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President's Budget Would Cut USGS by 21 Percent
The United States Geological Survey (USGS) would be funded at $860 million, a 21 percent cut from the fiscal year (FY) 2017 level. Funding for the water resources program would be reduced by 23 percent to $165 million. The administration’s budget would also reduce support for the natural hazards program by 19 percent. These include programs to monitor earthquakes and volcanoes, which would each be slashed by 21 percent. Other programs would also see deep cuts, with budget for the ecosystems program reduced by 40 percent, core science systems reduced by 20 percent, and science support programs cut by 15 percent. The ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

President Calls for Big Cuts for ESA Listings
The President’s fiscal year (FY) 2019 Interior Department budget proposal would limit Endangered Species Act (ESA) listing activity to $10.9 million, which is about half the $20.4 million received in FY 2017. Gavin Shire, public affairs head of the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), said in a statement, “Our focus is on prioritizing species recovery, where we have funding for recovery planning, five-year reviews and down- and delisting packages.” The budget proposal for Interior notes that officials want to focus “available resources on the recovery of the more than 1,660 species listed domestically ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

When every fish counts
(University of California - Davis) Genetic analysis by UC Davis showed about one-third of endangered delta smelt were misidentified in surveys of the Yolo Bypass. Their study found that genetic tools can be a powerful complement to visual identification of endangered fish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

More than half the fish in the sea
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Vignieri, S. Tags: Ecology, Geochemistry, Geophysics twis Source Type: news

Dispersal of fish eggs by water birds -- just a myth?
(University of Basel) How do fish end up in isolated bodies of water when they can't swim there themselves? For centuries, researchers have assumed that water birds transfer fish eggs into these waters -- however, a systematic literature review by researchers at the University of Basel has shown that there is no evidence of this to date. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How long can we treat the suffering of animals as an inconvenient truth? | Michael Brooks
A revolution is coming in our relationship with ‘lower’ creatures, provoked by a greater knowledge of their cognition. Labour’s new plans for animal welfare are just a startScientific insight is a powerful thing, but will it ever override the human lust for health, prosperity and, saddest of all, convenience? This question entered my head as I read of the Labour party ’s newly announcedpolicies for animal welfare“informed and underpinned by the latest evidence on animal sentience”. Such an approach would lead to laudable bans on foie gras imports and nonsensical badger culling. But let &...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Michael Brooks Tags: Ethical and green living Animals Animal welfare Biology Science Ethics Richard Dawkins Environment The meat industry Food Farming fish UK news Source Type: news

High levels of microplastics found in Northwest Atlantic fish
(Frontiers) A new study finds 73 percent of mesopelagic fish caught in the Northwest Atlantic had microplastics in their stomachs -- one of the highest levels globally. Typically living at depths of 200-1,000 meters, these fish could spread microplastic pollution throughout the marine ecosystem, by carrying microplastics from the surface down to deeper waters. They are also prey for fish eaten by humans, meaning that microplastics could indirectly contaminate our food supply. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Newly-hatched salmon use geomagnetic field to learn which way is up
(Oregon State University) Researchers who confirmed in recent years that salmon use the Earth's geomagnetic field to guide their long-distance migrations have found that the fish also use the field for a much simpler and smaller-scale migration: When the young emerge from gravel nests to reach surface waters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 16, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Red tide outbreak in Chile puts salmon farms on alert: industry group
SANTIAGO (Reuters) - A growing outbreak of "red tide" has put salmon farms on alert in fish-rich southern Chile, an industry group said on Thursday, though its impact is still far less extensive than in 2016, when a much larger outbreak decimated fish farms. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

$40 Million Later, A Pioneering Plan To Boost Wild Fish Stocks Shows Little Success
A California program begun 35 years ago to boost waning white seabass populations became a model for other states. Now the first scientific review finds the program had a stunningly low success rate.(Image credit: Mike Shane/Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute ) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Clare Leschin-Hoar Source Type: news

Hurricanes Irma and Maria temporarily altered choruses of land and sea animals
(American Geophysical Union) Audio recordings of Hurricanes Irma and Maria's passage over Puerto Rico document how the calls of coastal critters changed in response to the deadly storms. The hurricanes caused a major disruption in the acoustic activity of snapping shrimp, a reduction in insect and bird sounds, and potentially an intensification of fish choruses, according to new research presented at the Ocean Sciences Meeting Friday. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Supporting wild freshwater fish populations
An EU-funded project is investigating ways to improve wild freshwater fish stocks. Its goal is to reverse declining fish populations and improve biodiversity in Europe's rivers and lakes. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - February 14, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Crack and cheese: do things really affect your brain 'like drugs'?
Claims that cheese, sex and Facebook affect your brain in the same way as drugs fundamentally misunderstand how it all worksThe internet is a weird place. Part of this is due to how things linger rather than disappear, as they tended to do with more “traditional” media. Nowadays, people’s jobs can (rightly or wrongly) be endangered fortweets they wroteyears ago. The adage about “today’s news is tomorrow’s fish and chip papers” seems no longer to apply.This is particularly true when a headline or story from years ago can be found by a group or community on a social network that miss...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Dean Burnett Tags: Science Psychology Science and scepticism Drugs Media Source Type: news

Africa:Mosquito Nets Widely Misused for Fishing, Study Finds
[VOA] Mosquito nets intended to prevent malaria are finding an unanticipated use as fishing nets all across the tropics, according to a new study. These fine-meshed nets scoop up fish of all types and sizes indiscriminately. Experts are worried they are draining fish populations. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 12, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Deep-sea fish use hydrothermal vents to incubate eggs
(Penn State) An international team of researchers have discovered egg cases of deep-sea fish near hydrothermal vents. The team believes that deep-sea skates, a relative of sharks and rays, use the warm water near the vents to accelerate the typically years-long incubation time of their eggs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Despite odds, fish species that bypasses sexual reproduction is thriving
(Washington University School of Medicine) An international team of scientists has sequenced the genome of the Amazon molly, a fish that reproduces asexually. The researchers expected that the asexual organism would be at a genetic disadvantage, but the Amazon molly is thriving. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

International team sequences first Amazon molly fish genome
(Texas A&M University) No species is immune from the suffering of unrequited love, but scientists expect to learn volumes about the biological basis of sex from the newly sequenced genome of an all-female, asexual Texas native -- the Amazon molly -- that has thrived as a master of male manipulation over millennia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

No sex for all-female fish species
(University of W ü rzburg) They reproduce through gynogenesis. Their offspring are clones of the mother. According to established theories, the Amazon molly should have become extinct a long time ago. A new study shows how the fish avoids this fate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Omega-6 Fatty Acid Levels Predict Preemies at Risk of Eye Issues (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Findings don't call for fish oil supplements, however (Source: MedPage Today Pediatrics)
Source: MedPage Today Pediatrics - February 9, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Feb 9, 2018 This Week in Cardiology Feb 9, 2018 This Week in Cardiology
Genetic risk scores and early onset CAD, ECGs in athletes, the ripple effect of weight loss, troponin in sepsis, and fish oil for CVD prevention are the topics discussed in this week's podcast.theheart.org on Medscape (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Commentary Source Type: news

HealthWatch: Amino Acid Fuels Aggressive Form of Breast Cancer
BOSTON (CBS) – A new study says diet could affect the spread of a deadly type of breast cancer. Researchers at Cedars-Sinai found that an amino acid called asparagine, which is found in many types of food, may fuel tumor cells. When the scientists eliminated asparagine from the diets of mice with “triple-negative” breast cancer, the cancer was less likely to travel to distant sites in the body. Asparagine is found in dairy, beef, poultry, eggs, fish, nuts, whole grains, and asparagus, but most fruits and vegetables are low in asparagine. Does this mean that you should remove all these foods from your diet...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Breast Cancer Health Healthwatch Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local asparagine Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Socioecological network finds space for cattle, fish, and people in the big mountain west
(Ecological Society of America) The social and ecological systems of mountains and their river basins are best approached holistically when dealing with complex problems in natural resources management, say ecologists working with the Mountain Social Ecological Observatory Network (MntSEON). An open access special issue of ESA's journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment on " Social-ecological systems in mountain landscapes, " highlights initiatives designed to build knowledge networks and foster resiliency in vulnerable mountain communities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A view from above and below: Hatchery chinook salmon are self-sorting in tanks
(Oregon State University) Hatchery-raised chinook salmon sort themselves into surface- and bottom-oriented groups in their rearing tanks, and this behavior might be due in part to the fish's genes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Survival fishing: 5 tips for catching, eating, and preserving fish
(Natural News) Aside from being a relaxing hobby, fishing can also help you survive when you’re trapped in the wild. If you know how to catch, cook, and preserve fish, you can fend for yourself when disaster strikes. (h/t to DoomsdayMoose.com) How to fish Before you fish, you will need to make a survival rod and lure.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Can you eat salmon skin?
A look at salmon skin, the skin of the oily fish rich in omega-3 ’s. Included is detail on the nutritional benefits and the potential risks of eating it. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Farmed seafood and livestock stack up differently using alternate feed efficiency measure
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for a Livable Future found that, contrary to widely held assumptions, farmed fish and shrimp convert protein and calories in feed to edible seafood at rates similar to livestock (i.e., cattle, pigs, and chickens). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Child aids paleontologists in discovery of new ancient fish species
(University of Alberta) The fossil, called Candelarhynchus padillai, is approximately 90 million years old, and has no modern relatives, explained Oksana Vernygora, PhD student in the Department of Biological Sciences and lead author on the study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 6, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Shoals of sticklebacks differ in their collective personalities
(University of Cambridge) Research from the University of Cambridge has revealed that, among schooling fish, groups can have different collective personalities, with some shoals sticking closer together, being better coordinated, and showing clearer leadership than others. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 6, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Rise in vegans and vegetarians send Quorn sales soaring
Sales of the firm ’s products, which replicate the shape and texture of everything from burgers to fish fingers, rose by an unprecedented 16 per cent last year as consumers turned away from meat. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Basics: Many Animals Can Count, Some Better Than You
Numerosity is deeply embedded in species that need to track quantity, such as hungry spiders and schooling fish. But the ability seems to have faded in humans. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NATALIE ANGIER Tags: Animal Behavior Animals Psychology and Psychologists Mathematics Biology and Biochemistry Numbers Source Type: news

Fish study IDs genes that regulate social behaviors
(Cornell University) Genes in an area of the brain that is relatively similar in fish, humans and all vertebrates appear to regulate how organisms coordinate and shift their behaviors, according to a new Cornell study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Britain comes first in Europe for factory made food
Consumers in Britain are least likely among Europeans to buy fresh fruit, vegetables, meat and fish, relying instead on reconstituted meats and high levels of salt and sugar. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Plastic pollution is threatening fish populations and the fishing industry in Central America
(Natural News) Plastic pollution is posing a threat to fish populations and fishing industry in Central America as a fisherman discovered plastics and other discarded materials, such as bottle caps, bits of plastic, a mangle comb, and a cigarette lighter, in the stomach of a mahi-mahi or also known as dolphinfish. The fisherman, who was... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mercury pollution in the Great Lakes: A look at how it impacts fish and what must be done to make them safe to eat
(Natural News) With ongoing advisories about toxic fish and warnings to limit consumption, there is no doubt that mercury pollution is a serious problem in the Great Lakes. For many years, the levels of mercury in the fish there dropped as regulations on area factories tightened, but levels have started to rise to concerning heights... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Fish oil may not be as healthful as you think, study finds
A new study finds that lifelong intake of fish or sunflower oil may damage the liver in a way that increases the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Liver Disease / Hepatitis Source Type: news

Lab notes: So long and thanks for all the fish?
Orcas talk! Well, one has, anyway: a study involving a killer whale called Wikie has revealed thatorcas can imitate human speech. Researchers have shown that killer whales able to copy words such as “hello”, “one, two” and ‘bye bye’ as well as sounds from other orcas. A great leap for our species, however, is the news that doctors in Newcastle have selected thefirst patients to undergo treatment which will result in ‘three-person babies’. Both women chosen for the radical therapy carry mutations that cause rare and devastating genetic disease. Another promising advance is the...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Tash Reith-Banks Tags: Science Source Type: news

'Ultra-processed' products now half of all UK family food purchases
Exclusive: health experts warn increasing popularity of industrially-made food will lead to negative effects such as obesity and poor healthHalf of all the food bought by families in the UK is now “ultra-processed”, made in a factory with industrial ingredients and additives invented by food technologists and bearing little resemblance to the fruit, vegetables, meat or fish used to cook a fresh meal at home.Research by global nutrition experts reveals the scale of our food evolution, from farm-fresh to factory-manufactured. “Real food” has been replaced by salty snacks and sugary cereals, industrial...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Nutrition Food & drink industry Health wellbeing Fitness Science World news Food science Life and style Society Business UK news Social trends Sugar Source Type: news

Fish Oil Supplements May Not Help Your Heart: Study
Title: Fish Oil Supplements May Not Help Your Heart: StudyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 2/1/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 2/2/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - February 2, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Levamisole: a high performance cutting agent - Solomon N, Hayes J.
Levamisole is an imidazothiazole chemical most frequently used as an antihelminthic agent in cattle. Over the last decade, levamisole has been increasingly encountered as an additive in both powder and crack cocaine. A white powder with a "fish scale" appe... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Fish Oil Supplements May Not Help The Heart: Study
Millions of people take fish oil supplements, hoping to benefit from the omega-3 fatty acids they contain. And the American Heart Association recommends omega-3 fatty acids supplements for people with a history of heart disease. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fish Oil Supplements May Not Help Your Heart: Study
THURSDAY, Feb. 1, 2018 -- Claims that fish oil supplements help prevent death from heart disease, heart attacks and stroke may be unfounded, British research suggests. Millions of people take fish oil supplements, hoping to benefit from the omega-3... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 1, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Cultural taboos around food are powerful – could vegans change ours?
As campaigns such as Veganuary become more popular could the way westerners categorise what ’s edible start to shift?Yesterday marked the end of “Veganuary”, the campaign to encourage people to try a vegan lifestyle for a month. Year on year the trend has grown. Might those one-month vegans change the habits of the rest of us - by changing what an animal is?Vegans shun all animal-derived products – meat, fish and leather obviously, but also eggs, dairy products, honey and wool. Beers refined using isinglass (derived from fish guts) are out, as would thenew UK £5 and £10 notes, if they co...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mary-Ann Ochota Tags: Anthropology Science Veganism Evolution Life and style Source Type: news

Omega-3 Supplements Don ’ t Protect Against Heart Disease
“ Carefully done trials provide no support for the hypothesis that fish oil supplements help, ” the senior author of a new study says. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Heart Omega-3 Fatty Acids Oils and Fats Fish and Other Marine Life Source Type: news

Sunflower and fish oils cause liver inflammation
Researchers from  the University of Granada found that, compared to olive oil, sunflower varieties cause thickening of liver tissue in rats and fish oil can speed up organ ageing. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fish and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)
(Source: MayoClinic.com - Ask a Specialist)
Source: MayoClinic.com - Ask a Specialist - January 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mediterranean diet might improve in vitro fertilization success, study finds
The diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, olive oil, nuts, some grains and fish. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

Mediterranean diet 'raises IVF success rate by 70%'
Adopting the healthy diet – which is loaded with fruit and veg, whole grains, olive oil and fish – boosted the chances of successful fertility treatment by almost 70 per cent for some women. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fish-Based Omega-3s Better Than Plant-Based For Prevention Of Breast Cancer
BOSTON (CBS) – Eating a diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids may help reduce the risk of breast cancer in women, but does the source of those good fats matter? Researchers at the University of Guelph, ON, Canada say, “Yes.” They looked at mice predisposed to develop an aggressive type of breast cancer and found that a diet rich in fish-based omega-3 fatty acids was eight times more effective at preventing breast tumor growth than a diet rich in plant-based omega-3s. Plant-based omega-3 fatty acids are found in soy, canola oil, walnuts, and flaxseed. Fish-based omega-3s are found in salmon, tuna, trout and oth...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Breast Cancer Health Healthwatch Local News Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Fish-derived omega-3 best for preventing breast cancer
Compared with the plant-based omega-3 ALA, EPA and DHA — which come from fatty fish — are much better for preventing breast cancer, researchers suggest. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: news

Salmon may help to prevent breast cancer
Researchers from  University of Guelph in Ontario found fish-based sources of omega-3 fatty acids also reduce the number of breast cancer tumors by 30 percent in mice with the disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news