COVID-19 vaccine urgency as delta variant continues to spread
Viruses constantly change through mutation, and new variants of viruses are expected to occur. Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 have been documented, including a highly transmittable form of COVID-19 known as the delta variant. The delta variant, which was first seen in December 2020 in India, is spreading globally. It's more contagious than the previous strains that have been detected in the U.S. It's also causing more severe illness.Dr. Melanie Swift, co-chair of Mayo Clinic's… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 26, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Consumer Health: Are you ready to add something new to your fitness routine?
If you know exercise is important and you're making time for a well-rounded fitness routine, good for you! But you may become bored with the same routine day after day. And if you're bored, you may be more apt to lose interest after a while. If it's time to add a new spark to your fitness routine, here are three ideas to consider: Aquatic exerciseSwimming pools are not just for swimming laps. Aquatic fitness options also include aerobics… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 26, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Emergency department visits related to opioid overdoses up significantly during COVID-19 pandemic
ROCHESTER, Minn. — Emergency department visit rates because of an opioid overdose increased by 28.5% across the U.S. in 2020, compared to 2018 and 2019, recent Mayo Clinic research finds. Emergency visits overall decreased by 14% last year, while visits because of an opioid overdose increased by 10.5%. The result: Opioid overdoses were responsible for 0.32 out of 100 visits, or 1 in every 313 visits, which is up from 0.25, or 1 in every… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 26, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q & amp;A podcast: Making progress in treating glioblastoma
When it comes to malignant tumors in the brain and spinal cord, glioblastoma is the most common. Glioblastoma is an aggressive form of cancer that forms from cells called astrocytes in the brain or the spinal cord. Glioblastoma can occur at any age, but it's more common in older adults. It can cause worsening headaches, nausea, vomiting and seizures. Glioblastoma can be difficult to treat. Current treatments include surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, but thanks to… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 26, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Sharing Mayo Clinic: Scarlett is running and smiling after surgery to correct pectus excavatum
When Sara Hutchins noticed an indent in her daughter Scarlett ’s chest, she immediately recognized the cause: pectus excavatum, a condition that causes the breast bone to sink into the chest. “My father had the same condition,” Sara says. “He’d had surgery to correct it but was never satisfied with his results.” Sara wanted to ensure that if Scarlett had surgery, she’d like what she saw in the mirror afterward. “I did a lot of research,” Sara… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 25, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Science Saturday: How geologic rock formations inform novel treatments for kidney stones
Human kidney stones are at least as old as the Giza pyramids. The oldest known kidney stone was found in Egyptian burial satin from 4400 B.C. In 2020, Mayo Clinic processed and analyzed some 90,000 kidney stones from all over the world. That number increases each year, reflecting a global uptick in kidney stone disease. But new research has unlocked how kidney stones actually form, which could be the key to treating or even eliminating… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 24, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q & amp;A podcast: Telemedicine before and after orthopedic surgery
In health care, one of the biggest changes during the COVID-19 pandemic was the expansion of telemedicine. Virtual visits have been used in many specialties, including orthopedics and orthopedic surgery. While the use telemedicine escalated out of necessity during the pandemic, Dr. Shawn O ’Driscoll, a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon, believes its use will continue to be used going forward. "I think that the advantages to patients are really going to be the driving forces behind… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 23, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Consumer Health: 10 ways aerobic exercise can help you live longer and healthier
A well-rounded fitness routine contains several elements, including strength training, core exercises, balance training, and flexibility and stretching. The fifth element is aerobic fitness. Aerobic activity causes you to breathe faster and more deeply, which maximizes the amount of oxygen in your blood. Your heart will beat faster, which increases blood flow to your muscles and back to your lungs. The better your aerobic fitness, the more efficiently your heart, lungs and blood vessels transport oxygen throughout… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 23, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: The right way to get your body flexible
Muscle flexibility is important for your body. But according to sports medicine experts at Mayo Clinic, the old way of stretching before you exercise isn't the right approach. Reporter Jason Howland explains in this Mayo Clinic Minute. Watch: The Mayo Clinic Minute https://youtu.be/ZiuoldvSc2U Journalists: Broadcast-quality video (0:58) is in the downloads at the end of this post. Please courtesy: "Mayo Clinic News Network." Read the script. "Having flexible muscles and mobile joints can help reduce… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 23, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Hesitant about COVID-19 vaccine development?
Some people may be hesitant to be vaccinated for COVID-19 because they think COVID-19 vaccines were developed too quickly. But today's successes are the result of many years of coronavirus research. “To say that these messenger RNA vaccines were only developed in the past year would be erroneous, ” says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "I know some people are hesitant and they might be fearful over some of the headlines they… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 22, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Beyond stem cells, regenerative medicine finds exosomes
Exosomes, a new tool in regenerative research, have implications for cardiac and tendon regeneration, wound healing, and incontinence, as well as many other applications. _______________________________ In the 60 or so years since stem cells were first defined, they've become heralds of a new type of medicine, one that promises to harness the body's healing properties. Stem cells are a sort of cellular blank slate and can be engineered to form any cell in the body.… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 22, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: ACL tears -- when surgery is the answer
ACL tears can sideline an athlete or crush an Olympic dream. It's a common knee injury affecting nearly twice as many women than men. Dr. Cedric Ortiguera, a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist, says 150,000 ‒200,000 ACL injuries occur each year in the U.S., and that number is growing as more children become involved in competitive sports year-round. The good news is that surgery can help get some athletes get back in the game. Watch: The Mayo… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 22, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Consumer Health: Understanding glioblastoma
Glioblastoma Awareness Day will be observed on Wednesday, July 21, which makes this a good time to learn more about one of the most complex, deadly and treatment-resistant cancers. Glioblastoma, a type of glioma, is an aggressive cancer that can occur in the brain or spinal cord. It can occur at any age, but it tends to occur more often in older adults. Approximately 13,000 people in the U.S. will be diagnosed with glioblastoma in… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 21, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q & amp;A podcast: Tips to stay healthy while working from home
The COVID-19 pandemic has forced people to readjust in many ways, including some companies shifting to remote work. Working from a home office has its benefits, but it also comes with quite a few challenges. Virtual offices mean added screen time which can lead to eye strain, ear problems and too much time sitting in one place. Living and working in the same space also can lead to challenges with setting boundaries and having an… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 21, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Monoclonal antibodies help COVID-19 patients avoid hospitalization
ROCHESTER, Minn. ― In a large observational study, Mayo Clinic researchers have shown that two monoclonal antibodies administered separately helped prevent hospitalization in high-risk patients who became infected with COVID-19. The study also showed more hospitalizations were observed among patients with more com orbidities. The findings appear in The Journal of Infectious Diseases. "The real-world data reported in this study confirm what has been seen in clinical trials involving a placebo," says Raymund Razonable, M.D., a… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 21, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Unvaccinated people at highest risk of being infected by delta variant
A highly transmittable form of COVID-19  known as the delta variant is spreading globally. Now a subvariant known as delta-plus has been identified. "Delta-plus just means that there's been an additional mutation in the delta variant," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases physician and researcher at Mayo Clinic. "We have not really seen that take off yet. And that's probably because it's being outcompeted by the delta variant. If you look at the original virus and… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 20, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: Drink to thirst when exercising
If the Summer Olympics inspires you to start working out, Mayo Clinic health experts say it's important to stay hydrated when you exercise. And a valuable term to remember is "drink to thirst." Reporter Jason Howland explains in this Mayo Clinic Minute. Watch: The Mayo Clinic Minute https://youtu.be/uEMhUqleuj8 Journalists: Broadcast-quality video pkg (0:57) is in the downloads at the end of the post. Please "Courtesy: Mayo Clinic News Network." Read the script. "You can become… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 20, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q & amp;A podcast: Ventricular assist devices aid heart failure patients
A ventricular assist device, also known as a VAD, is an implantable mechanical pump that helps pump blood from the lower chambers of your heart, or ventricles, to the rest of your body. Although this device can be placed in the left, right or both ventricles of your heart, it is most frequently used in the left ventricle. When placed in the left ventricle it is called a left ventricular assist device, or LVAD. A ventricular… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 19, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Respiratory illnesses on the rise with symptoms similar to COVID-19
A respiratory infection prevalent mostly in the winter has been increasing in parts of the U.S."Particularly in the South part of the U.S., we have seen an increase in what's called RSV, or respiratory syncytial virus. It's a virus that causes a cold much like influenza causes a cold, though it can be severe in very young children and elderly adults," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases physician and researcher at Mayo Clinic. Watch:… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 19, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Sun protection for children -- and adults
DEAR MAYO CLINIC: What are the best kinds of sunscreen to use on my kids? Do spray sunscreens work as well as lotions? Also, does UPF clothing offer more sun protection than a standard long-sleeved shirt? ANSWER: Sunscreen can and should be safely used for children 6 months and older. You may see that some sunscreens are specifically labeled for babies or kids. However, children can use the same sunscreen as adults. The most important factor about… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 16, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Keeping translational science on the fast track to curb COVID-19 pneumonia
At the beginning of the pandemic, experimental therapies were the only options available to help patients. Turning them into standard care required clinical and translational research. Experts in the Mayo Clinic Center for Clinical and Translational Science helped make that happen. ____________________________________ "I think we've accomplished in this year what normally would take seven years," says Saad Kenderian, M.B., Ch.B., a Mayo Clinic cancer researcher.  Claudia Lucchinetti, M.D., director of Mayo Clinic's Center for Clinical and Translational Science,… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 16, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q & amp;A podcast: On the verge of predicted surge with COVID-19 delta variant
The delta variant is being blamed for hot spots in the U.S. where cases of COVID-19 are on the rise. These hot spots account for most cases in the U.S. They are also the geographical areas that tend to have the lowest vaccination rates. "It's no surprise that the two go together," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "This (delta variant) is the bad actor that… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 15, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: Skin cancer concerns for people with darker skin
Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer. About 1 in 5 people in the U.S. will have skin cancer during their lives. And it affects all skin colors. Reporter Jason Howland explains in today's Mayo Clinic Minute. Watch: The Mayo Clinic Minute https://youtu.be/umD3Cqs91cY Journalists: Broadcast-quality video (1:18) is in the downloads at the end of this post. Please courtesy: "Mayo Clinic News Network." Read the script. Forty percent of all cancers in Caucasians… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 15, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Treatment for vaginal dryness for menopausal women
DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I began menopause about two years ago at age 52. I am noticing that I am beginning to experience vaginal dryness. Is this normal? Is there anything that can be done about it? I have tried using over-the-counter lubricants, and they don't help much. ANSWER: Vaginal dryness is common in women who are approaching menopause and those who have gone through menopause. Other related symptoms include vaginal and vulvar irritation; burning or itching; discomfort… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 14, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Grief; It's complicated
This article is written by Mayo Clinic Staff. ___________________________________________________ But for some people, feelings of loss are debilitating and don't improve even after time passes. This is… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 14, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Vaping and teens
DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I am a former smoker who began smoking in high school. I quit a few years ago after a lung cancer scare. As a father, I have often shared with my children about the dangers of smoking. Recently, I overheard my daughter talking to her friends about vaping. Should I be as concerned about vaping as I am about smoking cigarettes? ANSWER: Vaping is the term often used to describe the act of using… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 13, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Tracking brain function during surgery using a new tool
Mayo Clinic uses innovative technology to map patients' cognitive functions during awake brain surgeries. When surgery is performed to remove a tumor, different techniques are used to help surgeons map out the brain so they can avoid the locations of important functions, such as movement, language and speech. The latest tool is NeuroMapper, a tablet-based testing platform developed by David Sabsevitz, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic neuropsychologist. Watch: Tracking brain function during surgery using a new… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 13, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q & amp;A podcast: Be aware of the rare cancer called sarcoma
A sarcoma is a rare form of cancer that begins in the bones and in the softer connective tissues in the body. Sarcomas that begin in the bones are called "bone cancer," and sarcomas that form in the tissues, including muscle, fat, blood vessels, nerves, tendons, and the lining of joints, are called "soft tissue sarcoma." "These are rare cancers, and in adults, sarcomas comprise less than 1% of new cancers diagnosed every year," says… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 12, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Chronic stress can wreak havoc on your mind and body
This article is written by Mayo Clinic Staff. ___________________________________________________________ On the contrary, you likely face many demands each day, such as taking on a huge workload, paying the bills and taking care of your family. Your body treats these… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 12, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Sharing Mayo Clinic: Every day you don't lose, you are winning
This article is written by Mayo Clinic Staff. Jennifer Summers, is an optimistic, articulate woman. The 35-year-old enjoys crafting, spending time with her close-knit… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 11, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Exercise after COVID-19
DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I am in my early 40s. During the COVID-19 pandemic, I didn't get as much exercise and I gained some weight. I now feel like I have less energy. I was previously infected with COVID-19. Is it safe to start exercising again in a crowded gym so that I can work out, lose some weight and gain some energy? Should I wear a mask? ANSWER: Regular physical activity and structured exercise can benefit people… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 9, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q & amp;A podcast: Working toward more diversity in orthopedic surgery
Of all the medical and surgical subspecialties, orthopedic surgery historically has had the lowest percentage of women and minorities. Mayo Clinic ’s orthopedic surgery department is working to change that. This summer, two female medical students are participating in an eight-week clinical and research internship in orthopedic surgery at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. The program was developed by Nth Dimensions, an organization that seeks to bring more women and minorities into the profession. "I think it's important… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 9, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

How can I prevent runner's diarrhea?
This article is written by Mayo Clinic Staff. ___________________________________________ The cause of runner's diarrhea isn't clear. Contributing factors likely include the physical jostling of the organs, decreased blood flow to the intestines, changes in intestinal hormone secretion, increased amount or introduction of new food, and pre-race anxiety and stress. What is clear… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 8, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: Why bone marrow donor diversity is needed
Bone marrow transplants are procedures that infuse healthy blood stem cells into your body to replace damaged or diseased bone marrow. Just like people in need of solid organ transplants, such as hearts or kidneys, people in need of a bone marrow transplant have to find a matching donor. Dr. Ernesto Ayala, a Mayo Clinic hematologist and oncologist, says bone marrow donations from people of all races and ethnicities are essential in order to help… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 8, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q and A: COVID-19 vaccination and precautions
DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I am due to get my second dose of COVID-19 vaccine in a few weeks. I understand this is an important step for me and my community, but I'm unsure what guidelines I should follow. Some of my friends are traveling, and they seem to have thrown all caution to the wind. What can I expect after being vaccinated for COVID-19, both physically and when in public? ANSWER: It is completely normal to have… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 7, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q & amp;A podcast: The new work-life balancing act
The COVID-19 pandemic has altered the way people work. As vaccination rates increase, some people are returning to the office. But many companies have opted to keep their employees working from home permanently. This change has positive and negative side effects, including the mental health aspects of working from home. "Any time there are changes, it can be challenging for people, particularly when you're not used to working from home," says Dr. Greg Couser, a… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 7, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Kidney stones and calcium
DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I have trouble with kidney stones and recently found out they are calcium oxalate stones. While I have stopped consuming all dairy products, I know that I need calcium as I age for bone health. Would adding in almond milk or another type of plant milk help? How do I take care of both my kidneys and bones? ANSWER: It sounds like your concern about milk and other dairy products is that their calcium may spur… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 6, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: Tips to pick healthier oils
Your body needs some fat to function normally. However, not all fats are created equal, and it ’s wise to choose healthier options whenever possible. Angie Murad, a licensed dietitian and patient educator with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, offers these tips for selecting cooking oils. Watch: The Mayo Clinic Minute https://youtu.be/LXCJR38di5E Journalists: Broadcast-quality video pkg (0:59) is in the downloads at the end of the post.Please courtesy: "Mayo Clinic News Network.’ Read the script. "So both canola and olive… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 6, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

New vaccine platform invented by Mayo enters COVID-19 clinical trial
A Mayo Clinic lab member is purifying an adenovirus vector for preclinical testing. A novel single-cycle adenovirus vaccine platform developed by Mayo Clinic will be used to target multiple infectious diseases and cancer indications, beginning with a phase 1 clinical study using the platform as a vaccine for COVID-19. Developed to enhance the expression of target antigens, the single-cycle adenovirus platform is under investigation for its ability to amplify immune responses. In contrast to replication-defective… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 6, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Keeping your fingernails in tip-top shape
DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I have noticed recently that my nails have an unusual color and shape, and I don ’t understand why. Although I do enjoy gardening, I don't have a job where I use my hands more than normal. I want my nails to be sturdy and healthy-looking. Can you provide some insight on how to achieve this and tips for properly taking care of my nails? ANSWER: For anyone concerned with nail health, the first step… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 5, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Consumer Health: UV radiation and your skin
July is UV Safety Month, which makes this a good time to learn more about the harmful effects of ultraviolet, or UV, radiation from sunlight or tanning beds. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer, according to the American Cancer Society. Skin cancer develops primarily on areas of sun-exposed skin, including the scalp, face, lips, ears, neck, chest, arms, hands and legs.  The three main types of skin cancer are basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 4, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Sharing Mayo Clinic: Receiving care for COVID-19 while pregnant
Last September, Kim and Lloyd Harter of Fairchild, Wisconsin, along with their daughter Eleanor Jacobo, tested positive for COVID-19. While they recovered, they also waited for a special new addition to their family: Kim was eight months pregnant. With pregnancy being a risk factor for complications due to COVID-19, a member of the COVID-19 Front-Line Care Team at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, called Kim to discuss her risks, as well as provide information about… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 4, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q & amp;A podcast: Taking the fear out of cardiac testing
When it comes to the heart, it can be scary to seek care when you think you might be having a problem. Tests may be necessary to evaluate your heart, and the unfamiliar terminology associated with these tests can be confusing and intimidating. Understanding terms like electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, coronary angiogram or stress test may help alleviate the fear. "Whenever we order these tests, we don't want you to have anxiety," says Dr. Christopher DeSimone, a Mayo… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 2, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Guide to safe grilling practices
The July Fourth holiday weekend often means gatherings. Keep your gathering safe by following the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's COVID-19 guidance for activities.  If you are looking forward to a weekend cookout, make sure to keep foodborne bacteria and germs off your guest list. Dr. Nipunie Rajapakse, a Mayo Clinic pediatric infectious diseases physician, says warmer temperatures are when foodborne germs thrive and illnesses peak. Watch: Dr. Nipunie Rajapakse talks about safe grilling practices. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19v4oRLW-hw&t=3s Journalists: Broadcas...
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 2, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Bleeding moles and skin checks
DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I have a significant number of moles. While most do not bother me, I have at least one that bleeds from time to time. Should I see my doctor for a mole that bleeds? ANSWER: Moles are groups of pigment cells, and nearly everyone has them. Most moles are harmless, but it's possible for melanoma — a rare but serious skin cancer — to develop in or near a mole. Although it may not… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 2, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Consumer Health: The importance of sunscreen, sunglasses and protective clothing for adults and children
July is UV Safety Month, which makes this a good time to learn more about protecting yourself and your family from the harmful effects of ultraviolet, or UV, radiation from sunlight. Exposure to UV radiation from the sun damages your skin, and increases your risk of developing skin cancer, wrinkles and age spots. Children are especially vulnerable because they tend to spend more time outdoors and can burn easily. Here are four ways you can… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 1, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

What holiday travelers need to know about COVID-19
The July Fourth holiday is a time when many people travel or host summer parties. While the number of COVID-19 cases in the U.S. is on the decline, health experts say with stagnating vaccination rates and the circulation of the more contagious Delta variant, the nation is not out of the woods yet, and everyone should still be cautious if they're planning a trip or getting together in large groups. "Anyone planning to have a… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 1, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic first to use next generation 4D ICE imaging to help patients with structural heart disease
Mayo Clinic recently became the first to use a next-generation 4D intracardiac echo (ICE) device in patients to guide heart procedures such as left atrial appendage closure, mitral valve repair and treatment of tricuspid valve regurgitation. The technology can also help physicians perform procedures without putting patients under general anesthesia. An echocardiogram is a noninvasive test that uses sound waves to produce detailed images of the heart's size, structure and function, as well as detailed images of… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 1, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: Fireworks and grilling safety reminders
Fireworks, grilling and campfires are part of the summer experience. This holiday weekend, make sure you keep safety top of mind. Dr. Michael Boniface, a Mayo Clinic emergency medicine physician, explains that burn injuries from these activities go up in the summer, and these injuries often can be prevented. Watch: The Mayo Clinic Minute https://youtu.be/iv3wlwXYAyw Journalists: Broadcast-quality video pkg (1:00) is in the downloads at the end of the post.Please "Courtesy: Mayo Clinic News Network." Read… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 1, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q & amp;A podcast: Summer travel and people not in your bubble during COVID-19 pandemic
"The reason we have the COVID-19 delta variant, the reason we have the delta plus variant is because of unimmunized people who get infected," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. He adds that 99.2% of the recorded COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. are in people not vaccinated against the virus. This is why he cautions folks who may be traveling this Fourth of July holiday and… (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - June 30, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news