Sharks Like To Hang Out, But Their Spots Often Overlap With Commercial Fishers'
Many shark species tend to congregate in the same areas as industrial fishing ships, a study finds. As a result, tens of millions of sharks in the open ocean end up caught either as food or bycatch. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

A Warm Bedtime Bath Can Help You Cool Down And Sleep Better
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susie Neilson Source Type: news

76 Billion Pills, 6 Companies And An Opioid Trial For The Ages
A new investigative report sheds light on the facts and figures behind the opioid crisis.(Image credit: John Moore/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Small Towns Fear They Are Unprepared For Future Climate-Driven Flooding
The central U.S. just experienced the most widespread river flooding ever recorded there. Flood defenses in major cities largely performed well, but many smaller communities were simply overwhelmed.(Image credit: NASA Earth Observatory) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Hersher Source Type: news

Mistrust And Lack Of Genetic Diversity Slow Gains In Precision Medicine
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pien Huang Source Type: news

Improved Prosthetic Hand Has A Lighter Touch And Easy Grip
There's still much research to be done before the device is routinely useful. But one man was able to use it to gently grasp his wife's hand and feel her touch — an emotional moment, he says.(Image credit: Dan Hixson/University of Utah College of Engineering) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: luisa torres Source Type: news

Sharks Have Few Places To Hide From Fishing, Study Shows
Many shark species tend to congregate in the same areas as industrial fishing ships, a study finds. As a result, tens of millions of sharks in the open ocean end up caught either as food or bycatch.(Image credit: Arun Sankar/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

50 Years Later: The Apollo 11 Moon Landing And How We Got There (Rebroadcast)
This week marks the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11's landing on the Moon.(Image credit: NASA/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brain Scans Find Differences But No Injury In U.S. Diplomats Who Fell Ill In Cuba
Advanced MRI scans of 40 embassy workers who developed health problems in Havana found no evidence to support claims that they were attacked or suffered brain injuries.(Image credit: Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

Catching Sight Of A Rare Butterfly In A Surprising Refuge
Regal fritillary butterflies have largely disappeared from the East Coast, save for a military base in central Pennsylvania. A few days each summer, hundreds descend for guided tours to see them.(Image credit: Doug Watson/WITF) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marie Cusick Source Type: news

Catching Sight Of A Rare Butterfly In A Surprise Refuge
The regal fritillary butterfly has largely disappeared from the East Coast, save for a military base in Central Pennsylvania. A few days each summer, hundreds descend for guided tours to see it.(Image credit: Doug Watson/WITF) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marie Cusick Source Type: news

A Study Confirms That Laugh Tracks Make Jokes Seem Funnier
Comedy shows on TV often use recorded laughter in combination with a live audience. A new study shows that hearing laughter, especially spontaneous laughter, makes a bad joke seem funnier. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

India Launches Mission To The Moon On Its 2nd Try
If Chandrayaan-2 reaches the moon as planned, India would become the fourth country to achieve a soft landing on the lunar surface, after the United States, Russia and China.(Image credit: Manish Swarup/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sasha Ingber Source Type: news

As NASA's Apollo Space Program Grew, Alabama Was Pressured To Desegregate
Hundreds of thousands of jobs were created for the Apollo space program. As the program ramped up, leaders in Huntsville, Ala., realized they needed to desegregate to attract talent. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Neuman Source Type: news

When It Comes To Vaccines And Autism, Why Is It Hard To Refute Misinformation?
For years scientists have said that there is no link between vaccines and autism. There are still many people who are reluctant to vaccinate. But, one woman has changed her mind about vaccines. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shankar Vedantam Source Type: news

Once Nearly Dead As The Dodo, California Condor Comeback Reaches 1,000 Chicks
In the 1980s, there were less than two dozen California Condors left. Today, more than 500 exist in the world, thanks to the efforts of conservationists.(Image credit: National Park Service/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Simon Source Type: news

Space Spinoffs: The Technology To Reach The Moon Was Put To Use Back On Earth
Project Apollo spurred on a technological revolution — everything from advances in food packaging to computers. Fifty years later, we are still reaping the rewards.(Image credit: Lily Padula For NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jacob Margolis, KPCC Source Type: news

Hawaiian Activists Protest Construction Of World's Largest Telescope In State
Native Hawaiian activists are protesting to prevent the construction of the world's largest telescope on Hawaii's tallest mountain. Now, authorities appear poised to break up the protests. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ryan Finnerty Source Type: news

An Imagined Future Speaks In 'Talking To Robots'
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Adam Frank Source Type: news

'Fresh Air' Commemorates The 50th Anniversary Of Apollo 11's Moon Landing
We listen to archival interviews with Michael Collins, of Apollo 11; Alan Shepard, the first American in space; Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield; and Chuck Yeager, who first broke the sound barrier. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Terry Gross Source Type: news

Rogue Weedkiller Vapors Are Threatening Soybean Science
Scientists at four leading universities have seen their soybean experiments injured by a stealthy vandal: drifting fumes from a weedkiller called dicamba, now popular among farmers.(Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dan Charles Source Type: news

Key Moments To The Lead-Up Of Apollo 11 Moon Landing
NPR's Noel King talks to historian Andrew Chaikin about the things that went wrong during the Apollo 11 moon landing. He wrote: Man on the Moon: The Voyages of the Apollo Astronauts. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Refinery Explosions Raise New Warnings About Deadly Chemical
Chemical experts say recent refinery explosions could have been far more devastating if deadly hydrogen fluoride was released. Some are calling for a ban on the chemical.(Image credit: Matt Rourke/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susan Phillips Source Type: news

Kids And Grownups Alike Wowed By Rocket Projected On The Washington Monument
In Washington, D.C., the Smithsonian is treating visitors to exhibits celebrating the 50th anniversary of the moon landing. After dark an image of the rocket is projected on the Washington Monument. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Martin Austermuhle Source Type: news

Is Climate Change Our No. 1 National Security Threat?
The president has called climate change a hoax, but many in the military consider it a threat we must fight. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Meet John Houbolt: He Figured Out How To Go To The Moon, But Few Were Listening
In the early 1960s, NASA was considering three different ideas for landing a man on the lunar surface. Houbolt's plan ultimately won out despite concerns within NASA that it was too risky.(Image credit: NASA/LARC/Bob Nye/PhotoQuest/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Neuman Source Type: news

If We All Ate Enough Fruits And Vegetables, There'd Be Big Shortages
There's already not enough produce for everyone in the world to get the daily recommended amount. Two new studies urge revamping the food system to feed the growing population and protect the planet.(Image credit: Wanwisa Hernandez/EyeEm/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Allison Aubrey Source Type: news

Telescope In Chile's Mountains Looks For Signals To Explain How The Universe Began
There's a telescope high up in the mountains of Chile that's looking for signals from the earliest moments of the universe. Finding these signals would be key to explaining how the universe began. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Top EPA Scientific Integrity Official Not Allowed To Testify At House Hearing
The top scientific integrity official from the Environmental Protection Agency was barred from attending a Congressional hearing on scientific integrity on Wednesday. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Hersher Source Type: news

WHO Declares Ebola Outbreak In Congo An International Health Emergency
The current outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo has killed more than 1,650 people, according to the World Health Organization. About 12 new cases are reported daily.(Image credit: Al-hadji Kudra Maliro/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

Seeing Apollo Through The Eyes Of Astronauts
Five former NASA astronauts who flew on space missions reflect on some of the awe-inspiring photos from Apollo 11, the first lunar landing flight.(Image credit: NASA) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ryan Kellman Source Type: news

Scientists Desert USDA As Agency Relocates To Kansas City Area
The mandatory move imposed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture on most of the workers at two vital research agencies has been criticized as a "blatant attack on science." (Image credit: J. Scott Applewhite/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

Huntsville Launches 5,000 Rockets To Commemorate Apollo 11 Anniversary
The U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Ala., celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch by inviting everyone to launch their own rocket. They're trying to beat the world record. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Brett Tannehill Source Type: news

Florida's Corals Are Dying Off, But It's Not All Due To Climate Change, Study Says
A new study from the Florida Keys shows that a lot of the stress on corals comes from local sources, providing hope that community action can help save them.(Image credit: JW Porter/University of Georgia) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pien Huang Source Type: news

The Dawn Of Low-Carbon Shipping
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Hersher Source Type: news

The Making Of Apollo's Command Module: 2 Engineers Recall Tragedy And Triumph
It was the only part of the Apollo 11 spacecraft that came back from the moon. Designing, testing and building it was a monumental task, according to two engineers who were part of the effort.(Image credit: NASA) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jacob Margolis Source Type: news

VIDEO: Move Objects With Your Mind? We're Getting There, With The Help Of An Armband
You know "the Force" that binds all things — the one that can let your mind move objects? The latest Future You video demos an armband that allows users to control objects with thoughts.(Image credit: NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elise Hu Source Type: news

Hawaii Protesters Block Access Road To Stop Construction Of Massive Telescope
Native Hawaiians chained themselves to a grate in a road to stop work on the controversial Mauna Kea project on what they say is sacred land. Development is scheduled to begin this week.(Image credit: AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Vanessa Romo Source Type: news

Cool Your Jets! Science Might Explain Your Weird And Emotional Airplane Behavior
The reason some passengers weep uncontrollably or order strange beverages in the sky might be related to high levels of noise and air pressure in the cabin.(Image credit: Fox Photos/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Josh Axelrod Source Type: news

Spacesuit Worn By Neil Armstrong Continues To Inspire
The spacesuit Neil Armstrong wore on the moon is iconic and continues to be the standard for crafting space garb. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Chloe Veltman Source Type: news

The Camera That Went To The Moon And Changed How We See It
Astronaut Walter Schirra's decision to bring a Swedish-made Hasselblad on his Mercury spaceflight set the course for NASA's choice of the camera for the Apollo lunar program.(Image credit: Charles Conrad Jr./NASA) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Neuman Source Type: news

Climate Change Fuels Wetter Storms — Storms Like Barry
The water in the Gulf of Mexico is hot and the Mississippi River is high. That could spell disaster for Louisiana.(Image credit: Matthew Hinton/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Hersher Source Type: news

Has Your Doctor Talked To You About Climate Change?
Some physicians say connecting environmental effects of climate change — heat waves, more pollen and longer allergy seasons — to the health consequences helps them better care for patients.(Image credit: Jesse Costa/WBUR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Martha Bebinger Source Type: news

Rippling Rainbow Map Shows How California Earthquakes Moved The Earth
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

'Late Migrations' Essays Create A Jeweled Patchwork Of Nature And Culture
New York Times columnist Margaret Renkl astonishes with her essays, a woven tapestry that makes one of all the world's beings that strive to live — and, in one way or another, face mortality.(Image credit: Milkweed) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Barbara J. King Source Type: news

As America Celebrates Apollo, A New Moon Race Is Underway
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Geoff Brumfiel Source Type: news

Cutting Just 300 Calories Per Day May Keep Your Heart Healthy
That's the equivalent of about six standard Oreos. But this modest reduction in calories could have protective benefits for our hearts, a new study finds.(Image credit: Sian Irvine/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susie Neilson Source Type: news

The Best Medicine: Decoding The Hidden Meanings Of Laughter
This week, a scientific look at what makes us laugh. Here's a hint — a lot of it isn't funny. We talk to neuroscientist (and stand up comedian) Sophie Scott. (Image credit: Flashpop/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shankar Vedantam Source Type: news

Bet On The Bot: AI Beats The Professionals At 6-Player Texas Hold 'Em
Six-player Texas Hold 'em has been too tough for a machine to master — until now. A bot named Pluribus crushed some of the world's best poker players using brash and unorthodox strategies. (Image credit: Facebook AI Research) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

Norway Surveys Sunken Soviet Submarine
A Norwegian team has found some radioactivity leaking from the sub, which sank in 1989. But they say it poses no threat to the environment.(Image credit: Ægir 6000/Institute of Marine Research Norway) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Geoff Brumfiel Source Type: news