As marine ecosystems change with warming ocean temperatures, will seafood still be on the menu.
Fish habitats are in fluctuation. Climate change plays a role on where fish live, the size of fish populations, and the location of future fishing grounds. As marine ecosystems change with warming ocean temperatures, will seafood still be on the dinner menu? Learn more on "The Discovery Files."This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - May 31, 2022 Category: Science Source Type: video

Mormyrids communicate using weak electric discharges
African fish called mormyrids communicate using weak electric discharges, or pulses, to locate prey and to communicate with each other. [Research supported by U.S. National Science Foundation grants IOS 1050701 and IOS 1755071.] Learn more in the Washington University in St. Louis news story ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - September 11, 2021 Category: Science Source Type: video

NIH Office of Dietary Supplements: Dietary Supplements: What You Need to Know
The NIH Office of Dietary Supplements More than half of adults and one-third of children in the United States take one or more dietary supplements such as multivitamins, omega-3 fish oil, St. John ’ s wort, or melatonin. During this presentation, nutrition scientists from the NIH Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) will provide an overview of dietary supplements and describe what you need to know to inform your decision-making about whether or when to take these products. Joseph M. Betz, Ph.D., ODS Acting Director, will give a brief introduction to this seminar. Carol J. Haggans, M.S., Registered Dietitian and ODS Scient...
Source: Videocast - All Events - March 8, 2021 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

A fish gets a walk-on part!
An international team of scientists has identified at least 11 species of fish suspected to have land-walking abilities. The findings are based on CT scans and a new evolutionary map of the hillstream loach family, which includes the only living fish species caught in the act of walking: a rare, ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - September 25, 2020 Category: Science Source Type: video

September 2020, Video 2 of 2: The Procedural Pause with James R. Roberts, MD, and Martha Roberts, ACNP, CEN: Fishing Out the Fish Hook
Many anglers arrive with a hook in the arm, hand, or scalp, unable to remove it themselves, say James and Martha Roberts, who show the removal of a hook from a patient’s ear in this video. Watch the video here, and learn more in their blog at http://bit.ly/EMN-ProceduralPause. (Source: Emergency Medicine News - Video)
Source: Emergency Medicine News - Video - August 31, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: video

September 2020, Video 1 of 2: The Procedural Pause with James R. Roberts, MD, and Martha Roberts, ACNP, CEN: Fishing Out the Fish Hook
Fish hook injuries may seem simple at first, but can quickly get complicated, depending on the site of injury and type of hook, say James and Martha Roberts, who show different removal techniques in this video. Watch the video here, and learn more in their blog at http://bit.ly/EMN-ProceduralPause (Source: Emergency Medicine News - Video)
Source: Emergency Medicine News - Video - August 31, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: video

Fossil cast of fin from juvenile Sauripterus taylori
A fossil cast of a fin from a juvenile Sauripterus taylori, a late Devonian (roughly 375 million years ago) fish with the primitive features of tetrapods. [Research supported by National Science Foundation grants EAR 0207721, EAR 0544093, EAR 0208377 and EAR 0544565.] Learn more ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - March 26, 2020 Category: Science Source Type: video

CT scan of dermal rays of pectoral fin
A computed tomography scan showing the dermal rays of the pectoral fin of Eusthenopteron foordi, a late Devonian (roughly 375 million years ago) fish with the primitive features of tetrapods. [Research supported by National Science Foundation grants EAR 0207721, EAR 0544093, EAR 0208377 ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - March 25, 2020 Category: Science Source Type: video

Reconstruction of'fishapod' Tiktaalik roseae
Reconstruction of Tiktaalik roseae, a late Devonian (roughly 375 million years ago) "fishapod" with features of both fish and four-legged tetrapods. [Research supported by National Science Foundation grants EAR 0207721, EAR 0544093, EAR 0208377 and EAR 0544565.] Learn more about this ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - March 25, 2020 Category: Science Source Type: video

How a little fish inspired a better suction cup.
The Northern clingfish has one of the best suction cups in the world on its belly. Borrowing from nature’s innovations, researchers made a copycat cup that’s even betterThis is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - October 16, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

We are what we eat: nutrition, genes, cognition & deep learning in age-related macular degeneration
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the United States and in the developed world. Two NIH-supported randomized clinical trials with 10 years of follow-up in nearly 10,000 participants demonstrated that nutritional supplements with antioxidant vitamins and minerals reduces the risk of progression to late AMD. Dietary data suggest the importance of the Mediterranean diet in reducing the risk of AMD, particularly fish consumption. The analyses of the genetic interaction with nutrition challenges the idea that you can eat away your geneti...
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 10, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Special Tuesday WALS Lecture: The fast and the furious: mechanisms underlying rapid cell motility
NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Directed crawling motility of animal-cell types ranging from neurons to macrophages requires the coordinated force-generating activity of multiple mechanical elements. Much molecular detail is now known about the constituents of some mechanical submachines such as the polymerizing actin network and the adhesion complexes, but it is not yet clear how these elements all work together to generate coherent, directed motion at the level of the whole cell. In order to understand cellular mechanisms of large-scale coordination, the Theriot laboratory focuses on two extremely fast-...
Source: Videocast - All Events - May 6, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Warming waters could reduce marine mammals  ’ competitive advantage in polar regions
A team of scientists analyzed data from nearly a thousand species of shark, fish, reptiles, mammals and birds and found that marine mammals hold a competitive advantage over sluggish, cold-blooded species in polar regions. However, as the oceans warm, this advantage will shrink, and mammal and bird ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

A protein that helps fish send covert electrical signals could inform new treatments for epilepsy
Fish known as "baby whales" possess a protein that enables them to communicate using electrical signals, and thus avoid predators. Turns out, this same protein exists in the hearts and muscles of humans, and a better understanding of its function could lead to improved treatments for heart ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - July 9, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

4 Awesome Discoveries You Probably Didn  ’ t Hear About This Week  – Episode 7
"Walking molecules" that haul damaged DNA to the cell's emergency room, drones that could be small as a fingernail, fish that do the "electric hide" and local interventions that could boost coral's resilience to bleaching. Yes, it's your weekly briefing on the latest discoveries you might not hear ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - June 30, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video