'Every Day Is A Good Day When You're Floating': Anne McClain Talks Life In Space
Kindergartners help NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro to ask questions to astronaut Anne McClain, who is serving on the International Space Station. She says every day is a good day when you're floating. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Volunteers Fight Bad Science
James Heathers is a postdoctoral researcher at Northeastern University, who looks for mistakes for fun. He speaks to NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks about errors published in scientific papers. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Talkin' Birds: The Great Backyard Bird Count
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda Morris Source Type: news

Remembering Mars Rover, 'Opportunity'
Space scientists pay tribute to the Mars rover, Opportunity, which died this week after 14 years sending data back to Earth. The rover was expected to last only three months. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Talkin' Birds: The Great Backyard Bird Count
For years, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's Great Backyard Bird Count have provided valuable data for avian research. Ray Brown from the Talkin' Birds podcast talks with Scott Simon about it. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Opinion: Good Night Oppy, A Farewell To NASA's Mars Rover
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Simon Source Type: news

Ph.D. Student Breaks Down Electron Physics Into A Swinging Musical
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emma Bowman Source Type: news

J. Marshall Shepherd: How Does Bias Shape Our Perceptions About Science?
Why do many people dismiss issues like climate change, despite strong scientific evidence? Climatologist J. Marshall Shepherd examines how different forms of bias shape how we perceive science.(Image credit: TED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NPR/TED Staff Source Type: news

Andreas Ekstr öm: Can We Solve For Bias In Tech?
We think of search engines as unbiased sources of information. But they're not — and they can be manipulated. Andreas Ekström asks: who should hold the burden of addressing bias in search engines?(Image credit: TED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NPR/TED Staff Source Type: news

Racial Disparities In Cancer Incidence And Survival Rates Are Narrowing
African-Americans still have the highest death rate and the lowest survival rate of any U.S. racial or ethnic group for most cancers. But the "cancer gap" between blacks and whites is shrinking.(Image credit: Siri Stafford/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Patti Neighmond Source Type: news

After 16 Months Of Dead Fish, Manatees And Dolphins, Florida's Red Tide Ebbs
The red tide algae bloom that has plagued coastal communities in Florida since 2017 is starting to dissipate, much to the relief of local communities and tourism officials.(Image credit: Greg Allen/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Greg Allen Source Type: news

World Health Organization Forms Committee To Guide Editing Of Human Genes
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

When Teens Threaten Violence, A Community Responds With Compassion
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rhitu Chatterjee Source Type: news

Hungry Deer May Be Changing How Things Sound In The Forest
Sound travels differently through open fields than the woods. When deer eat up bushes, small trees and other forest plants, it affects the transmission of bird calls and other natural sounds.(Image credit: Rob Swanson/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Bugs Vs. Superbugs: Insects Offer Promise In Fight Against Antibiotic Resistance
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paul Chisholm Source Type: news

Social Spelunking With Will Hunt
What's really under our feet? According to author Will Hunt, there are whole worlds.(Image credit: Evening Standard/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NASA Says Ultima Thule Actually Looks Like A Pancake And A Walnut
They had initially thought the object four billion miles from Earth looked like a snowman. The New Horizons spacecraft flew by it on New Year's Day and new images give scientists a clearer picture. (Image credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

NASA Will Make A Last Attempt To Contact Mars Rover Opportunity
Scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., announced Tuesday that they will make one last attempt to reach the Mars rover Opportunity though they are not expecting a response. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jacob Margolis Source Type: news

Wreckage Of WWII Aircraft Carrier Found In The South Pacific Ocean
The Hornet played a role in several key events in the war – including the Doolittle Raid on Japan and the Battle of Midway. Researches have located it three miles below the surface. (Image credit: Photo courtesy of Paul G. Allen's Vulcan Inc) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

Storm Clouds And Sunshine: How Florida Prepares For Climate Change
The state and its key industries are among the most at-risk of being decimated by our changing climate.(Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Giving Medicine To Young Children? Getting The Dose Right Is Tricky
In a recent survey, 1 in 5 parents said they thought using a household spoon was OK for measuring their child's medicine. It's not. Here's how to help little kids without overdosing them.(Image credit: Meredith Rizzo/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Patti Neighmond Source Type: news

Friday News Roundup - International
Savage, climate change and the latest on Venezuela are some of the things that made headlines this week.(Image credit: Roy Rochlin/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Putting Mosquitoes On A Diet Might Help Stop Them From Biting Humans
New research finds that feeding mosquitoes human diet drugs causes them to lose their taste for human blood for days. The researchers hope this could be used to reduce the spread of disease. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

Living Near Your Grandmother Has Evolutionary Benefits
Humans are evolutionary oddballs for living long past our reproductive prime. New research explains how grandmothers might be the reason why.(Image credit: Nicole Xu for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jonathan Lambert Source Type: news

Avoiding The Ouch. Scientists Are Working On Ways To Swap The Needle For A Pill
A lot of vaccines and some medications need to be delivered by injection. Two groups of researchers are designing ways of delivering these medications by putting them in pill form.(Image credit: Felice Frankel/MIT) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Avoiding The Ouch: Scientists Are Working On Ways To Swap The Needle For A Pill
A lot of vaccines and some medications need to be delivered by injection. Two groups of researchers are designing ways of delivering these medications by putting them in pill form.(Image credit: Felice Frankel/MIT) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Why We Keep Forgiving Facebook
No number of scandals seem to scrape the company’s bottom line.(Image credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Morning People May Have A Health Edge Over Night People
A new study suggests that being a morning person makes you slightly less susceptible to depression or mental illness. It, however, is not a very big effect. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Satellite Imagery Suggests 2nd Iranian Space Launch Has Failed
The rocket was supposed to carry a small satellite into orbit. The suspected failure comes just weeks after another launch attempt fell short. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Geoff Brumfiel Source Type: news

Satellite Imagery Suggests Second Iranian Space Launch Has Failed
The rocket was supposed to carry a small satellite into orbit. The suspected failure comes just weeks after another launch attempt fell short. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Geoff Brumfiel Source Type: news

2018 Was Earth's Fourth-Hottest Year On Record, Scientists Say
The last five years are also the five hottest years on record for average global temperature, according to scientists from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.(Image credit: Kathryn Mersmann/NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christopher Joyce Source Type: news

Environmental Photographer Focuses On Protecting The Climate — And Its People
The new documentary The Human Element follows James Balog as he captures the places and people affected by the rising oceans, wildfires and air pollution associated with climate change. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dave Davies Source Type: news

Ahead Of 2020 Winter Olympics, A Building Boom In Kyoto Is Yielding Ancient Artifacts
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Anthony Kuhn Source Type: news

Ahead Of 2020 Summer Olympics, A Building Boom In Kyoto Is Yielding Ancient Artifacts
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Anthony Kuhn Source Type: news

The North Magnetic Pole Is Shifting East, Fast
NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Nature reporter Alex Witze about a rapid shift in the Earth's magnetic poles. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gene-Editing Scientist's 'Actions Are A Product Of Modern China'
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Schmitz Source Type: news

As Magnetic North Pole Zooms Toward Siberia, Scientists Update World Magnetic Model
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Francesca Paris Source Type: news

Scans Show Female Brains Remain Youthful As Male Brains Wind Down
Researchers say the metabolism of a woman's brain remains higher than a man's throughout a lifetime. And that may help with late-life creativity and learning.(Image credit: Sherbrooke Connectivity Imaging /Getty Images/Cultura RF) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

Scans Show Women's Brains Remain Youthful As Male Brains Wind Down
Researchers say the metabolism of a woman's brain remains higher than a man's throughout a lifetime. And that may help with late-life creativity and learning. (Image credit: Sherbrooke Connectivity Imaging /Getty Images/Cultura RF) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

The Climate For Climate Politics In 2019
Even though the Midwest has been gripped by the icy polar vortex, that doesn’t mean climate change isn’t happening, despite what you may see on Twitter. In the beautiful Midwest,(Image credit: Astrid Riecken/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

If You're Often Angry Or Irritable, You May Be Depressed
Physicians have been taught to look for signs of hopelessness, sadness and lack of motivation to help them diagnose depression. But anger as a depression symptom is less often noticed or addressed.(Image credit: Ariel Davis for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

For Migratory Birds, Lebanon Is A 'Black Hole' Where They Are Hunted, Trapped, Killed
Every year, some 2.6 million birds are shot or die after being trapped in illegal nets in Lebanon. "This country is a black hole in terms of protection," says a conservationist.(Image credit: Sam Tarling for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ruth Sherlock Source Type: news

Hallucinations Kidnap The Senses In 'The Collected Schizophrenias'
Esmé Weijun Wang's new book is part memoir, part deeply researched work of science about her diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder. She says she first noticed her brain was different at age five.(Image credit: Amr Alfiky/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lulu Garcia-Navarro Source Type: news

Game Brain Science: How Your Super Bowl Team Plays Can Sway What You Eat
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maria Godoy Source Type: news

The Role Climate Change Plays In Weather Extremes
After a week of record-cold temperatures, NPR's Michel Martin speaks with climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe about how climate change is leading to more weather extremes. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Remembering Lamia Al-Gailani, Pioneering Iraqi Archaeologist
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jane Arraf Source Type: news

U.S. Scientists Researching Gene Editing In Human Embryos
Despite outrage over gene editing in China that affected the birth of twins, research is underway in the U.S. to assess the safety and effectiveness of CRISPR tools to edit genes in human embryos. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

The U.S. And Russia Are Stocking Up On Missiles And Nukes For A Different Kind Of War
The U.S. and Russia seem increasingly interested in battlefield nuclear weapons. Arms control advocates fear a return to the darkest days of the Cold War.(Image credit: Yuri Smityuk/TASS via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Geoff Brumfiel Source Type: news

New U.S. Experiments Aim To Create Gene-Edited Human Embryos
Despite outrage over gene editing in China that affected the birth of twins, research is underway in the U.S. to assess the safety and effectiveness of CRISPR tools to edit genes in human embryos.(Image credit: Rob Stein/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news