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A New Era For Astronomy Has Begun
Astronomy is forever changed by the viewing of the collision of neutron stars; we can now watch these processes in many different ways as they run their course, says astrophysicist Marcelo Gleiser.(Image credit: Susan Walsh/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marcelo Gleiser Source Type: news

Computer Learns To Play Go At Superhuman Levels 'Without Human Knowledge'
Researchers say they have constructed an AI program that can teach itself to play the ancient strategy game at a level far beyond humans.(Image credit: DeepMind) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

Diabetes Technology Moves Closer To Making Life Easier For Patients
While the technology is moving rapidly, insurance, regulatory, and supply challenges make it harder for patients to quickly access the latest medical advances to manage their condition.(Image credit: Alden Chadwick/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Miriam E. Tucker Source Type: news

Invasive 'Devil Fish' Plague Mexico's Waters. Can't Beat 'Em? Eat 'Em
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amy E. Robertson Source Type: news

Where Do We Come From?
Look in a microscope to find out.(Image credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Push To House More Lab Monkeys In Pairs
Enhancing a research monkey's life by housing it with a pal often doesn't hurt the study, says a researcher who's done it. In her own experience, she says, "it actually helped to improve the science."(Image credit: Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Search Of DNA In Dogs, Mice And People Finds 4 Genes Linked To OCD
Scientists looking for genetic factors behind obsessive compulsive disorder looked for clues in the DNA of humans and two animal species. Genes active in a particular brain circuit emerged.(Image credit: Ute Grabowsky/Photothek via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Angus Chen Source Type: news

Astronaut Scott Kelly's Latest Mission: A Book
After a year in space, Kelly says, writing a book was harder than he thought — but still, he adds, "If I write a bad sentence people are only going to get angry with me. They're not going to die."(Image credit: NASA/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Martin Source Type: news

Nostalgia Isn't Just A Fixation On The Past - It Can Be About The Future, Too
Is nostalgia an emotion that's bitter, or sweet? Psychologist Clay Routledge explains what causes us to feel nostalgic and how nostalgia affects us.(Image credit: Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rhaina Cohen Source Type: news

Sleep Scientist Warns Against Walking Through Life 'In An Underslept State'
"Human beings are the only species that deliberately deprive themselves of sleep for no apparent gain," says sleep scientist Matthew Walker. His new book is Why We Sleep. (Image credit: MCKIBILLO/Getty Images/Imagezoo) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Terry Gross Source Type: news

After Hurricane Power Outages, Looking To Alaska's Microgrids For A Better Way
Alaska is a leader in microgrids since its remote communities have had to power themselves for decades.(Image credit: Eric Keto/Alaska's Energy Desk) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Waldholz Source Type: news

Studies Skewed By Focus On Well-Off, Educated Brains
What does a "normal" brain look like? Something a lot different when researchers make sure that study participants reflect the race, education and income levels of the U.S. at large.(Image credit: Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

Astronomers Strike Gravitational Gold In Colliding Neutron Stars
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Mindfulness Apps Aim To Help People Disconnect From Stress
Finding inner calm hard to come by? Some people use their device obsession to help them disconnect. The apps aren't a quick fix, therapists say, but might help you stick to a mindfulness practice.(Image credit: Photo Illustration by Carolyn Rogers/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Allison Aubrey Source Type: news

'Quackery' Chronicles How Our Love Of Miracle Cures Leads Us Astray
Tobacco enemas? Mercury pills? Ice pick lobotomies? A new book explains how throughout history, miracle "cures" often didn't just fail to improve people's health, they maimed and killed.(Image credit: Courtesy of Workman Publishing) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: April Fulton Source Type: news

A School For Kids With Autism Copes With Fire's Physical And Emotional Damage
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Devin Katayama Source Type: news

Jeremy, The Lonely, Left-Twisting Snail, Dies — But Knows Love Before The End
OK, "love" might be overstating it. But the little lefty — whose seemingly hopeless search for a mate sparked an international quest — did manage to procreate before he shuffled off this mortal coil.(Image credit: Angus Davison/University of Nottingham) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Camila Domonoske Source Type: news

'The Butchering Art': How A 19th Century Physician Made Surgery Safer
Before surgeons accepted germ theory, operations often killed patients. All Things Considered host Robert Siegel talks with the author of a new biography of antiseptic advocate Joseph Lister.(Image credit: Bettmann Archive) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: April Fulton Source Type: news

With OK From EPA, Use Of Controversial Weedkiller Is Expected To Double
The EPA says farmers can still spray dicamba on their crops next year — with some new restrictions. The weedkiller has been blamed for drifting into fields, damaging millions of acres of crops.(Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dan Charles Source Type: news

Is Harrison Ford An Android In 'Blade Runner'?
Ever since the first movie achieved cult status, fans have hotly debated if Rick Deckard, played by Harrison Ford, is a replicant. Blade Runner 2047 leaves room for argument, says fan Adam Frank.(Image credit: Joel Ryan/Invision/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Adam Frank Source Type: news

California Blazes Are Part Of A Larger And Hotter Picture, Fire Researchers Say
The wildfires in California's wine country are coming in the midst of a near-record fire season nationwide. Researchers say a warming climate is a factor.(Image credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Geoff Brumfiel Source Type: news

Elizabeth Loftus: How Can Our Memories Be Manipulated?
Years of research have taught Elizabeth Loftus just how unreliable our memories are. From tweaking a real memory to planting a completely fabricated one, tampering with our minds is surprisingly easy.(Image credit: James Duncan Davidson/TED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NPR/TED Staff Source Type: news

This Week's Air Quality Is Worst On Record For San Francisco Bay Area
As wildfires spread through Northern California counties, clouds of smoke and ash are spreading, too, far beyond the flames. Air quality officials have a database that's searchable by ZIP code.(Image credit: Lesley McClurg/KQED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lesley McClurg Source Type: news

Is This How The Trump Administration Might Save Coal?
Energy Secretary Rick Perry says subsidizing coal and nuclear power plants would make the grid more reliable. An unlikely array of critics say the move is expensive and unnecessary.(Image credit: Reid Frazier/Allegheny Front) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alisa Barba Source Type: news

The Mechanics Behind Yellowstone's Old Faithful
The Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park blows water approximately ever 90 minutes. The the mechanics behind this beautiful mystery have been revealed this week in a new study. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA Panel Endorses Gene Therapy For A Form Of Childhood Blindness
Food and Drug Administration advisers unanimously recommended that the agency approve the first gene therapy for an inherited disease — a rare defect that causes blindness in children.(Image credit: Spark Therapeutics) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Brazil's Deep Cuts To Science Funding Will Lock Country In The Past
Scientists worldwide have watched Brazil's budget cuts in shock. We, too, could see trouble ahead if flat U.S. federal spending without additional corporate funding continues, says Marcelo Gleiser.(Image credit: monsitj/Getty Images/iStockphoto) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marcelo Gleiser Source Type: news

After A Failed Launch, Smart Shoe Benefits From A Reboot
Hahna Alexander initially invented a shoe that could charge a battery, but no one wanted to use it. "You have to invent something that people can't live without," she says.(Image credit: Frederic Sielgel for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Madeline K. Sofia Source Type: news

The Coming Sewer Gold Rush
Environmental chemists studied Swiss sewage and found trace amounts of gold, silver and rare earth metals. It could be valuable, but chemists say it's probably not worth the cost of recovering. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tiny, Transparent Worm Challenges Notions About Sex
Scientists have found a group of worms that haven't reproduced sexually for 18 million years. Normally that would be a recipe for quick extinction, but these little guys seem none the worse for wear.(Image credit: Courtesy of Karin Kiontke and David Fitch/ NYU) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rae Ellen Bichell Source Type: news

Pumas Are Not Such Loners After All
Researchers are startled to find that pumas, also called mountain lions, meet up quite frequently with their fellow big cats — perhaps to share an elk carcass.(Image credit: Mark Elbroch/Panthera/Science) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Health Conditions That Increase Stroke Risk Rise Across All Ages, Races
Smoking, drug abuse and diabetes are all modifiable risk factors for stroke. Yet a large study of patients hospitalized for stroke suggests the number of people with these risk factors is rising.(Image credit: Brenda Muller/Gallo Images/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: April Fulton Source Type: news

There's Gold In Them Thar Sewage Pipes, Swiss Researchers Say
Each year, more than $3 million in gold and silver wind up in Swiss wastewater, scientists found. But in most cases, it doesn't make economic sense to extract and recycle the metals.(Image credit: Elke Suess/Eawag) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Camila Domonoske Source Type: news

Why A Long-Term Disability Policy Is More Important Than Pet Insurance
Though not as trendy as pet insurance, a long-term disability policy is pretty cheap and can save your bacon if you have an accident, get cancer or otherwise can't work for a few months or years. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michelle Andrews Source Type: news

Why A Long-Term-Disability Policy Is More Important Than Pet Insurance
Though not as trendy as pet insurance, a long-term-disability policy is pretty cheap and can save your bacon if you have an accident, get cancer or otherwise can't work for a few months or years.(Image credit: Rich LaSalle/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michelle Andrews Source Type: news

EPA Vows To Speed Cleanup Of Toxic Superfund Sites Despite Funding Drop
Superfund was initially paid for by taxes on crude oil, chemicals and the companies that created the toxic waste sites. But those taxes expired in 1995, leaving states strapped to find the money.(Image credit: Joe Wertz/Stateimpact Oklahoma) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Wertz Source Type: news

Here Are The 2017 MacArthur 'Genius' Grant Winners
Jason De León, Njideka Akunyili Crosby and Derek Peterson are among the 24 winners of this year's MacArthur Fellowship, which honors "extraordinarily talented and creative individuals."(Image credit: John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Colin Dwyer Source Type: news

Weeks After Hurricane Maria, Puerto Rico Struggles To Turn On The Lights
Nearly 90 percent of Puerto Rico is still without power more than two weeks after Hurricane Maria. Authorities say it will take months to restore electricity after the storm destroyed the power grid.(Image credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Samantha Raphelson Source Type: news

What Drives Some People To Take Personal Risks To Help Strangers?
Acts of altruism — like saving swimmers caught in a riptide from drowning or donating a kidney to a stranger — are among the thorniest puzzles of human nature, says guest blogger Abigail Marsh.(Image credit: monsitj/Getty Images/iStockphoto) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Marsh Source Type: news

EPA Chief Announces Reversal Of Obama-Era Curbs On Coal Plants
In a speech in Kentucky on Monday, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt said the old rules aimed at reducing carbon dioxide were tantamount to declaring war on the coal industry.(Image credit: Andrew Harnik/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Neuman Source Type: news

What Influences Attitudes Toward Gun Reform?
A paper published this summer shows gun ownership relates to beliefs about mass shootings and points to gun ownership as a powerful driver of motivated cognition, says psychologist Tania Lombrozo.(Image credit: DmyTo/Getty Images/iStockphoto) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tania Lombrozo Source Type: news

What Influences Attitudes Toward Gun Control Reform?
A paper published this summer shows gun ownership relates to beliefs about mass shootings and points to gun ownership as a powerful driver of motivated cognition, says psychologist Tania Lombrozo.(Image credit: DmyTo/Getty Images/iStockphoto) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tania Lombrozo Source Type: news

How To Make AI The Best Thing To Happen To Us
We can thrive with AI if we win the race between the growing power of our technology and the wisdom with which we manage it, but we must ditch the idea of learning from our mistakes, says Max Tegmark.(Image credit: liuzishan/Getty Images/iStockphoto) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Max Tegmark Source Type: news

Hurricane Nate Expected To Hit Gulf Coast As Category 2
Hurricane Nate is intensifying as it takes aim at the U.S. Gulf Coast. People from southeast Louisiana to the Florida Panhandle are bracing for Nate, which forecasters say could strengthen to a Category 2 storm. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Debbie Elliott Source Type: news

As Residents Start To Return, Devastated Barbuda Struggles To Rebuild
The Caribbean island of Barbuda had to evacuate all its residents when Hurricane Irma hit last month, but now they are slowly starting to return. NPR's Michel Martin catches up with reporter Anika Kentish who's been following the story. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Relationship Between Domestic Violence And Mass Shootings
In at least 54 percent of mass shootings, the perpetrator also shot an intimate partner or relative. NPR's Michel Martin talks with gun policy expert Robert Spitzer about the pattern of domestic abuse among mass shooters. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Should You Leave Grandma With The Robot?
Once a technology that treats emotions as data becomes pervasive, we may soon find that data is the only aspect of emotion we come to recognize or value, says astrophysicist Adam Frank.(Image credit: iStock) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Adam Frank Source Type: news

Trump Guts Requirement That Employer Health Plans Pay For Birth Control
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alison Kodjak Source Type: news

Friday News Roundup - International
The Secretary of State has gone public about what might've been said in private. Under mounting pressure, the King of Spain has been speaking out. And the Nobel prize committee has given the world a lot to talk about.(Image credit: David Ramos/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Light Pollution Can Impact Nocturnal Bird Migration
A new study of how birds react to the annual light tribute to September 11th in New York City provides compelling evidence for how artificial light can disorient large numbers of migrating birds. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news