Friday News Roundup - International
We talk about the suspension of Britain's Parliament, the G7 Summit, a U.S. cyberattack on Iran and more. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

EPA Aims To Roll Back Limits On Methane Emissions From Oil And Gas Industry
"This would be a huge step backward," said one environmental advocate. "It would cause greatly increased pollution." The Trump administration says it will help the oil and gas industry save money.(Image credit: Charlie Riedel/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

After Months In A Dish, Lab-Grown Minibrains Start Making 'Brain Waves'
Researchers say clusters of human brain cells grown in the lab can spontaneously generate electrical patterns similar to the brain waves of a 6-month-old fetus.(Image credit: Alysson Muotri/UC San Diego Health Sciences) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

A Story Of Nazi Uranium
A cube of uranium from a Nazi nuclear reactor has turned up in Maryland. Now two researchers are trying to figure out how it got there and what happened to similar artifacts. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Geoff Brumfiel Source Type: news

Duped In The Deli Aisle? 'No Nitrates Added' Labels Are Often Misleading
Consumer groups are urging the USDA to change labeling rules for processed meats. They argue that "uncured" and "no nitrates added" labels may falsely lead people to believe these meats are healthier.(Image credit: Foodcollection/Getty Images/Foodcollection) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Allison Aubrey Source Type: news

Sand, Sunscreen And ... Sharks! Cape Cod Beach Towns Do More To Keep People Safe
One year after a young man died in a shark attack, Cape Cod beach towns are adding emergency services and high-tech detection. An influx of great whites followed a rebound in the seal population.(Image credit: Sarah Mizes-Tan/WCAI) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah Mizes-Tan Source Type: news

Teen Climate Activist Greta Thunberg Arrives In New York After Sailing The Atlantic
The 16-year-old Swedish activist chose sailing over flying to attend a United Nations climate summit. She's inspired young people around the world to protest for more climate action.(Image credit: Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeff Brady Source Type: news

'Vagina Bible' Tackles Health And Politics In A Guide To Female Physiology
Frustrated with online marketing sites that peddle needless "health aids" and fears, gynecologist and columnist Jen Gunter aims to dispel myths about the female body and restore power to patients.(Image credit: Meredith Rizzo/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mara Gordon Source Type: news

A Newer, Faster Way To Detect Norovirus In Water Supplies
Norovirus sickens tens of millions of people each year. They get the disease from contaminated food or water. Engineers have developed a rapid, inexpensive test to detect the virus in water supplies. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Study Questions Mainstay Treatment For Mild Asthma
Many of the 26 million Americans with asthma use a low-dose steroid inhaler daily to prevent symptoms. But a recent study raises questions about this strategy for people with mild, persistent asthma.(Image credit: hsyncoban/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: April Dembosky Source Type: news

Robots Compete In Disaster Test
Robotics teams from all over the country compete in Pennsylvania in the Subterranean Challenge to see whose robot performs best in a simulated mine disaster scenario. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kathleen Davis Source Type: news

Academic Science Rethinks All-Too-White 'Dude Walls' Of Honor
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Getting Coral To Reproduce
NPR's Leila Fadel speaks with Florida Aquarium's lead coral scientist Keri O'Neil about getting stone coral to repeatedly reproduce in a lab setting. This could help save global coral populations. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Friday News Roundup - International
The world is on fire. No, seriously. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists In New York Are Trying To Edit The DNA In Human Sperm
NPR got exclusive access to the only lab known to be trying to edit the DNA in human sperm, which raises all the same thorny issues as modifying genes in human embryos (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Lack Of Diversity In Genetic Databases Hampers Research
Scientists around the world are working to correct a problem with genetic health information — too much of it is currently based on samples of Europeans. (Image credit: Yann Arthus-Bertrand/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Harris Source Type: news

How Dr. Kenneth Davis Turned the Mount Sinai Health System Around
The neurobiologist oversaw one of the largest financial turnarounds in academic medicine. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

News Brief: Federal Deficit, New Immigration Policy, DNA Experiment
The Congressional Budget Office revises its federal deficit estimate. New policy would allow the government to indefinitely detain children with their families. And, the results of a DNA experiment. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Noel King Source Type: news

Naked And Unafraid: The Secret Lives Of Naked Mole Rats
Picture a hairless, wrinkly rodent about the size of a small sweet potato — kinda cool, kinda weird. They also are extraordinarily long-lived. Researchers are lining up to study their secrets.(Image credit: Gregory G Dimijian/Getty Images/Science Source) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pien Huang Source Type: news

Naked And Unafraid: 6 Wild Facts About Naked Mole Rats
Picture a hairless, wrinkly rodent about the size of a small sweet potato — kinda cool, kinda weird. They also are extraordinarily long-lived. Researchers are lining up to study their secrets.(Image credit: Gregory G Dimijian/Getty Images/Science Source) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pien Huang Source Type: news

Subtle Differences In Brain Cells Hint at Why Many Drugs Help Mice But Not People
A detailed comparison of mouse and human brain tissue found differences that could help explain why mice aren't always a good model for human diseases. (Image credit: David Robertson, ICR/Science Photo Library) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

More U.S. Towns Are Feeling The Pinch As Recycling Becomes Costlier
The U.S. recycling industry is facing a quandary: Too much of the plastic we use can't be recycled, and taxpayers increasingly are on the hook for paying for all that trash to hit the landfills.(Image credit: Rebecca Davis/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Davis Source Type: news

U.S. Recycling Industry Is Struggling To Figure Out A Future Without China
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christopher Joyce Source Type: news

Perfect Storm Hits U.S. Recycling Industry
Since Woodbury, N.J., began the nation's first mandatory curbside recycling program, the industry is in trouble. China has stopped taking all the plastic so facilities are overwhelmed. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Davis Source Type: news

Cigarettes Can't Be Advertised On TV. Should Juul Ads Be Permitted?
Though tobacco ads have been banned from TV for about 50 years, the marketing of electronic cigarettes isn't constrained by the law. Public health advocates consider that a loophole that hurts kids.(Image credit: Steven Senne/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michelle Andrews Source Type: news

Cave Diver Risks All To Explore Places 'Where Nobody Has Ever Been'
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dave Davies Source Type: news

Can Maternal Fluoride Consumption During Pregnancy Lower Children's Intelligence?
A Canadian study suggests that fluoride consumed by pregnant women can affect the IQ of their children. No single study provides definitive answers, but the findings will no doubt stir debate.(Image credit: vitapix/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Harris Source Type: news

How Much Hotter Are The Oceans? The Answer Begins With A Bucket
Scientists need to track the history of sea temperatures precisely to model climate change. A newly discovered clue in measurements taken by sailors in the 1930s could have far-reaching implications.(Image credit: Suomi NPP — VIIRS/NASA Earth Observatory) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Hersher Source Type: news

Got Pain? A Virtual Swim With Dolphins May Help Melt It Away
A recent study found virtual reality experiences were better at easing pain than watching televised nature scenes. Immersive distraction seems key to the success, scientists say.(Image credit: Courtesy of Cedars Sinai/Screenshot by NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Allison Aubrey Source Type: news

This App Aims To Save New Moms' Lives
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jordan Tobias Source Type: news

How We Hear Our Own Voice Shapes How We See Ourselves And How Others See Us
At some point in our lives, many of us realize that the way we hear our own voice isn't the way others hear us. This gap has consequences. It shapes how we see ourselves and how others see us. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shankar Vedantam Source Type: news

These Engineers Have Found A Way To Use Sweat For Some Medical Tests
Engineers at the University of California Berkeley have developed a patch that can measure someone's sweat composition and sweat rate at the site of excretion. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Denise Herzing: Do Dolphins Have A Language?
We know that dolphins make distinctive clicks and whistles. But is that a language? Researcher Denise Herzing thinks it might be — and for the past 35 years — she's been working on unlocking it.(Image credit: James Duncan Davidson / TED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NPR/TED Staff Source Type: news

Barbara King: Do Animals Grieve?
In 2018, an orca made headlines when she carried her dead calf on her back for weeks. Barbara King says this was a display of animal grief and explains how this changes our relationship with animals.(Image credit: Bret Hartman/Bret Hartman / TED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NPR/TED Staff Source Type: news

Deinse Herzing: Do Dolphins Have A Language?
We know that dolphins make distinctive clicks and whistles. But is that a language? Researcher Denise Herzing thinks it might be — and for the past 35 years — she's been working on unlocking it.(Image credit: James Duncan Davidson / TED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NPR/TED Staff Source Type: news

Devastating Banana Fungus Arrives In Colombia, Threatening The Fruit's Future
A fungus that has destroyed banana plantations in Asia is now in Latin America. The disease moves slowly, but there's no cure, and it could mean calamity for the continent's banana industry. (Image credit: Jan Sochor/LatinContent via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dan Charles Source Type: news

These Experimental Shorts Are An 'Exosuit' That Boosts Endurance On The Trail
No ordinary pair of shorts, these were designed by Harvard scientists to work with the wearer's own leg muscles when walking or running, and might make a soldier's heavy loads easier to carry.(Image credit: Wyss Institute at Harvard University) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

In Defense Of Naked Mole Rats And What We Can Learn From Them
Picture a pinkish, hairless, wrinkly rodent about the size of a small sweet potato. Researchers are studying naked mole rats to figure out what they can learn about longevity and health. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pien Huang Source Type: news

'Lithium' Is A Homage To A Drug — And To The Renegade Side Of Science
By celebrating those who applied the substance as a drug, Walter A. Brown aims to raise awareness — and to demolish what remains of the myth that scientific progress is driven by rigorous dispassion.(Image credit: Liveright) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Etelka Lehoczky Source Type: news

Is Grass-Fed Beef Really Better For The Planet? Here's The Science
There are many elements to consider: climate, animal welfare, greenhouse gas emissions, land use. And with so many factors at play, sometimes the answer gets complicated.(Image credit: John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nancy Matsumoto Source Type: news

Trump Administration Makes Major Changes To Protections For Endangered Species
Interior Secretary David Bernhardt says the revisions will make the landmark conservation law more efficient. Critics say it will hurt endangered plants and animals as they face mounting threats.(Image credit: Wilfredo Lee/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nathan Rott Source Type: news

2 Experimental Ebola Drugs Saved Lives In Congo Outbreak
Drugs tested in the Democratic Republic of Congo are effective in treating Ebola, scientists say. They have run a study in the midst of a deadly epidemic and in the face of armed assaults on doctors.(Image credit: Jerome Delay/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Harris Source Type: news

In 'The Mosquito,' Humans Face A Predator More Deadly Than The Rest
Timothy C. Winegard has written a well-researched work of narrative nonfiction that tells a history of the world through the role that mosquitoes — and mosquito-borne illnesses — have played in it.(Image credit: Dutton) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gabino Iglesias Source Type: news

The Swaying Power Of Scented Spaces Isn't Always Right Under Our Nose
Can you lift the mood of a public space with a fragrance? Smell and taste researcher Dr. Alan Hirsch talks with NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer about the practice and its effects on mood and behavior.(Image credit: Gary Hershorn/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sacha Pfeiffer Source Type: news

Scientists Find Out How Leaping Maggots Leap
The scientists captured the acrobatic jumps of a tiny maggot-like creature with high-speed cameras to figure out how it does this trick with no arms, legs, or wings.(Image credit: Journal of Experimental Biology, Farley et al) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

What To Feed Locusts
Researchers at Arizona State University are studying locusts in hopes of finding better ways of preventing swarms from destroying crops.(Image credit: Joe Palca/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Researchers Are Trying To Find A Solution To Cut Concrete's Carbon Emissions
Researchers are trying to make a cleaner concrete to cut greenhouse gas emissions and curb climate change. The industry is estimated to account for at least 7% of global carbon dioxide emissions. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nathan Rott Source Type: news

Experts On Climate Change Say How We Use Land To Grow Food Needs To Change
Some of the world's top experts on climate change issued a new warning on Wednesday about how we use land to grow food. They say it's contributing to global warming, but it doesn't have to. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dan Charles Source Type: news

A World Without Water
A quarter of the world's population is at high risk of running out of water.(Image credit: ARUN SANKAR/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

U.N. Says Agriculture Must Change To Prevent Worst Effects Of Climate Change
Humans must drastically alter food production in order to prevent the most catastrophic effects of global warming, according to a U.N. report. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dan Charles Source Type: news