A 'Mole' Isn't Digging Mars: NASA Engineers Are Trying To Find Out Why
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Study: For HIV-Infected Babies, Treatment Should Start At Birth
Every day, as many as 500 babies in sub-Saharan Africa are born with HIV. A study out of Botswana finds that if newborns are given treatment right away, the virus becomes almost undetectable. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pien Huang Source Type: news

A Single Dose Of Ketamine Might Help Heavy Drinkers, Study Finds
Participants in the U.K. experimental study dramatically reduced their average alcohol intake for months after the initial dose. Ketamine has also been used to treat severe depression.(Image credit: Bruce Forster/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Are Still Rising, U.N. Report Says
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Hersher Source Type: news

Young Researchers Feel Excitement And Sadness To See Arctic Ice That May Disappear
Some projections say that by 2040 the Arctic Ocean may see its first ice-free summer in modern history. That means mixed emotions for young scientists seeing the ice for the first time. (Image credit: Ravenna Koenig/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ravenna Koenig Source Type: news

Young Researchers Feel Excitement And Sadness To See Arctic Ice That May Disappear
Young Arctic researchers get their first glimpse of sea ice — and reflect on how the ice caps may melt away over the course of their careers. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ravenna Koenig Source Type: news

'An Eye-Opener': Virtual Reality Shows Residents What Climate Change Could Do
In a historic African American community near Baltimore, residents put on virtual reality headsets and watch their homes flood. The town hopes they'll support efforts to prepare for sea level rise.(Image credit: Nathan Rott/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nathan Rott Source Type: news

Using Virtual Reality To Communicate The Immediacy Of Climate Change
The threat of climate change and the efforts needed to adapt to it are hard to comprehend. One Maryland community hopes it can be a model for communicating the risk and prompting action.(Image credit: Nathan Rott/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nathan Rott Source Type: news

Climate Planners Turn To Virtual Reality And Hope Seeing Is Believing
The threat of climate change and the efforts needed to adapt to it are hard to comprehend. One Maryland community hopes it can be a model for communicating the risk and prompting action.(Image credit: Nathan Rott/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nathan Rott Source Type: news

Excess Weight Can Weaken The Flu Shot
Scientists have come to realize that flu vaccines are less effective for people who are overweight or obese. Now researchers are trying to figure out why and hope to develop better vaccines.(Image credit: Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Harris Source Type: news

Trump Holds White House Meeting On Vaping And E-Cigarettes
President Trump held a "listening session" on youth e-cigarette use on Friday. It remains unclear if a ban on vaping flavorings is near or off the table entirely. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Allison Aubrey Source Type: news

Dessa: How Can You Fall Out Of Love?
For years, musician Dessa tried to get over a toxic relationship. But she couldn't figure out how — until she tried something unconventional: using neuroscience to dull her feelings for her ex.(Image credit: Josh Tam) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NPR/TED Staff Source Type: news

Helen Fisher: How Does Love Affect The Brain?
Helen Fisher says love is a biological drive and a survival mechanism. She discusses the science of love and how much control we have over who we love, how we love, and whether that love lasts.(Image credit: Bret Hartman/TED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NPR/TED Staff Source Type: news

Guy Winch: How Can We Choose To Move On From Heartbreak?
We don't consider heartbreak to be as serious as physical injury, but emotional pain can stay with us much longer. Psychologist Guy Winch says dealing with heartbreak starts with asserting control.(Image credit: Bret Hartman/TED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NPR/TED Staff Source Type: news

A Rare Meteor Shower May Grace The Skies Thursday
Some scientists predict the Alpha Monocerotids meteor shower will be visible at 11:50 p.m. ET. However, one NASA expert is skeptical of the forecast. (Image credit: Peter Komka/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paolo Zialcita Source Type: news

A Rare Meteor Shower May Grace The Skies Tonight
Some scientists predict the Alpha Monocerotids meteor shower will be visible at 11:50 p.m. ET. However, one NASA expert is skeptical of the forecast. (Image credit: Peter Komka/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paolo Zialcita Source Type: news

'It's Going To Get Worse': How U.S. Countertop Workers Started Getting Sick
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

The Loudness Of Vowels Helps The Brain Break Down Speech Into Syl-La-Bles
Syllables are the building blocks of spoken language. And now a study of brain activity hints at how we extract them from a stream of speech. (Image credit: filo/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

VIDEO: Elon Musk's Next Quest Is A Mind-Machine Meld. Let's Consider The Implications
The tech entrepreneur recently said he is making implants that connect our brains to our devices. So let's explore the ethics of human upgrading — and what technology has already done to us. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elise Hu Source Type: news

CRISPR For Sickle Cell Disease Shows Promise In Early Test
Scientists are reporting the first evidence that genetically edited cells could be safely helping a patient with sickle cell disease. The cells are producing a crucial oxygen-carrying protein. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

50 Years Ago, Americans Made The 2nd Moon Landing... Why Doesn't Anyone Remember?
Everyone knows about Apollo 11, the first moon landing. And about ill-fated Apollo 13. Between them is the forgotten mission — Apollo 12.(Image credit: NASA) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Geoff Brumfiel Source Type: news

The Challenges Scientists Face While Working In The Arctic Ocean
The Arctic Ocean is a stunning place that not many get the chance to see. But if you're a scientist there to do field work, that beauty comes with some pretty unique challenges. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ravenna Koenig Source Type: news

Eat Like The Ancient Babylonians: Researchers Cook Up Nearly 4,000-Year-Old Recipes
Written on four tablets, three of which date back no later than 1730 B.C., the recipes are considered to be the oldest known. And they taste pretty good, says a scholar who recreated them.(Image credit: Klaus Wagensonner/Yale Babylonian Collection) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Simon Source Type: news

Molecular Scissors Could Help Keep Some Viral Illnesses At Bay
A new technique uses the CRISPR molecule to snip away at the part of RNA viruses that allows them to spread infection by making copies of themselves.(Image credit: Susanna M. Hamilton/Broad Communications) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

How Best To Use The Few New Drugs To Treat Antibiotic-Resistant Germs?
Infectious disease specialists debate whether it's better to give the strongest antibiotics all at once for drug-resistant germs, or save the most innovative medicines for use as a last resort.(Image credit: Science Photo Library/Science Source) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Harris Source Type: news

A New Way To Stop Viruses
Scientists in Massachusetts think they may be onto a new approach for treating viral infections, using CRISPR to quickly target the part of the virus that replicates it. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Opioid Addiction In Jails: An Anthropologist's Perspective
In Getting Wrecked: Women, Incarceration, and the American Opioid Crisis, a Rikers Island doctor says drug treatment in U.S. jails and prisons is often shaped by societal prejudice, not science.(Image credit: Catie Dull/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Vaughn Source Type: news

Silver-Backed Chevrotain, With Fangs And Hooves, Photographed In Wild For First Time
Scientists say their goal was to rediscover a type of chevrotain that had been "lost to science" for nearly 30 years. Chevrotains are the world's smallest hoofed mammal, or ungulate.(Image credit: Southern Institute of Ecology/Global Wildlife Conservation/Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research/NCNP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bill Chappell Source Type: news

A Myth Of Masculinity: The Truth About Testosterone
You really don't know as much about the hormone as you think.(Image credit: Alex Davidson/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Meditation Reduced The Opioid Dose She Needs To Ease Chronic Pain By 75%
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Allison Aubrey Source Type: news

Skywatchers In North America Hope For Clear Skies To See Transit Of Mercury
Monday morning, the solar system's innermost planet will begin a 5.5-hour march across the disc of the sun. All you need to see it are clear skies and access to a telescope with a sun filter.(Image credit: Bill Ingalls/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Neuman Source Type: news

You Can Get A Master's In Medical Cannabis In Maryland
The University of Maryland, Baltimore, now has a master's program dedicated to the science and therapeutics of medical weed because of a growing number of students looking for expertise in the field.(Image credit: Bloomberg via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Martin Austermuhle Source Type: news

Privacy And DNA Tests
NPR's Scott Simon speaks to New York University law professor Erin Murphy about privacy issues surrounding popular DNA and ancestry tests. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Stress Over Mass Shootings, Health Care Access High Among Latinos, Survey Finds
A national survey by psychologists shows a significant rise in U.S. stress in 2019. Mass shootings, the election campaign and concerns about health care costs and access top the list of stressors.(Image credit: Luke E. Montavon/Bloomberg/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Patti Neighmond Source Type: news

New Study Challenges The Assumption That Math Is Harder For Girls
Research shows that when boys and girls as old as 10 do math, their patterns of brain activity are indistinguishable. The finding is the latest challenge to the idea that math is harder for girls. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

The News Roundup - International
Over 11,000 scientists support a new study that warns of a climate emergency.(Image credit: PRAKASH SINGH/AFP via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Math Looks The Same In The Brains Of Boys And Girls, Study Finds
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

Western Individualism May Have Roots In The Medieval Church's Obsession With Incest
Researchers combed Vatican archives to find records of how ancient church policies restricting whom one could marry shaped Western values and family structures today. (Image credit: Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rhitu Chatterjee Source Type: news

There's A Promising New Vaccine For One Of The World's Top Health Threats
Dengue afflicts nearly 400 million people worldwide every year, but a vaccine has remained elusive. New research offers a path forward.(Image credit: Aditya Irawan/NurPhoto/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jason Beaubien Source Type: news

Lithium-Ion Batteries Help Power Civilizations, But How Can They Be Recycled?
Researchers are worried that the lithium ion batteries powering our phones, and soon our cars, will turn into a big waste problem. They're trying to figure out how to recycle them. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dan Charles Source Type: news

How The World Has Changed! Science During The 40 Years Of 'Morning Edition'
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Scrubbing Your House Of Bacteria Could Clear The Way For Fungus
A new study in Brazil finds that urban apartments have more diverse fungi — some healthy, some potentially not — than villages in the Amazon rainforest. (Image credit: Science Source) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pien Huang Source Type: news

CRISPR Approach To Fighting Cancer Called 'Promising' In 1st Safety Test
Attempts to use the gene-editing tool CRISPR to develop a treatment for cancer seem safe and feasible in the earliest findings from the first three patients. "So far, so good," scientists say.(Image credit: Jure Gasparic/EyeEm/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

The Changes In Science And Technology Over The Last 4 Decades
A look at the biggest stories in science, technology and health over Morning Edition's 40 years on the air. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Trump Administration Proposes Relaxing Rules On Waste From Coal Plants
The Environmental Protection Agency would give coal plants more time to close unlined coal ash ponds, and ease rules on wastewater. Opponents say that prolongs the risk of toxic spills.(Image credit: Gerry Broome/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Reid Frazier Source Type: news

U.S. Formally Begins To Leave The Paris Climate Agreement
Under the agreement hammered out in 2015, the first day that countries can reverse the promises they made is Nov. 4, 2019. It will be another year before the American withdrawal is official.(Image credit: David Swanson/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Hersher Source Type: news

'The Great Pretender' Seeks The Truth About 'On Being Sane In Insane Places'
Journalist and Brain on Fire author Susannah Cahalan writes in an urgent, personal book that the '70s study by David Rosenhan had an outsized effect on psychiatry — and may have been fatally flawed.(Image credit: Grand Central Publishing ) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michael Schaub Source Type: news

This Congolese Doctor Discovered Ebola But Never Got Credit For It — Until Now
Dr. Jean-Jacques Muyembe first confronted a mysterious, bloody disease in 1976. But credit for the discovery went to Belgian researchers.(Image credit: Samantha Reinders for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eyder Peralta Source Type: news

Scientists Prioritize Protection of 'Climate Refugia'
As climate change drives temperatures higher, scientists are finding places that are warming slightly less. They're known as "climate refugia." (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lauren Sommer Source Type: news

'On The Backs Of Tortoises' Challenges Us To Consider How Much Of Life Is Intertwined
Nominally an environmental and social history of the Galápagos Islands, it lays bare the entangled issues confronting us as we attempt conservation efforts while facing a sweeping ecological crisis.(Image credit: Education Images/Universal Image) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Genevieve Valentine Source Type: news