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Exploring the ground truth: NASA's twin study investigates metabolites
(NASA/Johnson Space Center) Stanford University School of Medicine Postdoctoral Fellow Tejaswini Mishra, Ph.D., is integrating multi-omics data for NASA's Twins Study and comparing all the metabolites in retired twin astronauts Scott and Mark Kelly. She saw a number of Scott's metabolites increase in levels when he went to space and when he returned to Earth some of those stayed elevated. By integrating data from other Twins Study investigations, she hopes they can determine the cause of this elevation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Survival of soil organisms is a wake-up call for biosecurity
(Pensoft Publishers) Tiny creatures in soil that attack plants have the ability to survive for at least three years stored in dry conditions, showed a recent AgResearch study. Furthermore, they were found to still be able to invade plant roots. The research article, published in the open access journal Neobiota, provides new insights into the biosecurity threats posed by passenger travel and trade between countries and tests various methods for nematodes detection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study reveals link between quality of sleep and risk of dementia
In the study, as the amount of REM sleep declined, the risk of dementia increased (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - August 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Early rotator cuff surgery helps return to activity
Early surgery to fix tears in a shoulder rotator cuff muscle improves strength, function and other outcomes in the long term, a new study from France finds. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - August 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cyberbullying weighs heavily on young people
Kids targeted by cyberbullies appear to be twice as likely to hurt themselves or to attempt suicide than their non-bullied counterparts, a new study finds. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - August 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nursing study proves missed care linked to higher mortality
Missed care is the reason why hospitals with lower registered nursing staff levels have a higher risk of patient death, new research published in full today has shown, sparking calls for more to be done to improve staffing levels. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - August 24, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Lithium in Drinking Water Linked to Lower Dementia Risk? (FREE)
By Kelly Young Edited by Richard Saitz, MD, MPH, FACP, DFASAM Higher levels of lithium in drinking water might have a protective effect against dementia over the long term, suggests an observational study in JAMA Psychiatry. A possible mechanism is lithium's … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - August 24, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Lack of REM sleep linked to higher risk of dementia, study finds
About one-third of adults say they don't usually get enough sleep. Now, there's news of a link between quality of sleep and risk of dementia. Dr. Jon LaPook explains the science behind the new report. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Breakfast cereal found contaminated with gender-bender chemical that tells your brain to make you fat
(Natural News) A landmark study conducted by researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center found that sugary cereals cause more harm than initially perceived. Almost all people are aware that these breakfast staples contribute to the growing obesity epidemic due to their high sugar content; yet scientists are now tracing a link between cereals and early... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vision loss associated with cognitive decline, dementia
(Reuters Health) - Hearing impairment is already linked to a heightened risk of cognitive decline in old age, and a new study suggests that impaired vision may carry the same risk. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Inflammatory Myopathy Mortality Highest in First Year Inflammatory Myopathy Mortality Highest in First Year
Patients with newly diagnosed idiopathic inflammatory myopathy had threefold increased mortality, and death risk was highest during the first year after diagnosis, a study found.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Rheumatology News Source Type: news

Brain activity tied to blood pressure during stress
(Reuters Health) - Brain scans obtained during psychological stress might someday help doctors identify people who are at higher risk for heart disease, a new study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Too Few Patients Follow the Adage: You Better Shop Around Too Few Patients Follow the Adage: You Better Shop Around
Despite having more financial'skin in the game'than ever, many consumers don't make any attempt to compare prices for health care services, a newly released study found.Kaiser Health News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care News Source Type: news

New Economic Analysis Based On Repatha ® (Evolocumab) Outcomes Data Published In JAMA Cardiology
Repatha Used in Patients at High-Risk For Cardiovascular Events is Cost-Effective at Net Prices at or Below $9,669 THOUSAND OAKS, Calif., Aug. 23, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) today announced results from a new Repatha® (evolocumab) economic analysis published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Cardiology. The study identifies the clinical and economic consequences of treating a population of patients at high-risk of cardiovascular (CV) events and defines the cost-effectiveness of Repatha under various clinical scenarios. The analysis is based on the clinical outcomes from t...
Source: Amgen News Release - August 23, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Blacks with prostate cancer less likely to get ideal treatment
(Reuters Health) - Black men with riskier prostate cancers may be less likely than their white counterparts to get aggressive treatment that can give them the best survival odds, a recent U.S. study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Alliance Foundation Trials opens global trial investigating first-in-class palbociclib in HR+, HER2+ metastatic breast cancer
The Alliance Foundation Trials, LLC (AFT), in conjunction with Pfizer and six international cancer research groups, have announced the launch of PATINA - a randomized, open-label, Phase 3 clinical study of the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK 4/6) inhibitor palbociclib (also known as IBRANCE®). (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - August 23, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Pfizer Business and Industry Source Type: news

Don ’t multitask while you read this
“In a world of computers and iPhones, it’s rare that we’re fully focused,” said Alan Castel, a UCLA professor of psychology.But how much do all of those distractions diminish our ability to remember? A new study led by Castel and Catherine Middlebrooks, a UCLA graduate student, found that while divided attention does impair memory, people can still selectively focus on what is most important — even while they’re multitasking.In one experiment, the researchers showed 192 students 120 words, divided into six groups of 20 words each.  Each word was visible on a computer screen for thre...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 23, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Supplement May Help Against Vision-Robbing Disease in Seniors
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 -- An inexpensive over-the-counter antioxidant/zinc supplement that may help preserve vision in older people is also cost effective, a new study suggests. The combo pill has been dubbed the " Age-Related Eye Disease Study... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 23, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Study: Opioid Users Don't See Overdose as Wakeup Call
(MedPage Today) -- Brush with death had little effect on subsequent use (Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry)
Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry - August 23, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

Many heart failure patients don ’t recognize the risks of their illness
(Reuters Health) - Even though doctors think most people with heart failure have a high likelihood of requiring a heart transplant or dying from complications of their illness, a small U.S. study suggests that many patients see a much rosier picture of their future. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Does Autism Risk Reside in Cells' Energy Engines?
Study suggests genetic variations in the DNA of mitochondria may up risk for developmental disorder (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NCI-Affiliated Oncologists Excluded From Narrow Insurance Networks
So-called “narrow network” healthcare plans are more likely to exclude oncologists who are associated with NCI-designated or NCCN Cancer Centers, according to a new study. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - August 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Dave Levitan Tags: News Oncology Pulse Practice & Policy Source Type: news

Study: 50M at risk of arsenic poisoning in Pakistan
A new study suggests some 50 million Pakistanis could be at risk of drinking arsenic-tainted groundwater (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Simple Tool Identifies Hypoglycemia Risk in Type 2 Diabetes Simple Tool Identifies Hypoglycemia Risk in Type 2 Diabetes
A six-item tool that uses standard clinical parameters can identify patients with type 2 diabetes who are at high risk of hypoglycemia-related healthcare utilization, a large US study reveals.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Life Expectancy, Voting Choices in U.S. Election Life Expectancy, Voting Choices in U.S. Election
Voters in counties where life expectancy has stagnated and declined in recent years were more likely to abandon the Democratic Party to help elect U.S. President Donald Trump, a new study suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care News Source Type: news

Can continuous glucose monitoring help with type 2 diabetes?
Reuters Health - People taking insulin for type 2 diabetes may manage symptoms better with a device that constantly checks their blood sugar, a small study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

More Support for Tight Blood Pressure Control
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 -- For people at increased risk of heart disease, intensive blood pressure control may be just as safe as standard treatment, a new study finds. Experts said the results bolster the case for more aggressive treatment of... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 23, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Steroid Pills Usually Ineffective Against Bronchitis, Study Finds
Research shows that, like antibiotics, these drugs won't reduce duration or severity of symptoms (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - August 23, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Infections, Nursing, Pharmacy, Pulmonology, Asthma, News, Source Type: news

Hypertension Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment, and Control Among Adults Aged ≥18 Years - Los Angeles County, 1999-2006 and 2007-2014
Study used NHANES data to look at the prevalence of hypertension in adults in Los Angeles County. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - August 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lithium in drinking water may affect Alzheimer's risk
Reuters Health - Long-term consumption of tiny amounts of lithium may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, but only if the dose isn't too small, according to a study that looked at levels of the element in drinking water throughout Denmark. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

How the horse became the only living animal with a single toe
The ancient ancestors of horses had four toes on their front feet and three on their back – but modern horses have just one. A new study could explain whyThey can reach speeds of more than 40km an hour, clear hurdles more than eight feet high andeven pirouette– and they manage it all with just one toe on each foot. Now researchers say they have unpicked how and why horses ended up with their unusual extremities.The only living animals with a single toe, equines (such as horses and zebras) had ancestors with multiple digits on their feet, with early relatives having four on their front feet and three on their ba...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Evolution Animals Biology Science Source Type: news

C-section mums warned about dangers of 'vaginal seeding'
What is the issue? A technique called vaginal seeding, sometimes used for babies born by caesarean section, "can give newborns deadly infections and sepsis," warns the Mail Online. Vaginal seeding involves rubbing vaginal fluid onto the skin of a newborn baby born by caesarean section. It's intended to mimic the natural transfer of microbes from their mother that babies have during a vaginal birth. This has been reported by some to help boost a baby's response against allergies and asthma. As many as 90% of Danish obstetricians and gynaecologists said they have been asked about it by prospective parents. Despite...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

Studies Suggest Automated Safety Systems are Preventing Car Crashes
WASHINGTON (AP) — Safety systems to prevent cars from drifting into another lane or that warn drivers of vehicles in their blind spots are beginning to live up to their potential to significantly reduce crashes, according to two studies released Wednesday. At the same time, research by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety raises concern that drivers may be less vigilant when relying on automated safety systems or become distracted by dashboard displays that monitor how the systems are performing. The two institute studies found that lane-keeping systems, some of which even nudge the vehicle back into its lane f...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - August 23, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joan Lowy, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Studies Suggest Automated Safety Systems are Preventing Car Crashes
WASHINGTON (AP) — Safety systems to prevent cars from drifting into another lane or that warn drivers of vehicles in their blind spots are beginning to live up to their potential to significantly reduce crashes, according to two studies released Wednesday. At the same time, research by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety raises concern that drivers may be less vigilant when relying on automated safety systems or become distracted by dashboard displays that monitor how the systems are performing. The two institute studies found that lane-keeping systems, some of which even nudge the vehicle back into its lane f...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 23, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joan Lowy, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Cancer survival: Current treatment for THIS deadly type works better in women
CANCER treatment tends to be the same for men and women, but a new study on oesophageal cancer has found that treating genders differently may be more effective. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cyberbullying Weighs Heavily on Young People
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 -- Kids and young adults targeted by cyberbullies appear to be twice as likely to hurt themselves or to attempt suicide than their non-bullied counterparts, a new study finds. Cyberbullies themselves aren't immune, either.... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 23, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

How Safe Is Your Drinking Water? Take a Look
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 -- Even if local health officials say it's safe, cloudy drinking water may have the potential to cause vomiting and diarrhea, a new research review finds. Researchers looked at past North American and European studies... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 23, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

High Glucose Variability Increases Mortality Risk High Glucose Variability Increases Mortality Risk
A new study assessed the impact of increased glucose variability on length of stay and mortality among hospitalized patients both with and without diabetes.Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology Journal Article Source Type: news

HotSpot Study Shines New Light on the Granite State ’s Opioid Crisis
Geisel researchers take a close look at New Hampshire’s complex opioid epidemic, and one city’s novel response. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - August 23, 2017 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Susan Green Tags: Insider News Press Release Center for Technology and Behavioral Health Clinical Trials Network drug addiction Features fentanyl Home-feature Lisa Marsch New Hampshire opioid addiction opioid crisis Source Type: news

Lithium in Drinking Water May Lower Dementia Risk Lithium in Drinking Water May Lower Dementia Risk
Higher long-term lithium exposure from drinking water may be associated with a lower incidence of dementia, results from a large population-based study suggest.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Could lithium help to prevent dementia?
A study of more than 800,000 people in Denmark finds that those exposed to higher levels of lithium in drinking water were at lower risk of dementia. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alzheimer's / Dementia Source Type: news

Bonti kicks off Ph2 trial for neurotoxin pain-reliever
Privately-held biotech Bonti said today that it launched the Lantern clinical program, evaluating its intramuscular neurotoxin injection as a non-opioid pain reliever. The first clinical trial, Lantern-1, is a Phase II study designed to assess the safety and efficacy of EB-001 in patients undergoing elective breast augmentation. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Bonti kicks off Ph2 trial for neurotoxin pain-reliever appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - August 23, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Biotech Clinical Trials Drug-Device Combinations Pain Management Pharmaceuticals bonti Source Type: news

Colorado's Ian Orme: Trendy probiotics do not work
Supplements do not provide enough 'good' bacteria to replace the 'bad' bacteria, says a Colorado professor. Studies suggest synbiotics - probiotics combined with prebiotics - are beneficial. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A novel non-surgical method for mild peri-implantitis- a multicenter consecutive case series
International Journal of Implant Dentistry20173:38https://doi.org/10.1186/s40729-017-0098-y© The Author(s). 2017Received:8 April 2017Accepted:13 July 2017Published:3 August 2017AbstractAimThe aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect on peri-implant mucosal inflammation from the use of a novel instrument made of chitosan in the non-surgical treatment of mild peri-implantitis across several clinical centers.Materials and methodsIn this 6-month multicenter prospective consecutive case series performed in six different periodontal specialist clinics, 63 implants in 63 pat...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - August 23, 2017 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Researchers move closer to peanut allergy cure
A new study documents "a major step forward" in developing a treatment for the common food allergy (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Early Rotator Cuff Surgery Helps Return to Activity
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 -- Early surgery to fix tears in a shoulder rotator cuff muscle is a good idea because it improves strength, function and other outcomes in the long term, a new study from France finds. Researchers also believe this kind of... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 23, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Do Common Vitamins Raise Lung Cancer Risk?
Increased odds only seemed to affect men or male smokers, study suggests (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Oral Contraceptives May Cut Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Oral Contraceptives May Cut Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk
Current oral contraceptive users had a 15% reduction in the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA); breast-feeding had no significant effect on RA risk, a Swedish study found.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Rheumatology News Source Type: news

Doctor-patient dialogue may boost use of blood pressure drugs
Doctors can help boost use of high blood pressure medications by their poor patients simply by talking to them, a new study suggests. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - August 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Noninvasive eye imaging may detect early signs of Alzheimer's
A study led by researchers at Cedars-Sinai and NeuroVision Imaging LLC provides a scientific basis for using noninvasive eye imaging to essentially detect signs of Alzheimer ’s. The experimental technology, developed by Cedars-Sinai and NeuroVision, scans the retina using techniques that can identify beta-amyloid protein deposits that mirror those in the brain.   (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - August 23, 2017 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news