Oncologists' meetings with drug reps don't help cancer patients live longer
Drug company reps commonly visit doctors to talk about new medications. A team of economists wanted to know if that helps patients live longer. They found that for cancer patients, the answer is no.(Image credit: Chris Hondros) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 22, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sydney Lupkin Source Type: news

How two good friends became sworn siblings — with the revival of an ancient ritual
Thousands of years ago, there was a ceremony to bind close friends together as sworn siblings. Could the practice be resurrected today to strengthen modern friendships? Two women did just that. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 22, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pien Huang Source Type: news

A cheap drug may slow down aging. A study will determine if it works
Studies suggest people who take metformin for diabetes may be at lower risk for cancer, heart disease and dementia. Now researchers aim to test if it prevents age-related diseases in healthy people. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 22, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Allison Aubrey Source Type: news

This Earth Day, how to know if the seafood you're eating is sustainable
Roughly 196 million tons of fish were harvested in 2020, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. The organization also notes that the number of overfished stocks worldwide has tripled in the last century. All of this overfishing has led to the decline of entire species, like Atlantic cod. Enter the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch. It and other free guides give consumers an overview of the world of fish and seafood, helping people to figure out the most sustainable fish available to them. With the help of Life Kit's Clare Marie Schneider, we figure out how to make informed decisions a...
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 22, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Clare Marie Schneider Source Type: news

The Lyrids meteor shower is peaking. Here's how to enjoy it with a bright moon
The Lyrids meteor shower is active until April 29 and is peaking overnight from Sunday into Monday. To see it, it's best to find an area with trees or a mountain blocking out the moon. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 21, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Huo Jingnan Source Type: news

Genes play a very small role in determining left-handedness, research finds
NPR's Ayesha Rascoe speaks with Clyde Francks, a geneticist in the Netherlands, about the latest research into what makes people left or right-handed. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 21, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ayesha Rascoe Source Type: news

A robot dog is training on Earth to be able to go to space one day
NPR's Scott Simon speaks with scientists Feifei Qian and Ryan Ewing of the LASSIE Project. It is training a robot dog to navigate different types of terrain in preparation for future space missions. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 20, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Simon Source Type: news

Which scientists get mentioned in the news? Mostly ones with Anglo names, says study
A new study finds that in news stories about scientific research, U.S. media were less likely to mention a scientist if they had an East Asian or African name, as compared to one with an Anglo name.(Image credit: gorodenkoff) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 19, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Hao Peng Source Type: news

An 11-year-old unearthed fossils of the largest known marine reptile
When the dinosaurs walked the Earth, massive marine reptiles swam. Among them, a species of Ichthyosaur that measured over 80 feet long. Today, we look into how a chance discovery by a father-daughter duo of fossil hunters furthered paleontologist's understanding of the "giant fish lizard of the Severn." Currently, it is the largest marine reptile known to scientists.Read more about this specimen in the study published in the journal PLOS One. Have another ancient animal or scientific revelation you want us to cover? Email us at shortwave@npr.org — we might talk about it on a future episode! (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 19, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Kwong Source Type: news

This week in science: Pompeiian frescoes, dark energy and the largest marine reptile
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Emily Kwong and Rachel Carlson of Short Wave about newly unearthed Pompeiian frescoes, how dark energy may be changing, and the largest known marine reptile. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 18, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Carlson Source Type: news

Lethal heat in West Africa is driven by human-caused climate change
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 18, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emmanuel Akinwotu Source Type: news

Wildfire smoke contributes to thousands of deaths each year in the U.S.
Two new studies show the unseen toll smoke is taking on people across the country. Climate change is likely to make the problem even bigger.(Image credit: David Dee Delgado) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 18, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alejandra Borunda Source Type: news

Why a campaign has started to bring back some plants that have been forgotten
The world depends on just a few crops for most of its food. Because that dependence could be risky, a new international effort supports research and development of overlooked plants as food sources. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 18, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dan Charles Source Type: news

COMIC: Our sun was born with thousands of other stars. Where did they all go?
Our sun was born in a cosmic cradle with thousands of other stars. Astrophysicists say they want to find these siblings in order to help answer the question: Are we alone out there? (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 18, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Connie Hanzhang Jin Source Type: news

Ancient predatory worms have scientists rethinking the history of life on Earth
500 million years ago, the world was a very different place. During this period of time, known as the Cambrian period, basically all life was in the water. The ocean was brimming with animals that looked pretty different from the ones we recognize today — including a group of predatory worms with a throat covered in teeth and spines. Researchers thought these tiny terrors died out at the end of the Cambrian period. But a paper published recently in the journal Biology Letters showed examples of a new species of this worm in the fossil record 25 million years after scientists thought they'd vanished from the Earth. One of...
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 17, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Carlson Source Type: news