How to live longer: Eating fish can slash early death - but how much should you eat?
HOW TO live longer is a question many people want to know the answer to, and the solution is simple - eating a healthy, balanced diet can add years onto your life. But what foods in particular should be included in your diet? A new study has revealed eating fish is the key to longevity, and health experts reveal just how much you have to eat. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Trends in alcohol-related disparities between heterosexual and sexual minority youth from 2007 to 2015: findings from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey - Fish JN, Baams L.
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess trends in alcohol-related disparities between heterosexual and sexual minority adolescents in the United States from 2007 to 2015. METHODS: Data were pooled from the 2007, 2009, 2011, 2013, and 2015 ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Chromosome-level reference genome of the Siamese fighting fish Betta splendens, a model species for the study of aggression - Fan G, Chan J, Ma K, Yang B, Zhang H, Yang X, Shi C, Law H, Ren Z, Xu Q, Liu Q, Wang J, Chen W, Shao L, Gon çalves D, Ramos A, Cardoso SD, Guo M, Cai J, Xu X, Wang J, Yang H, Liu X, Wang Y.
BACKGROUND: Siamese fighting fish Betta splendens (NCBI Taxonomy ID: 158456) are notorious for their aggressiveness and accordingly have been widely used to study aggression. However, the lack of a reference genome has so far limited the understanding of t... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Non-Human Animals and Insects Source Type: news

Is Shellfish Healthy? Here ’s What the Experts Say
With all the talk about the disease-fighting, life-extending superpowers of the Mediterranean diet, a lot of people are trying to cram more seafood into their meals. But while there are endless articles extolling the healthful glories of fatty, omega-3-rich fish like salmon and mackerel, there’s not much talk about shellfish—or whether these sea creatures deserve space on your shopping list. As it turns out, they do. “Shellfish are high-quality protein sources—just like land animals—meaning they have all the essential amino acids,” says Faye Dong, professor emerita of food science and hu...
Source: TIME: Health - July 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Fish oil supplements for a healthy heart 'nonsense'
The evidence around omega-3 supplements is flimsy at best, say experts. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - July 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Zimbabwe:Effects of Mercury On Human Beings
[The Herald] For foetuses, infants and children, the primary health effect of mercury is impaired neurological development. Mercury exposure in the womb, which can result from a pregnant woman's consumption of fish that contain mercury, can adversely affect a baby's growing brain and nervous system. Impacts on thinking, memory, attention, language, and fine motor and visual spatial skills have been seen in children exposed to mercury in the womb. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 18, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Fish consumption may prolong life
(Wiley) Consumption of fish and long-chain omega-3 fatty acids was associated with lower risks of early death in a Journal of Internal Medicine study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Glowing bacteria on deep-sea fish shed light on evolution, 'third type' of symbiosis
(Cornell University) For the first time, scientists have sequenced and analyzed the genomes of bacteria that live in anglerfish bulbs. The bacteria were taken from fish specimens collected in the Gulf of Mexico. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Media coverage of new Cochrane Review of Cochrane Review on omega-3 fatty acids
New evidence published today shows there is little or no effect of omega 3 supplements on our risk of experiencing heart disease, stroke or death. Below is a round-up for some of the media coverage.Fishy findings: Cochrane review finds omega-3 supplements don't help heartsonScimexOmega 3 supplements do not reduce risk of heart disease, stroke, or death, finds review onthe bmjOmega-3 pills and fish oil ‘useless’ for preventing diseaseonThe Times IT'S OIL A MYTH Omega-3 and fish extracts don ’t help your heart health, researchers claim onThe SunFish oil for a healthy heart'nonsense 'on BBC News‘B...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 18, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Fish oil for a healthy heart 'nonsense'
The evidence around omega-3 supplements is flimsy at best, say experts. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - July 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How fish oil supplements can CUT levels of good fat
THE millions who down fish oil to protect their heart would do better to eat vegetables instead, say experts. Popular supplements, including omega-3, provide little or no benefit and could even reduce levels of “good” cholesterol, analysis of studies showed. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientific expert reaction to Cochrane Review on omega-3 fatty acids
This study provides no evidence to suggest that this dietary advice should change.”Read the press releaseSee the media coverageDeclared interestsProf Tim Chico: “No conflicts.”Dr Ian Johnson: “Ian Johnson has previously held honorary academic appointments in the medical school at the University of East Anglia.”Prof Tom Sanders: “Scientific governor of British Nutrition Foundation, Honorary Director of Nutrition HEART UK.”The Science Media CentreThe Science Media Centre is an independent venture working to promote the voices, stories and views from the scientific community to the ne...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 17, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Is eating tilapia fish safe and healthful?
Tilapia is a popular edible fish that is low in fat and a good source of protein and omega-3 fatty acids. Tilapia farming occurs around the world, but some people worry about farming practices and whether or not tilapia is safe to eat. Here, we provide information about the farming, breeding, and safety of tilapia. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

The ancient armor of fish -- scales -- provide clues to hair, feather development
(University of Virginia) How do scale patterns on fish provide understanding of the development of feathers, fur -- and even cancer? Biologists are investigating. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Cochrane health evidence challenges belief that omega 3 supplements reduce risk of heart disease, stroke or death
New evidence published today shows there is little or no effect of omega 3 supplements on our risk of experiencing heart disease, stroke or death.Omega 3 is a type of fat. Small amounts of omega 3 fats are essential for good health, and they can be found in the food that we eat. The main types of omega 3 fatty acids are; alpha ­linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).  ALA is normally found in fats from plant foods, such as nuts and seeds (walnuts and rapeseed are rich sources). EPA and DHA, collectively called long chain omega 3 fats, are naturally found in fatty fish, su...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 16, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Researchers Find Link Between Vitamin D and Asbestosis
This study was not designed to explain whether supplementing with vitamin D will protect against asbestosis. This new research also does not examine if taking vitamin D will slow down the progression of existing ILD. Still, there are a lot of good reasons to pay attention to the sunshine vitamin. Regardless of whether a person has been exposed to asbestos, no one should ignore very low vitamin D levels. People already diagnosed with an asbestos-related cancer, may benefit from a quick check of vitamin D levels. According to the medical literature, up to 80 percent of people with cancer may be vitamin D deficient. People ca...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 16, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

FDA Recalls Common Heart Drug For Potential Cancer Risk
(CNN) — The recall of a common drug used to control blood pressure and help prevent heart failure was announced by the US Food and Drug Administration on Friday, a week after 22 other countries recalled it because the drug contains a chemical that poses a potential cancer risk. Valsartan is off patent and is used as a component of other generic medicines, but not all medicines containing the ingredient are involved, according to the FDA. The US recall includes the the versions of valsartan that are made by Major Pharmaceuticals, Solco Healthcare and Teva Pharmaceuticals Industries Ltd. as well as valsartan/hydrochlor...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Valsartan Source Type: news

Friendlier fish may be quicker to take the bait
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) The bluegill on your dinner plate might have been more social than the rest of its group, according to a new study from the University of Illinois, and its removal from the lake could mean major changes for the remaining population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chile Fisherman Race to Recapture Escaped Salmon That Could Pose Risk Chile Fisherman Race to Recapture Escaped Salmon That Could Pose Risk
Chilean fishermen were working Thursday to recover hundreds of thousands of salmon that escaped from a fish farm as environmentalists warned of possible risks if they are eaten by humans, the government said.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Fish Pedicure Causes Woman to Lose Toenails
FRIDAY, July 13, 2018 -- A woman lost several toenails after a fish pedicure, according to a case report published online July 3 in JAMA Dermatology. Shari R. Lipner, M.D., Ph.D., from Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City, reports on a young... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 13, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Light receptors determine the behavior of flashlight fish
(Ruhr-University Bochum) Biologists at the Ruhr-Universit ä t Bochum characterized new, unknown photoreceptors from the bioluminescent flashlight fish Anomalops katoptron. The photoreceptors known as opsins allow the fish to detect light with a specific wavelength. As published on the July 11, 2018, in PLOS ONE the scientists found new opsin variants, which are specialized to detect low intensity blue light in the wavelength range of bioluminescent light emitted by the fish. The blue light can be used to influence the fish behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Moving fish farms enables seagrass meadows to thrive, study shows
(University of Plymouth) Off the coast of Cyprus in the Mediterranean Sea, many fish farms have been moved into deeper waters -- and on the seabeds beneath their previous locations, the meadows are flourishing once again. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Targeting fish parasites for a healthier aquaculture industry
EU-funded marine scientists are fighting fish parasites in farmed fish by developing new strategies and technologies to prevent their spread and ensure high-quality seafood for consumers. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - July 12, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Four ways to get more omega 3s without taking fish oil capsules
(Natural News) A few years back omega 3s had their time in the limelight as the latest and greatest nutrient you should focus on, with specific attention to fish oil capsules. Although certain types of fish can yield a beneficial amount of omega 3s, there seemed to be a complete black out on other sources... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Your fish may contain toxic chemicals, study reveals
The University of Pittsburgh study found that farmers are using feed that contains a type of synthetic flame retardant imported from countries 'without advanced food safety regulations'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is Hummus Actually Healthy? Here ’s What the Experts Say
Hummus, the chickpea-based dip that’s a staple in many Middle Eastern cuisines, is on the rise in the U.S. Multiple factors are fueling its growing popularity, according to the USDA: Hummus is naturally gluten-free, and Americans now have bigger appetites for healthier snacks. But how healthy is hummus? Here’s what the experts say. What is hummus made of? Traditional hummus is made from a blend of chickpeas, olive oil, tahini (sesame paste), lemon juice and spices, and this mix makes for a nutrient-dense food, says Elizabeth G. Matteo, a registered dietitian at Boston University’s Sargent Choice Nutritio...
Source: TIME: Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sophia Gottfried Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

How a Mediterranean diet could reduce osteoporosis
(University of East Anglia) Eating a Mediterranean-type diet could reduce bone loss in people with osteoporosis -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia. New findings published today show that sticking to a diet rich in fruit, vegetables, nuts, unrefined cereals, olive oil, and fish can reduce hip bone loss within just 12 months. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The first endemic Baltic Sea fish species received its name
(University of Helsinki) Researchers at the University of Helsinki discovered and named a new endemic fish species in the Baltic Sea, the 'Baltic flounder,' Platichthys solemdali. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 11, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Romans had whale industry, archeological excavation suggests
Ancient whale bones have been found on three Roman fish processing sites close to the Strait of GibraltarAncient bones found around the Strait of Gibraltar suggest that the Romans might have had a thriving whaling industry, researchers have claimed.The bones, dating to the first few centuries AD or earlier, belong to grey whales and North Atlantic right whales – coastal migratory species that are no longer found in European waters.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Archaeology Science Whales Cetaceans Environment Marine life Wildlife Source Type: news

Romans had whaling industry, archaeological excavation suggests
Ancient whale bones have been found on three Roman fish processing sites close to the Strait of GibraltarAncient bones found around the Strait of Gibraltar suggest that the Romans might have had a thriving whaling industry, researchers have claimed.The bones, dating to the first few centuries AD or earlier, belong to grey whales and North Atlantic right whales – coastal migratory species that are no longer found in European waters.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Archaeology Science Whales Cetaceans Environment Marine life Wildlife Source Type: news

Human rights abuse continues in Thailand’s fishing industry; new database lets seafood importers know if there is slavery in their supply chain
(Natural News) A new tool has been developed to inform the public whether the fish that they’ve bought (or are eating) comes from fisheries engaged in child labor. The Seafood Slavery Risk Tool is the brother to the already-known Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program which shows how sustainable the seafood is using a red,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New UN agriculture agency report underscores value of fishing in fight against global hunger
The vital role that fishing and fish-farming play in supporting some of the poorest families across the world, came under the spotlight on Monday with the publication of the annual United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) report on the global industry. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - July 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Science — And Environmental Hazards — Behind Fish Oil Supplements
Author Paul Greenberg says the harvesting of tiny fish for omega-3 supplements is having a ripple effect, leading to less healthy and bountiful oceans. His new book is The Omega Principle. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Terry Gross Source Type: news

In responding to predation risk, secondhand experience can be as good as new
(Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Throughout the living world, parents have many ways of gifting their offspring with information they will need to help them survive. A new study from University of Illinois in Nature Ecology and Evolution examining the effects of exposure to predators across two generations of stickleback fish yielded a surprising insight into how such transgenerational information is used. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fluorescent fish genes light path to neuroblastoma
(Rice University) Neurodevelopmental biologist Rosa Uribe, a CPRIT Scholar who was recruited to Rice University in 2017 with a grant from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, has a new tool in the search for the origins of neuroblastoma, the third-most common pediatric cancer in the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: The diet that could improve your brain's health
If you knew changing your diet today could make your brain healthier, would you? Research suggests the Mediterranean diet could be the key. Dr. Maria Vassilaki, a Mayo Clinic epidemiology researcher, explains how a Mediterranean diet full of fruits and vegetables, fish, healthy oils like olive oil, and less meat and saturated fat appears to [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 9, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Common Heart Drug Recalled In 22 Countries For Possible Cancer Link
(CNN) — A common drug used to control blood pressure and help prevent heart failure is being recalled in 22 countries because it contains a chemical that poses a potential cancer risk. Valsartan is off-patent and is used as a component of other generic medicines. Novartis, the company that originally developed the drug, said Sandoz valsartan and valsartan/HCT film-coated tablets are being recalled since they “do not meet our high quality standards.” Pharmacies in the UK are advised to recall valsartan batches containing medicines made by Dexcel Pharma Ltd and Accord Healthcare. The recall involves about 2...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Valsartan Source Type: news

Nature's antifreeze inspires revolutionary bacteria cryopreservation technique
(University of Warwick) The survival mechanisms of polar fish have led scientists at the University of Warwick to develop of a revolutionary approach to 'freeze' bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Woman lost her toenails after fish pedicure
Trauma from the so-called "doctor fish" nibbling on her toenails likely caused them to separate, according to a new case study (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - July 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eating healthily during pregnancy 'could protect babies from allergies'
Researchers found women who eat more fish and seafood have children who appear to have a healthier mix of gut bugs - called bifidobacterium - which are seen as beneficial for health. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Fish Pedicure' Caused One Woman's Toenails to Stop Growing
Title: 'Fish Pedicure' Caused One Woman's Toenails to Stop GrowingCategory: Health NewsCreated: 7/3/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 7/5/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Skin General)
Source: MedicineNet Skin General - July 5, 2018 Category: Dermatology Source Type: news

Scientists say that by 2050, our oceans will have more plastic than fish; U.N. calls for more decisive action
(Natural News) In honor of World Environment Day, the U.N. is calling on decisive action to stem one of our planet’s biggest environmental threats: plastic pollution. The statistics are mind-blowing: 8 million tons of plastic end up in our oceans and seas each year. The number of microplastics found in the ocean outnumber the stars... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Fish Pedicure' Makes Woman's Toenails Stop Growing
During a fish pedicure, people immerse their feet in warm water and let doctor fish eat away at dead skin. The procedures have become all the rage in recent years. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - July 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fish pedicure caused woman's toenails to fall out
An unnamed woman in her 20s, who is believed to be from New York, developed onychomadesis, which caused her to shed her nails at their roots, six months after having the unusual spa treatment. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

After fish pedicure, woman loses her toenails
After a young woman's toenails started to separate from her toes, a doctor finally zeroed in on the reason: a fish pedicure, according to a report published Tuesday in the journal JAMA Dermatology. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

' Fish Pedicure' Caused One Woman's Toenails to Stop Growing
TUESDAY, July 3, 2018 -- A New York City woman who got a trendy " fish pedicure " may have lost a little more than the dead skin on her feet -- she may have lost her toenails, too. So finds a case report published July 3 in the journal JAMA... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 3, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Spearfishing makes fishes more timid
(Forschungsverbund Berlin) Fisheries scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and international colleagues have studied the response of fish in the Mediterranean Sea to spearfishing. The fish are able to finely discriminate if divers carry a speargun or not. They adjust their escape behavior and keep a safe distance outside the shooting range. This is good for the fish and a challenge for the spearfisher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Could a fishy diet block Parkinson’s? DR ROSEMARY answers your health questions
Q: CAN eating oily fish block the onset of Parkinson ’s disease? It runs in my family and I want to prevent it happening to me. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Food waste from fish found to have a biomedical application: Collagen in fish scales promotes wound healing
(Natural News) “Let food be your medicine” gets a slightly different take with this study: Researchers from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have discovered a novel use for fish scales, which are commonly discarded in the cooking process. Their study, published in the journal Acta Biomaterialia, found that the collagen present in fish scales has the potential to be used... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news