al.08:14 Research HighlightsUsing sound to estimate glacial retreat, and building a dodgier drone. Research Highlight: Underwater microphones listen as as glacier retreats; Research article: Falanga et al.10:32 Algorithmic heart diagnosisScientists have developed a new algorithm which calculates the amount of blood pum...
Source: Nature Podcast - March 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Podcast Extra: Rosamund Pike on portraying Marie Curie
Radioactive is a new biopic on Marie Skłodowska Curie with Rosamund Pike taking on the role of Curie. This Podcast Extra is an extended version of reporter Lizzie Gibney's interview with Rosamund, in which they talk about stepping into the shoes of the scientific giant. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - March 21, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Coronapod: “Test, test, test!”
In the first of our new podcast series, Benjamin Thompson, Noah Baker, and Amy Maxmen discuss the epidemiology needed to control the Covid-19 outbreak.In this episode:03:57 Testing timesCase numbers of Covid-19 have leapt around the world in recent days, but how many undetected cases are out there? We talk about the urgent need to deploy two of the cornerstones of effective epidemiology – testing and contact tracing – and discuss why these measures aren’t being rolled out worldwide.News article: Scientists exposed to coronavirus wonder: why weren’t we notified?; News article: South Korea is reportin...
Source: Nature Podcast - March 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

19 March 2020: Rosamund Pike in Radioactive, and the resurgence of Russian science
This week, we speak to Rosamund Pike about her experience portraying Marie Skłodowska Curie, and we find out how science in Russia is changing after years of decline.In this episode:01:43 RadioactiveBritish actor Rosamund Pike tells us about her new film, and her experience of portraying double Nobel-Laureate Marie Curie. Arts Review: Marie Curie biopic should have trusted pioneer’s passion10:17 Research HighlightsThe neural circuitry involved in stopping, and a jelly-like substance that cleans paintings. Research Highlight: A neural highway to human motor control; Research article: Mas...
Source: Nature Podcast - March 18, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Podcast Extra: Coronavirus - science in the pandemic
In this Podcast Extra, we hear from epidemiologists, genomicists and social scientists about how they're working to tackle the coronavirus and what they've learned so far. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - March 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Long Read Podcast: Are feelings more than skin deep?
Research in the 1960s and 1970s suggested that emotional expressions – smiling when happy, scowling when angry, and so on – were universal. This idea stood unchallenged for a generation.But a new cohort of psychologists and cognitive scientists are revisiting the data. Many researchers now think that the picture is a lot more complicated, and that facial expressions vary widely between contexts and cultures.This is an audio version of our feature: Why faces don’t always tell the truth about feelings, written by Douglas Heaven and read by Kerri Smith. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acas...
Source: Nature Podcast - March 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

12 March 2020: An ancient bird trapped in amber, and life beneath the ocean floor
This week, a newly discovered bird species from the time of the dinosaurs, and microbes hundreds of metres below the ocean floor.In this episode:00:44 A tiny, toothy, ancient birdResearchers have found a perfectly preserved bird fossil trapped in amber, with some rather unusual features. Research Article: Xing et al.; News and Views: Tiny bird fossil might be the world’s smallest dinosaur08:09 Research HighlightsDental hygiene in the time of the Vikings, and wildebeest bones feed an African ecosystem. Research Article: Bertilsson et al; Research Article: Subalusky et al.10:21 D...
Source: Nature Podcast - March 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

05 March 2020: Ultrafast machine vision, and quicker crystal creation
This week, improving computers’ image identification, and a new method for growing crystals.00:44 Upgrading computer sightResearchers have designed a sensor that allows machines to assess images in nanoseconds. Research Article: Mennel et al.; News and Views: In-sensor computing for machine vision06:51 Research HighlightsCalorie restriction’s effects on rat cells, and the dwindling of sandy seashores. Research Highlight: Old age’s hallmarks are delayed in dieting rats; Research Highlight: Sandy beaches are endangered worldwide as the climate changes08:53 Crafting cr...
Source: Nature Podcast - March 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Backchat: Covering coronavirus
In this edition of Backchat we take a deep dive into Nature's coverage of coronavirus. As cases climb, what are some of the challenges involved in reporting on the virus? For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - February 28, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

27 February 2020: Mapping fruit flies ’ neural circuitry, and perfecting the properties of metallic glass
This week, the brain pathways of egg laying in fruit flies, and preventing fractures in metallic glass.In this episode:00:46 Working out the wiring behind fruit fly behaviourResearchers have identified a neural circuit linking mating and egg laying in female fruit flies. Research Article: Wang et al.06:01 Research HighlightsAncient, cave-dwelling cockroaches, and hairy moths dampen sound. Research Highlight: Cockroaches preserved in amber are the world’s oldest cave dwellers; Research Highlight: Stealth flyers: moths’ fuzz is superior acoustic camouflage07:57 Making better metallic glas...
Source: Nature Podcast - February 26, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Podcast Extra: ‘There is lots of anxiety’: a scientist’s view from South Korea
In recent days, the number of coronavirus cases have surged in South Korea.In this Podcast Extra Nick Howe speaks to Bartosz Gryzbowski, a researcher based in the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, which is just 60km away from epicentre of the South Korean outbreak. He explains how the outbreak has affected his research and what the atmosphere is like there at the moment. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - February 26, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Podcast Extra: How coronavirus is affecting research in South Korea
In recent days, the number of coronavirus cases have surged in South Korea.In this Podcast Extra Nick Howe speaks to Bartosz Gryzbowski, a researcher based in the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, which is just 60km away from epicentre of the South Korean outbreak. He explains how the outbreak has affected his research and what the atmosphere is like there at the moment. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - February 26, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

20 February 2020: Improving battery charging, and harnessing energy from the air
This week, machine learning helps batteries charge faster, and using bacterial nanowires to generate electricity from thin air.In this episode:00:46 Better battery chargingA machine learning algorithm reveals how to quickly charge batteries without damaging them. Research Article: Attia et al.07:12 Research HighlightsDeciphering mouse chit-chat, and strengthening soy glue. Research Highlight: The ‘silent’ language of mice is decoded at last; Research Article: Gu et al.09:21 Harnessing humidityA new device produces electricity using water in the air. Research Article: Liu ...
Source: Nature Podcast - February 19, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

13 February 2020: The puzzling structures of muddled materials, and paving the way for the quantum internet
This week, uncovering the structure of materials with useful properties, and quantum entanglement over long distances.In this episode:00:45 Analysing Prussian bluesAnalogues of the paint pigment Prussian blue are used in a variety of chemical processes. Now, researchers have uncovered their atomic structure. Research Article: Simonov et al.; News and Views: Ordered absences observed in porous framework materials08:17 Research HighlightsTeenagers’ natural sleep cycles impact on academic performance, and an extinct, giant rodent with a surprisingly tiny brain. Research Highlight: A teenage...
Source: Nature Podcast - February 12, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

06 February 2020: Out-of-office emails and work-life-balance, and an update on the novel coronavirus outbreak
This week, how setting an out-of-office email could help promote a kinder academic culture.In this episode:00:47 Being truly out of officeLast year, a viral tweet about emails sparked a deeper conversation about academics’ work-life-balance. Could email etiquette help tip the balance? Careers Article: Out of office replies and what they can say about you09:35 Research HighlightsFinding the ‘greenest’ oranges, and the benefits of ‘baby talk’. Research Article: Bell and Horvath; Research Highlight: Babies benefit when Mum and Dad are fluent in ‘baby talk&rsquo...
Source: Nature Podcast - February 5, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

30 January 2020: Linking Australian bushfires to climate change, and Asimov's robot ethics
This week, establishing the role of climate change in Australian bushfires, and revisiting Isaac Asimov’s ethical rules for robots.In this episode:00:46 Behind the bushfiresResearchers are working to establish the role that climate change is playing in the bushfires that are raging across Australia. News Feature: The race to decipher how climate change influenced Australia’s record fires; Editorial: Australia: show the world what climate action looks like10:02 Research HighlightsThe debate around how Vesuvius claimed its victims, and an ancient mummy speaks. Research Highlight: Vit...
Source: Nature Podcast - January 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

23 January: How stress can cause grey hair, and the attitude needed to tackle climate change
This week, why stress makes mice turn grey, and how to think about climate change.In this episode:00:45 Going greyAnecdotal evidence has long suggested stressas a cause of grey hair. Now, a team of researchers have showed experimental evidence to suggest this is the case. Research Article: Zhang et al.; News & Views: How the stress of fight or flight turns hair white08:39 Research HighlightsAncient bones suggest that giant ground sloths moved in herds,plus an atomic way to check for whiskey fakes. Research Highlight: A bone bed reveals mass death of herd of giant ground sloths; Resear...
Source: Nature Podcast - January 22, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

16 January 2020: Strange objects at the centre of the galaxy, and improving measurements of online activity
In this episode: 00:45 Observing the centre of the galaxyResearchers have uncovered a population of dust-enshrouded objects orbiting the supermassive black hole at the centre of the galaxy.Research Article: Ciurlo et al. 06:34 Research HighlightsA London landmark’s height lends itself to a physics experiment, and generous behaviour in parrots. Research Highlight: An iconic structure in London moonlights as a scientific tool; Research Highlight: Parrots give each other gifts without promise of reward 09:00 The human ‘screenome’ projectTo understand the effects of online media consumption, re...
Source: Nature Podcast - January 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

09 January 2020: A look ahead at science in 2020
In this episode of the podcast, Nature reporter Davide Castelvecchi joins us to talk about the big science events to look out for in 2020. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy (Source: Nature Podcast)
Source: Nature Podcast - January 8, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

01 January 2020: Our reporters ’ top picks of 2019
In this special round-up episode of the Nature Podcast, our reporters choose their favourite podcast piece of 2019.In this episode:00:33 A sole sensationA study of people who do and don't wear shoes looks into whether calluses make feet less sensitive. Nature Podcast: 26 June 2019; Research article: Holowka et al.; News and Views: Your sensitive sole08:56 The make up of the far side of the MoonInitial observations from the first lander to touch down on the far side of the Moon. Nature Podcast: 15 May 2019; Research article: Li et al.15:43 Growth MindsetHow a one hour course could improve academic achievement. Nature Podcas...
Source: Nature Podcast - January 1, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts

Nature PastCast, December 1920: The Quantum Theory
This year, Nature celebrates its 150th birthday. To mark this anniversary we’re rebroadcasting episodes from our PastCast series, highlighting key moments in the history of science.In this episode, we’re heading back to the early twentieth century, when physicists had become deeply entangled in the implications of the quantum theory. At its smallest scales was the world continuous? Or built of discrete units? It all began with Max Planck. His Nobel Prize was the subject of a Nature news article in 1920.This episode was first broadcast in December 2013.From the archiveNature 16 December 1920 For information rega...
Source: Nature Podcast - December 27, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Springer Nature Limited Source Type: podcasts