Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Up Again. What Now, Climate?
The fortuitous dip in emissions of the main greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, during the past three years is over, as economies turn up. The trend in the near future looks grim, say climate scientists.(Image credit: Christian Petersen-Clausen/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christopher Joyce Source Type: news

Infections May Raise The Risk Of Mental Illness In Children
A large study of Danish kids finds that childhood infections are linked with a higher risk of developing some mental illnesses. The risk is highest in the months immediately following the infection.(Image credit: Rebecca Nelson/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rhitu Chatterjee Source Type: news

The More You Know About Mars …
…the more you know about Earth.(Image credit: ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fishermen Sue Big Oil For Its Role In Climate Change
The food industry is already feeling the effects of climate change, which will likely force expensive adaptations in the future. At least one sector is looking to make energy companies pay.(Image credit: Michael Melford/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alastair Bland Source Type: news

VIDEO: To Save A Fox, Scientists Took To Land, Air And Sea
When the world's population of Channel Island foxes started to vanish in the '90s, no one knew why. Bringing them back from near-extinction has meant unraveling a mystery that started with WWII.(Image credit: Ryan Kellman/Adam Cole/NPR's Skunk Bear) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ryan Kellman Source Type: news

Nearly 200 Countries Meet In Poland To Participate In Climate Conference
The world's nations meet in Poland this week to continue negotiations on how to slow climate change as recent research and extreme weather reveal that dangerous effects on climate are already here. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christopher Joyce Source Type: news

Careless CRISPR?
A set of gene-edited twins has made questions about the ethics of modifying humans much more urgent. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High Stakes As International Climate Conference Begins
The U.N. climate meeting underway in Poland is the most important climate conference since the 2015 Paris Agreement set emissions reduction goals for nearly every country on Earth.(Image credit: Czarek Sokolowski/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Hersher Source Type: news

How Much Protein Do You Really Need?
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Patti Neighmond Source Type: news

Kids With Concussions Can Phase In Exercise, Screen Time Sooner Than Before
No longer do kids with concussions need to sit in dark rooms for days on end. For the first time in nearly a decade, the nation's pediatricians have loosened their guidance on concussion recovery.(Image credit: Allie Wilson/Getty Images/EyeEm) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maanvi Singh Source Type: news

Lulu's Log: Bennu Asteroid
In Lulu's Log, we learn about Mike Puzio. When he was nine years old, he won a contest to name an asteroid. He chose Bennu. On Monday, a NASA spacecraft lands on Bennu for the first time. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lulu Garcia-Navarro Source Type: news

Neil deGrasse Tyson Responds To Claims Of Sexual Harassment
Three women have accused astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson of sexual misconduct. One says she quit her producer job on his TV show because of inappropriate behavior. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Neil DeGrasse Tyson Rejects Claims Of Sexual Misconduct
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Trump Administration Says Companies Can 'Incidentally Harass' Marine Mammals
It's a decision opposed by environmental groups, who say the blasts could harm marine animals, and some coastal communities, who fear it could be a precursor to offshore drilling. (Image credit: Eva Hambach/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

Dead Sea Lions With Gunshot Wounds Wash Up On Washington State Shores
At least eight dead sea lions with bullet holes have been found since September. It's illegal to shoot marine mammals, but that hasn't stopped some fishermen from going after them.(Image credit: Don Emmert /AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Samantha Raphelson Source Type: news

Changes In Brain Scans Seen After A Single Season Of Football For Young Players
MRI scans of the brains of young football players suggest that repeated blows to the head can change the shape of nerve fibers in the corpus callosum, which connects the two halves of the brain. (Image credit: groveb/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ashley Westerman Source Type: news

Harvard Medical School Dean Weighs In On Ethics Of Gene Editing
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with George Daley, dean of Harvard Medical School, about this week's international summit on gene editing and how the birth of babies with edited genes was received. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Improve Mood By Stimulating A Brain Area Above The Eyes
People with symptoms suggesting depression felt better immediately when tiny pulses of electricity reached a brain area called the lateral orbitofrontal cortex.(Image credit: Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

With New Leadership, Planned Parenthood Plots The Path Forward
The organization reportedly saw a surge of interest in IUDs after President Trump's election, but it's not just for birth control, or for women. What does Dr. Leana Wen have planned for the organization?(Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Science Summit Denounces Gene-Edited Babies Claim, But Rejects Moratorium
The Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing issues a consensus on how scientists might responsibly move forward to create gene-edited babies in the wake of a rogue scientist's claims.(Image credit: China News Service/VCG via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

International Science Summit Denounces Gene-Edited Babies, But Rejects Moratorium
The Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing issues a consensus on how scientists might responsibly move forward to create gene-edited babies in the wake of a rogue scientist's claims.(Image credit: China News Service/VCG via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

'In Search Of The Canary Tree' Highlights The Links Between Nature, Climate And Us
Conservation scientist Lauren E. Oakes weaves her musings about humans' place in a warming world together with conservation science in a moving and effective way.(Image credit: PR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Barbara J. King Source Type: news

Facing Backlash, Chinese Scientist Defends Gene-Editing Research On Babies
He Jiankui, who shocked the world by asserting he had genetically edited twin girls, faced growing criticism from other researchers as he spoke at a scientific conference in Hong Kong.(Image credit: Kin Cheung/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Facing Backlash, Scientist Defends Gene-Editing Research On Babies
He Jiankui, who shocked the world by asserting he had genetically edited twin girls, faced growing criticism from other researchers as he spoke at a scientific conference in Hong Kong.(Image credit: Kin Cheung/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Amid Layoffs, An American Automotive Institution Tries To Change
America's largest automaker, General Motors, says it wants to eliminate costs and concentrate on electric and self-driving vehicles.(Image credit: LARS HAGBERG/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ebola Treatment Trials Launched In Democratic Republic Of The Congo Amid Outbreak
The virus has killed at least 240 people in the past four months, and it has shown no signs of abating. But the new trials may help end future outbreaks sooner.(Image credit: John Wessels/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Colin Dwyer Source Type: news

China Expands Research Funding, Luring U.S. Scientists And Students
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Chinese Scientist Says He's Created First Genetically Modified Babies
He Jiankui says he undertook the experiment in order to protect the twin baby girls from HIV. The claim is being met with international skepticism and condemnation. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

New Probe Lands On Mars For Unprecedented Mission
NASA's InSight lander arrived on the red planet Monday. Its mission is to explore the interior of the planet in a way no previous probe has been able to do. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Thanks To Science, You Can Eat An Apple Every Day
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel D. Cohen Source Type: news

'Why We Dream' Is A Spirited, Cogent Defense Of Dreams And Dream-Telling
"If we fail to take the simple steps to remember and understand our dreams, we are throwing away a gift from our brains without bothering to open it," writes Alice Robb.(Image credit: Sirintra Pumsopa/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lily Meyer Source Type: news

Chinese Scientist Says He's First To Genetically Edit Babies, Report Says
According to The Associated Press, a Chinese scientist says that he has helped to create the first genetically edited babies. There's no independent confirmation of his claim. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Chinese Scientist Says He's First To Create Genetically Modified Babies Using CRISPR
A scientist says he created the first genetically edited babies using CRISPR to protect them from infection with the AIDS virus. The move has prompted immediate criticism as premature and reckless. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Chinese Scientist Says He's First To Genetically Edit Babies
Scientist says that he helped create the first genetically edited babies to protect them from getting infected with the AIDS virus. The move has prompted immediate criticism as premature and reckless. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

News Brief: Border Closure, Genetically Edited Babies, Climate Report
The U.S. briefly shut down its largest border crossing with Mexico Sunday. A report from The AP indicates designer babies are more within reach. A comprehensive climate report has been released. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Martin Source Type: news

Look Out Mars, Here Comes InSight
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

NASA Probe Lands Safely On Martian Surface
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

National Report Confirms Climate Change 'Is Affecting Every Sector,' Scientist Says
The economy could take a major hit if climate change continues at its current pace, according to the latest National Climate Assessment. NPR's Michel Martin speaks with climate scientist Michael Mann. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Twin's Difficult Birth Put A Project Designed To Reduce C-Sections To The Test
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Martha Bebinger Source Type: news

In Iraq, A Race To Protect The Crumbling Bricks Of Ancient Babylon
A U.S.-funded conservation project is shoring up the brick walls of the ancient city. The hope is that Babylon will qualify for UNESCO World Heritage status.(Image credit: Jane Arraf/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jane Arraf Source Type: news

Understanding The Impacts Of Climate Change
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks to climate scientist Brenda Ekwurzel about the National Climate Assessment released on Friday and whether the impacts of climate change being felt already are reversible. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Climate Change Is Already Hurting U.S. Communities, Federal Report Says
According to the government's most comprehensive assessment to date, climate change has already damaged American infrastructure and cost both money and lives.(Image credit: Noah Berger/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Hersher Source Type: news

Gun Shops Work With Doctors To Prevent Suicide By Firearm
Of all the deaths by gunfire in Colorado, suicides account for about 80 percent. A coalition of doctors, public health researchers and gun shop owners are working together to prevent that self-harm.(Image credit: Theo Stroomer for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Block Source Type: news

Researchers Find 115 Plastic Cups In Dead Whale's Stomach
The following items were among those found in the animal's stomach: 19 pieces of hard plastic, two sandals, four plastic bottles, 25 plastic bags, and about seven pounds of rope. (Image credit: Muhammad Irpan Sejati Tassakka/AKKP Wakatobi via AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

Chickenpox Outbreak Hits N.C. Private School With Low Vaccination Rates
Three dozen students have been infected at Asheville Waldorf School – which has among the very highest rates of parents claiming religious exemption from state vaccine requirements.(Image credit: Milos Bataveljic/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laurel Wamsley Source Type: news

As Insurers Offer Discounts For Fitness Trackers, Wearers Should Step With Caution
Millions of Americans use wearable devices to monitor their diet and fitness. Some insurance companies offer incentives to use them, but privacy advocates caution customers not to share too much data.(Image credit: Morgan Walker for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Stephanie O'Neill Source Type: news

An 'Exceptionally Rare' 2-Headed Snake Found In Virginia Has Died
Two-headed snakes don't live very long in the wild, so when one was found in a Northern Virginia yard, the discovery got the attention of scientists and social media alike.(Image credit: J.D. Kleopfer/Virginia Dept. of Game and Inland Fisheries) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gabriela Saldivia Source Type: news

Science, Technology, Math, Engineering And Now Congress
"Somebody with a technical background might think in a little bit different than the way, for instance, that a lawyer would think," says Chrissy Houlahan, a new lawmaker with a STEM background.(Image credit: Matt Rourke/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ashley Westerman Source Type: news

David Baron: Why Should You Experience A Total Solar Eclipse?
The moment David Baron saw his first total solar eclipse in 1998, he was hooked. He's spent the last 20 years chasing them across the globe—all for a few minutes of joy, wonder and awe.(Image credit: David Baron) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ingrid Fetell Lee: How Can We Design More Joy Into Our Surroundings?
Ingrid Fetell Lee discovered that certain elements--like bright color, abundance, round shapes--are universally joyful. She says designing more joyful spaces can actually change how we feel and act.(Image credit: Ryan Lash/TED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news