BASILAR: Endovascular Treatment Improves Outcomes in BAO Stroke BASILAR: Endovascular Treatment Improves Outcomes in BAO Stroke
The addition of endovascular therapy to thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke with basilar artery occlusion improved functional outcomes in a new registry study.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - February 22, 2020 Category: Cardiology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Brief cognitive-based psychosocial intervention and case management for suicide attempters discharged from the emergency department in Taipei, Taiwan: a randomized controlled study - Lin YC, Liu SI, Chen SC, Sun FJ, Huang HC, Huang CR, Chiu YC.
We examined the effectiveness of brief cognitive-based psychotherapy plus standard case management in the prevention of further suicide attempts, clinical severity, and treatment adherence in a randomized clinical trial compared with standard ca... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Program and Other Evaluations, Effectiveness Studies Source Type: news

Assessing protective factors in treated violent offenders: associations with recidivism reduction and positive community outcomes - Coupland RBA, Olver ME.
The present study examined the assessment of protective factors and their linkages to treatment change, institutional and community recidivism, and positive community outcomes in a high-risk treated sample of violent male offenders. Participants included 1... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Depression and suicidal ideation among patients with cancer in the United States: a population-based study - Abdel-Rahman O.
PURPOSE: To evaluate the association between cancer diagnosis and depression and suicidal ideation in a population-based cohort in the United States. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination S... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Concussions in the National Football League: the evolution of video review for assessing the frequency and reliability of visible signs - Zuckerman SL, Elbin RJ, Sills AK, Crandall JR, Lessley DJ, Moran CM, Moran CD, Solomon GS.
Background: The use of video review to document visible signs (VS) of sport-related concussion in the National Football League (NFL) is a novel method to recognize head injuries.Hypothesis/Purpose: The current pilot studies used varying metho... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Characteristics and circumstances of death related to gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB) - Darke S, Peacock A, Duflou J, Farrell M, Lappin J.
Introduction: Gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has gained substantial popularity as an illicit recreational drug. The current study aimed to: (1) determine the characteristics and circumstances of death of all recorded cases of GHB-related death in Austr... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Drinking contexts and their association with acute alcohol-related harm: a systematic review of event-level studies on adults' drinking occasions - Stevely AK, Holmes J, McNamara S, Meier PS.
ISSUES: Event-level alcohol research can inform prevention efforts by determining whether drinking contexts-such as people or places-are associated with harmful outcomes. This review synthesises evidence on associations between characteristics of adults' d... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Young Adults Source Type: news

Exploring participation after paediatric acquired brain injury - Keetley R, Westwater-Wood S, Manning JC.
This study aimed to explore the levels of participation in a UK sample of children and young people (CYP) with an acquired brain injury (ABI) at home, school and in the community through a cross-sectional study. The Child and Family Follow-Up Survey was di... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Evaluation of adolescent sport specialization and injury mechanism by sex: a secondary analysis - Biese KM, Post EG, Schaefer DA, Hernandez MI, Brooks MA, McGuine TA, Bell DR.
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to compare the association of sport specialization with previous overuse and acute injuries between male and female adolescent athletes. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: Questionnaires were c... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Drinking and responses to antidrinking messages among young adults: an fMRI study - Garrison KA, Demartini KS, Corlett PR, Worhunsky PD, Krystal JH, O'Malley SS.
Young adults consume most of their alcohol by binge drinking, and more than one-third report binge drinking in the past month. Some will transition out of excessive drinking, while others will maintain or increase alcohol use into adulthood. Public health ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Want to lose more weight? Intensive therapy from dietitians can help older adults, study finds
Older adults may have better success at losing weight if they do it with the help of intensive behavioral therapy from dietitians, a new study shows. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Junk food is killing sperm count and lowering male testosterone, study says
The fast-food, high sugar, fats and carbs diet of Western countries may be contributing to the nosedive of sperm counts in men, a new study says. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How to live longer: How education or a lack of it can increase life expectancy
HOW TO live longer: The quest for a longer and healthier life brings about many theories. A latest study shines a light on how one's education could increase life expectancy. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Drug has long-term survival benefit for some lung cancer patients
The results of a large global study show even a tiny amount of a biomarker known as PD-L1 can predict a long-term survival benefit from using pembrolizumab. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 21, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Bad diets to blame for plummeting sperm counts: Men who eat junk food have 25% fewer swimmers
A study of almost 3,000 Danish men found those who eat a diet full of junk food have a sperm count of 122million compared with 167million in men who eat healthily. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Banning Indoor Tanning Devices Could Save Lives and Money Banning Indoor Tanning Devices Could Save Lives and Money
Banning indoor tanning devices outright in the United States, Canada, and Europe could prevent as many as 448,000 melanomas and 9.7 million keratinocyte carcinomas,   according to a recent study.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - February 21, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Going to university could help you to live longer: Every step of education adds 1.37 years to life
Researchers combed through data of more than 5,000 American people. Race and income were not as strong life predictors as education level, according to the study led by Yale School of Medicine. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dengue Virus Infection May Increase Risk for Developing Leukemia
FRIDAY, Feb. 21, 2020 -- Dengue virus infection is associated with an increased risk for leukemia, according to a study published online Feb. 12 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers& Prevention. Yu-Wen Chien, Ph.D., from the National Cheng Kung... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Low Income May Increase Risk for Specific Glomerular Diseases
FRIDAY, Feb. 21, 2020 -- Socioeconomic position is inversely associated with standardized incidence of lupus nephritis and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related glomerulonephritis (ANCA-GN), according to a study published online Feb. 20 in the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

AI Imaging Analysis Prognostic in Coronary Artery Disease
FRIDAY, Feb. 21, 2020 -- Reduced myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) are prognostic for patients with coronary artery disease, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in Circulation. Kristopher D. Knott,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Cancer Therapy-Associated Polyposis May Mimic CRC Predisposition
FRIDAY, Feb. 21, 2020 -- Childhood and young adulthood cancer (CYAC) therapy-associated polyposis (TAP) often has clinical features suggestive of at least one colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition syndrome, according to a study published online... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Dermatopathologists Favor Making Pathologic Reports Available
FRIDAY, Feb. 21, 2020 -- Most dermatopathologists perceive that making pathologic test result reports available to patients is a good idea, although they are concerned about increasing patient worry and confusion, according to a study published... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Most Doctors Perceive Benefits of Vaccines for Children Program
FRIDAY, Feb. 21, 2020 -- Most pediatricians report that the Vaccines for Children Program (VFC) has high perceived benefits, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in Pediatrics. Sean T. O'Leary, M.D., M.P.H., from the University of Colorado... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

HbA1c Levels Lower in Older, Multimorbid Patients With T2DM
FRIDAY, Feb. 21, 2020 -- A higher proportion of older and multimorbid patients with type 2 diabetes achieve low hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in BMJ Open Diabetes Research& Care. Rozalina G. McCoy,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Major Malformations Up With Macrolide Prescribing in Pregnancy
FRIDAY, Feb. 21, 2020 -- Prescribing macrolide antibiotics during the first trimester of pregnancy is associated with an increased risk for major fetal malformation, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in The BMJ. Heng Fan, from University... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Himalayan wolf lopes towards recognition as distinct species
Animal ’s unique adaptation to low-oxygen life can be basis for protection, say researchersWolves living in the Himalayas are to be recognised as a subspecies of the grey wolf, with researchers predicting that the animals will soon be declared a unique species.The wolves surviving at high altitudes in Nepal and on the Tibetan plateau possess a genetic adaptation to cope with the lack of oxygen that is not found in any other wolf, a study reports.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 21, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Barkham Tags: Endangered species Animals World news Nepal Tibet Conservation Environment Mountains South and Central Asia Science Wildlife Source Type: news

Parkinson’s disease: Tracking brain iron levels ‘could be helpful for early diagnosis’
PARKINSON'S DISEASE gets progressively worse over time but picking up the condition early on can help those affected to manage their symptoms and maintain quality of life for as long as possible. Finding ways to identify the condition in the early stages is therefore a main research priority, and a new study has developed a pioneering approach to early diagnosis. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What happens to the liver when you drink alcohol? For one, it loses its ability to protect against cancer
(Natural News) Adipokines are cell signaling proteins produced by adipose tissue (fat). These “circulating hormones” facilitate communication between various organs, such as the brain, liver and muscles. Dysregulation of adipokines, which also mediate inflammation, has dire consequences and is associated with serious health problems like obesity, cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes. In a recent study, researchers from the Medical... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: RSNA should tackle air travel carbon footprint
Airplane travel-related carbon dioxide emissions caused by the RSNA's annual...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Philips sets new carbon dioxide emission goals Carestream reduces its environmental impact Irish radiology department finds it's not easy being green HIMSS: Clinton sees healthcare IT as global game changerComments: 2/21/2020 12:24:14 PMDoctorDalai Seriously? Wonder what the city of Chicago might have to say about the impact of NOT having RSNA...   The latest figures I could find with a fast google search were from 2007 (no doubt there are more recent numbers but I was too lazy to searc...
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 21, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Could contrast mammo supplant CE-MRI for confirming breast cancer?
Contrast-enhanced (CE) mammography might be better suited than contrast-enhanced...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MRI finds cancer missed on clinical breast exams Study supports interval MRI for likely benign findings MRI finds breast cancer early in women with family history Contrast mammo equals MRI for measuring tumor size Study finds contrast mammo an alternative to breast MRI (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 21, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Validation of the questionnaire "Sources of Occupational Stress in Firefighters & Paramedics (SOOS-11)" - Kleine B, Kr öger C.
So far, there is no German instrument for determining occupational stress in members of volunteer firefighting (MVF). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the Sources of Occupational Stress in Firefighters& Paramedics (SOOS-11). MVF were interview... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Women's economic empowerment, participation in decision-making and exposure to violence as risk indicators for early childhood caries - Folayan MO, El Tantawi M, Vukovi ć A, Schroth R, Gaffar B, Al-Batayneh OB, Amalia R, Arheiam A, Obiyan M, Daryanavard H.
OBJECTIVES: In view of the association between early childhood caries (ECC])and maternal social risk factors, this study tried to determine if there were associations between indicators of processes, outputs and outcomes of women's empowerment, and the pre... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Train running safety on non-ballasted bridges - Arvidsson T, Andersson A, Karoumi R.
The train running safety on non-ballasted bridges is studied based on safety indices from the vertical wheel-rail forces. A 2D train-track-bridge interaction model that allows for wheel-rail contact loss is adopted for a comprehensive parametric study on h... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

End-of-Life Wishes May Not Be Honored in the Hospital End-of-Life Wishes May Not Be Honored in the Hospital
Patients with documented treatment-limiting medical orders who are hospitalized near the end of life often receive care that is inconsistent with their preferences, according to a new study.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - February 21, 2020 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Hospital Medicine News Source Type: news

Topical sesame oil is effective at reducing pain in patients with chemotherapy-induced phlebetis
In this study, researchers from Iran assessed the effects of topical sesame oil, particularly if it could reduce the severity of pain caused by chemotherapy-induced phlebitis (CIP). Their results were published in the journal Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice. CIP is one of the most common complications developed by cancer patients. The use of complementary... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Active Role in Decision Making for Prostate Cancer Surgery Leads to Less Decision Regret
In this study, researchers suggested that patients who play a more active role in making decisions about their prostate cancer surgery are less likely to experience “decision regret” about their choices. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - February 21, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Hannah Slater Source Type: news

Study examines why colon cancer is more deadly in pediatric and young adult patients
(American College of Surgeons) Colon cancer is more likely to be lethal in children and young adults than middle-aged adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 21, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Deciphering the mechanism that determines organ size and shape
(Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)) The study, published in the journal Developmental Cell and performed in Drosophila, unravels how developmental genes regulate organ size and proportions.Researchers at IRB Barcelona demonstrate that the size and patterning of a given organ are regulated by different mechanisms.Given the high genetic and mechanistic conservation between flies and humans, these discoveries pave the way for new research lines into congenital malformations and other diseases (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 21, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Alcohol-induced deaths in US
(JAMA Network) National vital statistics data from 2000 to 2016 were used to examine how rates of alcohol-induced deaths (defined as those deaths due to alcohol consumption that could be avoided if alcohol weren't involved) have changed in the US and to compare the results by demographic groups including sex, race/ethnicity, age, socioeconomic status and geographic location. The study is accompanied by two commentaries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How decline in memory, gait speed are associated with dementia risk
(JAMA Network) The risk of dementia in adults 60 and older who experience declines in both memory and gait speed was compared with adults who experience no decline or decline in either memory or gait speed only in this observational meta-analysis that included six studies with about 8,700 participants from the US and Europe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ER patients may care less about a doctor's race and gender than previously thought
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) When a patient goes to an ER today, they have a higher chance than before of seeing a doctor who's a woman or a person of color. And they're also more likely to get a survey after they go home, asking how satisfied they were with their care. A new study may help allay worries about the potential impact of underlying patient bias on those ratings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Walking together: Personal traits and first impressions affects step synchronization
(Tohoku University) Walking is one of our most natural, daily actions. Now, a new study led by a Tohoku University researcher suggests that walkers use step synchronization as a form of non-verbal social communication. The results lend credence to the effects of psychological traits on movement interaction between humans.   (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bariatric surgery effective against early-onset obesity too
(University of Gothenburg) Surgical treatment of obesity is as effective for individuals who developed the disorder early, by the age of 20, as for those who have developed obesity later in life, a study from the University of Gothenburg shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The practice of meditation leaves marks in the brain
(IMT School for Advanced Studies Lucca) The study conducted at IMT School for Advanced Studies Lucca shows that the practice of Transcendental Meditation has positive effects on psychological well-being and that these effects are correlated with measurable changes in the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New torula yeast product as digestible as fish meal in weanling pig diets
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) Starting weanling pigs off with the right diet can make all the difference for the health and productivity of the animal. A new University of Illinois study shows amino acids from a new torula yeast product are more digestible by young pigs than amino acids from fish meal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mental health challenges four times higher in young mothers
(McMaster University) The study, recently published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, says identifying and treating mental health issues in young mothers is especially important as their health also affects the wellbeing of their children. The research recommends 'further efforts should be directed at engaging and treating this high-risk group.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds certain genetic test not useful in predicting heart disease risk
(Vanderbilt University Medical Center) A Polygenic Risk Score -- a genetic assessment that doctors have hoped could predict coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients -- has been found not to be a useful predictive biomarker for disease risk, according to a Vanderbilt study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NUI Galway highlights reproductive flexibility in hydractinia, a Galway bay jellyfish
(National University of Ireland Galway) A new study, led by Dr Tim DuBuc and Professor Uri Frank from the Centre for Chromosome Biology at NUI Galway, has found that Hydractinia, a North Atlantic jellyfish that also lives in Galway Bay, reproduces in a similar way to humans but does so far more flexibly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study detects abnormally low levels of a key protein in brains of young men with autism
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Brains of young men with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have low levels of a protein that appears to play a role in inflammation and metabolism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lipid signaling from beta cells can potentiate an inflammatory macrophage polarization
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) The insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas unwittingly produce a signal that may aid their own demise in Type 1 diabetes, according to a study of the lipid signals that drive macrophage cells in the body to two different phenotypes of activated immune cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news