4 Awesome Discoveries You Probably Didn  ’ t Hear About This Week  – Episode 7
"Walking molecules" that haul damaged DNA to the cell's emergency room, drones that could be small as a fingernail, fish that do the "electric hide" and local interventions that could boost coral's resilience to bleaching. Yes, it's your weekly briefing on the latest discoveries you might not hear ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - June 30, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

Sensory system in fish fins evolves in parallel to fin shape (Image 1)
A Gomphosus varius, or bird wrasse, on a coral reef in Palau. A recent study found that the sensory system in fish fins evolves in parallel to fin shape and mechanics, and is specifically tuned to work with the fish's swimming behavior. [Image 1 of 8 related images. See (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - March 3, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

Sensory system in fish fins evolves in parallel to fin shape (Image 2)
Brett Aiello, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Organismal Biology and Anatomy at the University of Chicago, and lead author of a study that shows that shape and mechanics of fish fins evolves in parallel with the sensory system. [Image 2 of 8 related images. See (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - March 3, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

Sensory system in fish fins evolves in parallel to fin shape (Image 3)
A Cheilinus fasciatus, or red-breasted wrasse, on a coral reef in Palau. A recent study found that the sensory system in fish fins evolves in parallel to fin shape and mechanics, and is specifically tuned to work with the fish's swimming behavior. [Image 3 of 8 related images. See (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - March 3, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

Sensory system in fish fins evolves in parallel to fin shape (Image 4)
A Gomphosus varius, or bird wrasse, on a coral reef in Palau. A recent study found that the sensory system in fish fins evolves in parallel to fin shape and mechanics, and is specifically tuned to work with the fish's swimming behavior. [Image 4 of 8 related images. See (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - March 3, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

Sensory system in fish fins evolves in parallel to fin shape (Image 5)
A Halichoeres hortulanus, or checkerboard wrasse. A recent study found that the sensory system in fish fins evolves in parallel to fin shape and mechanics, and is specifically tuned to work with the fish's swimming behavior. [Image 5 of 8 related images. See (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - March 3, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

Sensory system in fish fins evolves in parallel to fin shape (Image 6)
Parrotfish, a common species in the Labridae family of fish. A recent study found that the sensory system in fish fins evolves in parallel to fin shape and mechanics, and is specifically tuned to work with the fish's swimming behavior. [Image 6 of 8 related images. See (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - March 3, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

Sensory system in fish fins evolves in parallel to fin shape (Image 7)
A Cheilinus fasciatus, or red-breasted wrasse, on a coral reef in Palau. A recent study found that the sensory system in fish fins evolves in parallel to fin shape and mechanics, and is specifically tuned to work with the fish's swimming behavior. [Image 7 of 8 related images. See (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - March 3, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

Sensory system in fish fins evolves in parallel to fin shape (Image 8)
A Cheilinus fasciatus, or red-breasted wrasse, on a coral reef in Palau. A recent study found that the sensory system in fish fins evolves in parallel to fin shape and mechanics, and is specifically tuned to work with the fish's swimming behavior. [Image 8 of 8 related images. Back to (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - March 3, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

Project allows users to explore 3-D vertebrate specimens from inside out (Image 7)
A computed tomography scan showing the skull of a grooved razor fish (Centriscus scutatus) from India. The scan was taken as part of a project to scan vertebrate specimens, then make the data available on an open access website. [Image 7 of 11 related images. See (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - December 14, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: video

Magnetism may help salmon find home (Image 2)
When sockeye salmon migrate from salt water to fresh water, they change color -- going from their ocean colors of mostly silver with some darker coloration on their backs (like a lot of other ocean fish) to red when in fresh water. [See related image (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - October 19, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: video

Underwater springs show coral response to ocean acidification (Image 6)
Submarine springs and the coral reefs that live near them sustain other species, like these fish. National Science Foundation-supported researchers are studying how corals respond to ocean acidification at natural undersea springs in an effort to understand and predict ocean acidification and its ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - August 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: video

Fish living in the dirt -- IS THIS REAL?
National Science Foundation fish expert and researcher (Prosanta Chakrabarty, Ph.D.) unearths an unusual video and discusses whether fish can really live in the dirt. The video includes footage obtained from the Ghana Mission Fund, which does not depict NSF-funded research. This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: video

Mellick’s Multimedia EduBlog: A Fishy Emergency
It’s that time of year again when your fish hook removal techniques have to be, ahem, on point. Dr. Larry Mellick reviews several options in this video and blog post, which you can find at http://bit.ly/Mellick. (Source: Emergency Medicine News - Video)
Source: Emergency Medicine News - Video - July 19, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: video