A ground-motion logic-tree scheme for regional seismic hazard studies - Kale, Akkar S.
We propose a methodology that can be useful to the hazard expert in building ground-motion logic trees to capture the center and range of ground-motion amplitudes. The methodology can be used to identify a logic-tree structure and weighting scheme that pre... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Health Tip: Eat More Cruciferous Vegetables
-- Eating lots of cruciferous vegetables -- such as kale, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower -- could lower your risk of developing heart disease, Australian researchers say. Study results published in the Journal of the American... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 31, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Also known as "rocket salad," arugula’s health benefits are like a cross between cruciferous vegetable and leafy green
(Natural News) If you’re on the road to a healthy lifestyle, a diet rich in nutrient-filled veggies is, for sure, part of your regimen. Many vegetables possess numerous health benefits, but some of the healthiest kinds are the leafy greens. One such veggie is a cousin of the cauliflower, radish, and kale. The arugula (Eruca sativa, Brassicaceae)... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

When it comes to chocolate, the darker the better: Dark chocolate reduces stress while improving memory
(Natural News) When new research comes out saying that we should increase our consumption of broccoli or start eating kale, we might not feel overly inclined to make the suggested changes. However, there are very few of us who don’t love chocolate, and two new studies by researchers from the Loma Linda University Adventist Health... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The CDC Is Telling Consumers to Stay Away from Romaine. Here ’s What You Should Eat Instead
As cases pile up in a nationwide E. coli outbreak, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is giving some out-of-character advice: Don’t eat romaine lettuce. That (temporary) admonition of the vegetable is meant to prevent the spread of food-borne illness, since the CDC has linked 84 E. coli infections — and counting — to romaine grown in the Yuma, Ariz., region. As the investigation continues, the agency has warned customers to dispose of store-bought romaine, and to avoid buying more or ordering it in restaurants unless it definitely wasn’t sourced from the Yuma area. The romaine war...
Source: TIME: Health - April 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Fall Prevention in Central Coast community pharmacies - Stuart GM, Kale HL.
ISSUE ADDRESSED: Fall injuries among people aged 65 years and over (older people) cause substantial health decline and cost to the health system. In 2009 in New South Wales 25.6% of older people fell in the previous year, and 10.7% (32,000) were hospitalis... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Best 40 foods for vitamin K
Vitamin K is an essential nutrient that helps the body clot blood, build strong bones, and keep the heart healthy. In this article, we look at foods to eat to increase vitamin K intake, including kale, spinach, other leafy greens, some dairy products, and natto. Learn about the difference between vitamin K-1 and K-2. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

The food that goes bad in your fridge amounts to trillions of gallons of wasted water
You walk into the grocery store with the best intentions, filing your cart with kale, broccolini, tofu and Greek yogurt.Then you get home, feel pressed for time and order a pizza.Before you know it, the perishables are going bad at the back of the fridge. They ’ll wind up in the trash, like so... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Weekend Recipe: Salmon Burgers With a Side of Sweet Potato Fries
Salmon burgers are probably one of my favourite meals to make at home. I often serve them with oven roasted sweet potatoes or a salad made from baby romaine lettuce and avocado mayonnaise that’s created by blending avocado with a little lemon, garlic, olive oil, water and sea salt. What I love about this recipe is that any leftovers can be enjoyed the next day. These burgers make a quick and easy, portable meal for lunchboxes, picnics and entertaining. Try them over steamed brown rice with a splash of wheat free tamari or over a massaged kale salad. They keep well in the fridge for up to three days. This recipe is fr...
Source: TIME: Health - April 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Teresa Cutter — The Healthy Chef Tags: Uncategorized Cooking Food Source Type: news

How Do You Know if Protein is ‘Complete’ or ‘Incomplete’?
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - April 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cynthia Sass / Health.com Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Demand for superfoods continues to increase; Can production keep up?
(Natural News) How many avocados have you eaten in the past week? How about blueberries or kale? When certain foods suddenly get a lot of attention for their nutritional content, it’s not unusual for demand to rise. The question is: Can producers keep up? According to the World Fruit Map 2018 from Rabobank, the avocado... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Impact of human development on safety consciousness in construction - Baradan S, Dikmen SU, Akboga Kale O.
The International Labor Organization, (ILO) reports that the risk of fatal occupational injuries in the developing countries is almost twice as high as in the developed countries, indicating a potential relationship between the fatality rates and the devel... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Seggiano USA, Inc. Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Tree Nuts
Seggiano USA, Inc. of Cheyenne, WY is voluntarily recalling Tuscan Kale Pesto mislabeled with Artichoke& Garlic labels because the labels do not declare tree nuts (cashews). Individuals who have allergies to tree nuts run the risk of a serious life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume the Tuscan Kale Pesto product. No incidents have been reported to date in connection with this issue. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - February 22, 2018 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Market of Choice Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Egg in Sezam Kale Salad
Market of Choice of Eugene, Oregon is recalling Sezam Kale Salad because it may contain undeclared EGG. People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to Egg run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume this product. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - February 22, 2018 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Quiz: Heart Healthy Food Choices
2 hours ago ... What's worse for your ticker: a hot dog or a hamburger? What's healthier: a spinach salad or one made from kale? AARP has teamed up with the experts at the American Heart Association to uncover amazingly simple swaps that will boost your health — effortlessly. Think you know which is best for you? (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - February 7, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Is The ‘ Souping ’ Trend For You?
 By Lisa Drayer, CNN (CNN) — When I first heard of “souping,” it brought me back to my clinical days working in a hospital, where pureed soups and other easy to digest foods — also known as “full liquids” — would be prescribed for patients recovering from gastrointestinal surgery, or those who had difficulty chewing or swallowing. Then I reflected upon how much I regularly enjoy soup, especially for the comfort it provides on cold, dreary days — even though, thankfully, I have no health issues that would require such an easily digestible meal. Soup is often my go-to in t...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Diets Source Type: news

The Best Kind of Breakfast to Eat, According to Metabolism Experts
This article originally appeared on CookingLight.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - January 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Zee Krstic / Cooking Light Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Why cumin is the new kale in latest healthy-eating trend
Superspices are the health trends of 2018 with spices including cumin, cumin and turmeric to boost your immune system and help with sleep. Health writer Anna Magee explains. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kale and other leafy vegetables may make your brain seem 11 years younger
Look into your salad bowl and think: If a fountain of cognitive youth were flowing in there, would you return every day?In research that gives new meaning to the expression “salad days,” a study published Wednesday finds that older people who ate at least one serving of leafy greens a day had... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - December 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

A Salad A Day May Keep Dementia Away
BOSTON (CBS) – It’s a hard concept, especially this time of year when sweets and Christmas cookies are everywhere, but as Dr. Mallika Marshall reports, researchers at Tufts University believe a salad a day may keep dementia away. Pedro Velazquez is hitting the salad bar for lunch. He’s doing his best to get more greens into his diet. “I’ve been trying to get rid of this (belly) for a while now so I go to the gym, then I come have a salad and I go to work,” explains Pedro. New research in the journal Neurology suggests eating salad could also help keep his memory in good shape. Sarah Boo...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Dementia Dr. Mallika Marshall Salad Source Type: news

A Salad a Day May Be Good for Brain Health
Older men and women who ate the most lettuce, spinach, kale and collard greens scored the equivalent of 11 years younger on cognitive tests than those who ate little or none. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Vegetables Lettuce Elderly Memory Dementia Source Type: news

Soy, cruciferous vegetables associated with fewer common breast cancer treatment side effects
(Georgetown University Medical Center) Consuming soy foods (such as soy milk, tofu and edamame) and cruciferous vegetables (such as cabbages, kale, collard greens, bok choy, Brussels sprouts, and broccoli) may be associated with a reduction in common side effects of breast cancer treatment in breast cancer survivors, say a team of scientists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How about a peanut butter and kale sandwich? Study shows that peanut butter enhances the vitamin A value of kale
(Natural News) It looks like aside from the classic peanut butter and jelly sandwich, there’s another — and healthier — way to enjoy peanut butter. According to a recent study, adding peanut butter to kale can boost the latter’s vitamin A value. According to researchers from South Korea, U.S., and Zimbabwe, peanut butter can help... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The only detox you'll ever need (video)
(American Chemical Society) People talk all the time about how they need to 'detox.' And there's a line of companies a mile long waiting to sell you juices and smoothies that claim to cleanse your body of harmful toxins. But the good news is your body is working hard to clear out toxins before you spend a dime on expensive products. Toxicology expert Raychelle Burks explains how in this kale-free episode of Reactions: https://youtu.be/zv0chkuT7cQ. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tres Latin Foods Announces Voluntary Recall of Specific Code Dates of Kale & Pinto Bean 10 oz. Pupusas and Black Bean and Sweet Corn 10 oz. Pupusas Due to an Undeclared Milk Allergen
Tres Latin Foods is voluntarily recalling two batches of production of Kale& Pinto Bean 10 oz. pupusas and one batch of its Black Bean& Sweet Corn pupusas due to an undeclared milk allergen. People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to milk run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - October 24, 2017 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Vitamin K in kale and broccoli keeps hearts healthy
Researchers from Augusta University found vitamin K maintains the size of the heart's left ventricle, which is the largest of the organ's four chambers and is responsible for pumping out oxygen-rich blood. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

California pet foods now going high-end, incorporating kale and quinoa into recipes
(Natural News) Many people consider their pet a full-fledged member of the family, providing it with the same level of care and love as they would a child. As people increasingly favor healthy food options, it’s only natural that this same philosophy is being extended to their pets in the form of premium pet food.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

These foods fight deadly lung disease
Your lungs are under constant assault. That’s why COPD is the third leading cause of death according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 15 million Americans have it. COPD is short for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It’s a group of lung diseases like emphysema and chronic bronchitis. They constrict your airways. They make breathing difficult and can cause wheezing or coughing. Most doctors will tell you that smoking is the major culprit. But even if you never smoked you are still at risk of COPD. You see, our modern world is a big factor. Our air is full of chemicals. Bad air i...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 4, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Health Nutrition chronic obstructive pulmonary disease COPD lung disease lungs Source Type: news

3 nutrients for a sharp, ageless brain
For decades mainstream medicine told us that dying neurons are the problem with an aging brain. But the difference between an old brain and a sharp, young brain isn’t just neurons… You see, mental function depends on two kinds of brain cells. Neurons are just half the story. In fact, when scientists studied Albert Einstein’s brain they found he had a wealth of “other” brain cells that accounted for his genius.  I’m talking about “glia,” or “glial” brain cells. Scientists have known about glial cells for a long time. But they thought they were just support ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 3, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

Detection of metabolic pattern following decompressive craniectomy in severe traumatic brain injury: a microdialysis study - Gupta D, Singla R, Mazzeo AT, Schnieder EB, Tandon V, Kale SS, Mahapatra AK.
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to detect mitochondrial dysfunction and ischaemia in severe traumatic brain injury and their relationship with outcome. METHODS: Forty-one patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) who underwent decompres... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Pet food goes upscale, with kale, quinoa and cage-free duck. But check with your vet first.
Americans will spend close to $30 billion feeding their pets this year, according to the American Pet Products Assn. That ’s up from $28.23 billion last year.Driving the growth: premium, human-grade food that is organic, minimally processed, slow-cooked and loaded with previously niche ingredients... (Source: L.A. Times - Health)
Source: L.A. Times - Health - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kavita Daswani Source Type: news

Outcome predictors in pediatric head trauma: a study of clinicoradiological factors - Garg K, Sharma R, Gupta D, Sinha S, Satyarthee GD, Agarwal D, Kale SS, Sharma BS, Mahapatra AK.
INTRODUCTION: Traumatic injuries are the leading cause of death and a major cause of disability among children. About 70%-80% of the accidental deaths in pediatric age group result directly from central nervous system lesions. METHODS: The purpose ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

High doses of vitamin C could help fight blood cancer
Found in high levels in oranges, peppers and kale, scientists at the Perlmutter Cancer Centre in New York believe it encourages blood cancer stem cells, which fuel the growth of tumours, to die. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lutein in avocados found to protect the brain from effects of aging
(Natural News) A new study showed that while green leafy vegetables such as spinach and kale are a staple food of people who are looking to stay fit, they can also be used by people who are looking to retain their brain power. According to the study that was published in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Leafy Greens May Guard Against Brain Aging Leafy Greens May Guard Against Brain Aging
Eating lutein-rich foods, such as kale and spinach, in middle age may protect against age-related cognitive impairment.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Kale nutrient may yield significant cognitive benefits
Lutein, a nutrient found in kale and spinach as well as eggs and avocados, may help to prevent or counteract cognitive aging, according to a new study. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Science Just Gave You A Brain-Boosting Reason To Eat Kale
If you need a reason to throw some kale in your smoothie or salad, a new study suggests that one of its key nutrients could be a high octane brain booster (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - July 26, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: David DiSalvo, Contributor Source Type: news

We fear death, but what if dying isn't as bad as we think?
Research comparing perceptions of death with accounts of those imminently facing it suggest that maybe we shouldn ’t worry so much about our own end“The idea of death, the fear of it, haunts the human animal like nothing else,” wrote Earnest Becker in his book,The Denial of Death. It ’s a fear strong enough to compel us to force kale down our throats, run sweatilyon a treadmill at 7am on a Monday morning, and show our genitals to a stranger with cold hands and a white coat if we feel something’s a little off.But our impending end isn ’t just a benevolent supplier of healthy behaviours. R...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 25, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jessica Brown Tags: Death and dying Science Psychology Life and style Source Type: news

Lutein may counter cognitive aging, study finds
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Spinach and kale are favorites of those looking to stay physically fit, but they also could keep consumers cognitively fit, according to a new study from University of Illinois researchers.The study, which included 60 adults aged 25 to 45, found that middle-aged participants with higher levels of lutein -- a nutrient found in green leafy vegetables such as spinach and kale, as well as avocados and eggs -- had neural responses that were more on par with younger individuals than with their peers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Management of depression and prevention of suicide: psychiatric nursing perspective - Kale S.
Depression is likely the most and still one of the most frequently diagnosed psychiatric illnesses. An occasional bout with the "blues," a feeling of sadness or downheartedness, is common among healthy people and considered to be a normal response to every... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news

15 Foods A Nutritionist Always Keeps In Her Fridge
By Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD Healthy eating is my foundation, and I like to think of a well-stocked fridge as pre-production for everyday life. Having the right mix of nutritious foods on hand helps me hit my daily target for veggies and fruit, and lets me throw together simple but balanced meals, so I don’t ever have to rely on takeout. To stock up for the week, I shop at multiple spots, including my local farmer’s markets, Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods, traditional supermarkets, and on amazon.com. I’d say I spend about $100 per week on groceries (some of the things I buy aren’t pictured because...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eight superfoods your body needs right now
We've had kale – God, have we had kale – chia seeds and blueberries. Here are some of the new food trends for 2017 that may change the way you eat. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

8 Things You Need To Know About Your Body's Energy Levels
By Hallie Levine Your energy makeover starts now It’s no wonder so many of us struggle with energy issues. We go, go, go from morning to night, running on little but grit and caffeine. But it doesn’t have to be that way! “The reality is, you can get a real boost by making a few simple changes,” says Nada Milosavljevic, MD, director of the integrative health program at Massachusetts General Hospital. That’s why we put together this complete guide to all-day energy: It’s packed with proven strategies that will keep you powered up as you plow through your to-do list. You’ll also learn...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Health And Beauty Benefits Of Green Vegetables
For Allure, by Ramona Emerson. The other day, my mother asked if we should have waffles for breakfast, and my response shocked even me: “What if we had a salad?” In the weeks since Allure asked me to write about leafy greens, I’ve changed. Once a kale agnostic, I’m now a Devout Kale Orthodox. The kind of person who eats spinach for breakfast and offers unsolicited advice to strangers in line at the salad bar: “You know, romaine is actually healthier than arugula.” (I know, spoiler alert. Just sit tight for a minute.) All the Good They’re Doing The more I learned about leafy greens...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mom's Viral Post Sums Up Why Parenting Used To Be Easier
An Australian mom’s viral Facebook post is highlighting the immense pressure parents face today. On Wednesday, blogger Constance Hall posted a photo of herself having fun with one of her children. In the caption, she shared a powerful message about the cost of trying to keep up with the demands of society. “What happens when we put too much pressure on mothers?” she asked.  Hall recalled that after becoming a mother, she once asked her father how her grandmother managed to raise 11 children. “My dad responded that she wasn’t given half the pressures I was,” she wrote. “S...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Food Trends 2017: What a Nutritionist Sees and Hopes You'll See
By Keith-Thomas Ayoob, Ed.D., R.D. A new year brings an opportunity to reflect on and reevaluate our lives. When you're a registered dietitian/nutritionist, it's also time to review food trends for 2017. That's why I look forward to the annual "What's Trending in Nutrition," a survey from Pollack Communications based on interviews with thousands of registered dietitians. Here's the survey's list of "Top 10 Superfoods" for 2017: 1 Seeds, such as chia and hemp 6 Kale 2 Avocados 7 Green tea 3 Nuts, such as almonds and walnuts 8 Coconut products 4 Fermented foods, such as yogurt 9 Exotic fruits ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could YOUR salad be contaminated? Doctor warns of toxic levels of copper lurking in kale, avocado and coconut
An expert claims copper found in produce such as kale, coconut and avocado could be making us sick. Dr Svetlana Koga says although copper is important, high amounts could be dangerous. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Hypothyroidism, spinach and kale
DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I have hypothyroidism and take medication for it. When researching online, I read that I should avoid kale and spinach. Is this true? I enjoy a kale or spinach smoothie almost daily and don?t want to give that up. Are there other foods I should avoid because of hypothyroidism? ANSWER: Although you [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - December 24, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

How Leafy Greens May Protect The Brain From Aging
This study contributes to a line of evidence which suggests that particular nutrients may be important for slowing specific aspects of aging in the brain,” Zamroziewicz said. “This work helps us understand how certain components of a healthy diet may improve specific aspects of brain health.” While it’s too early to make specific dietary recommendations based on these findings, it can’t hurt to boost your brain power with these delicious kale recipes.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consum...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kale Is About To Have An Identity Crisis
To develop a new variety of kale tailored to American palates, plant researchers are surveying consumer attitudes on the leafy green. The takeaway so far? "Be less like kale." (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Natalie Jacewicz Source Type: news