Microplastics Are Turning Up Everywhere, Even In Human Excrement
A very small study shows that microplastics are in human waste in many parts of the world. While it's not entirely clear what that means for our health, it might be a sign that we need to pull back.(Image credit: Desiree Martin/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jill Neimark Source Type: news

Antipsychotic Drugs Don't Ease ICU Delirium Or Dementia
Though widely prescribed in hospital intensive care units to treat hallucinations and other signs of delirium, Haldol and similar drugs are no better than a placebo for such patients, a study finds.(Image credit: Nehru Sulejmanovski/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Harris Source Type: news

Want To Keep Your Brain Sharp? Take Care Of Your Eyes And Ears
Two large studies show that age-related memory loss can be slowed significantly when older people promptly address hearing and vision loss.(Image credit: Leyla B/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Allison Aubrey Source Type: news

A Climate Scientist On 'Slaying The Climate Dragon'
Kate Marvel, a climate scientist at Columbia University and NASA, talks to NPR's Scott Simon about her fairy tale on climate change and reads passages from the story. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Transferring An Organ From An HIV-Positive Donor
Surgeons in South Africa transplanted part of a liver from an HIV-positive mother to her uninfected daughter — a medical first. Scott Simon talks to Dr. Harriet Etheredge, a medical bioethicist. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Slow Trip To A Hot Planet: Spacecraft Launches For Mission To Mercury
The European Space Agency's BepiColombo will take seven years to reach the innermost planet in our solar system, where temperatures at the surface can reach 800 degrees Fahrenheit.(Image credit: NASA, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington via AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

A Slow Trip To A Hot Planet: Spacecraft Poised For Mission To Mercury
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Scientists Learn To Hear The 'Songs' Of Ice Shelves
Scientists have found a new way to analyze the structural integrity of ice shelves at the end of the world, through the songs the winds sing on top of them.(Image credit: De Agostini Picture Library/De Agostini/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Andrew Flanagan Source Type: news

Grandma Was Right: Sunshine Helps Kill Germs Indoors
All kinds of bacteria live with us indoors, and some can make us sick. A new study shows that rooms exposed to light had about half the live bacteria found in rooms that were kept in darkness.(Image credit: Dave G Kelly/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kathleen O'Neil Source Type: news

Bye, Bye, Beer? Brewers Say They've Got A Plan On Climate Change
A scientific paper published this week predicts climate change will send beer prices skyrocketing and drastically reduce the barley crop. It got tons of media attention. But is beer really doomed?(Image credit: Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alastair Bland Source Type: news

Bye-Bye, Beer? Brewers Say They've Got A Plan On Climate Change
A scientific paper published this week predicts climate change will send beer prices skyrocketing and drastically reduce the barley crop. It got tons of media attention. But is beer really doomed?(Image credit: Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alastair Bland Source Type: news

What Do You Get A Nobel Prize Winner? It's Hard To Find A Perfect Gift
The University of Missouri was deciding how to honor George Smith, who shared the 2018 Nobel in chemistry. Some schools designate parking spots but Smith bikes. He now has his own spot in a bike rack. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Geological Teams Try To Determine The Future Of Storm-Affected Communities
Researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey are on the ground in Florida looking for the high water marks of Hurricane Michael. FEMA uses these maps to determine who is eligible for what kind of aid. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jacob Harper Source Type: news

EPA Boasts Of Reduced Greenhouse Gases, Even As Trump Questions Climate Science
U.S. production of heat-trapping greenhouse gases fell 2.7 percent last year. But larger cuts will be needed to address climate change.(Image credit: Branden Camp/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Horsley Source Type: news

Not Just For Cows Anymore: New Cottonseed Is Safe For People To Eat
Cottonseed is full of protein but toxic to humans and most animals. The USDA has approved a genetically engineered cotton with edible seeds. They could eventually feed chickens, fish — or even people.(Image credit: Courtesy of Lacey Roberts/Texas A&M University) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dan Charles Source Type: news

Geologists Question 'Evidence Of Ancient Life' in 3.7 Billion-Year-Old Rocks
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Distrust Of Health Care System May Keep Black Men Away From Prostate Cancer Research
Black men are hit hardest by prostate cancer, but they are underrepresented in research. Researchers held focus groups in three states to understand why. (Image credit: Tetra Images/Getty Images/Tetra images RF) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Cohen Source Type: news

Survey Finds Widespread 'Moral Distress' Among Veterinarians
Most of the 800 veterinarians surveyed feel ethical qualms when pet owners ask them to euthanize animals that could be treated, or when owners ask to keep pets alive who will suffer needlessly.(Image credit: Anya Semenoff/Denver Post via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carey Goldberg Source Type: news

Excavation Of Lithuania's Great Synagogue Highlights A 'Painful Page' From History
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lucian Kim Source Type: news

After Paul Allen Co-Founded Microsoft, He Changed Brain Science Forever
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

Beer Prices Could Double Because Of Climate Change, Study Says
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bill Chappell Source Type: news

Climate Change Could Make Beer Prices Double, Study Says
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bill Chappell Source Type: news

'Brief Answers To The Big Questions' Is Stephen Hawking's Parting Gift To Humanity
The physicist's posthumous book highlights his belief in the rationality of nature and on our ability to uncover its secrets — and a faith in science's ability to solve humanity's biggest problems.(Image credit: Santi Visalli/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marcelo Gleiser Source Type: news

Why It's Hard To Change Minds About Climate Change
The science is there. But some people aren't.(Image credit: Aishath Adam/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Coffee Rust Threatens Latin American Crop; 150 Years Ago, It Wiped Out An Empire
The fungus, which has no cure, is destroying harvests in Latin America. In the 1800s, it devastated Sri Lanka's powerhouse coffee industry. And scientists say it's only a question of time.(Image credit: Jeff Koehler for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeff Koehler Source Type: news

2 Towns: Guess Which 1 Is Liberal And Which Is Conservative
A social scientist says some portion of people's political leanings can come from an unlikely source: their DNA. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shankar Vedantam Source Type: news

After Journalist Disappears, Companies Reconsider Saudi Investment
U.S. executives are pulling out of an investment conference scheduled to take place in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, next week — as controversy swirls around the disappearance of a missing Saudi journalist. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Ydstie Source Type: news

Getting Back What You Lost — Rebuilding In A Wildfire Zone
In northern California, homes are being rebuilt in the same area that burned to the ground in last year's Tubbs Fire. Despite the risk, a severe housing shortage in the area is forcing tough choices.(Image credit: Lauren Sommer/KQED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lauren Sommer Source Type: news

Critic Of Federal Public Lands Management To Join Department Of The Interior
The Department of the Interior has chosen a prominent property rights attorney in Wyoming as their new deputy solicitor. Its a controversial appointment for environmental groups.(Image credit: Mead Gruver/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kirk Siegler Source Type: news

If Your Medical Information Becomes A Moneymaker, Could You Get A Cut?
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Harris Source Type: news

If Your Medical Information Becomes A Moneymaker, Could You Could Get A Cut?
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Harris Source Type: news

Colorado's Anti-Fracking Measure Would Keep Wells Farther Away From Homes And Schools
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Grace Hood Source Type: news

Old-Growth Forests May Help Songbirds Cope With Warming Climate
Songbirds have been in decline for decades, and it's becoming clear that climate change is a factor. Scientists are finding that old-growth forests may help the birds cope with rising temperatures.(Image credit: Greg Davis/OPB) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jes Burns Source Type: news

Last Year, The Flu Put Him In A Coma. This Year He's Getting The Shot
When 39-year-old Charlie Hinderliter got the flu last winter, he ended up in a medically induced coma and spent 58 days hospitalized. Serious, even fatal, complications can hit patients of any age.(Image credit: Neeta Satam for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bram Sable-Smith Source Type: news

When In Drought: States Take On Urgent Negotiations To Avoid Colorado River Crisis
After years of sustained drought, water managers along the Colorado River system are renegotiating water cutbacks to seven Western states, hoping to avoid more drastic shortages in the future.(Image credit: Luke Runyon/KUNC) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Luke Runyon Source Type: news

'The Ravenmaster' Is Definitely (There) For The Birds
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Petra Mayer Source Type: news

'Sperm Donor' Families: 45 Children And Counting
NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks with Kianni Arroyo, whose biological father is donor #2757 and a popular choice in the sperm bank world. Arroyo is looking to connect with all of her half siblings. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Good News For 'Green' Brews: Consumers Say They'll Pay More For Sustainable Beer
More than 1,000 U.S. beer drinkers surveyed say they would pay about $1.30 more for a six-pack of beer if it was produced at a brewery that invests in water conservation or solar power.(Image credit: Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel D. Cohen Source Type: news

Meet The Internet Researchers Unmasking Russian Assassins
The group Bellingcat seeks to unmask covert operations, rogue groups and corruption around the globe. But can they keep their independence?(Image credit: Meredith Rizzo/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Geoff Brumfiel Source Type: news

Friday News Roundup - International
Plus, the first female Doctor Who.(Image credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Robin Steinberg: How Can We End The Injustice Of Bail?
The bail system disproportionately impacts low-income people of color and pressures defendants into pleading guilty. But Robin Steinberg is implementing a plan to fix this--without waiting for reform.(Image credit: Ryan Lash/TED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NPR/TED Staff Source Type: news

Steven Wise: If Chimpanzees Can Feel And Think, Should They Also Have Legal Rights?
Animals like chimpanzees are autonomous beings with rich emotional lives, says animal rights lawyer Steven Wise. He's working to get courts to recognize them as "legal persons" and grant them rights.(Image credit: Steven Wise) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NPR/TED Staff Source Type: news

Brett Hennig: Should We Replace Politicians With Random Citizens?
Brett Hennig says democracy — and the process of voting — is broken. To fix it, he has a radical suggestion: replacing politicians with a demographically representative selection of random citizens.(Image credit: Daniel Páth/TED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NPR/TED Staff Source Type: news

Vivek Maru: How Can We Make Legal Support Accessible To All?
Often, people who don't understand the law or can't pay for lawyers end up being mistreated. Lawyer Vivek Maru calls for a global community of paralegals to place the law on the side of the people.(Image credit: Ryan Lash/TED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NPR/TED Staff Source Type: news

For Sale! Certified Lunar Meteorite — Weight 12 lbs — Mileage 250K
Ever look at the moon and say, "Yeah, I want a piece of that"? Well, an online auction house has one for sale. (Image credit: Rodrique Ngowi/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ruben Kimmelman Source Type: news

For Sale! Certified Lunar Meteorite — Weight 12 Pounds — Mileage 250,000
Ever look at the moon and say, "Yeah, I want a piece of that"? Well, an online auction house has one for sale.(Image credit: Rodrique Ngowi/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ruben Kimmelman Source Type: news

U.S. And Russian Astronauts Safe Following Rocket Malfunction After Launch
NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with retired Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield about Thursday's failed launch of a Russian Soyuz rocket carrying a U.S.-Russian crew to the International Space Station. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Easy DNA Identifications With Genealogy Databases Raise Privacy Concerns
A majority of Americans of European descent could be linked to third cousins, or closer relatives, using genealogy databases, a study finds. Soon it may be possible to identify nearly everyone by DNA.(Image credit: Randy Pench/Sacramento Bee/TNS via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Human Retinas Grown In A Dish Reveal Origin Of Color Vision
Our ability to see colors develops in the womb. Now scientists have replicated that process in the lab using human cells that grow into a functioning retina.(Image credit: Johns Hopkins University) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

Manned Rocket Headed For International Space Station Fails, Makes Emergency Landing
Astronaut Nick Hague and Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin were on board when their Soyuz MS-10's booster malfunctioned. The two made it out safely. (Image credit: Dmitri Lovetsky/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bill Chappell Source Type: news