Is TikTok giving people Tourette ’s Syndrome?
Clinicians around the world have noticed an increase in young adults, often women, developing ‘tic-like behaviours’ – sudden movements or vocalisations similar to what’s seen in Tourette Syndrome. Except these tics come on much later in life, and escalate more rapidly. Some have blamed the recent rise on social media – but the reality is much more complicated.Madeleine Finlay talks to Guardian reporter Sirin Kale and research psychologist Dr Seonaid Anderson about the young people experiencing this debilitating disorder, and what can be done about it.Archive: NewsNation; TikTokContinue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 2, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Madeleine Finlay, produced by Anand Jagatia, sound design by Axel Kacouti é Tags: Science Neuroscience Mental health Social media Source Type: news

Musculoskeletal injuries and conditions among homeless patients - Kale NN, Marsh J, Kale NK, Miskimin C, Mulcahey MK.
INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to analyze existing literature on musculoskeletal diseases that homeless populations face and provide recommendations on improving musculoskeletal outcomes for homeless individuals. METHODS: A comprehensi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Chakras, crystals and conspiracy theories: how the wellness industry turned its back on Covid science
Its gurus increasingly promote vaccine scepticism, conspiracy theories and the myth that ill people have themselves to blame. How did self-care turn so nasty?Ozlem Demirboga Carr is not really into all that woo ‑woo stuff. “I’m definitely a full-science kind of person,” says the 41-year-old telecoms worker from Reading. She doesn’t believe in crystals, affirmations or salt lamps. But she did find herself unusually anxious during the UK’s Covid lockdown in March 2020 and, like many people, decid ed to practise yoga as a way to de-stress.“I tried to be open-minded and I was open to advic...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sirin Kale Tags: Coronavirus Science and scepticism Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Social media World news Digital media Society Health Medical research Social networking Source Type: news

The regrets of the unvaccinated: why Covid-bereaved families are speaking out
The majority of those dying of Covid-19 in the UK and the US are have not been vaccinated. Bereaved relatives are telling their stories to try to convince others to get their jabsPhil Valentine was a Tennessee-based conservative talk radio host who was sceptical about the US government ’s response to the coronavirus crisis. He was not completely ‘anti-vax’, but he did not think he was vulnerable to Covid and talked on air about his decision not to be vaccinated. He even performed a song called Vaxman, a parody of the Beatles’ Taxman. Shortly after the song was released, he contracted the virus.Befor...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 1, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Michael Safi with Sirin Kale; produced by Adrian Lacey and Rudi Zygadlo; executive producers Elizabeth Cassin, Phil Maynard and Archie Bland Tags: Coronavirus UK news US news Health Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Science Source Type: news

‘I’m scared I’ve left it too late to have kids’: the men haunted by their biological clocks
It ’s certainly not just women who worry about ageing and procreation – and now men have begun speaking about their own deep anxietiesIt was when Connor woke up in the middle of the night to go to the bathroom that he started thinking about it. The 38-year-old civil servant from London got back into bed and couldn ’t sleep: he was spiralling. “I thought: ‘Shit, I might not be able to have children. It actually might not happen,’” he says.“It started with me thinking about how I’m looking to buy a house, and everything is happening too late in my life,” Connor says...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 28, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sirin Kale Tags: Men Parents and parenting Reproduction Life and style Science IVF Fertility problems Biology Health Society Mental health Family Source Type: news

The last great mystery of the mind: meet the people who have unusual – or non-existent – inner voices
Does your internal monologue play out on a television, in an attic, as a bickering Italian couple – or is it entirely, blissfully silent?Claudia*, a sailor from Lichfield in her late 30s, is not Italian. She has never been to Italy. She has no Italian family or friends. And she has no idea why a belligerent Italian couple have taken over her inner voice, duking it out in Claudia ’s brain while she sits back and listens.“I have no idea where this has come from,” says Claudia, apologetically. “It’s probably offensive to Italians.” The couple are like the family in the Dolmio pasta sa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sirin Kale Tags: Neuroscience Psychology Life and style Biology Source Type: news

The Plight of Haiti
By Jan LundiusSTOCKHOLM / ROME, Sep 30 2021 (IPS) I assume channel surfing and internet browsing contribute to a decrease in people’s attention span. I am not familiar with any scientific proof, though while working as a teacher I found that some students may be exhausted when five minutes of a lesson has passed and begin fingering on their smartphones. They might also complain if a text is longer than half a page, while finding it almost impossible to read a book. Maybe we are all incapable of keeping a focus. For a while, Afghanistan overshadowed the media stream, though interest faded when the tragic scenes at th...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 30, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jan Lundius Tags: Aid Armed Conflicts Climate Change Crime & Justice Economy & Trade Education Food and Agriculture Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Labour Latin America & the Caribbean Migration & Refugees TerraViva United Source Type: news

‘The virus is painfully real’: vaccine hesitant people are dying – and their loved ones want the world to listen
In the UK, the majority of those now in hospital with Covid-19 are unvaccinated. Many face their last days with enormous regret, and their relatives are telling their stories to try to convince others like themMatt Wynter, a 42-year-old music agent from Leek, Staffordshire, was working out in his local gym in mid-August when he saw, to his great surprise, that his best friend, Marcus Birks, was on the television. He jumped off the elliptical trainer and listened carefully.The first thing he noticed was that Birks, who was also from Leek and a performer with the dance group Cappella, looked terrible. He was gasping for brea...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sirin Kale Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Health Society Psychology Source Type: news

‘What is happening to me?’ The teenagers trying to make sense of long Covid
More than 100,000 Britons under 25 have endured months of debilitating symptoms, while doctors struggle to help and others fail to take them seriously. Four young people describe what it ’s likeIt took Niamh 20 minutes to wash her face – and she cried the whole time. That was in December 2020 when the 19-year-old first-year student at the University of Leeds had been living withlong Covid for two months. “I didn’t have the energy to move my arms,” she says. She remembers sitting on the toilet, trying to muster the strength to stand up and run the tap. It took all her energy just to switch on t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sirin Kale Tags: Long Covid Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Science Society UK news Children Vaccines and immunisation Health Microbiology Schools Source Type: news

How to live longer: A tea made from a fruit rich in vitamin K keeps the heart healthy
HOW TO live longer can be achieved by simply adding more fruits and vegetables rich in vitamins and minerals. One such fruit made into a tea is said to help lower cholesterol and keep the heart healthy, and it is more healthy than kale. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hygiene theatre: how excessive cleaning gives us a false sense of security
Covid-19 is a mainly airborne disease. So does our endless disinfecting and hand sanitising serve any purpose – or could it be worse than useless?Claudia, a 26-year-old beauty worker, dreads it when her clients ask to go to the toilet. “It’s a whole other thing to clean,” she says. “They could have touched anything in there. I have to wipe down the whole thing with antibacterial spray and wipes.”It is her job to maintain stringent cleaning protocols at the London skincare clinic where she works. When clients arrive for their appointments, Claudia checks them in, offers them a drink &ndas...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sirin Kale Tags: Hygiene Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Source Type: news

Bee-impersonating flies show pollinator potential
(Washington State University) An observational study found that out of more than 2,400 pollinator visits to flowers at urban and rural farms in in Western Washington about 35% of were made by flies -- most of which were the black-and-yellow-striped syrphid flies. For a few plants, including peas, kale and lilies, flies were the only pollinators observed. Bees still made the majority, about 61%, of floral visits, but the rest were made by other insects and spiders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Are Some Foods Super Bitter to You? You Might Have Lower COVID Risk
TUESDAY, May 25, 2021 -- If you can't stand broccoli, celery or kale, you may be a supertaster, and it just might protect you from COVID-19. Supertasters are folks who are highly sensitive to bitterness. They're not only less likely to get COVID-19... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 25, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Kale health benefits: The vegetable can help with blood pressure, weight loss and diabetes
KALE is a leafy green superfood you can definitely benefit from adding into your meals. Highly nutritious, the member of the cruciferous family contains vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Minna Heeraman had an aggressive cancer. Did the March 2020 treatment shutdown shorten her life?
Minna ’s pancreatic surgery was cancelled as a result of the pandemic. By the time treatments resumed, her tumour was too big for doctors to operateWhen Minna Heeraman ’s friends knew that she was dying, they made a video for her to watch from the hospital bed she had set up in her living room. It was a goodbye video. One after another, her friends spoke to the camera with tears in their eyes. They shared their memories of times spent together. Wine in the garde n on sunny afternoons. Hen dos. Weddings. Christmas meet-ups. “I don’t know what more to say, Minna,” says one friend, choking back s...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 4, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sirin Kale Tags: Cancer Society Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Science NHS Health Source Type: news

James Mcallister was a much-loved family man. Did the Christmas mixing confusion cause his death?
In the run-up to Christmas, the government dithered and made last-minute rule changes that left many people baffled. A surge in coronavirus cases soon followedAll through the spring of 2020, and into the summer, Michelle Mcallister carefully shielded her husband, James Mcallister. Michelle, 39, who lives in the Wednesfield area of Wolverhampton, was a full-time carer to James, 52. A former used car dealer, James had heart failure and had used a colostomy bag since a stomach ulcer burst in 2016. He was unable to work and was often in pain, reliant on a walking stick and occasionally a wheelchair to get around.The couple had...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 6, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sirin Kale Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Science World news Microbiology Society Source Type: news

Bob Pape was a beloved father and foster carer. Did 'eat out to help out' cost him his life?
Last August, Pape and his family went on a city break to Birmingham, making the most of chancellor Rishi Sunak ’s discount scheme. The day after he arrived home, his symptoms beganAmanda Pape didn ’t want to go on a city break to Birmingham during a pandemic, but her husband, Bob, a 53-year-old lawyer, insisted. “Bob was convinced that the government would not allow people to travel if it wasn’t safe,” says Amanda, a 56-year-old former teacher. Bob was persuasive – he was a lawyer, after all – so she relented. Along with her daughter, Jazzy, 19, one of Jazzy’s friends and a c...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 30, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sirin Kale Tags: Eat out to help out Society Coronavirus Business Infectious diseases Medical research Science Source Type: news

Strawberries, Spinach, Kale Top ‘Dirty Dozen’ List Again
All three items were in the same positions last year, but the 2021 version also adds collard and mustard greens along with kale in the No. 3 spot. Nearly 70% of the non-organic fresh produce sold in the U.S. has residues of potentially harmful pesticides, the latest report found. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - March 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Characterising the patterns of and factors associated with increased alcohol consumption since COVID-19 in a UK sample - Oldham M, Garnett C, Brown J, Kale D, Shahab L, Herbe ć A.
INTRODUCTION: To examine changes in drinking patterns and to assess factors associated with reported increases in frequency of drinking, units consumed and frequency of heavy episodic drinking (HED) during the UK lockdown. METHODS: Online cross-sec... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Trump pardons former WellCare executives in final round of pardons
As part of a flurry of last-minute pardons and commutations, President Donald Trump granted pardons to five former executives of WellCare Health Plans who were convicted in a case involving allegations of defrauding Florida ’s Medicaid program. Trump pardoned former WellCare CEO and President Todd Farha, former General Counsel Thaddeus Bereday, former Chief Financial Officer Paul Behrens, former Vice President William Kale and former Vice President Peter Clay. FBI agents raided WellCare's Tampa… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 20, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jim Saunders Source Type: news

Trump pardons former WellCare executives in final round of pardons
As part of a flurry of last-minute pardons and commutations, President Donald Trump granted pardons to five former executives of WellCare Health Plans who were convicted in a case involving allegations of defrauding Florida ’s Medicaid program. Trump pardoned former WellCare CEO and President Todd Farha, former General Counsel Thaddeus Bereday, former Chief Financial Officer Paul Behrens, former Vice President William Kale and former Vice President Peter Clay. FBI agents raided WellCare's Tampa… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - January 20, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: Jim Saunders Source Type: news

A Child So Sick They Feared the Worst, Now They Urge Change
By LINDSAY WHITEHURST Associated Press MONTPELIER, Idaho (AP) — Kale Wuthrich watched doctors surround his son in the emergency room, giving him fluids though IV tubes, running a battery of tests and trying to stabilize him. He was enveloped by the confusion and fear that had been building since his 12-year-old suddenly fell ill weeks after a mild bout with the coronavirus. “He was very close at that point to not making it, and basically they told me to sit in the corner and pray,” Wuthrich said. “And that’s what I did.” Related: COVID-19 in Kids — It’s Not a Small P...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Idaho Patient care Pediatric Care Source Type: news

A Child So Sick They Feared the Worst, Now They Urge Change
By LINDSAY WHITEHURST Associated Press MONTPELIER, Idaho (AP) — Kale Wuthrich watched doctors surround his son in the emergency room, giving him fluids though IV tubes, running a battery of tests and trying to stabilize him. He was enveloped by the confusion and fear that had been building since his 12-year-old suddenly fell ill weeks after a mild bout with the coronavirus. “He was very close at that point to not making it, and basically they told me to sit in the corner and pray,” Wuthrich said. “And that’s what I did.” Related: COVID-19 in Kids — It’s Not a Small P...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - December 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Idaho Patient care Pediatric Care Source Type: news

A Child So Sick They Feared the Worst, Now They Urge Change
By LINDSAY WHITEHURST Associated Press MONTPELIER, Idaho (AP) — Kale Wuthrich watched doctors surround his son in the emergency room, giving him fluids though IV tubes, running a battery of tests and trying to stabilize him. He was enveloped by the confusion and fear that had been building since his 12-year-old suddenly fell ill weeks after a mild bout with the coronavirus. “He was very close at that point to not making it, and basically they told me to sit in the corner and pray,” Wuthrich said. “And that’s what I did.” Related: COVID-19 in Kids — It’s Not a Small P...
Source: JEMS Latest News - December 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Idaho Patient care Pediatric Care Source Type: news

A Child So Sick They Feared the Worst, Now They Urge Change
By LINDSAY WHITEHURST Associated Press MONTPELIER, Idaho (AP) — Kale Wuthrich watched doctors surround his son in the emergency room, giving him fluids though IV tubes, running a battery of tests and trying to stabilize him. He was enveloped by the confusion and fear that had been building since his 12-year-old suddenly fell ill weeks after a mild bout with the coronavirus. “He was very close at that point to not making it, and basically they told me to sit in the corner and pray,” Wuthrich said. “And that’s what I did.” Related: COVID-19 in Kids — It’s Not a Small P...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - December 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Idaho Patient care Pediatric Care Source Type: news

A Child So Sick They Feared the Worst, Now They Urge Change
By LINDSAY WHITEHURST Associated Press MONTPELIER, Idaho (AP) — Kale Wuthrich watched doctors surround his son in the emergency room, giving him fluids though IV tubes, running a battery of tests and trying to stabilize him. He was enveloped by the confusion and fear that had been building since his 12-year-old suddenly fell ill weeks after a mild bout with the coronavirus. “He was very close at that point to not making it, and basically they told me to sit in the corner and pray,” Wuthrich said. “And that’s what I did.” Related: COVID-19 in Kids — It’s Not a Small P...
Source: JEMS Operations - December 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Idaho Patient care Pediatric Care Source Type: news

A Child So Sick They Feared the Worst, Now They Urge Change
By LINDSAY WHITEHURST Associated Press MONTPELIER, Idaho (AP) — Kale Wuthrich watched doctors surround his son in the emergency room, giving him fluids though IV tubes, running a battery of tests and trying to stabilize him. He was enveloped by the confusion and fear that had been building since his 12-year-old suddenly fell ill weeks after a mild bout with the coronavirus. “He was very close at that point to not making it, and basically they told me to sit in the corner and pray,” Wuthrich said. “And that’s what I did.” Related: COVID-19 in Kids — It’s Not a Small P...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - December 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Idaho Patient care Pediatric Care Source Type: news

How did the number and type of injuries in patients presenting to a regional Level I trauma center change during the CoViD-19 pandemic with a stay-at-home order? - Sherman WF, Khadra HS, Kale NN, Wu VJ, Gladden PB, Lee OC.
BACKGROUND: During a pandemic, it is paramount to understand volume changes in Level I trauma so that with appropriate planning and reallocation of resources, these facilities can maintain and even improve life-saving capabilities. Evaluating nonaccidental... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Operators' load monitoring and management - Kale U, Roh ács J, Rohács D.
Due to the introduction of highly automated vehicles and systems, the tasks of operators (drivers, pilots, air traffic controllers, production process managers) are in transition from "active control" to "passive monitoring" and "supervising". As a result ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

An audit of admissions and mortality of orthopedic indoor patients in a tertiary care hospital of India - Banerjee S, Suresh G, Kale AB, Sathe AH.
INTRODUCTION: Mortality in orthopaedics is different in underdeveloped, developing and developed countries depending on the health, orthopaedic and trauma care services, education status and social awareness. Analysis of mortality and causes of death is an... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

When Reconciliation With Family Comes With a Price Tag
The crispy kale sits between us, untouched. ... I knock my wineglass against its bowl, the cabernet heavy on my tongue. ... I'm tempted to switch to vodka, but my big sis is a teetotaler and I'm wa... (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - June 27, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

A Mother, a Pandemic and Scorched Rice
“You have an American amount of rice,” my mother told me as news of the coronavirus intensified. “Go get the biggest bag you can find.” (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lynn Jones Johnston Tags: Rice Cooking and Cookbooks Families and Family Life Pork Meat Kale (Vegetable) Quarantines Vietnam Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Source Type: news

Depressive symptoms and its associated factors among prisoners in Debre Berhan prison, Ethiopia - Reta Y, Getachew R, Bahiru M, Kale B, Workie K, Gebreegziabhere Y.
BACKGROUND: Depression is a common mental disorder among prisoners characterized by a mood change involving a feeling of sadness, lack of interest, or hopelessness that lasts for weeks, months, or even longer. Besides imprisonment, depression is the primar... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Attention Vegetable Haters: It Could Be In Your Genes
By Sandee LaMotte, CNN (CNN) — If certain vegetables have always made you gag, you may be more than a picky eater. Instead, you might be what scientists call a “super-taster:” a person with a genetic predisposition to taste food differently. Unfortunately, being a super-taster doesn’t make everything taste better. In fact, it can do the opposite. Super-tasters are extremely sensitive to bitterness, a common characteristic of many dark green, leafy veggies such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and Brussels sprouts, to name a few. “The person who has that genetic propensity gets more of the sul...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Source Type: news

Faking it: could I go from being an introvert to an extrovert in one week?
New research has found that being an extrovert makes you happier. So I spent a week attending social events to see if I could trick myself into being more naturally outgoingI was asked to torture myself for a week for this experiment. Well, not torture, but close enough for me. For a week,this introvert would put social awkwardness to one side and live as an extrovert. I don ’t particularly enjoy meeting new people. I decline most party invitations and if I do go, I leave as soon as I can without causing offence. Sometimes I fantasise about doingwhat Princess Diana used to do when she wanted to lose friends – c...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sirin Kale Tags: Friendship Health & wellbeing Walking Fitness Life and style Psychology Science Source Type: news

Compliments brand vegetables recalled due to Listeria risk
The affected products include certain fresh-cut vegetables such as kale, cauliflower and green beans. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - November 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Nova Scotia Source Type: news

Evaluation of pile driving accidents in geotechnical engineering - Eski şar T, Akboga Kale O.
Pile driving accidents that occurred between the years 1984-2018 were selected from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration database with 84 cases. To evaluate the causes of accidents, pile driving stages were presented and the potential hazards ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Bathroom hygiene: how to ensure you never spread E coli
The largest cause of bacterial bloodstream infections in the UK is not associated with uncooked meat as we thoughtUncooked chicken has a reputation problem where germs are concerned, and rightly so. But new research from the University of East Anglia, published in The Lancet: Infectious Diseases, finds that people not washing their hands may be a leading cause in the spread of E coli in the UK.“Let’s be clear about E coli,” says Prof David Livermore, who led the research. “We all have harmless E coli that live in our gut. Additionally there are some strains that can cause diarrheal diseases, ranging...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sirin Kale Tags: Health E coli Life and style UK news Science Hygiene Source Type: news

Cooking With Greens
FRIDAY, Oct. 18, 2019 -- It's time to go beyond spinach and kale. To really power up your meals with greens, you want to explore the taste and texture of watercress and dandelions. And the following recipes will get from the fridge to your table in... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 18, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Domino: Beer is OK (If You Exercise), But Avoid Kale
Frank Domino, M.D., delivered his popular " Top 10 Updates in Evidence-based Medicine " Sept. 27 during the Family Medicine Experience in Philadelphia. As usual, his presentation drew a huge crowd. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - October 1, 2019 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Children choosing super veg such as kale and celeriac
Young children are more likely to eat vegetables according to a new survey, especially brightly coloured vegetables such as carrots, peas, sweetcorn and broccoli according to research. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fragrance sensitivity: why perfumed products can cause profound health problems
An intolerance to manufactured scents can lead to migraines, respiratory issues and long-term sick leave. So should they be banned in public spaces?If you flew abroad this summer, you probably passed through an airport ’s duty-free perfume section. Perhaps you paused to spritz yourself with an expensive scent you had no intention of buying, before making the obligatory trip to WH Smith for overpriced crisps and bottles of water.For most people, the wafting odours of perfume counters are not a problem. But, for some, the trip through duty free is a choking, cloying experience.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sirin Kale Tags: Health & wellbeing Fragrance Fashion Medical research Science Source Type: news

Consumer Reports finds hazardous bacteria in pre-washed greens
Consumer Reports says it tested nearly 284 samples of fresh greens like lettuce, spinach and kale and found six of those samples tainted with listeria (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - July 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Listeria risk from recalled packaged kale highlights pathogen's challenge
This is the third time in eight months that an Eat Smart product has been recalled in Canada because of Listeria, one of the most dangerous foodborne pathogens. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - July 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Eat Smart-brand kale salad recalled amid fears of Listeria
Eat Smart-brand kale salad has been recalled in six provinces because it could be contaminated with Listeria, according to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - July 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Eat Smart brand kale salad recalled amid fears of Listeria
Eat Smart brand kale salad has been recalled in six provinces because it could be contaminated with Listeria, according to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - July 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Tracing the roots: Mapping a vegetable family tree for better food
(University of Missouri-Columbia) In the new study, a team of multi-institution scientists led by the University of Missouri challenged prior theories of the origins of three vegetables -- canola, rutabaga and Siberian kale -- by mapping the genetic family tree of these leafy greens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Add a Sweet Surprise to Your Veggie Juice: Chocolate
FRIDAY, June 7, 2019 -- Juicing nutrient-rich green vegetables like kale, broccoli and spinach gives you a brew of many vitamins and minerals, all in just one cup. But green juices can have an overpowering flavor, so many people want to cut their... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 7, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Medical News Today: A compound in broccoli and kale helps suppress tumor growth
A compound present in broccoli, kale, and other cruciferous plants restored an underperforming tumor suppressor in a mouse model of cancer, study reveals. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Natural compound found in broccoli reawakens the function of potent tumor suppressor
(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) Long associated with decreased risk of cancer, broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables -- the family of plants that also includes cauliflower, cabbage, collard greens, Brussels sprouts and kale -- contain a molecule that inactivates a gene known to play a role in a variety of common human cancers. A new study demonstrates that targeting the gene, known as WWP1, with the ingredient found in broccoli suppressed tumor growth in cancer-prone lab animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news