How did 500 species of a fish form in a lake? Dramatically different body clocks
(Florida Atlantic University) Despite the dramatic difference between day and nightlife, how fish exploit different times of day has not been studied systematically. Scientists explored alterations in the circadian timing of activity and the duration of rest-wake cycles in Lake Malawi's cichlids and identified the first single nocturnal species. Timing and duration of rest and activity varies dramatically, and continuously, between populations of Lake Malawi cichlids, providing a system for exploring the molecular and neural basis underlying variation in nocturnal activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A discovery that " literally changes the textbook "
(Michigan State University) The network of nerves connecting our eyes to our brains is sophisticated and researchers have now shown that it evolved much earlier than previously thought, thanks to an unexpected source: the gar fish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Regional habitat differences identified for threatened piping plovers on Atlantic coast
(US Geological Survey) Piping plovers, charismatic shorebirds that nest and feed on many Atlantic Coast beaches, rely on different kinds of coastal habitats in different regions along the Atlantic Coast, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bilateral visual projections exist in non-teleost bony fish and predate the emergence of tetrapods
In most vertebrates, camera-style eyes contain retinal ganglion cell neurons that project to visual centers on both sides of the brain. However, in fish, ganglion cells were thought to innervate only the contralateral side, suggesting that bilateral visual projections appeared in tetrapods. Here we show that bilateral visual projections exist in non-teleost fishes and that the appearance of ipsilateral projections does not correlate with terrestrial transition or predatory behavior. We also report that the developmental program that specifies visual system laterality differs between fishes and mammals, as the Zic2 transcri...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Vigouroux, R. J., Duroure, K., Vougny, J., Albadri, S., Kozulin, P., Herrera, E., Nguyen-Ba-Charvet, K., Braasch, I., Suarez, R., Del Bene, F., Chedotal, A. Tags: Evolution, Neuroscience r-articles Source Type: news

Repairing the fish heart
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Purnell, B. A. Tags: twis Source Type: news

Revealing meat and fish fraud with a handheld 'MasSpec Pen' in seconds
(American Chemical Society) Meat and fish fraud are global problems, costing consumers billions of dollars every year. On top of that, mislabeling products can cause problems for people with allergies, religious or cultural restrictions. Current methods to detect this fraud, while accurate, are slower than inspectors would like. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have optimized their handheld MasSpec Pen to identify common types of meat and fish within 15 seconds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 31, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientific Specimens Are Going Online, But Much Remains Hidden In Storage
From fish in jars to rare seeds and microbes, hundreds of millions of biological specimens are stored around the U.S., and caretakers are trying to make them accessible for future research.(Image credit: Melissa Aja/Museum of Comparative Zoology/President and Fellows of Harvard College) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Book Club Discussion of Lulu Miller's Why Fish Don't Exist
The Scientist Social Club talked to the author and her dad, Chris Miller. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 26, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Study analyses fish larval dispersal in western Mediterranean
(University of Barcelona) A new study analyzes the larval dispersal of nine fish species in the western Mediterranean and identifies three large areas in which there is barely fish exchange, so fish would remain in the same area all their life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 26, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Should you take fish oil? Depends on your genotype
(University of Georgia) Fish oil supplements are a billion-dollar industry built on a foundation of purported, but not proven, health benefits. Now, new research from a team led by a University of Georgia scientist indicates that taking fish oil only provides health benefits if you have the right genetic makeup. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 25, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genesis Healthcare names turnaround specialist as second CEO in 3 months
Struggling nursing home operator Genesis Healthcare has named a turnaround specialist and former hedge fund manager as its new CEO. Harry Wilson replaces Robert H. Fish, who will continue to serve on the company's board of directors. Fish had only held the title CEO of Genesis since January, following the exit of longtime CEO George Hager. Wilson founded MAEVA Group in 2011, a firm focused on helping to transform and better po sition companies for long-term success. Early in his career he spent… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 24, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

Genesis Healthcare names turnaround specialist as second CEO in 3 months
Struggling nursing home operator Genesis Healthcare has named a turnaround specialist and former hedge fund manager as its new CEO. Harry Wilson replaces Robert H. Fish, who will continue to serve on the company's board of directors. Fish had only held the title CEO of Genesis since January, following the exit of longtime CEO George Hager. Wilson founded MAEVA Group in 2011, a firm focused on helping to transform and better po sition companies for long-term success. Early in his career he spent… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 24, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

Corals may need their predators' poop
(Rice University) Fish that dine on corals may pay it forward with poop. Rice University marine biologists found high concentrations of living symbiotic algae in the feces of coral predators on reefs in Mo'orea, French Polynesia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fish are ingesting plastic at higher rates, new research warns
(Natural News) Marine plastic pollution is a pervasive problem around the world. Now, new research shows that fish are eating plastic dinners at higher rates than before, including some species that are threatened or near-threatened. Published in the journal Global Change Biology, the study revealed that marine fish are consuming 2.4 percent more plastic each year over... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Russian scientists find microplastics in Siberian snow and rainwater
Researchers have found microplastics in the guts of fish in Siberia's rivers “ all of which connect with the Arctic Ocean. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mar 19 2021 This Week in Cardiology Mar 19 2021 This Week in Cardiology
COVID-19, Fish Oil and AF risk, SGLT2 inhibitors and renal outcomes, and TAVR vs SAVR are the topics discussed by John Mandrola, MD, in this week ’s podcast.theheart.org on Medscape (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - March 19, 2021 Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiology Commentary Source Type: news

Associations of relationship experiences, dating violence, sexual harassment, and assault with alcohol use among sexual and gender minority adolescents - Kiekens WJ, Baams L, Fish JN, Watson RJ.
Sexual and gender minority (SGM) adolescents report higher rates of dating violence victimization compared with their heterosexual and cisgender peers. Research on dating violence often neglects diversity in sexual and gender identities and is limited to e... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 19, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Turns out altruism is for the fish
(Osaka City University) Through a series of prosocial choice tasks, researchers reveal prosocial and antisocial characteristics in male convict cichlid fish. The fish distinguish between female breeding partners, unknown females, and rival males by adjusting their actions to either provide food for both them and the females or avoid providing food for the rival males. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How flashlight fish communicate with light signals in the school
(Ruhr-University Bochum) Flashlight fish have the ability to generate situation-specific blink patterns resembling a visual Morse code. Researchers at Ruhr-Universit ä t Bochum have shown in laboratory and field experiments that the animals use these light signals to coordinate their behaviour in the school when visibility is limited. Both the light intensity and the blinking frequency affected the animals' behaviour. The team has shared their findings in the journalScientific Reports, published online on 19 March 2021. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fish Oil, Vitamin D Won't Prevent A-Fib: Study
A-fib, also known as atrial fibrillation, affects more than 33 million people worldwide and is the most common type of abnormal heart rhythm. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - March 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fish Oil, Vitamin D Won't Prevent A-Fib: Study
THURSDAY, March 18, 2021 -- For people hoping to prevent the heart rhythm disorder known as " a-fib, " new research shows that taking vitamin D or fish oil supplements won't help. A-fib, also known as atrial fibrillation, affects more than 33 million... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 18, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Fish Oil, Vitamin D Won't Prevent A-Fib: Study
Title: Fish Oil, Vitamin D Won't Prevent A-Fib: StudyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 3/18/2021 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 3/18/2021 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - March 18, 2021 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Harbour porpoises attracted to oil platforms when searching for food
(Aarhus University) A large gathering of fish tempts harbour porpoises to search for food around oil and gas platforms, even though the noise from these industrial plants normally to scare the whales away. Decommissioned platforms may therefore serve as artificial reefs in the North Sea. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 18, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists document first biofluorescent fish in the Arctic
(American Museum of Natural History) For the first time, scientists have documented biofluorescence in an Arctic fish species. The study, led by researchers at the American Museum of Natural History who spent hours in the icy waters off of Greenland where the red-and-green-glowing snailfish was found, is published today in theAmerican Museum Novitates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 18, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Simpsons Didn't Predict COVID (and Other Myths Dispelled) The Simpsons Didn't Predict COVID (and Other Myths Dispelled)
The Poynter Institute's PolitiFact fact-checkers also clarify that nothing cures COVID-19, certainly not fish tank cleaner or cocaine, in a list of the wackiest claims posted in the pandemic.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Emergency Medicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape Emergency Medicine Headlines - March 17, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Changes in alcohol use since the onset of COVID-19 are associated with psychological distress among sexual and gender minority university students in the U.S - Salerno JP, Shrader CH, Algarin AB, Lee JY, Fish JN.
BACKGROUND: Sexual and gender minority (SGM) young persons are experiencing compounding effects of COVID-19 due to unique social inequalities and existent mental health and substance use challenges. Given that 41% of all young persons are enrolled in unive... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 17, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

How Industrial Fishing Creates More CO2 Emissions Than Air Travel
It’s been well established by now that the agricultural systems producing our food contribute at least one fifth of global anthropogenic carbon emissions—and up to a third if waste and transportation are factored in. A troubling new report points to a previously overlooked source: an industrial fishing process practiced by dozens of countries around the world, including the United States, China, and the E.U. The study, published today in the scientific journal Nature, is the first to calculate the carbon cost of bottom trawling, in which fishing fleets drag immense weighted nets along the ocean floor, scraping ...
Source: TIME: Science - March 17, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Aryn Baker Tags: Uncategorized embargoed study Explainer Londontime overnight TIME 2030 Source Type: news

A deep dive into cells' RNA reality
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) A new RNA detection method named BOLORAMIS allows to design and uses a new type of DNA probe that directly binds its RNA target and allows the straight-forward synthesis of a barcoded DNA amplicon, which can be visualized by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) or sequenced in situ. BOLORAMIS enables the analysis of different classes of RNAs with higher specificity and sensitivity than FISSEQ and other methods, works in the context of cells and tissues, and can be highly multiplexed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 17, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fish detectives: the sleuths using ‘e-DNA’ to fight seafood fraud
A Canadian supplier known for wild salmon has teamed up with geneticists to prove what really ends up on the plateRevealed: seafood fraud happening on a vast global scaleThe first notable thing about the wild salmon fillet Dane Chauvel shows me is its colour – a rich red that, even over FaceTime, makes my mouth water. The second notable thing is that it’s definitely salmon.This might not seem like a debatable fact. Chauvel is co-founder of Organic Ocean Seafood in Vancouver, Canada, housed in a historic building at the mouth of the 854-mile (1,375km) Fraser River, one of Canada ’s main salmon courses. The...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Stephen Leahy Tags: Fish Fishing industry Environment Food Genetics Biology Science Marine life Wildlife Crime US crime Canada World news UK news US news Source Type: news

COVID-19 patient thanks UCLA medical team that saved her life
Blanca Lopez, 47, walked slowly through the gleaming lobby ofRonald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, her brown eyes huge over her mask. Her teenage son, Criztiaan, pointed out landmarks where he used to wait for physicians ’ updates on his mother’s condition during her COVID-19 hospitalization.None of it looked familiar.Outside a dozen health care workers huddled in the January night air after a 12-hour shift. Despite the late hour, the mood was festive. The doctors, nurses and therapists chattered with excitement, their masked faces animated in the warm glow of the courtyard ’s illuminated fountains.When Lope...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 12, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

LGBTQ state policies: a lever for reducing SGM youth substance use and bullying - Watson RJ, Fish JN, Denary W, Caba A, Cunningham C, Eaton LA.
PURPOSE: Sexual and gender minority youth (SGMY) are more likely than their cisgender and heterosexual peers to use substances and to be bullied, yet it is unknown whether the absence/presence of youth- and LGBTQ-specific equity laws drive these disparitie... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Fish off the coast of Fukushima show high concentrations of radioactive cesium
(Natural News) For the first time since 2019, fish contaminated with high levels of radioactive cesium have been caught off the coast of the Fukushima Prefecture in Japan on Feb. 22, according to local public broadcaster NHK. Laboratory tests revealed that black rockfish caught at a depth of 24 meters (m) nearly 8.8 kilometers (km) off... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 10, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eating Fish Links With Fewer CVD Events in High-Risk People Eating Fish Links With Fewer CVD Events in High-Risk People
An analysis of more than 191,000 people worldwide shows a significant link between eating two fish meals a week and fewer cardiovascular disease (CVD) events, but only for those with CVD or at high risk for it.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - March 10, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Eating Fish Tied to Fewer CVD Events in High-Risk People Eating Fish Tied to Fewer CVD Events in High-Risk People
An analysis of more than 191,000 people worldwide shows a significant link between eating two fish meals a week and fewer cardiovascular disease (CVD) events, but only for those with CVD or at high risk for it.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - March 10, 2021 Category: Cardiology Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Global Study Supports Eating Fish for Heart Health
Title: Global Study Supports Eating Fish for Heart HealthCategory: Health NewsCreated: 3/9/2021 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 3/10/2021 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - March 10, 2021 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Global Study Supports Eating Fish for Heart Health
TUESDAY, March. 9, 2021 -- For people with heart disease, eating fish twice a week may be a lifesaver. New worldwide research shows that two 6-ounce servings a week of oily fish, like salmon, might help prevent cardiovascular disease in high-risk... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 9, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

There will never be a cuttlefish in the cabinet – and that makes me sad | Emma Beddington
Octopuses and their relatives are remarkably clever and controlled. How many of our top politicians can say the same?Back in the gentler days of the internet, before it was just bots and people shouting at tea, I had a blog, and through it, occasional exchanges with a woman I described as my “cephalopod correspondent”. She would write, sharing interesting titbits about squid behaviour, cuttlefish news and, once, a picture of “anOctopus cyanea on a penny ”.I think of her often now, as every week it seems we learn something spectacular about the tentacular. Octopuses are competent and creative problem...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Emma Beddington Tags: Marine life Animals Biology Science Wildlife Environment Psychology Source Type: news

VIMS scientists want to hear your fish tales... or at least see your photos
(Virginia Institute of Marine Science) Researchers at William& Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science are casting a wide net in search of fish photos. Their immediate goal is to use angler snapshots to train software to identify different fish species. Their ultimate goal is to put that artificial intelligence into a " RecFish " cell-phone app, giving anglers a multi-use field guide and scientists a collaborative tool for better management of recreational species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 9, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Eating oily fish just twice a week 'could slash heart attack risk'  
Two servings of fish a week could prevent people with heart disease from having major heart attacks or strokes, Canadian researchers say. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eating fish high in omega-3s may lower death risk for heart patients
Adults with heart disease who consume 6 or more ounces of fish a week can reduce their risk for more serious heart complications or death by up to 20%, a study published Monday by JAMA Internal Medicine found. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - March 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Federal court rules FDA's fast-tracked GMO Salmon ILLEGAL due to environmental concerns
(Natural News) Time for supper kids! We’re having genetically mutated fish with hormone-laden tarter sauce, and a side of worm-killing Frankencorn. If every consumer really knew what GMO really meant, nobody would buy food made with them, and that’s why a court of law just rejected what the crooks at the FDA tried to ‘fast-track’... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study finds two servings of fish per week can help prevent recurrent heart disease
(McMaster University) An analysis of several large studies involving participants from more than 60 countries, spearheaded by researchers from McMaster University, has found that eating oily fish regularly can help prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) in high-risk individuals, such as those who already have heart disease or stroke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

EU accused of ‘neocolonial’ plundering of tuna in Indian Ocean
Indian Ocean states say EU pushing weakest conservation efforts for yellowfin tuna while EU ‘distant fleet’ hoovers up the most fish (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Female gannets go the extra mile to feed chicks
(University of Exeter) Female gannets travel further than male gannets to find fish for their chicks in some years but not others, new research shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 4, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hammer time! Baby fish brain lights up listening to U Can't Touch This – video
Australian DJ and neuroscientist Rebecca Poulsen – AKA BeXta – is studying what happens to a zebrafish larvae brains when they hear certain sounds. Thenshe played one MC Hammer's 1990 hit… 'You can see when the vocal goes ‘ohhh-oh’, specific neurons light up and you can see it pulses to the beat,' she says. 'To me it looks like neurons responding to different parts of the music'Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 3, 2021 Category: Science Tags: Neuroscience Australia news Fish Environment Hip-hop Pop and rock Source Type: news

Nigeria: Nigeria Has 2,5 Million Metric Tonnes of Fish Deficit - Minister
[Vanguard] Despite being the largest producer of fish in Africa, Nigeria currently records a 2.5million metirc tonnes of fish deficit, a situation that may have jeopardised protein intake amongst Nigerians. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - March 3, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Ownership ’s hidden rules: Q & A with ‘Mine!’ co-author James Salzman
In the new book“Mine!: How the Hidden Rules of Ownership Control Our Lives” (Doubleday), UCLA School of Law professor James Salzman reveals the hidden rules that govern who owns what — from the reclining space behind airline seats to HBO passwords for streaming shows. Salzman is the Donald Bren Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law at UCLA Law, a faculty member of theEmmett Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, and one of the country ’s leading scholars of environmental law. His co-author is Michael Heller, the Lawrence A. Wien Professor of Real Estate Law at Columbia Law School.&l...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 3, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Small-scale fisheries offer strategies for resilience in the face of climate change
(Stanford's School of Earth, Energy& Environmental Sciences) Small-scale fisheries, which employ about 90 percent of the world's fishers and supply half the fish for human consumption, are on the frontlines of climate change. They may offer insights into resilience. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 3, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Diversity of fish species supply endangered killer whale diet throughout the year
(NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region) Endangered Southern Resident killer whales prey on a diversity of Chinook and other salmon. The stocks come from an enormous geographic range as far north as Alaska and as far south as California's Central Valley, a new analysis shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 3, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Theaters hit the one-year anniversary of shutdown. How are artists keeping afloat?
Daniel Fish, Culture Clash, Dael Orlandersmith, Richard Maxwell, Annie Dorsen and Lars Jan reveal much loss — but also see a way forward. (Source: L.A. Times - Health)
Source: L.A. Times - Health - March 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charles McNulty Source Type: news