President Trump Proposes Large Budget Cuts for Science
The White House released the President’s Budget Request for fiscal year (FY) 2020 on March 11, 2019, proposing deep cuts to science funding for the third consecutive year. The proposal calls for significant cuts to many federal science agencies, including the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The $4.7 trillion FY 2020 budget framework includes $1.3 trillion in discretionary spending and provides $543 billion (-5 percent) for nondefense discretionary spending, which is the source for ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 19, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

USGS Slated for Restructuring, 16 percent Budget Cut
Under President Trump’s budget plan for fiscal year (FY) 2020, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) would be funded at $983.5 million, a 17 percent cut from the FY 2019 level. The budget proposes to consolidate the agency’s seven mission areas into five new mission areas to reflect “stakeholder-focused realignment of program priorities.” The five new mission areas would be: Ecosystems, Energy and Mineral Resources, Natural Hazards, Water Resources, and Core Science Systems. Programs formerly under the Environmental Health area would be moved into the Ecosystems and Water Resources areas and p...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 19, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

AIBS House Testimony: Restore Funding for Interior and Environment Science
The American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) has provided testimony to the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies regarding FY 2020 funding for biological research programs within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Smithsonian Institution. An excerpt from the testimony: “We encourage Congress to provide the USGS with $1.2 billion in FY 2020 and at least $234 million for the Ecosystems mission area within USGS. We further request that Congress provide EPA Science and Technology with at least...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 19, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Amarin defies critics with more positive Vascepa data
Amarin Corp. has released new data from a study showing that its fish oil medication, Vascepa, can significantly reduce the occurrence of several adverse heart events. (Source: PharmaManufacturing.com)
Source: PharmaManufacturing.com - March 18, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Rx Fish Oil Cuts Heart Dangers in Statin Takers
The study suggests that the prescription fish oil pill, not to be confused with over-the-counter supplements, reduces the lifetime risk of dying from heart disease; having a non-fatal heart attack or stroke; or needing heart surgery or hospitalization for a heart complication. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - March 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Prescription Fish Oil Goes Beyond Preventing First CV Events
(MedPage Today) -- New REDUCE-IT data point to secondary prevention benefit (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - March 18, 2019 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

New study suggests fish oil derivative may benefit heart health
New numbers suggest that a purified fish oil derivative, a prescription drug called Vascepa, is more effective at preventing cardiovascular events than previously thought. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Giving Your Baby Peanuts Early On May Help Prevent Allergies, New Guidelines Say
Introducing peanuts early may help some babies avoid allergies, according to new guidance from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The guidelines, published in the journal Pediatrics, update and replace the AAP’s 2008 report on preventing atopic diseases — such as asthma, skin conditions and food allergies — in children. While the science in this area is still developing, the AAP’s new report says that there is more evidence than ever to suggest that purposefully introducing some foods to children early in life may help prevent them from developing food allergies, which affect about 8% of Amer...
Source: TIME: Health - March 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

8 Science-Backed Ways to Prevent Heart Attacks, According to New Guidelines
Experts have issued a new set of guidelines on the best ways to prevent first heart attacks, strokes and heart failure — and for the first time, they focus squarely on the patient. The new guidelines recognize how doctors can support people to not only address their medical risk factors, but also to change their behaviors and lifestyles in order to reduce their risk. The latest revisions to the guidelines, issued by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA), were announced at the annual meeting of the ACC. They are intended to help doctors figure out a patient’s risk of h...
Source: TIME: Health - March 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Heart Disease Source Type: news

There ’ s New Advice To Prevent Food Allergies In Children
This study — known as the Learning Early About Peanut or LEAP trial — showed that children at high risk of developing peanut allergies who are introduced to peanuts at 4 months to 6 months old had a significantly lower risk of developing a peanut allergy than those who waited until they were 5 years; 1.9% of the kids who had peanuts early developed an allergy, compared with 13.7% of the kids who waited. The LEAP trial formed the basis for Monday’s new recommendations, which encourage the early introduction of peanut products in infants at high risk for allergies. But most babies are not at high risk, and ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Food Allergies Source Type: news

Prescription Fish Oil Pill Vascepa Lowers Heart Attack Risk in Those Already on Statins
MONDAY, March 18, 2019 -- Patients who have high triglycerides and take cholesterol-lowering statins to lower their risk for heart attack or stroke can cut that risk by another 30 percent by adding a high-dose omega-3 fatty acid pill, investigators... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 18, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Prescription Fish Oil Pill Lowers Heart Attack Risk in Those Already on Statins
Title: Prescription Fish Oil Pill Lowers Heart Attack Risk in Those Already on StatinsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 3/18/2019 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 3/18/2019 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - March 18, 2019 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Gay-straight alliances, inclusive policy, and school climate: LGBTQ youths' experiences of social support and bullying - Day JK, Fish JN, Grossman AH, Russell ST.
Gay-Straight Alliances (GSA) and school policies focused on support for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning youth may reduce bias-based bullying and enhance social supports in schools. Using multivariate regression, we tested the rel... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Capitalism is destroying the Earth. We need a new human right for future generations | George Monbiot
The children on climate strike are right: their lives should not be sacrificed to satisfy our greedThe young peopletaking to the streetsfor the climate strike are right:their future is being stolen. The economy is an environmental pyramid scheme, dumping its liabilities on the young and the unborn. Its current growth depends on intergenerational theft.At the heart of capitalism is a vast and scarcely examined assumption: you are entitled to as great a share of the world ’s resources as your money can buy. You can purchase as much land, as much atmospheric space, as manyminerals, as much meat and fish as you can affor...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: George Monbiot Tags: Climate change Environment Protest Science Young people Society World news Source Type: news

Micro-CT detects early tumor growth in lymph nodes
Researchers from Japan were able to detect metastatic tumors in lymph nodes...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Phase-contrast CT captures microscopic details of mummy Micro-CT reveals hawk mummy is actually a human fetus Researchers visualize cardiac conduction system in 3D Just keep scanning: Project builds CT database of fish CT nanoparticle contrast: Good as gold? (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 14, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

BMA urges chancellor to reform pension tax rules
BMA highlights impact on doctors to chancellor who is making his Spring Statement today Related items fromOnMedica GPs set to be balloted on willingness to take industrial action Health secretary ‘committed’ to contract negotiations So long and thanks for all the fish … NHS staff report stress, violence and dissatisfaction with pay GP contract for England brings overall 3.4% increase (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - March 13, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Sunscreens may be harming fish embryos
(Natural News) We’ve been told over and over again how important it is to wear sunscreen every time we step outdoors, but even those of us who prefer to skip it most days so our bodies can get the sunlight needed to create vitamin D still tend to apply a generous amount of sunscreen before... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA Lifts Import Restrictions on Genetically Engineered Salmon
The fast-growing fish can now be raised and sold in the US, although it's likely to be some time before the product hits the market. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 11, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Omega-3s found to help those suffering from PTSD
(Natural News) PTSD, or post-traumatic stress disorder, is a mental health condition that often occurs after a person witnessed or experienced a terrifying event. People with PTSD often experience psychophysiological symptoms such as a pounding heart. Researchers from Japan suggest that this particular symptom may be improved by taking fish oil supplements and eating more foods... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

1 in 3 businesses sold mislabeled fish, advocacy group found
The seafood you buy at the supermarket may not always be what it says on the label. A new report found one in five samples of fish tested from markets and restaurants were mislabeled. The U.S. imports about 90 percent of its seafood. But once those shipments cross the border, the report says they are rarely tracked all the way to your table. Anna Werner reports. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - March 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Fish On Your Plate May Not Be What You Ordered
A new investigation finds that one-fifth of U.S. seafood tested is mislabeled. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 7, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Ordering fish? What's on the menu often isn't what's on your plate
If you splurge on the sea bass or snapper, you may not always be getting what you pay for, even at the fanciest restaurants and upscale fish markets. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Coral reef parks protecting only 40 percent of fish biomass potential
(Wildlife Conservation Society) Marine scientists from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and other groups examining the ecological status of coral reefs across the Indian and Pacific oceans have uncovered an unsettling fact: even the best coral reef marine parks contain less than half of the fish biomass found in the most remote reefs that lie far from human settlements. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How antifreeze proteins make ice crystals grow
(Bielefeld University) Bacteria, plants, insects, or even fish use antifreeze proteins to protect themselves from the cold. The proteins block the growth of ice crystals. In a new study, a German-Israeli research team has confirmed that these proteins also possess an unusual second property: at low temperatures, they can promote rather than inhibit the growth of ice crystals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Heart-healthy diets in early adulthood linked to better brain function in middle age
(American Academy of Neurology) Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, moderate in nuts, fish and alcohol and low in meat and full-fat dairy is associated with better cognitive performance in middle age, according to a study published in the March 6, 2019, online issue of Neurology ® , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Cognitive abilities include thinking and memory skills. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cochrane Infectious Disease Group works with WHO on latest guidelines for malaria vector control
The World Health Organization publishedGuidelines for malaria vector control, drawing on seven Cochrane reviews specially prepared for them by theCochrane Infectious Diseases Group (CIDG).  With its editorial base at Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM), CIDG was asked to review all of the evidence that was used in bringing together what WHO have described as a “one-stop shop” for countries and partners working to implement effective malaria vector control measures. Consolidating more than 20 sets of WHO recommendations and good practice statements into one user friendly document, the guidelines su...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - March 5, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Nutritional supplements do NOT help stave off depression
The Exeter University study of 1,000 people found the supplements, which contained folic acid, vitamin D, omega-3 fish oils, zinc and selenium, worked no better than the placebos. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Leprosy Survivor Creates Hope and Support for Others Affected by Disease
Filipino businessman Ariel Lazarte was diagnosed with Hansen’s Disease in 2014. Since his treatment he has built a successful business and has become a patron for those affected by the disease. Credit: Nalisha Adams/IPSBy Nalisha AdamsMANILA, Mar 4 2019 (IPS)When Ariel Lazarte from Quezon City, Philippines, was first diagnosed with leprosy in 2014, his life seemed as if it were falling apart. But now more than four years later Lazarte’s life is a huge contrast from the poverty and isolation he experienced as a person affected by leprosy.Now the owner of multiple businesses, including ones in transport and const...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Nalisha Adams Tags: Asia-Pacific Civil Society Conferences Development & Aid Featured Headlines Health Human Rights Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations leprosy Nippon Foundation Philippines Sasakawa Memorial Health Foundation (SMHF) Source Type: news

The Connection Between Physical and Mental Health
Many of us seriously underrate how strongly our body affects our state-of-mind. We don’t realize how strongly poor diet, lack of sleep, and too little exercise can affect our emotional and mental health. Better Nutrition Can Alleviate Depression and Anxiety Over the past decade, interest in how diet affects mental health has grown considerably. Large studies have found that habitual consumption of an unhealthy diet (defined as high in processed foods) is associated with increased risk of depression, anxiety, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents.1 A study employing a “d...
Source: Psych Central - March 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Fabiana Franco, Ph.D. Tags: Anxiety Depression Exercise General Habits Healthy Living Sleep Source Type: news

Medical News Today: A list of the best high-protein snacks
High-protein snacks that are beneficial for health include nuts, pulses, fish, and seeds. People can add many directly to their diet. Learn more about the best high-protein snacks here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

'Mama's Last Hug' Makes Case That Humans Are Not Alone In Experiencing Emotions
In his new book, primate behavior researcher Frans de Waal writes that "emotions are everywhere in the animal kingdom, from fish to birds to insects and even in brainy mollusks such as the octopus."(Image credit: AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Barbara J. King Source Type: news

Paleontology: Diversification after mass extinction
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) A team led by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich paleontologist Adriana L ó pez-Arbarello has identified three hitherto unknown fossil fish species in the Swiss Alps, which provide new insights into the diversification of the genus Eosemionotus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What are the best dietary sources of vitamin D?
Vitamin D can improve bone, muscle, and immune system health. Foods with a high vitamin D content include oily fish, some mushrooms, and egg yolks. Learn more about the best dietary sources of vitamin D here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Climate Change Takes A Bite Out Of Global Fisheries, Study Finds
New research shows fish populations have declined by as much as 35 percent in some areas due to ocean warming. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 28, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Trilobites: How the Icefish Got Its Transparent Blood and See-Through Skull
Research shows how the Antarctic blackfin icefish differs from its close relatives on the genetic level. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JOANNA KLEIN Tags: Fish and Other Marine Life Antarctic Regions Blood Evolution (Biology) Genetics and Heredity Nature Ecology & Evolution (Journal) your-feed-science Source Type: news

Turning them on, turning them off -- how to control stem cells
(University of Bath) Scientists at the University of Bath have identified how a mutant gene in fish is involved in controlling stem cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 28, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Warm seas scatter fish
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Fish provide a vital source of protein for over half the world's population, with over 56 million people employed by or subsisting on fisheries. But climate change is beginning to disrupt the complex, interconnected systems that underpin this major source of food. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 28, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study: Fish oils found to treat asthma by reducing formation of inflammatory proteins
(Natural News) Could fish oil really help treat asthma? New research has indicated that may just be the case. Scientists from the University of Rochester Medical Center have reportedly made a shocking discovery about omega-3 fatty acids, and what purpose they may be able to serve for asthma patients. Their research, which was published in... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Soybean Oil or Fish Oil? This Study ’s Result Surprised Wilmot Cancer Researchers
Investigators discovered, unexpectedly, that soybean oil was better than fish oil for reducing cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer survivors. (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - February 27, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news

Featured Review: Mediterranean-style diet for the prevention of cardiovascular disease
In this Q&A we asked the lead author Professor Saverio Stranges from Western University Canada to explain more about the mediterranean diet and its role in preventing cardiovascular disease following the publication of aCochrane Review on this topic. What makes a diet ‘Mediterranean’?Scientific interest in the traditional Mediterranean dietary pattern originated in the 1960s because of the observation that populations in countries of the Mediterranean region, such as Greece and Italy, had lower mortality from cardiovascular disease compared with northern European populations or the US, probably as a re...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - February 27, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Katie Abbotts Source Type: news

Office worker, 69, developed mercury poisoning after eating too much fish
The 69-year-old man - who has not been named - was taken to the Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center by his wife. Doctors initially thought he had suffered a stroke or drunk too much alcohol. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Using histones as bait: How do cells decide how to repair their DNA?
(Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health) When DNA in the cell nucleus gets damaged, our cells can resort to a variety of repair mechanisms. A recent study published in 'Nature Cell Biology', to which scientists from Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen made major contributions, elucidates the molecular basis by which a cell makes the choice between these repair mechanisms. The trick the scientists used: they developed a molecular bait to literally fish out the relevant proteins from the cell nucleus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

This Project Aimed To Be A Model For Saving Farms And Fish In California. It Failed.
But a separate effort by a cattleman nearby shows how a ranch can thrive in a water-scarce future. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 26, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

'Dead zone' volume more important than area to fish, fisheries
This study was published this month in Environmental Research Letters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 26, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Why Food Could Be the Best Medicine of All
When Tom Shicowich’s toe started feeling numb in 2010, he brushed it off as a temporary ache. At the time, he didn’t have health insurance, so he put off going to the doctor. The toe became infected, and he got so sick that he stayed in bed for two days with what he assumed was the flu. When he finally saw a doctor, the physician immediately sent Shicowich to the emergency room. Several days later, surgeons amputated his toe, and he ended up spending a month in the hospital to recover. Shicowich lost his toe because of complications of Type 2 diabetes as he struggled to keep his blood sugar under control. He wa...
Source: TIME: Health - February 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized health Nutrition Source Type: news

Fish oil supplements during pregnancy may protect children from high blood pressure
Studying obese children under the age of six, researchers at the University of Kansas found some did not have the typical spike in systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can Eating Dessert Be Good for Your Diet?
The case against dessert seems open and shut. The sugar that makes treats so sweet has been linked to weight gain and chronic diseases ranging from type 2 diabetes to cancer; many desserts also have an abundance of saturated fats, which potentially harm the heart, and plenty of empty calories. But some studies are suggesting that having dessert every once in a while — the real, indulgent kind, not the cut-up fresh-fruit kind — may actually be a useful tool for eating more healthfully, when it’s used strategically. It turns out that picking dessert first — instead of after a meal, like most of us do ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Mom's Prenatal Fish Oil Might Help Kids' Blood Pressure Later
FRIDAY, Feb. 22, 2019 -- Obese young children may have less risk for high blood pressure if their mother took the omega-3 fatty acid DHA -- found in fish oil -- during pregnancy, new research suggests. The findings could be important since rising... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 22, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

The Mirror Test Peers Into the Workings of Animal Minds
Nearly 50 years after its development, only a handful of creatures have passed the self-awareness exam. A new attempt with fish highlights a debate over the test's use and meaning. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 21, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Congress Completes FY 2019 Appropriations, President Declares Emergency
Congress has passed a bipartisan spending and border security package that includes fiscal year (FY) 2019 funding for the federal agencies that were shuttered during the 35-day partial government shutdown in December 2018 and January 2019. Included in the spending package was $1.375 billion for barriers along the U.S.-Mexico border. President Trump agreed to sign the legislation, but declared a national emergency to transfer funds from other government programs to fund wall construction. Congress completed its work on FY 2019 appropriations by passing the spending package, which includes seven funding bills for Interior, ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 20, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news