Snakes On A Plain: Invasive Species And How We Handle Them
Go full monty on that python!(Image credit: Conservancy of Southwest Florida) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Understanding The Statements Of Mass Shooters
Rachel Martin talks with Patrick Blanchfield of the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research about what we should focus on in the manifestos left behind and published by recent mass shooters. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gun Violence Prevention Research
NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with Garen Wintemute, director of the Violence Prevention Research Program at UC Davis, about the shift in people's behaviors in the aftermath of mass shootings. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Evidence Shows Popular Pesticides Could Cause Unintended Harm To Insects
Studies are revealing new, unintended threats that neonicotinoid pesticides pose to insects. The chemicals, widely used by farmers, are difficult to control because they persist in the environment.(Image credit: Alejandro Tena) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dan Charles Source Type: news

Amid Protests In Hawaii Against Giant Telescope, Astronomers Look To 'Plan B'
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Neuman Source Type: news

'Gods Of The Upper Air' Traces The Birth Of Cultural Anthropology
Charles King tells the story of Franz Boas' powerful challenge to racial science — and of how others like Margaret Mead and Zora Neale Hurston contributed to that project.(Image credit: ullstein bild Dtl./ullstein bild via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Barbara J. King Source Type: news

Pain Rescue Team Helps Seriously Ill Kids Cope In Terrible Times
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alison Kodjak Source Type: news

Chile And Telescopes Are A Match Made In Heaven
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Dairy Ice Cream, No Cow Needed: These Egg And Milk Proteins Are Made Without Animals
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maria Godoy Source Type: news

I Scream, You Scream, We All Scream For ... Lab-Grown Animal Proteins!
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maria Godoy Source Type: news

'Strange Harvests' Turns Nature's Fairy Tales Inside Out
Edward Posnett's book is more than an impressive add to the modern travelogue: it refuses to accept the landscape at face value as it paints remote terrain in visceral and breathtaking prose.(Image credit: Edward Posnett) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carson Vaughan Source Type: news

Sesame Allergies Are Likely More Widespread Than Previously Thought
New research suggests allergies to sesame are comparably prevalent as those to some tree nuts. The findings come as the FDA weighs whether to require sesame to be listed as an allergen on food labels.(Image credit: Patrick Donovan/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susie Neilson Source Type: news

Friday News Roundup - International
Will the United States get out of Afghanistan? (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Trust In Scientists Is Rising, Poll Finds
The proportion of people who say they have a "great deal" of confidence in scientists to act in the public interest increased from 21% in 2016 to 35% in 2019, according to the Pew Research Center.(Image credit: Roy Scott/Science Source) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Harris Source Type: news

Turtle Embryos May Play A Role In Determining Sex
Scientists have found that turtle embryos can play a role in determining their own sex, which could help their species guard against climate change. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

This Remote Corner Of Nevada Is One Of The Darkest Places In The World
Because of light pollution, most people in the U.S. don't know what a full night sky looks like. But the Massacre Rim area in Nevada has recently been designated a Dark Sky Sanctuary.(Image credit: Richie Bedarski/Friends of Nevada Wilderness) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Noah Glick Source Type: news

Turtle Embryos May Play A Role In Whether They Become Male Or Female
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

Hawaii Extends Thirty Meter Telescope Permit Amid Protests
"Because TMT construction is not imminent, I am withdrawing the emergency proclamation effective immediately," Ige said on Tuesday following a decision to allow an extra two years for construction. (Image credit: Audrey McAvoy/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Vanessa Romo Source Type: news

Loggerhead Sea Turtles Lay Record-Breaking Number Of Nests In The Southeast This Year
In Georgia, record numbers of loggerhead turtle nests have thrilled scientists working to save the endangered species. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Molly Samuel Source Type: news

Kids See Bearded Men As Strong — But Unattractive, Study Finds
New research shows that young children have a negative reaction to beards, but that changes as they get older. Children with bearded fathers did feel more warmly toward facial hair.(Image credit: Maskot/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Plastics Or People? At Least 1 Of Them Has To Change To Clean Up Our Mess
As consumers rebel against plastic waste, there's a growing question: Do we invent something people can toss without harming the environment or do we change people by giving them a chance to reuse?(Image credit: Wayne Parry/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christopher Joyce Source Type: news

Irritating Compounds Can Show Up In 'Vape Juice'
Among the possibly harmful compounds are "acetals," which form when some ingredients combine on the shelf, researchers say, and can inflame airways when inhaled.(Image credit: Gabby Jones/Bloomberg via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susie Neilson Source Type: news

Irritating Compounds Discovered In 'Vape Juice'
Research chemists who analyzed a number of flavored e-liquids found that some ingredients combine on the shelf to create "acetals" — compounds likely to irritate or inflame airways when inhaled.(Image credit: Gabby Jones/Bloomberg via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susie Neilson Source Type: news

Doctors In The U.S. Use CRISPR Technique To Treat A Genetic Disorder For The 1st Time
For the first time, doctors have used the gene-editing technique CRISPR to treat a genetic disorder in the U.S. The patient, who has sickle cell disease, spoke with NPR about her treatment. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

With An Eye Toward Lower Emissions, Clean Air Travel Gets Off The Ground
Air travel is set to grow dramatically. It will be a while before electric planes truly take off, but people are trying to reduce their carbon footprint now with offsets and "flight shaming."(Image credit: Jure Makovec/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ari Shapiro Source Type: news

Bugged By Insects? 'Buzz, Sting, Bite' Makes The Case For 6-Legged Friends
The decline of Earth's insect population may have serious consequences for humans, says scientist Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson. Insects are the world's janitors, as well as pollinators and a food source.(Image credit: Sefa Kaya/500px Prime/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Terry Gross Source Type: news

In A 1st, Doctors In U.S. Use CRISPR Tool To Treat Patient With Genetic Disorder
Victoria Gray, 34, of Forest, Miss., has sickle cell disease. She is the first patient ever to be publicly identified as being involved in a study testing the use of CRISPR for a genetic disease.(Image credit: Meredith Rizzo/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Sickle Cell Patient Reveals Why She Is Volunteering For Landmark Gene-Editing Study
Victoria Gray, 34, of Forest, Miss., hopes the gene-editing technique CRISPR will relieve her lifelong suffering caused by the genetic blood disorder that affects millions of people around the world.(Image credit: Meredith Rizzo/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Volcano Experts And Archaeologists Are Clashing Over Access To Study Pompeii
Volcanologists and archaeologists are clashing over access to the ancient site of Pompeii. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lulu Garcia-Navarro Source Type: news

Opinion: Is Anything More Urgent Than The Temperature Of Our Planet?
Our Earth is in the middle of what may be the hottest summer on record. Scorching new records were set all over Europe this week. What could be more urgent news than the temperature of our planet?(Image credit: Alain Pitton/NurPhoto via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Simon Source Type: news

Genetic Counselors Of Color Tackle Racial, Ethnic Disparities In Health Care
They work with patients to decide when genetic testing is appropriate, interpret test results and counsel families on the ways hereditary diseases might impact them. A trusting relationship is key.(Image credit: Karen Santos for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Erika Stallings Source Type: news

Lethal Injection Drugs' Efficacy And Availability For Federal Executions
The Justice Department's announcement that the federal government will resume its use of capital punishment has raised questions about the drugs it plans to use.(Image credit: Yuri Gripas/Reuters) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susie Neilson Source Type: news

College Student Discovers 65-Million-Year-Old Triceratops Skull
Harrison Duran, a 23-year-old college student at University of California, Merced, spent his summer internship hunting for dinosaur fossils. (Image credit: Fossil Excavators) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Josh Axelrod Source Type: news

Dialysis Firm Cancels $524,600.17 Medical Bill After Journalists Investigate
This week, NPR profiled a Montana man who was billed nearly half a million dollars for 14 weeks of dialysis, after being caught in a dispute between insurer and the dialysis provider. Now he owes $0.(Image credit: Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jenny Gold Source Type: news

Birds Are Trying To Adapt To Climate Change — But Is It Too Little, Too Late?
By breeding and migrating earlier, some birds are adapting to climate change. But it's probably not happening fast enough for some species to survive, according to new research.(Image credit: Michael P. Harris) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pien Huang Source Type: news

Decisions, Decisions: Some We Struggle To Make, Others We Can't Forget
This week on the Hidden Brain radio show, decision-making. We learn why we often stumble when trying to make ourselves happy, and why certain decisions leave us wondering "what if?"(Image credit: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shankar Vedantam Source Type: news

Sharks Like To Hang Out, But Their Spots Often Overlap With Commercial Fishers'
Many shark species tend to congregate in the same areas as industrial fishing ships, a study finds. As a result, tens of millions of sharks in the open ocean end up caught either as food or bycatch. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

A Warm Bedtime Bath Can Help You Cool Down And Sleep Better
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susie Neilson Source Type: news

76 Billion Pills, 6 Companies And An Opioid Trial For The Ages
A new investigative report sheds light on the facts and figures behind the opioid crisis.(Image credit: John Moore/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Small Towns Fear They Are Unprepared For Future Climate-Driven Flooding
The central U.S. just experienced the most widespread river flooding ever recorded there. Flood defenses in major cities largely performed well, but many smaller communities were simply overwhelmed.(Image credit: NASA Earth Observatory) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Hersher Source Type: news

Mistrust And Lack Of Genetic Diversity Slow Gains In Precision Medicine
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pien Huang Source Type: news

Improved Prosthetic Hand Has A Lighter Touch And Easy Grip
There's still much research to be done before the device is routinely useful. But one man was able to use it to gently grasp his wife's hand and feel her touch — an emotional moment, he says.(Image credit: Dan Hixson/University of Utah College of Engineering) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: luisa torres Source Type: news

Sharks Have Few Places To Hide From Fishing, Study Shows
Many shark species tend to congregate in the same areas as industrial fishing ships, a study finds. As a result, tens of millions of sharks in the open ocean end up caught either as food or bycatch.(Image credit: Arun Sankar/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

50 Years Later: The Apollo 11 Moon Landing And How We Got There (Rebroadcast)
This week marks the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11's landing on the Moon.(Image credit: NASA/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brain Scans Find Differences But No Injury In U.S. Diplomats Who Fell Ill In Cuba
Advanced MRI scans of 40 embassy workers who developed health problems in Havana found no evidence to support claims that they were attacked or suffered brain injuries.(Image credit: Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

Catching Sight Of A Rare Butterfly In A Surprising Refuge
Regal fritillary butterflies have largely disappeared from the East Coast, save for a military base in central Pennsylvania. A few days each summer, hundreds descend for guided tours to see them.(Image credit: Doug Watson/WITF) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marie Cusick Source Type: news

Catching Sight Of A Rare Butterfly In A Surprise Refuge
The regal fritillary butterfly has largely disappeared from the East Coast, save for a military base in Central Pennsylvania. A few days each summer, hundreds descend for guided tours to see it.(Image credit: Doug Watson/WITF) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marie Cusick Source Type: news

A Study Confirms That Laugh Tracks Make Jokes Seem Funnier
Comedy shows on TV often use recorded laughter in combination with a live audience. A new study shows that hearing laughter, especially spontaneous laughter, makes a bad joke seem funnier. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

India Launches Mission To The Moon On Its 2nd Try
If Chandrayaan-2 reaches the moon as planned, India would become the fourth country to achieve a soft landing on the lunar surface, after the United States, Russia and China.(Image credit: Manish Swarup/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sasha Ingber Source Type: news

As NASA's Apollo Space Program Grew, Alabama Was Pressured To Desegregate
Hundreds of thousands of jobs were created for the Apollo space program. As the program ramped up, leaders in Huntsville, Ala., realized they needed to desegregate to attract talent. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Neuman Source Type: news