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Obesity and Sleep Disorders in Postmenopausal Women Obesity and Sleep Disorders in Postmenopausal Women
This study investigated the relationship between obesity and sleep architecture in postmenopausal women.Menopause (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health Journal Article Source Type: news

Trump's NASA Budget Cancels Space Telescope and Five Earth Science Missions
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) would receive $19.9 billion if Congress adopts the President’s fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget. At this level, the agency would see an increase of about 1.3 percent over the enacted FY 2017 level. Under the President’s budget the White House would cancel numerous missions and a major telescope. The budget would zero out the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope. The orbiting observatory is designed to study dark energy and explore exoplanets. NASA has struggled to keep the costs of the program below a $3.2 billion cap, but the cancellation of a project that ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

President's Budget Slashes NOAA
President Trump’s fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget request would provide $4.6 billion to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), a 20 percent reduction compared to enacted 2017 funding of $5.7 billion. The proposal would slash spending for climate change-related activities across the agency by $40 million, ending competitive grants for climate-change research and studies aimed at understanding the impacts of global warming on the Arctic. The administration seeks to eliminate $273 million in grants, including the National Sea Grant College Program, the National Estuarine Research Reserve System, coas...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Become an Advocate for Science: Join the AIBS Legislative Action Center
Quick, free, easy, effective, impactful! Join the AIBS Legislative Action Center. The Legislative Action Center is a one-stop shop for learning about and influencing science policy. Through the website, users can contact elected officials and sign-up to interact with lawmakers. The website offers tools and resources to inform researchers about recent policy developments. The site also announces opportunities to serve on federal advisory boards and to comment on federal regulations. This new tool is made possible through contributions from the Society for the Study of Evolution and the Botanical Society of America. AIBS...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Short Takes
The InterAcademy Partnership (IAP), a global network of academies of sciences and medicine, has released a summary of the workshop on "Assessing the Security Implications of Genome Editing Technology" that was held in Germany in October 2017 and convened by the IAP, US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, the European Academies Science Advisory Council, and the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. The international workshop brought together global experts in genetic engineering, security studies, and public policy to discuss strategies to mitigate potential security concerns posed...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Trump's language on school shooter's mental health could be harmful, experts say
President Trump called the Parkland high school shooter a "sicko." Experts say this kind of language is harmful, and studies show that most people with mental illness are more likely to be victims, not perpetrators. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sipping acidic fruit teas can wear away teeth, says study
Even unsweetened drinks are acidic and should not be drunk between meals, researchers say. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

E-cigarette users at risk of brain and heart damage
E-cigarettes vapor contains metals - including lead - from the heating coils that vaporize e-liquid, putting users at risk of cancer and brain damage, a new study from Johns Hopkins warns. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

All 21 antidepressants researchers looked at work better than placebo: Study
A new study finds that all 21 antidepressants that researchers looked at work better than placebo. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Fathers Can Pass Ovarian Cancer Risk To Their Daughters
BOSTON (CBS) – A new study finds that a higher risk of ovarian cancer can be passed from father to daughter. Researchers at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY looked at data from the Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry and discovered a genetic mutation passed from a father to his daughter on the X-chromosome that puts her at higher risk for ovarian cancer. The research team is looking for what the Ovarian Cancer gene looks like. (WBZ-TV) When we think of hereditary ovarian cancer, we often think of the BRCA genes that raise the risk of both ovarian cancer and breast cancer in first degree female relatives,...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Cancer Risk Dr. Mallika Marshall Genes ovarian cancer Source Type: news

Compounds In Red Wine May Promote Good Oral Health
BOSTON (CBS) – Compounds found in red wine may promote good oral health. When bad bacteria stick to teeth and gums they can cause cavities, dental plaque and gum disease. Researchers in Spain found that polyphenols may interfere with bacteria’s ability to stick to cells. Red wine may promote oral health. (WBZ-TV) Polyphenols are not only found in red wine but many other foods including teas and blueberries and many other foods. However, this study is not a reason to start drinking red wine. Wine also contains acids which can damage the enamel of your teeth. (Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports fo...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Health Watch Oral Health Red Wine Source Type: news

Experimental Rotavirus Vaccine More Effective When Started at Birth Experimental Rotavirus Vaccine More Effective When Started at Birth
An experimental oral rotavirus vaccine, when given at birth and in two subsequent doses, can reduce the rate of severe and potentially deadly diarrhea by 75%, according to new study conducted among Indonesian babies.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Venezuelans Report Big Weight Losses in 2017 as Hunger Hits Venezuelans Report Big Weight Losses in 2017 as Hunger Hits
Venezuelans reported losing on average 11 kilograms (24 lbs) in body weight last year and almost 90% now live in poverty, according to a new university study on the impact of a devastating economic crisis and food shortages.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Some Outcomes Not Necessarily Better With Robotic Prostate Surgery Some Outcomes Not Necessarily Better With Robotic Prostate Surgery
Men with prostate cancer who get the gland removed may be just as likely to suffer erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence with robotic surgery as with other operations, a UK study suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Spacewatch: Nasa planet hunter will target the rock zone
Using the TESS satellite, now at the Kennedy Space Centre, the agency is to study 200,000 stars in a quest for habitable planetsNasa ’s next planet hunting mission has arrived at the Kennedy Space Centre, in Florida, for final checks ahead of its April launch. TheTransiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will spend at least two years studying more than 200,000 nearby stars and looking for planets. The mission is expected to discover thousands of previously unknown worlds by detecting the small drops in light which occur when each planet passes across the face of its parent star.This approach, known as the transit ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: Planets Nasa Space Astronomy Science US news World news Source Type: news

Center for Infectious Disease Research receives $17 million grant to study tuberculosis
10 million new cases of active TB are diagnosed each year. The grant allows CIDR to continue addressing the unanswered questions surrounding the disease. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 22, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

Air pollutants linked to abnormal fetal growth
Chinese mothers who were exposed to a high level of air pollutants during pregnancy had a higher risk of abnormal fetal growth, according to a new YSPH study. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 22, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Blacks in U.S. lose quality of life due to fewer knee replacements
(Reuters Health) - Black people with knee osteoarthritis may have a worse quality of life than white patients in part because they ’re less likely to be offered knee replacement surgery or to get the procedure when it’s recommended, a U.S. study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Women likely to pick more effective birth control
A study by the University of Utah gave birth control to 7,400 women and found without having cost as an issue, participants were twice as likely to choose the most effective methods such as IUDs. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women prefer long-lasting birth control if cost isn't a factor: Study
According to a new study women prefer IUDs or implants, if cost isn't a factor. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Allergy Drug May Reduce Relapse in Neuromyelitis Optica Allergy Drug May Reduce Relapse in Neuromyelitis Optica
The pilot study, which showed an effect of allergy drug cetirizine, suggests a key role of eosinophils in the pathogenesis of NMO, researchers say.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

AEROSOLS: Tiny particles found to have a big impact on weather
(Natural News) Tiny particles contribute to the making of powerful storms and affect the weather in more ways than one, a study that was published in the January 26 issue of the journal Science showed. While it is not news to scientists that aerosols bring an essential role in impacting weather and climate, the new... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Too Much TV Could Boost Your Odds for a Blood Clot
The study found that people who spend too much time in front of the TV are at increased risk for blood clots in their veins -- a condition called venous thromboembolism (VTE). (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Research Debunks Two Medical Marijuana Myths
The impact of marijuana legalization also has been minimal on the risk for fatal overdosing among adult users of opioid pain medications, a separate study team has found. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Exercising Yourself to Death: The Risk of Rhabdo
Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome involving muscle breakdown and damage. When muscles are injured, they release their contents, including a muscle enzyme, into the bloodstream. The disorder is dangerous but rare. In one study, 22 people out of 100,000 were known to have it. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

E-cigarette vapors contain toxic chemicals, study finds
E-cigarette vapors contain toxic metals, including lead, that leak from the heating coils, according to a new study at Johns Hopkins. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Nasal Flu Vaccine Is Set to Come Back Next Year. Here ’s What to Know About It
After a two-year hiatus, the nasal flu vaccine is set to return to doctors’ offices next year. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) voted 12 to 2 on Wednesday to return the nasal spray to the CDC’s list of recommended vaccines for the 2018-2019 flu season. Pending final approval from the CDC director, the vote would greenlight the spray for widespread use and compel insurance companies to cover it. The committee stopped short of explicitly recommending the nasal spray, however, and will instead let providers and patients decide if they’ll use it instead of traditional flu shots. There ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news

Medical pot laws don't increase teens' recreational use: Study
A university study has debunked the belief that legalizing medical marijuana increases recreational use of pot among U.S. adolescents. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists make cells glow so brightly they can be seen outside the body
Synthetic bioluminescent molecules allows researchers to track individual cells in animals with unprecedented accuracyScientists have stolen a trick from fireflies and jellyfish to make animals with cells that glow so brightly they can be seen from outside the body.The Japanese team created mice and marmosets whose brains contain nerve cells that produce light which can be picked up by a camera to study the tissues inside the living animals.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Medical research Science Animals Neuroscience Source Type: news

Could Tracking Hospital Staff Lead to Better Patient Care?
As part of a Smart Hospitals initiative, SATO Healthcare and Nagoya University Hospital’s Medical IT Center are using IoT technology to study patient care. “With this study, Nagoya University Hospital primarily seeks to visualize the work status of nurses and amount of time they spend with patients,” Kevin Leidheiser, public relations for Sato Holdings Corp., told MD+DI. “It seeks to clarify the amount of resources used to handle patients with certain characteristics and believes it will be able to use captured data to quantitatively evaluate work difficulty and efficacy.” Researchers are empl...
Source: MDDI - February 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

Young men ’s drinking tied to later liver disease risk
(Reuters Health) - Men who drink alcohol in late adolescence are more likely to develop severe liver disease decades later than young people who don ’t drink at all, a Swedish study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Self-compassion may protect perfectionists from getting depressed
(Reuters Health) - Learning to respond to your failures with kindness, or self-compassion, may help offset the negative effects of perfectionism at any age, according to a small study of Australian teens and adults. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Collagen Solutions jumps on positive study data
Shares in Collagen Solutions (LON:COS) rose this week after the U.K.-based company touted positive data from an eight-year study of 15 patients who received ChondroMimetic implants to repair cartilage defects in their knees. The company plans to apply for CE Mark clearance in the European Union for its ChrondroMimetic implant based on the results from this long-term study. Using 3D MRI analyses, researchers found that cartilage regeneration in the defects treated with Collagen Solutions’ device had reached a structural quality that was almost identical to native cartilage. The team also saw that after eight years, pa...
Source: Mass Device - February 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Clinical Trials Implants Orthopedics Regenerative Medicine Wall Street Beat collagensolutions Source Type: news

Should the FDA Approve the Mediterranean Diet for Depression? Should the FDA Approve the Mediterranean Diet for Depression?
Two studies show impressive improvements in depression scores with a healthy diet high in plant-based foods and omega-3 fats.Medscape Psychiatry (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry Commentary Source Type: news

Medical News Today: How too much TV could kill you
You might think binge-watching your favorite show is harmless, but a new study finds that too much TV could raise the risk of potentially fatal blood clots. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) Source Type: news

Some antidepressants better than others, study says
Every drug in the study worked better than a placebo, but there were some significant differences (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sepsis could be prevented by the gut, study suggests
When the guts of mice had more of certain types of microbes, they had higher levels of a blood protein that can protect against sepsis, according to new research from the University of Pennsylvania. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Your gut flora may protect against sepsis
A mouse study showed that having a particular mix of gut microbes raised blood levels of IgA antibodies, which in turn protected against bacterial sepsis. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses Source Type: news

FDA clears Access Vascular ’ s HydroPICC catheter
Access Vascular said today that its HydroPICC catheter has won 510(k) clearance from the FDA. The peripherally-inserted central catheter is designed with Access Vascular’s proprietary bulk-hydrophilic material, which the company touted as “the ideal material for long-term implantable vascular access devices.” “The FDA clearance of the HydroPICC catheter is an important milestone for Access Vascular and a critical step forward on our pathway to commercialization,” founder, president & CEO, James Biggins, said in prepared remarks. “Today’s news is a validation of our team&rs...
Source: Mass Device - February 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: 510(k) Catheters Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Vascular accessvascular Source Type: news

Heavy Drinking Is the Biggest Risk Factor for Dementia, Study Says
Hot on the heels of headlines linking alcohol consumption with longer life comes new research that casts a much more sobering light on drinking. According to an analysis of more than 1 million people—the largest study of its kind to date—scientists say that heavy alcohol use is the biggest modifiable risk factor for dementia, especially early-onset forms of the disease. The findings, which are published in The Lancet Public Health, came as a shock to the researchers involved. “We hypothesized that alcohol would play some role, but I don’t think anyone expected the size of the effect to be so large,&...
Source: TIME: Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Research Source Type: news

Endologix CEO McDermott to step down; shares slide -10% on Q4 results | Personnel Moves for Feb. 22, 2018
Endologix (NSDQ:ELGX) CEO John McDermott is planning to step down once an appropriate replacement is found, the company said yesterday as it announced fourth-quarter results that handily topped earnings expectations but missed on the top line. “Despite the business challenges over the past couple of years, I am confident that Endologix has a bright future. Our vision is clear, the value proposition is compelling, and our pipeline of new products positions us for significant long-term growth. I remain deeply committed to our employees, physicians, and patients and will do whatever I can to support an effective le...
Source: Mass Device - February 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: MassDevice Earnings Roundup Stent Grafts Wall Street Beat attunemedical Biocoat Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Dynatronics Corp Endologix Medtronic personnel-moves Presbia Wound Management Technologies Source Type: news

Aimmune's Peanut Allergy Drug Meets Main Goal, Shares Surge Aimmune's Peanut Allergy Drug Meets Main Goal, Shares Surge
U.S. drug developer Aimmune Therapeutics Inc said on Tuesday its peanut allergy drug met the main goal of an eagerly awaited late-stage study, sending its shares up 18 percent premarket.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - February 22, 2018 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Allergy & Clinical Immunology News Source Type: news

Docs Question Ethics of Diabetes Drugs CV Outcomes Studies Docs Question Ethics of Diabetes Drugs CV Outcomes Studies
In a viewpoint article, two former pharma employees question the ethics of FDA-mandated studies on diabetes drugs and suggest the results shouldn't influence clinical guidelines.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Eating 'better' is better than counting calories for weight loss: Study
Plus, a dietitian shares her tips for eating non-processed foods. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

Antidepressants Do Work, Some Better Than Others: Study
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - February 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Nursing, Pharmacy, Psychiatry, News, Source Type: news

Arrival of Beaker folk changed Britain for ever, ancient DNA study shows
At least 90% of the ancestry of Britons was replaced by a wave of migrants, who arrived about 4,500 years ago, say researchersThe largest ever study on ancient DNA has shown that Britain was changed forever by the arrival of the Beaker folk, a wave of migrants about 4,500 years ago who brought with them new customs, new burial practices, and beautiful, distinctive bell-shaped pottery.Related:First modern Britons had 'dark to black' skin, Cheddar Man DNA analysis revealsContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Archaeology Genetics Science Source Type: news

Major review reveals most and least effective antidepressants
Antidepressants are more effective than placebo for the short-term treatment of acute depression in adults, a study led by UK researchers has confirmed. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - February 22, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Remineralization Potential of Mints Containing Bioactive Agents in Artificially Induced Root Caries
This study investigated the remineralization effect of experimental mint formulations containing bioactive agents (xylitol; green tea extract, GT; and amorphous calcium phosphate, ACP) in the progression of artificially induced root caries. Root caries lesions were induced by demineralization solution (pH 4.6; 96 h; 37 °C). The lesions were treated with mint A, mint B, mint C, xylitol, GT, ACP, or remineralization solution (RS; negative control). Specimens were pH-cycled through treatments (5×/day; 3 min) and 6 cycles of acidic (pH 5.0; 30 min) and neutral (pH 7.0; 10 min) buffers for 8 days. Bacterial coll agena...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - February 22, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Too Much TV Could Boost Your Odds for a Blood Clot
THURSDAY, Feb. 22, 2018 -- Hours spent binge-watching that hot new series might feel great, but it's doing no favors for your blood vessels, new research shows. The study found that people who spend too much time in front of the TV are at increased... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 22, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Want to Boost Reproducibility? Get Another Lab Involved
Including as few as two labs in a study improved the odds of getting the true effect size by as much as 23 percent, according to a replication model. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Daily News Source Type: news