Measles Shots Aren't Just For Kids: Many Adults Could Use A Booster Too
With U.S. measles cases at record highs, doctors say adults who got vaccinated prior to 1968 should consider getting revaccinated to make sure they and their neighbors are protected.(Image credit: Eric Risberg/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Allison Aubrey Source Type: news

After Pentagon Ends Contract, Top-Secret Scientists Group Vows To Carry On
The 60 or so members of the Jasons are normal academics by day. But each summer, they come together to study tough problems for the military, intelligence agencies and other parts of the government.(Image credit: R. Fugate/Air Force Research Laboratory) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Geoff Brumfiel Source Type: news

This Is Your Brain On Ads: How Mass Marketing Affects Our Minds
How many ads have you encountered today? On this week's radio show, we discuss the insidiousness of advertising in American media. (Image credit: Phillip Waterman/Getty Images/Cultura RF) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shankar Vedantam Source Type: news

5 Years After Flint's Crisis Began, Is The Water Safe?
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Steve Carmody Source Type: news

NASA's InSight Probe May Have Recorded First Sounds Of Marsquake
A NASA probe called InSight is on Mars listening for marsquakes and it seems it has detected the first sounds of a quake, probably. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Scientists Explain A Common Fight In Basketball
Are players just pretending to be so certain the ball is out on their opponent? Or could there be a difference in how they experience the event that has them pointing a finger at the other player? (Image credit: Beck Diefenbach/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

Decoded Brain Signals Could Give Voiceless People A Way To Talk
Scientists have found a way to transform electrical signals in the brain into intelligible speech. The advance may help people paralyzed by a stroke or disease, but the technology is experimental.(Image credit: Gary Waters/Science Source) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

Candida Auris: The Deadly Fungus Among Us
What you need to know about an emerging superbug.(Image credit: Nicolas Armer/picture alliance via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Teaching Climate Change: Push And Pull
A new poll shows that only 42 percent of teachers cover climate change in their classrooms.(Image credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Meal Kits Have A Smaller Carbon Footprint Than Grocery Shopping, Study Says
While it may seem that heaps of plastic from meal kit delivery services make them less environmentally friendly than traditional grocery shopping, a new study suggests that's not necessarily true.(Image credit: Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jonathan Lambert Source Type: news

Special K: Ketamine, From Party Drug To Depression Medication
A new drug based on ketamine was recently approved by the FDA to treat depression in treatment-resistant patients.(Image credit: Photo Illustration by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Dig Into Hard Questions About The Fluorinated Pollutants Known As PFAS
PFAS are a family of chemicals accumulating in the soil, rivers, drinking water and the human body. How much exposure to these substances in clothes, firefighting foam and food wrap is too much?(Image credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Hersher Source Type: news

Former Astronaut On Watching For Life-Destroying Objects From Space
NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks to former astronaut Ed Lu, who co-founded a planetary defense nonprofit, about a meteor that exploded with the energy of 10 atomic bombs over the Bering Sea. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Einstein's Unfinished Revolution' Looks At The Quantum-Physics-And-Reality Problem
A century after the birth of quantum mechanics, no one is sure what it is telling us about the nature of reality — and Lee Smolin's book adds to a stream of excellent works on the topic.(Image credit: Bettmann Archive) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Adam Frank Source Type: news

Hurricane Michael Was A Category 5, NOAA Finds — The First Since Andrew In 1992
With winds of 160 mph, the October hurricane was the strongest on record to make landfall on the Florida Panhandle, where communities are still trying to recover. NOAA upgraded it from a Category 4.(Image credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laurel Wamsley Source Type: news

Tiny Earthquakes Happen Every Few Minutes In Southern California, Study Finds
A new catalog of Southern California earthquakes is 10 times larger than its predecessor list. The details of frequent, small quakes help scientists study what triggers large, destructive ones.(Image credit: Rich Pedroncelli/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Hersher Source Type: news

Gene Therapy Advances To Better Treat 'Bubble Boy' Disease
The latest advance is not only encouraging news for patients with severe combined immunodeficiency. It's a test case for all those scientists working to develop better gene therapy techniques.(Image credit: AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Harris Source Type: news

Scientists Restore Some Function In The Brains Of Dead Pigs
The cells regained a startling amount of function, but the brains didn't have activity linked with consciousness. Ethicists see challenges to assumptions about the irreversible nature of brain death.(Image credit: Stefano G. Daniele and Zvonimir Vrselja, Sestan Laboratory, Yale School of Medicine) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Climate Change Was The Engine That Powered Hurricane Maria's Devastating Rains
Maria was the rainiest hurricane known to have hit the island. Scientists say a storm of its severity is nearly five times more likely to occur today, with warmer air and oceans, than in the 1950s.(Image credit: Carlos Giusti/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Hersher Source Type: news

Climate Change Is 'Greatest Challenge Humans Have Ever Faced,' Author Says
Bill McKibben, who first warned of climate change 30 years ago, says its effects are now upon us: "The idea that anybody's going to be immune from this anywhere is untrue." His new book is Falter. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dave Davies Source Type: news

First U.S. Patients Treated With CRISPR As Human Gene-Editing Trials Get Underway
This could be a crucial year for the powerful gene-editing technique CRISPR as researchers start testing it in patients to treat diseases such as cancer, blindness and sickle cell disease.(Image credit: Molekuul/Getty Images/Science Photo Library) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Scientists Plan To Start Human Trials Testing CRISPR Soon
The powerful gene-editing technique is moving out of the lab and into the clinic. Trials will use CRISPR to try to treat a variety of diseases, ranging from cancer and blindness to blood disorders. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Microplastic Found Even In The Air In France's Pyrenees Mountains
Tiny fragments broken down from larger pieces of plastic have already been found in rivers, lakes, oceans and in agricultural soil. But very few studies of wind-borne microplastic have ever been done.(Image credit: VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christopher Joyce Source Type: news

'Our Planet' Nature Documentary Addresses The 800-Pound Gorilla — Human Impact
The new Netflix series takes a hard look at the effects of our behavior on the natural world. Series producer Alastair Fothergill says that this is a different, more urgent type of show.(Image credit: Sophie Lanfear/Silverback/Netflix) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ari Shapiro Source Type: news

Do You Love Lying In Bed? Get Paid By NASA To Do It For Space Research
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sacha Pfeiffer Source Type: news

High Stress Drives Up Your Risk Of A Heart Attack. Here's How To Chill Out
A study of siblings finds those who have a stress-related disorder have a 60 percent higher risk of heart attack or other cardiovascular event, compared to their less-stressed brothers and sisters.(Image credit: stock_colors/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Allison Aubrey Source Type: news

Get Paid To Stay In Bed, For Space Science
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer speaks with Jennifer Ngo-Anh of the European Space Agency about their planned study during which subjects will stay in bed for two months. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can This Breakfast Cereal Help Save The Planet?
Some environmentalists say food production needs a fundamental reboot, with crops that stay rooted in the soil for years, like Kernza, a prairie grass. Even General Mills says it likes the idea.(Image credit: Olivia Sun/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dan Charles Source Type: news

Friday News Roundup - International
The arrests of Julian Assange and Omar al-Bashir dominated global news headlines this week.(Image credit: AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Israeli Robotic Moon Landing Fails In Final Descent
Israeli scientists are studying what caused an engine failure in the closing minutes of what they hoped would be a historic lunar landing.(Image credit: Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Gonzales Source Type: news

Ketamine May Relieve Depression By Repairing Damaged Brain Circuits
Scientists are learning how the party drug ketamine relieves depression so quickly — and why its effects fade over time.(Image credit: Kevin Link/Science Source ) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

As Weeds Outsmart The Latest Weedkillers, Farmers Are Running Out Of Easy Options
In the long-running war between farmers and weeds, it's advantage, weeds. Scientists in Kansas have found examples of the dreaded pigweed that are immune to the newest weed-killing technologies. (Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dan Charles Source Type: news

Ancient Bones And Teeth Found In A Philippine Cave May Rewrite Human History
Islands in Southeast Asia were clearly important in the evolution of early humans, say scientists who have turned up 50,000-year-old remains of what they suspect is a previously unknown human species.(Image credit: Callao Cave Archaeology Project) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christopher Joyce Source Type: news

Earth Sees First Image Of A Black Hole
Every image you've ever seen of a black hole has been a simulation. Until now. "We have seen what we thought was unseeable," said Event Horizon Telescope Director Shep Doeleman.(Image credit: Event Horizon Telescope collaboration et al) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bill Chappell Source Type: news

Porcupine Barbs For Better Wound Healing
Surgeons would love to find a replacement for surgical staples — one that doesn't aggravate wounds on the way in and out. Bioengineers think they've found the right model — a porcupine's quill.(Image credit: Lindsay Wildlife Experience) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Josh Cassidy Source Type: news

Are Plastic Bag Bans Garbage?
A national movement to ban plastic bags is gaining steam, but these restrictions may actually hurt the environment more than help it. Human nature, hard truths, and what kind of bag to use anyway?(Image credit: Fiona Goodall/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Greg Rosalsky Source Type: news

'Losing Earth' Explores How Oil Industry Played Politics With The Planet's Fate
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Terry Gross Source Type: news

1A Across America: Hurricane Harvey Recovery Tests Faith In Government
We visit Houston to talk to people still recovering from Hurricane Harvey.(Image credit: Andrew Schneider/Houston Public Media) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Big Cities, Bright Lights And Up To 1 Billion Bird Collisions
When birds migrate, they can become attracted to and disoriented by artificial lights. The result: they end up colliding with skyscrapers and other buildings. (Image credit: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lindsey Feingold Source Type: news

Juno Flies By Jupiter
NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro asks NASA scientist Steven Levin about the spacecraft Juno's latest Jupiter fly-by, occurring this weekend. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Math Teacher's Life Summed Up By The Gifted Students He Mentored
A biologist at Harvard was chatting with a colleague about a mentor who pushed him to do harder math problems. It turns out the colleague had the same mentor — and so did many others.(Image credit: Sara Stathas for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Mummified Mice And Falcons Found In Newly Unveiled Egyptian Tomb
More than 50 animals were found in the tomb, along with mummies of a woman and a young boy. It's "one of the most exciting discoveries ever," Mostafa Waziri of the Supreme Council of Antiquities said.(Image credit: Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jenny Gathright Source Type: news

Opinion: Can Stonehenge Offer A Lesson For Brexit?
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Simon Source Type: news

Japan (Very Carefully) Drops Plastic Explosives Onto An Asteroid
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Geoff Brumfiel Source Type: news

Cats Might Not Act Like It, But They Know Their Names As Well As Dogs, Study Says
In the study by Japanese researchers, cats reacted to their own name. Researchers say it's the first evidence showing cats can understand spoken words.(Image credit: Hasan Jamali/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew S. Schwartz Source Type: news

Cats Don't Fetch, But Know Their Names As Well As Dogs, Researchers Say
In the study by Japanese researchers, cats reacted to their own name. Researchers say it's the first evidence showing cats can understand spoken words.(Image credit: Hasan Jamali/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew S. Schwartz Source Type: news

Stop The Presses! Newspapers Affect Us, Often In Ways We Don't Realize
This week we consider what we misunderstand about newspapers – from their long history of hype, to the hidden price we pay when they close. (Image credit: John Moore/John Moore/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shankar Vedantam Source Type: news

Bad Diets Are Responsible For More Deaths Than Smoking, Global Study Finds
Some 11 million deaths annually are linked to diet-related diseases like diabetes and heart disease, a study finds. Researchers say that makes diet the leading risk factor for deaths around the world.(Image credit: John D. Buffington/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Allison Aubrey Source Type: news

Every Breath You Take: An Indoor Smog Story
Just keep breathin' and breathin' and breathin' and breathin'...(Image credit: NOEL CELIS/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

USDA Terminates Deadly Cat Experiments, Plans To Adopt Out Remaining Animals
Scientists infected the cats with toxoplasmosis and later killed them. Bipartisan members of Congress complained about the practice and the agency ended the program.(Image credit: USDA photo obtained through a FOIA request/White Coat Waste Project) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Vanessa Romo Source Type: news