Bad Diets Are Responsible For More Deaths Than Smoking, Global Study Finds
Some 11 million deaths annually are linked to diet-related diseases like diabetes and heart disease, a study finds. Researchers say that makes diet the leading risk factor for deaths around the world.(Image credit: John D. Buffington/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Allison Aubrey Source Type: news

Every Breath You Take: An Indoor Smog Story
Just keep breathin' and breathin' and breathin' and breathin'...(Image credit: NOEL CELIS/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

USDA Terminates Deadly Cat Experiments, Plans To Adopt Out Remaining Animals
Scientists infected the cats with toxoplasmosis and later killed them. Bipartisan members of Congress complained about the practice and the agency ended the program.(Image credit: USDA photo obtained through a FOIA request/White Coat Waste Project) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Vanessa Romo Source Type: news

Laysan Albatross: An Unexpected Attraction In Hawaii
For more than a decade, Cathy Granholm has been tracking the Laysan albatross. They come down to Hawaii every winter from Alaska to nest and raise their chicks. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Here's Why Some Mess Is Not Always A Bad Thing
Does mess drive you nuts? Astrophysicist Adam Frank says to think of it as showing off — all proteins need mess to do their own work. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Adam Frank Source Type: news

Flooding And The Food Chain
How much could infrastructure damage to the Midwest cost? And how will it affect the region's farmers?(Image credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NASA: Debris From India's Anti-Satellite Test Raised Threat To Space Station
"That is a terrible, terrible thing to create an event that sends debris in an apogee that goes above the International Space Station," NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said.(Image credit: Handout /Reuters) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bill Chappell Source Type: news

Step 1: Build A House. Step 2: Set It On Fire
After back-to-back hurricanes and wildfires, insurers are looking for more-resilient construction materials. That means building model homes and then blowing off their roofs or setting them on fire.(Image credit: Ryan Kellman/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Hersher Source Type: news

Young Astronomer Uses Artificial Intelligence To Discover 2 Exoplanets
A team led by an undergraduate student at the University of Texas, Austin has found two new planets by using artificial intelligence to sift through data from NASA's planet-hunting Kepler telescope.(Image credit: NASA via AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - April 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

How A Cosmic Collision Sparked A Native American Translator's Labor Of Love
On April 1, astronomers will start two huge machines and continue hunting for ripples in space-time. One scientist gets his mom to translate news of each discovery into her native language, Blackfoot.(Image credit: Courtesy of Russell Barber) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Deep Brain Stimulation: Remote Control Brain
We have the story of one woman who is taking part in an experiment on deep brain stimulation. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alix Spiegel Source Type: news

EPA Science Panel Considering Guidelines That Upend Basic Air Pollution Science
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Hersher Source Type: news

Dozens Of Nonnative Marine Species Have Invaded The Galapagos Islands
The number of alien species, likely brought by ship traffic, stunned scientists. And they suspect that the foothold of such creatures may have been underestimated in other tropical habitats, too.(Image credit: Courtesy of Jim Carlton) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christopher Joyce Source Type: news

How Mosquitoes Sniff Out Human Sweat To Find Us
Female mosquitoes searching for a meal of blood detect people partly by using a special olfactory receptor to home in on our sweat. The finding could lead to new approaches for better repellents.(Image credit: Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Can We Overcome Racial Bias? 'Biased' Author Says To Start By Acknowledging It
In her new book, psychology professor Jennifer Eberhardt explores how unconscious racial bias shapes human behavior — and suggests that we examine what situations can trigger racial bias.(Image credit: Viking) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ailsa Chang Source Type: news

Jury Awards $80 Million In Damages In Roundup Weed Killer Cancer Trial
The verdict represents the second time a jury has decided in favor of a multimillion-dollar damage award after concluding that Roundup caused cancer.(Image credit: Jeff Chiu/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Gonzales Source Type: news

Blech! Brain Science Explains Why You're Not Thirsty For Salt Water
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

VIDEO: Head Lice Up Close, And All Too Personal
Claws of the louse that afflicts human scalps fit neatly around a single human hair. Louse eggs stick to hair shafts with a sort of glue. Maybe the best remedy for you and the kids? Comb, baby, comb.(Image credit: Josh Cassidy/KQED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gabriela Quir ós Source Type: news

Trump Administration Dims Rule On Energy Efficient Lightbulbs
The Trump administration wants to reverse a rule designed to make lightbulbs more efficient. Environmental groups say the change will cost consumers and waste energy.(Image credit: Mark Lennihan/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeff Brady Source Type: news

Duke Whistleblower Gets More Than $33 Million In Research Fraud Settlement
Duke University is paying the U.S. government $112.5 million to settle accusations that it submitted bogus data to win federal research grants.(Image credit: Chris Keane/Reuters) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bill Chappell Source Type: news

New Climate Books Stress We Are Already Far Down The Road To A Different Earth
David Wallace-Wells' The Uninhabitable Earth and Nathaniel Rich's Losing Earth offer valuable perspectives on climate change — if we're committed to being adult enough to face the future.(Image credit: Alexander Gerst/ESA/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Adam Frank Source Type: news

Need A Can't-Miss Wheel Of Cheese? Try Playing It Some Hip-Hop
Researchers exposed cheese to different genres of music for 24 hours a day over six months to find out that hip-hop might create the tastiest cheese. (Image credit: FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lulu Garcia-Navarro Source Type: news

A Very Important Study On Cheese And Hip-Hop
Researchers wanted to know if playing music to cheese could affect the taste. Dr. Beat Wampfler talked about the answer. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Recent Destructive Cyclones Tell Us About Climate
A cyclone hit Southern Africa and a "bomb cyclone" hit Nebraska causing massive flooding. NPR's Michel Martin talks to climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe about the climate implications of these events (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Makes People Heed A Weather Warning — Or Not?
One social scientist says it's how people interpret these warnings that matters and that "we need to get out there and do a better job of understanding their perspective." (Image credit: Christina Chung for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Ellis Source Type: news

Trying To Do Good
We know our actions affect those around us. But how do we know whether our impact is positive? This week on Hidden Brain, what it means to do good in the world. (Image credit: Hanna Barczyk for NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shankar Vedantam Source Type: news

Human Genomics Research Has A Diversity Problem
Studies on the genetics of human diseases have focused largely on people of European descent. Researchers say this lack of diversity is bad science and exacerbates health inequities. (Image credit: Mint Images/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jonathan Lambert Source Type: news

Fentanyl-Linked Deaths: The U.S. Opioid Epidemic's Third Wave Begins
Overdose deaths involving fentanyl are rising — up 113 percent on average each year from 2013 to 2016. Dealers are adding cheap fentanyl to the illicit drug supply, and some users get it accidentally.(Image credit: Salwan Georges/Washington Post/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Martha Bebinger Source Type: news

Fentanyl-Linked Deaths: The U.S. Opioid Epidemic's Third Wave
Overdose deaths involving fentanyl are rising — up 113 percent on average each year from 2013 to 2016. Dealers are adding cheap fentanyl to the illicit drug supply, and some users get it accidentally.(Image credit: Salwan Georges/Washington Post/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Martha Bebinger Source Type: news

Statisticians' Call To Arms: Reject Significance And Embrace Uncertainty!
Scientists and statisticians are putting forth a bold idea: ban the very concept of "statistical significance." A bit more humility would be in order to account for the ambiguity in the world.(Image credit: intraprese/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Harris Source Type: news

In 'Horizon,' Considering All That Is Connected
Barry Lopez's new book is a biography and a portrait of some of the world's most delicate places, but at heart it's a contemplation of the belief that the way forward is compassionately, and together.(Image credit: Deckle Edge) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Genevieve Valentine Source Type: news

U.S. Mathematician Becomes First Woman To Win Abel Prize, 'Math's Nobel'
"I find that I am bored with anything I understand," Karen Uhlenbeck once said. That sentiment is part of why she won what many call the Nobel of mathematics Tuesday. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bill Chappell Source Type: news

Aspiring Doctors Seek Advanced Training In Addiction Medicine
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Will Stone Source Type: news

Sex, Empathy, Jealousy: How Emotions And Behavior Of Other Primates Mirror Our Own
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Terry Gross Source Type: news

Marcelo Gleiser Wins Templeton Prize For Quest To Confront 'Mystery Of Who We Are'
The prestigious award comes with nearly $1.5 million in winnings. The physicist, who teaches at Dartmouth and has written for NPR, says he's driven by the "many questions we still have no clue about."(Image credit: Eli Burakian/Dartmouth College) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Colin Dwyer Source Type: news

Massive U.S. Machines That Hunt For Ripples In Space-Time Just Got An Upgrade
The twin sites in the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory are about to go back online. New hardware should make them able to sense more colliding black holes and other cosmic events.(Image credit: Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Misophonia: When Life's Noises Drive You Mad
Some people experience intense rage or fear when they hear the sound of people chewing, spitting, or throat-clearing. Turns out they may have a rare condition known as misophonia(Image credit: Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: April Fulton Source Type: news

Cannabis 101 At The University Of Connecticut
With expanding markets for hemp and marijuana, some students believe that taking the class could help their careers. "I'm definitely interested in the plant and where it can go," Madison Blake said.(Image credit: Ethan Miller/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Patrick Skahill Source Type: news

Researchers Who Study Mass Shootings Say Perpetrators Often Idolize And Copy Others
The man who claimed responsibility for the mass shooting in New Zealand posted a lengthy statement online before the attack. Researchers who study mass killings say perpetrators often idolize and copy others. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eddie Woo: How Can Math Help Us Understand The Complexity Of The Universe?
The world is full of recurring patterns based on math. Math teacher Eddie Woo explains why human beings are naturally drawn to patterns and how we can use math to engage with our complex world.(Image credit: Vincenzo Amato/TEDxSyd) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NPR/TED Staff Source Type: news

Adam Spencer: Why Are Monster Prime Numbers Important?
Adam Spencer is fascinated by prime numbers. These seemingly simple numbers can be found in monster sizes—the latest being almost 25 million digits long.(Image credit: James Duncan Davidson/TED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NPR/TED Staff Source Type: news

Counting Other People's Blessings
Envy is one of the most unpleasant of all human emotions. This week, we explore an emotion that can inspire us to become better people — or to commit unspeakable acts.(Image credit: Steve Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shankar Vedantam Source Type: news

Did Cooking Really Give Us The F-Word?
Some linguists are arguing that the advent of softer food, thousands of years ago, led to changes in biting patterns and eventually, to more frequent use of sounds like "f" and "v" in human language. (Image credit: Scott Moisik) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tracee Ellis Ross Teams Up For Time's Up With Her Aunt, Dr. Barbara Ross-Lee
The Hollywood movement is now expanding into healthcare equity.(Image credit: Rich Fury/Getty Images for The Hollywood Reporter) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Call For Global Moratorium On Creating Gene-Edited Babies
An international group of 18 prominent scientists and bioethicists is calling for countries around the world to impose a moratorium on the creation of babies whose genes have been altered in the lab.(Image credit: Mark Schiefelbein/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Call For Global Moratorium On Creating Gene-Edited Babies
An international group of 18 prominent scientists and bioethicists is calling for countries around the world to impose a moratorium on the creation of babies whose genes have been altered in the lab.(Image credit: Mark Schiefelbein/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

A 'Bomb Cyclone' Is Thwacking The Central U.S.
The storm is bringing high winds, snow, rain and dangerous road conditions. Meteorologists and local officials are warning people across the West and Midwest to cancel travel plans.(Image credit: GOES-East/NOAA) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rebecca Hersher Source Type: news

It's 2050 And This Is How We Stopped Climate Change
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dan Charles Source Type: news

Scientists Thread A Nano-Needle To Modify The Genes Of Plants
Getting DNA into plant cells is tricky. Researchers have tried using infectious bacteria, as well as gene guns that shoot gold bullets. Then a physicist came up with a new approach almost by accident.(Image credit: Courtesy of Markita del Carpio Landry) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joe Palca Source Type: news

Teaching Kids To Control Their Anger
Teaching children to control their emotions, especially anger, is difficult. We look at how another culture accomplishes this and learn about a powerful tool that American parents may be overlooking. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michaeleen Doucleff Source Type: news