Higher levels of omega-3 acids in the blood increases life expectancy by almost five years
(IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute)) Researchers have found that omega-3 levels in blood erythrocytes are very good mortality risk predictors. The study used data from a long-term study group, the Framingham Offspring Cohort, which has been monitoring residents of this Massachusetts town, in the United States, since 1971 and concludes that " Having higher levels of these acids in the blood, as a result of regularly including oily fish in the diet, increases life expectancy by almost five years " , (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Forty Under 40 2021: Corey Fish, Brave Care
Corey Fish is chief medical officer for the pediatric urgent care clinic operator Brave Care. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 21, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Innovative program entertains and teaches children about fish migration
(Wiley) It's important to communicate about hard-to-see and complex environmental topics and issues with young people. In an article published in People and Nature, an international team reflects on the group's creation of the Shout Trout Workout, a lyric poem, comic, and music video for children aged 8-14 years old designed to entertain, engage, and enrich learning about migratory fishes and aquatic environments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Who eats the invaders?
(University of Malta) A landmark scientific study involving marine biologists from Greece, Turkey, Cyprus, Libya, Italy, Tunisia, the UK, the US and even Malta, documenting instances where native Mediterranean species have preyed upon two highly invasive marine fish - the Pacific red lionfish and the silver-cheeked toadfish - has just been published. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A new model of coral reef health
(Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation) Scientists have developed a new way to model and map the health of coral reef ecosystems using data collected on the Global Reef Expedition. This innovative method, presented today at the International Coral Reef Symposium (ICRS), can determine which natural and anthropogenic factors are most likely to lead to persistently vibrant coral and fish communities. Their findings can help scientists identify the reefs most likely to survive in a changing world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 21, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fish friends help in a crisis
(Nova Southeastern University) To better understand how familiarity impacts social fishes, a group of research scientists studied this idea using schooling coral reef fish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How to get rid of headaches: Study suggests surprising diet for reducing migraines
A team of researchers, who conducted a study comparing fatty fish to vegetable-based baths and oils, discovered that fish oil can help frequent migraine sufferers reduce their monthly number of headaches. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Not eating oily fish regularly can shorten life expectancy more than smoking, study reveals 
Scientists found that smoking knocked four years off life expectancy whereas low levels of the fatty acid - found in oily fish such as salmon and mackerel - could reduce it by five years. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

My Daughter's First Pet —the Next Big Model Organism?
Bettas were likely the first fish welcomed into human homes. Now, scientists are welcoming them into the lab to learn how genes dictate their appearance and behavior. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - July 15, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

A Summer Red Tide Has Left Hundreds Of Tons Of Dead Fish Along Tampa Bay's Shore
The hordes of fish were killed by a red tide, a large "bloom" of toxic algae that appears on Florida's Gulf Coast about once a year. Experts say the bloom shouldn't be happening right now.(Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Josie Fischels Source Type: news

At Least 600 Tons Of Dead Fish Have Washed Up Along Tampa Bay's Shore
The hordes of fish were killed by a red tide, a large "bloom" of toxic algae that appears on Florida's Gulf Coast about once a year. Experts say the bloom shouldn't be happening right now.(Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Josie Fischels Source Type: news

Stop tossing your pet goldfish in lakes, officials warn. 'They grow bigger than you think'
The city of Burnsville, Minnesota is asking its residents to not throw out pet fish after finding large groups of giant goldfish in a waterway. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

GSK's head of oncology jumps to Boston precision medicine startup
Just eight months out of stealth, precision medicine startup Scorpion Therapeutics has netted a big fish in Axel Hoos, the head of oncology at GlaxoSmithKline plc, who is leaving the firm next month to head up Scorpion as CEO. Founded by serial entrepreneur and former IFM Therapeutics CEO Gary Glick, Scorpion has already raised about $270 million and nearly doubled its team to about 50 people. Under Hoos' leadership, the startup is slated to begin clinical trials next year, make its drug pipeline… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - July 9, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: Rowan Walrath Source Type: news

GSK's head of oncology jumps to Boston precision medicine startup
Just eight months out of stealth, precision medicine startup Scorpion Therapeutics has netted a big fish in Axel Hoos, the head of oncology at GlaxoSmithKline plc, who is leaving the firm next month to head up Scorpion as CEO. Founded by serial entrepreneur and former IFM Therapeutics CEO Gary Glick, Scorpion has already raised about $270 million and nearly doubled its team to about 50 people. Under Hoos' leadership, the startup is slated to begin clinical trials next year, make its drug pipeline… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 9, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Rowan Walrath Source Type: news

Q & A: UN Food Systems Summit Opportunity for the World to Unite on Healthy, Fair & Sustainable Food Systems
Food systems, from farm to fork to disposal, account for 21-37% of anthropogenic GHG emissions. Fresh produce at a supermarket. Credit: Alison Kentish/IPSBy Alison KentishUNITED NATIONS, Jul 9 2021 (IPS) Before the COVID-19 pandemic upended every sphere of life, the world was lagging on a goal to end hunger by 2030. According to the United Nations, more than 820 million people had already been categorised as food insecure, meaning they lacked access to reliable and sufficient amounts of affordable, healthy food. The impact of measures to contain the virus, land degradation, climate change and the global extreme poverty rat...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Alison Kentish Tags: Climate Change Editors' Choice Featured Food & Agriculture Food Security and Nutrition Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition Foundation (BCFN) Source Type: news

Experts recommend a varied and moderate consumption of sushi limiting quantities of tuna
(Universitat Rovira i Virgili) The consumption of sushi has increased significantly since the start of the 21st century, as has the number of restaurants offering it throughout the region. Although eating fish is recommended because of its high nutritional value, it can also lead to exposure to contaminants, such as heavy metals. Likewise, rice is a food that provides many nutrients and fibre and is low in fat, but it too can be source of pollutants such as arsenic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How fishing communities are responding to climate change
(Wellesley College) What happens when climate change affects the abundance and distribution of fish? Fishers and fishing communities in the Northeast United States have adapted to those changes in three specific ways, according to new research published in Frontiers in Marine Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The reproductive advantages of large male fish
(Bielefeld University) In mosquitofish, of the genus Gambusia, male fish are smaller than females - sometimes only half the size. Biologists had previously assumed that smaller male mosquitofish had at least some reproductive advantages. Researchers from the transregional collaborative research centre NC ³ at Bielefeld University have shown in a systematic review and meta-analysis that larger mosquitofish are actually more successful at reproduction. The re-searchers are presenting their findings today (07.07.2021) in the Journal of Animal Ecology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 7, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Trout Appear to Get Hooked on Meth
After eight weeks of exposure to ecologically plausible levels of methamphetamines, the fish tended to prefer meth-laced water over water without the drug. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - July 6, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Can You Eat Your Way to Fewer Migraines?
TUESDAY, July 6, 2021 -- Eating lots of fatty fish and cutting out polyunsaturated fats may reduce the frequency and intensity of migraines, a new study suggests. Omega-3 fatty acids from fish like tuna, salmon, bluefish and mackerel may help manage... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 6, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Mental health consequences of long-term stays in refugee camps: preliminary evidence from Moria - van de Wiel W, Castillo-Laborde C, Francisco Urz úa I, Fish M, Scholte WF.
BACKGROUND: Ever since the implementation of the EU-Turkey deal, most refugees that enter Greece via sea are confined to the island on which they arrive until their asylum claims are adjudicated, where they generally reside in camps. Some of these camps ha... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 5, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Flaws in Asia ’s Pearl
In March 2021, the UN Human Rights Council was given a mandate to collect and preserve information and evidence of crimes related to Sri Lanka's 37-year long civil war that ended in 2009. Meanwhile, Western nations taking a cue from the Human Rights Council’s highly critical resolution on Sri Lanka appear to be tightening the noose. Credit: UN Photo / Violaine Martin. 43rd session of the Human Rights Council. By Neville de SilvaLONDON, Jul 5 2021 (IPS) For well over a century Ceylon, now Sri Lanka, has been known to the world as the ‘Pearl of the Indian Ocean’ for its multifaceted attractions. That is unt...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 5, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Neville de Silva Tags: Armed Conflicts Asia-Pacific Civil Society Crime & Justice Featured Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

How fish got their spines
(University of Konstanz) Many fish species evolved parts of their fins into sharp, spiny, needle-like elements -- called fin spines -- that function to protect the fish against predators. Such spines have evolved independently in different lineages and are considered evolutionary drivers of fish diversity. In a study published in PNAS a research team based at the University of Konstanz now shows how fin spines arise from soft fin rays and how they could emerge independently in multiple fish groups. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 5, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Seabird colony creates 'halo' of depleted fish stocks
(University of Exeter) A vast seabird colony on Ascension Island creates a " halo " in which fewer fish live, new research shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 5, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tuna Story Exposes Challenges of Seafood Authentication
A New York Times investigation ’s failure to amplify tuna DNA from Subway’s tuna salad sandwiches likely says more about the complexities of identifying processed fish than about the ingredients. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - July 1, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Consuming a diet with more fish fats, less vegetable oils can reduce migraine headaches
NIH-funded study finds frequency, intensity of monthly migraines declined among those on higher fish oil diet. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - July 1, 2021 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Why are some fish warm-blooded? Predatory sharks gain speed advantage
(Trinity College Dublin) New research from marine biologists offers answers to a fundamental puzzle that had until now remained unsolved: why are some fish warm-blooded when most are not? It turns out that while (warm-blooded) fish able to regulate their own body temperatures can swim faster, they do not live in waters spanning a broader range of temperatures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 1, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mediterranean diet with oily fish could help reduce migraine frequency
Omega-3 fatty acids linked to reduction of headaches in women, study findsEating a Mediterranean diet containing lots of oily fish could help to reduce the frequency of migraines in people who suffer from them, data suggests.Roughly 10 million adults in the UK suffer frommigraines, with women three times more likely to be affected than men. Although several new treatments have become available in recent years, many people continue to experience pain.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 30, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Science correspondent Tags: Food Diets and dieting Health Science Life and style Society Fish Source Type: news

Kenya: Why Researchers Want Busia Residents to Consume More Fish
[Nation] Researchers are concerned about poor nutritional habits in Busia County, particularly low consumption of fish in households. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 30, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Mongoose in the city: How landscape can impact disease transmission in Botswana
(Virginia Tech) " The question has always been how do we predict what's going to happen once an infectious disease emerges, " said Kathleen Alexander, the William E. Lavery Professor in the Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation. " By using systems that are tractable, we can begin to learn a lot more about how disease dynamics are shaped by host behavior and environmental drivers, including urbanizing landscapes. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 29, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Using the ancient art of Kirigami to make an eyeball-like camera
(University of Houston) Using Kirigami, the Japanese art of paper cutting, a mechanical engineer at the University of Houston has developed a camera with a curvy, adaptable imaging sensor that could improve image quality in endoscopes, night-vision goggles, artificial compound eyes and fish-eye cameras. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 28, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Key Driver of Fish Oil's Antidepressant Effects Revealed Key Driver of Fish Oil's Antidepressant Effects Revealed
New data provide key insights into how omega-3 fatty acids produce anti-inflammatory effects to improve depression. But the findings are preliminary and, at this point, have no clinical implications.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - June 24, 2021 Category: Neurology Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

Rare genetic defect replicated in fish model
(University of Heidelberg) A rare genetic defect that affects the so-called ALG2 gene can cause serious metabolic diseases in humans. Until now, its rareness and complexity made it difficult to study this congenital glycosylation disorder. A research team from the Centre for Organismal Studies (COS) of Heidelberg University has finally succeeded in introducing the underlying mutation in the ALG2 gene in a fish model, allowing the causes of these complex diseases to be studied at the molecular level. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 23, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A warming climate and intensifying land use increase mercury content in fish
(University of Helsinki) Recent studies show that, in the future, the mercury concentration of fish in Finnish Lapland can shift closer to the level found in lakes located below the Arctic Circle. According to researchers, mercury content should be increasingly carefully investigated and monitored in fish and food webs, as the climate and land use change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

African Coelacanths May Live to Be 100: Study
This evolutionarily ancient fish species has a lifespan that's around five times longer than previously thought, and a gestation time of more than five years. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - June 18, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Fish Oil Supplements May Help Fight Depression
Fish oil supplements are often taken for heart health, but a new study finds they may also help fight depression. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - June 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could Fish Oil Supplements Help Fight Depression?
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - June 18, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Neurology, Psychiatry, Rheumatology, Nutrition, News, Source Type: news

Could Fish Oil Supplements Help Fight Depression?
FRIDAY, June 18, 2021 -- Fish oil supplements are often touted as good for your heart health, but a new study finds they may also help fight depression. " Using a combination of laboratory and patient research, our study has provided exciting new... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 18, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Could Fish Oil Supplements Help Fight Depression?
Title: Could Fish Oil Supplements Help Fight Depression?Category: Health NewsCreated: 6/18/2021 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 6/18/2021 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Depression General)
Source: MedicineNet Depression General - June 18, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

Mysterious coelacanth fish can live for 100 years – study
Research sheds more light on the giant ‘living fossils’ once thought extinct but which have survived since the age of the dinosaursThe coelacanth – a giant, mysterious fish that has survived since the time of the dinosaurs – can live for 100 years, a study has found.The slow-moving fish, which grow to be the size of a human, are nicknamed a “living fossil”, and also grow at a very slow pace.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Marine life Science Wildlife Environment Source Type: news

Weird ‘Living Fossil’ Fish Lives 100 Years, Pregnant For 5
The coelacanth — a giant bizarre fish still around from dinosaur times — can live for 100 years, a new study found. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 17, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: news

Fish nutrition database to help combat malnutrition across the globe
(Lancaster University) A treasure trove of vital nutritional data about fish species is being made freely available and accessible globally -- plugging a knowledge gap that will bolster efforts to tackle malnutrition across the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 17, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

‘Gamechanging’ £10m environmental DNA project to map life in world’s rivers
eBioAtlas programme aims to identify fish, birds, amphibians and land animals in freshwater systems from the Ganges to the MekongConcealed by the turbid, swirling waters of the Amazon, the Mekong and the Congo, the biodiversity of the world ’s great rivers has largely remained a mystery to scientists. But now a multimillion-pound project aims to describe and identify the web of life in major freshwater ecosystems around the world with “gamechanging” DNA technology.The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and UK-based environmental DNA (eDNA) specialistsNatureMetrics have launched a partne...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Greenfield Tags: Biodiversity Rivers Environment IUCN red list of endangered species Wildlife Conservation Animals Endangered habitats World news Americas Biology Genetics Amazon rainforest Peru Trees and forests Democratic Republic of the Co Source Type: news

Crayfish behave more boldly after exposure to antidepressants – study
Traces of drugs found in water can make crustaceans more outgoing – but also vulnerable to predatorsAntidepressant drugs in water can alter the behaviour of crayfish, making them bolder and more outgoing, and therefore more vulnerable to predators, researchers have found.Low levels of antidepressants – excreted by humans or disposed of incorrectly – are found in many water bodies. Researchers from the University of Florida assessed the impact of these medicines on crayfish, which are a fundamental component of many aquatic food webs – given they eat almost everything, from plants, insects, leaf litt...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Natalie Grover Science correspondent Tags: Marine life Wildlife Environment Drugs Science Source Type: news

Does a plant-based diet really help beat COVID-19?
It was found that health professionals who reported following diets that are vegetarian, vegan or pescatarian (those that exclude meat but include fish) had a lower risk of developing moderate-to-severe COVID-19. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - June 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mand ë Holford: Could Snail Venom Someday Save Your Life?
Cone snails are deadly sea predators; their venom can kill fish and even humans. But chemical biologist Mandë Holford says that powerful venom can actually be used for good — to treat human diseases.(Image credit: Courtesy of TED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - June 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Manoush Zomorodi Source Type: news

Ayana Elizabeth Johnson: Why The Strange and Wonderful Parrot Fish Is In Trouble
Marine biologist Ayana Elizabeth Johnson is obsessed with one research subject — the parrot fish. She says there is urgent work to be done to save them and their home, the coral reefs.(Image credit: Ryan Lash / TED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - June 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Manoush Zomorodi Source Type: news

Marah Hardt: What Can We Learn From The Sex Lives Of Fish?
Marine biologist Marah Hardt is fascinated with the mating habits of marine life. If we want to save the oceans, she says we have to understand the weird and whimsical sex that helps populate it.(Image credit: Courtesy of TED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - June 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Manoush Zomorodi Source Type: news

An omega-3 that's poison for tumors
(Universit é catholique de Louvain) 3D tumors that disintegrate within a few days thanks to the action of a well-known omega-3 (DHA, found mainly in fish) -- this is the exceptional discovery by University of Louvain researchers.Hungry for fatty acids, tumor cells in acidosis gorge themselves on DHA but are unable to store it correctly and literally poison themselves. The result? They die. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New dipping solution turns the whole fish into valuable food
(Chalmers University of Technology) When herring are filleted, more than half their weight becomes a low-value 'side stream' that never reaches our plates. Now, scientists from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have developed a special dipping solution which can significantly extend the side streams' shelf life, and increase the opportunities to use them as food. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news