New class of membranes shown to regenerate tissue and bone, viable solution for periodontitis
Periodontitis affects nearly half of Americans ages 30 and older, and in its advanced stages, it could lead to early tooth loss or worse. Recent studies have shown that periodontitis could also increase risk of  heart disease and Alzheimer’s disease.A team of UCLA researchers has developed methods that may lead to more effective and reliable therapy for periodontal disease — ones that promote gum tissue and bone regeneration with biological and mechanical features that can be adjusted based on treatment needs. Thestudy is published online in ACS Nano.Periodontitis is a chronic, destructive diseas...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 22, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Cancer tumours in the gut feed off sugary drinks, new study shows
Scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York, found that mice consuming high-fructose corn syrup, used in biscuits, ice cream and energy drinks, saw intestinal tumours grow faster. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Finding a new home —how good (and bad) bacteria colonize the gut
Three studies have revealed details of what happens when a community of bacteria inhabiting the gut is disrupted and then rebuilt by a change in diet or by adding bacteria from a healthy donor, providing valuable insights that could help with the design of microbe-based therapies for the treatment of gastrointestinal infections and other digestive diseases. (Source: NIDDK News)
Source: NIDDK News - March 22, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Kidney protein could expand the window for developmental nephron production
A study in mice showed that a partial reduction of the protein hamartin in the developing kidney leads to larger numbers of nephrons —the basic functional unit of the kidney.  (Source: NIDDK News)
Source: NIDDK News - March 22, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Studies show difficulty in treating type 2 diabetes in youth and highlight unique aspects of the disease in young people
New research reveals that the only two medications approved for pediatric type 2 diabetes do not prevent rapid progression of prediabetes or recent onset type 2 diabetes in young people with the disease; however, analyses comparing metabolic tests of adults in a companion study and the youth study participants are helping scientists understand how the disease differs with age, which may one day lead to better treatment approaches. (Source: NIDDK News)
Source: NIDDK News - March 22, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Science Issues Concern About HIV Remission Monkey Study Science Issues Concern About HIV Remission Monkey Study
A once-promising strategy for HIV suppression failed to show efficacy in humans; now Science publishes an"editorial expression of concern" about the monkey study on which it was based.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - March 22, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Diversity Missing in Genetic Studies Diversity Missing in Genetic Studies
European populations are overrepresented in genetic and genomic studies, contributing to healthcare inequities.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - March 21, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Internal Medicine News Source Type: news

Some ADHD meds may increase risk of psychosis, study finds
New research sheds light on a rare but potentially dangerous risk of some common medications for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Seizure Freedom in TLE Tied to Piriform Cortex Resection Seizure Freedom in TLE Tied to Piriform Cortex Resection
Results from a study of individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) who underwent surgery could have important implications in terms of a target for drug development and deep brain stimulation.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - March 21, 2019 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Texting and driving bans prevent 1,600 ER visits a year, study finds  
Right now, 660,000 Americans are trying to text from behind the wheel. Bans on using cell phones while driving have cut ER visits for car crashes by 4% a year, a Texas A&M study found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Machines Treating Patients? It ’s Already Happening
Rayfield Byrd knows when it’s time to wake up every morning. The 68-year-old Oakland, Cal., resident hears a voice from the living room offering a cheery good morning. Except Byrd lives alone. A little after 8 a.m. each day, a small yellow robot named Mabu asks Byrd how he’s doing. Byrd has Type 2 diabetes and congestive heart failure, and about three years ago, he had surgery to implant a microvalve in his heart to keep his blood flowing properly. To stay healthy, he takes four medications a day and needs to exercise regularly. To make sure his heart is still pumping effectively, his doctor needs to stay on to...
Source: TIME: Health - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Artificial Intelligence Life Reinvented medicine Source Type: news

Can Drinking Very Hot Tea Raise Your Risk Of Esophageal Cancer?
A study showed that drinking tea above this temperature was associated with higher esophageal cancer rates. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - March 21, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Y. Lee, Contributor Source Type: news

Video » Mobile Technology for Global Mental Health Research
This webinar highlights three NIMH supported research studies that leverage mobile technology to address mental health challenges such as depression and substance use in lower middle-income countries. The purpose of the webinar is to introduce or enhance knowledge on how mobile health technologies establish research networks, build capacity and improve mental health outcomes in low to middle income countries. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - March 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

Psychosis Risk Varies With ADHD Meds, Still Small
In the study, people who took amphetamines, like Adderall and Vyvanse, seemed to carry a relatively greater risk than the methylphenidates Ritalin and Concerta. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Long-term hormone use after menopause tied to Alzheimer's risk
(Reuters Health) - Women who take hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to ease menopause symptoms like hot flashes and night sweats may be slightly more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease, a large Finnish study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Most health apps share data with third parties, study shows
The widespread use of mobile health apps is opening up patients to the potential for massive privacy breaches, a new study says (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dementia care: Younger people with certain condition more prone to dementia, says study
DEMENTIA is a term used to describe different symptoms relating to the degeneration of brain functioning. There ’s currently no cure, but research has suggested different causes and ways to prevent the condition. A new study has found younger people with a certain condition are more prone to dementia. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Some Medical Apps Routinely Share Data Some Medical Apps Routinely Share Data
Study authors advise clinicians to be aware of the privacy risks when they use such apps themselves or recommend them to patients.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Internal Medicine News Source Type: news

Car crash ER visits fell in states that ban texting while driving, study says
States with bans on texting while driving saw an average 4% reduction in emergency department visits after motor vehicle crashes, an equivalent of 1,632 traffic-related emergency department visits per year, according to a new analysis. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sky-High Prevalence of Skin Conditions Found in Ordinary Germans
(MedPage Today) -- Most people in study weren't aware of having them (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - March 21, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Study: High-fat diet causes trans-generational health problems, impacting humans for generations to come
(Natural News) The human race is constantly evolving at the genetic level. Epi-genetic factors are always influencing the genetic expression within the individual. Families pass on a firm DNA sequence from parent to offspring, but certain external factors and intra-cellular activities can affect genetic expression. These phenotype alterations in gene expression can also be passed... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Phone app may help conquer fear of heights
(Reuters Health) - People who are terrified of heights may be able to conquer their phobia using a virtual reality app and an inexpensive set of cardboard VR googles, a Dutch study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Another Promising Alzheimer ’ s Drug Trial Ends In Failure: ‘ This One Hurts ’
(CNN) — It’s another devastating blow in the search for a treatment for patients living with Alzheimer’s disease. Pharmaceutical giant Biogen and its Japanese partner Eisai announced Thursday they were halting two phase three clinical trials of a drug that targets the buildup in the brain of beta-amyloid, one of two proteins that researchers believe contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s. The drug, called aducanumab, was the most promising candidate in a field that has been littered with failures. It was so promising that the company was running two phase three trials simultaneously, said neur...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Alzheimer's Disease CNN Source Type: news

IceCure Medical touts interventional radiology cryoablation study data
IceCure Medical yesterday released data from an interventional radiology study of its liquid-nitrogen-based cryoablation technology. Results from the study were presented at the Annual European Association of Urology Congress in Barcelona, the Israel-based company said. IceCure Medical’s ProSense cryoablation system uses liquid nitrogen technology for the treatment of benign and cancerous tumors through freezing, the company said. “The ProSense system has already demonstrated excellent progress as a rapid, in-office solution for the treatment of breast tumors. This new data adds to our growing clinical evi...
Source: Mass Device - March 21, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials IceCure Medical Ltd. Source Type: news

Certain Dietary Patterns Linked to Cognitive Performance
THURSDAY, March 21, 2019 -- Higher Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) and A Priori Diet Quality Score (APDQS) scores are associated with better cognitive performance in midlife, according to a study published online March 6 in Neurology. Claire T. McEvoy,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - March 21, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Tighter Gun Laws = Safer Schools
THURSDAY, March 21, 2019 -- Stricter gun laws keep U.S. high school students safer, a new study says. Surveying nearly 100,000 high school students, researchers found that tightening of state gun laws was associated with a lower risk of teens being... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 21, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Antimicrobial properties of red ginseng make it a great natural cure for acne
(Natural News) Having an acne breakout? Try red ginseng. A recent study published in the journal Phytotherapy Research reports that red ginseng (Panax ginseng) improves the symptoms of acne, making it a safe and effective natural remedy. Acne — a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin — develops when bacteria abnormally grow in hair follicles. The most... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AR-controlled robot could help people with motor disabilities with daily tasks
In a small study published in PLOS ONE, 80 percent of participants using a surrogate robot achieved  clinically meaningful improvement on a modified version of the Action Research Arm Test.  (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - March 21, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Risk of MS Progression May Be Lessening Over Time (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Swedish study shows patients with relapsing onset MS are taking longer to reach disability milestones (Source: MedPage Today Neurology)
Source: MedPage Today Neurology - March 21, 2019 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

Tai chi found to benefit the brains of older people
(Natural News) Taking up mind-body exercises – for instance, ballroom dancing or tai chi – could help maintain the health of your brain and your body during the later years of your life. This regimen was supported by the results of a new study, in which exercises that involve both mental and physical activities raised the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Red raspberry exhibits anti-metastatic properties against human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells
(Natural News) A study published in The American Journal of Chinese Medicine suggested that red raspberry (Rubus idaeus) can be used to treat and prevent nasopharyngeal cancer. In the study, researchers at Chung Shan Medical University in China examined the antimetastatic properties of red raspberry extract on human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Nasopharyngeal cancer is characterized... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Clinical trial explores whether video conversations can prevent dementia in isolated seniors
Oregon Health& Science University's ongoing study has participants discussing  memories and tapping their critical thinking skills multiple times each week. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - March 21, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Most anti-vaxxer trolls on Facebook are mothers who support Trump or Sanders
A new University of Pittsburgh study reveals that the majority of anti-vaccination comments on Facebook are written by mothers. More than half of them support Trump, but 11% are for Sanders. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Modeled Manual Therapy May Protect Against Repetitive Motion Pain, Rat Study Suggests
Results of a recently published rat study suggest that 3 weeks of modeled manual therapy (MMT) largely prevented the physiological processes and pain that often accompany a repetitive motion injury. (Source: NCCAM Featured Content)
Source: NCCAM Featured Content - March 21, 2019 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: NCCIH Source Type: news

GSK reports positive data for experimental blood cancer drug
GlaxoSmithKline received a boost for its oncology research on Thursday, as it reported further positive data from a study of its experimental drug for blood cancer. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Teleflex touts real-world UroLift study data
Teleflex (NYSE:TFX) today released results from real-world studies of its UroLift minimally invasive treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia, touting its safety and effectiveness. Data from the studies were presented at the 2019 European Association of Urology meeting in Barcelona, Spain. The UroLift system uses tiny devices inserted into the urethra in a minimally invasive procedure to reopen the lower urinary tract by pushing aside tissue from the enlarged prostate, the Wayne, Penn.-based company said. Teleflex said that it presented data from a real-world retrospective study of 30 men with urinary rete...
Source: Mass Device - March 21, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Urology Teleflex Source Type: news

A Guide to Measuring Drug-Target Residence Times with Biochemical Assays
Download this guide from BellBrook Labs to learn about how to use Transcreener ® biochemical assays to measure drug-target residence times, complete with examples and case studies! (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 21, 2019 Category: Science Tags: The Scientist The Marketplace Source Type: news

Africa: Drug-Resistant TB - a New Study Offers New Hope
[The Conversation Africa] Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death in the world from a single infectious disease, causing more deaths than HIV/AIDS. In 2017, 10 million people developed TB disease globally and an estimated 1.6 million died. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - March 21, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Cryopreservation of immature testicular tissue leads to successful birth in monkeys
NIH-funded study is an early step in effort to maintain fertility of childhood cancer patients. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - March 21, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Human Genomics Research Has A Diversity Problem
Studies on the genetics of human diseases have focused largely on people of European descent. Researchers say this lack of diversity is bad science and exacerbates health inequities. (Image credit: Mint Images/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jonathan Lambert Source Type: news

Lack of Diversity in Genetic Datasets is Risky for Treating Disease
Certain populations have been historically underrepresented in genome sequencing studies, but the NIH, private clinics, and 23andMe and other companies are trying to fix that. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 21, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Childhood adversity linked to higher out-of-pocket health care costs in adulthood
FINDINGSA study has found that out-of-pocket health care spending and medical debt are substantially higher when adults have a history of adverse childhood experiences. The study showed that household medical costs were 30 percent higher, and the likelihood of medical debt was doubled, when an adult had lived through three or more adverse experiences during childhood.BACKGROUNDAdverse childhood experiences include abuse, neglect and household dysfunction that occur before 18 years of age. The types of hardships can include divorce or separation from parents, violence in the home and parental mental illness. Such experience...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 21, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Why your gut may hold the key to cardiovascular health
A new study examines the link between gut bacteria, aging, and cardiovascular health. The authors conclude that 'the fountain of youth may lie in the gut.' (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Yale researchers awarded $40 million to study opioid addiction treatments
Drs. Ismene Petrakis and Sandra Springer are co-principal investigators leading new research, which is supported by the Veterans Affairs Cooperative Study. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - March 21, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Pesticides Tied to Autism Risk in Kids
THURSDAY, March 21, 2019 -- Children who are exposed to common pesticides, either while in the womb or in the first year of life, may be more likely to develop autism, a new study suggests. While the researchers stressed that it's premature to say... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 21, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

What Drives'Anti-Vaxxer' Parents? It's a Mixed Bag, Study Shows
THURSDAY, March 21, 2019 -- Anti-vaccination campaigns abound on social media, but the people involved are not necessarily driven by any single motivation, a new study suggests. Instead, researchers say, people who voice their anti-vaccine... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 21, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

As Kids Get Hooked on Vaping, Parents Are Desperate for Treatment That Doesn ’t Exist
Jami Scheetz knew that her 15-year-old son, Devon, needed help. His grades were slipping and he had been caught vaping at school so many times that he was on the brink of being expelled. Last fall, at the start of his freshman year, Devon’s school even sent him to the hospital for drug testing after getting in trouble once again. In the emergency room, Devon finally admitted it: He was addicted. “He said to me, ‘Mom, I can’t quit on my own. I need help,'” Scheetz says. E-cigarettes are illegal for people younger than 18 (and in some states, 21) but that hasn’t stopped teens from vaping i...
Source: TIME: Health - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Addiction Source Type: news

NIH study finds no evidence that calcium increases risk of AMD
People taking the mineral for other medical reasons should stay the course. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - March 21, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Parkinson's gene therapy may reduce medicine required for treatment
A new brain operation may reduce the severity of motor problems in people with Parkinson's disease and decrease the amount of medication they need, a new study says. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A New Role for Platelets: Boosting Neurogenesis After Exercise
A mouse study finds that when blood platelets are activated during exercise, they release factors that increase the number of newborn neurons in the hippocampus. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 21, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news