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The environment can become a noninvasive therapeutic approach to bolster white matter health
(Children's National Health System) Those parents you overhear transforming trips to the grocery store into sensory adventures -- telling babies too young to babble that broccoli is GREEN, radishes are RED and tangerines are ORANGE -- are onto something. Being exposed to a complex and stimulating environment rich with new sights, sounds and a full vocabulary can play a powerful role in strengthening infants' developing brains. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

At the Farmers' Fair, Growers Display Foods for a Healthier Tajikistan
March 17, 2017Health workers are reaching beyond their health facilities to educate  communities on the power of food and water.Food and water —can’t live without'em. They are two of the most basic necessities for a healthy life, and yet793 million people around the world remain undernourished and780 million people don ’t have access to clean drinking water.We ’re working to change that.IntraHealth International’sFeed the Future Tajikistan Health and Nutrition Activity (THNA) is helping health workers educate their communities about the power of food and WASH (water, sanitation, and hygie...
Source: IntraHealth International - March 17, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

7 Ways to Improvise In A Food Desert
“Dr. Hyman, I’m going to my in-laws for the holidays, and they live in a food desert,” a reader recently wrote. “Seriously, they have one grocery store and a McDonald’s. What do I do? I’m going to be there for almost 10 days!” Trust me when I say we’ve all been there. I’ve traveled to towns where I’ve felt forced to make the most of what is available and the options weren’t very impressive. Sometimes you have to improvise and do the best you can with what you have. It’s not your fault you can’t find real food in the average American town. The foo...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What The Latest Research Really Means For Crohn’s Disease
A recent study came out this month identifying specific fungus and bacteria that were linked to cases of Crohn’s disease. While E coli had previously been identified, this new study finds Serratia marcescens and candida tropicalis are in the mix as well (1). Crohn’s disease affects more than a half-million people each year inflicting debilitating symptoms such as chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss and fatigue. Researchers were pleased to present this new information in the hopes of leading to better treatment options for patients down the road. While this study sheds light on possible aberrations of ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 30, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Why Sprouts Are Especially Good At Harboring Dangerous Bacteria
Sprouts may sound cute, but the tiny greens have sickened more than 2,500 people and caused 186 hospitalizations and three deaths in the past two decades, a new report finds. “Sprout contamination continues to pose a serious public health concern,” the researchers from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) wrote in their report. The arm of the FDA that wrote the new report focuses on investigating outbreaks and finding ways to prevent them. The findings on sprouts were presented on Oct. 28 at IDWeek 2016, a meeting in New Orleans of several organizations focused on infectious diseases. The report on sprouts ha...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Why Sprouts Are Especially Good At Harboring Dangerous Bacteria
Sprouts may sound cute, but the tiny greens have sickened more than 2,500 people and caused 186 hospitalizations and three deaths in the past two decades, a new report finds. “Sprout contamination continues to pose a serious public health concern,” the researchers from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) wrote in their report. The arm of the FDA that wrote the new report focuses on investigating outbreaks and finding ways to prevent them. The findings on sprouts were presented on Oct. 28 at IDWeek 2016, a meeting in New Orleans of several organizations focused on infectious diseases. The report on sprouts ha...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fall cover crops for livestock grazing may improve soil health, protect environment
Turning cattle out to graze in harvested fields was once a common practice. It's something that researchers would like to see used again--and improved by planting cover crops, such as such as oats, sorghum, turnips, radishes or millet. These have the potential to improve the soil health and utilize any remaining nutrients, thus preventing runoff that pollutes lakes and streams. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 18, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Voodoo Medicine: Time To Stop
The world's most celebrated athlete standing on the podium in Rio in honor of receiving yet another gold medal has something important in common with your lazy uncle throwing back a cold one in his Barcalounger. Yes, swimming powerhouse Michael Phelps, purple-spotted from cupping therapy, and your slovenly relative with a beer gut both share a bond -- a weakness in succumbing to the allure of voodoo medicine. Modern-day snake oil salesmen hawking quick cures and TV doctors peddling the latest diet miracle with blatantly ridiculous claims are everywhere on the tube, social media, the supermarket and old-fashioned billboards...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 12, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Freedom To Fail: Simulations And The Future Of Our Species
"Plans are useless. Planning is everything." - Dwight David Eisenhower If all goes as planned, in 18 days the hatch will open and our one-year mission to simulated space will end. Thanks in part to this mission, if all goes as planned, a generation from now we'll be waist-deep in our first attempt to land humans on Mars. Between now and then, plans will accumulate: a plan for building a launch vehicle; a plan for getting our stuff there (hopefully, most of it in advance); a plan for how to select and train and feed and water a crew of four or more for three years. Sometimes, twenty years feels like enough time t...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 11, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

False Promises: Avoid ‘Miracle’ Rice and Just Eat a Carrot
Vandana Shiva. (Photo: The Seeds of Vandana Shiva film)By Dr Vandana ShivaNEW DELHI, Aug 10 2016 (IPS)Norman Borlaug, father of the Green Revolution, died on September 9, 2009. Alfred G. Gilman died on December 23, 2015.Both were Nobel laureates and now both dead. Gilman was a signatory to a recent letter condemning Greenpeace and its opposition to genetic engineering. How many Nobel laureates does it take to write a letter? Easily ascertained — the dead Gilman and 106 others were enlisted in “supporting GMOs and golden rice”. Correct answer — 107, dead or alive.The laureates were rounded up by Val ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 10, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Vandana Shiva 2 Tags: Biodiversity Crime & Justice Development & Aid Economy & Trade Food & Agriculture Gender Global Green Economy Headlines Health Women's Health Source Type: news

Why This Father Feeds His Son Freakish Fruit And Vegetables
Jordan Figueiredo’s son, Evan, hates salads. The 5-year-old, like many 5-year-olds, just can’t get into his greens. But if there’s one thing he can’t get enough of, it’s carrots with legs. Or peaches with noses. Basically, if it’s a fruit or vegetable that doesn’t look the way it’s “supposed” to, Evan is calling dibs. And the weirder it looks, the more he wants it. Evan gets this from his father. The elder Figueiredo works by day as a solid waste specialist for the Castro Valley Sanitation District, about a 40-minute drive outside of San Francisco, working to make...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Day 300: Virtually There
Until we get really good at transgressing the laws of physics, we live under the thumb of certain hard facts. One of the hardest is this: we can't physically be in two places at once. Happily, through miracles of modern technology like speakerphones, Skype, and virtual reality, as long as we're on the same planet as an event, we can virtually attend. At least, our likenesses can. Our voices, faces, and/or avatars can appear in our places. Using these work-arounds, our essences can sort of exist in two or more places at once. Virtually near-infinite versions of ourselves, some more robust than others, can experience element...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 30, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

We Might Be Able To Grow Edible Food In Martian Soil
In a dystopian future where we’ve depleted the shrinking resources of our home planet and a few lonely, intrepid survivors are trying to eke out an existence on Mars, at least the vegetables won’t kill us. Probably. New research from scientists at Wageningen University in the Netherlands found that radishes, peas, tomatoes and rye grown in soil formulated to simulate the soil on Mars were safe to eat. The "Mars" dirt was enhanced with some organic matter from Earth that isn't present in soil from the red planet. The researchers have said previously that people colonizing Mars could theoretically ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 28, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

You can eat vegetables from Mars, say scientists after crop experiment
Dutch researchers successfully raise radishes, peas, rye and tomatoes in soil mixed to match that of the red planet – giving hope that settlers could grow foodCrops of four vegetables and cereals grown in soil similar to that on Mars have been found safe to eat by Dutch scientists.Radishes, peas, rye and tomatoes grown on dirt mixed on Earth to copy that of the red planet were found to contain “no dangerous levels” of heavy metals, said the team from Wageningen University in the Netherlands. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 24, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Staff and agencies in The Hague Tags: Mars Space Science World news Source Type: news

Forage radish is the cream of cover crops, say experts
When it comes to the most beneficial cover crops farmers can use to suppress weeds and increase production values, scientists have found that forage radish is at the top of the list, according to new research. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

4 Amazing Ways Curious Kids Can Explore The Life of Plants
Are you a parent or an educator looking for a new learning experience for your child or students? If your child is interested in science, why not expose them to the magic of life sciences! I've selected 4 of the best learning experiences for you to share with your child. All are well-priced, educational, and are focussed on self-directed learning. Namoo Namoo is a newly-released application that provides an interactive learning experience for children. Its design means it is perfect for self-directed learning, yet it is also able to be used with a parent, or even by a teacher in the classroom. With Namoo, new fact...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

New Protocol Aims to Cut Trillion-Dollar Food Waste Bill
Tsering Dorji works on his farm in western Bhutan’s Satsam village. Due to inadequate transportation and marketing opportunities, he loses half of what he produces every rainy season. Credit: Stella Paul/IPSBy Stella PaulCOPENHAGEN, Jun 8 2016 (IPS)Four years ago, 27-year-old Tsering Dorji of western Bhutan’s Satsam village took to organic vegetable farming. Since then, thanks to composted manure and organic pesticide, the soil health of his farm has improved, and the yield has increased manifold.Dorji, once a subsistence farmer, now has about 60 bags of surplus food every two months to sell and earn a profit.&...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 8, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Stella Paul Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Energy Environment Food & Agriculture Global Global Governance Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Labour Natural Resources Population Poverty & SDGs Trade & Investment Water & San Source Type: news

Everything You Need To Know About Hawaii's Wildly Popular Poke Bowls
If you live in any major U.S. city, you've probably caught wind of the nation's new favorite food -- the poke bowl. Not "poke" like the always awkward Facebook feature, but "POH-keh" -- cubed raw fish, seasoned any way you want it. While it may seem like a new trend, this simple and addictive Hawaiian dish has been around for centuries. It's basically Hawaii's favorite food and for good reason: Poke is healthy, delicious and totally unique. A photo posted by Foodland Hawaii (@foodlandhi) on Apr 6, 2014 at 2:51pm PDT Walk into virtually any supermarket in the Aloha State and you'll find ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bibimbap, The Delicious Dish That You're Probably Too Afraid To Pronounce
If you've ever refrained from ordering something because you didn't know how to pronounce it, we totally feel you. But no one should be deprived of the deliciousness that is bibimbap for fear of embarrassment. Once and for all, it's pronounced "bee-beem-bahp," but it might as well be called "beautiful bowl of YUM." The secret to making the perfect bowl of this healthy Korean classic is variety. Listen to your taste buds and don't be afraid to go a little crazy. Start with a base layer of warm white rice. Then add shredded cucumber, carrot, zucchini, kimchi and bean sprouts -- season or s...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Reduction of Ego-Depletion
In recent years, psychological science has been increasingly roiled by a "replication crisis" wherein numerous theories the field was once certain about are proving rather wobbly on closer inspection. With the release of a new replication report by multiple scholarly labs in the journal Perspectives on Psychological Science, a theory called ego-depletion is the latest to come under scrutiny. What is Ego-Depletion and Why Should You Care? Ego-depletion refers to an idea that we have a limited amount of self-control or willpower. Every time we engage in one task that requires willpower, that results in less energy ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

These Mock Martian Crops Show We Could Grow Food On Mars
Establishing a sustainable colony on Mars would come with incredible challenges, none more pressing than figuring out how to keep inhabitants from starving. To the delight of sci-fi fans, the innovative approach of fictional astronaut Mark Watney to growing potatoes in the movie "The Martian" might just be the solution. Scientists at Wageningen University and Research Centre in the Netherlands say they have successfully grown -- and harvested -- several crops, including tomatoes and peas, in simulated Martian and lunar soils. The goal of the ongoing study is to provide the basis for growing cr...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 11, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

First tomatoes, peas harvested on Mars, moon soil simulant
The second experiment on how to grow crops on Mars and moon soil simulant have given a surprising outcome. As a result of what the researchers in the Netherlands learned from their first experiments, they were able to grow ten different crop species. Tomatoes, peas, rye, garden rocket, radish and garden cress were harvested. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Arctic Communities Turn Challenges Brought On By Climate Changes Into Advantages
This article originally appeared on Arctic Deeply. For weekly updates about Arctic geopolitics, economy, and ecology, you can sign up to the Arctic Deeply email list.   Related on HuffPost: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

From the Archives – Letter from a World War I Nurse
From 1914 to 1918, Europe endured the horrors of The Great War, now known as World War I. In recognition of the 100th anniversary of the conflict, “From the Archives” will feature a series of articles on Red Cross involvement in the war. Among the many nurses who volunteered to go to Europe to tend to the wounded soldiers was Marie Louise McDowell. McDowell, 34 years old and a resident of Middletown, Del., traveled to France on the SS Chicago in June 1917 as part of American Ambulance, Neuilly-sur-Seine. Marie Louise McDowell’s Passport Photo (Courtesy Middletown Historical Society) She was with American...
Source: Red Cross Chat - January 27, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Nicholas Lemesh Tags: Archives History Volunteers From the Archives nurses world war I Source Type: news

How Close Are We To Developing A Self Sufficient Space Station?
How far are we from developing fully self-sufficient space stations? originally appeared on Quora - the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights. Answer by Robert Walker, Writer of articles on Mars and Space issues, on Quora. We are a long way away from developing fully self-sufficient space stations. At least if you mean ones that are able to make and repair all the complex machinery, spacesuits, life support systems, computers, modules, etc. Instead, what they are attempting is: First, to recycle all the oxygen for breathing. At the moment they lose a lot of it int...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 8, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Got Insomnia? Trade Your Cappuccino in for a Macaccino and Get a Good Night's Sleep
According to Harvard Medical School people who get insufficient sleep place themselves at risk for major health issues including heart disease, obesity, compromised immune systems and early mortality. As Arianna Huffington describes in her best-selling book, "Thrive," restorative sleep is essential to overall well-being and happiness. Obviously, over-consumption of coffee and caffeine can greatly effect our bodies' ability to receive deep, restorative sleep. Drinking coffee creates the illusion of having energy because caffeine increases neuron firing which in turn cause our pituitary glands to secrete more adr...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

10 Satisfying Low-Sodium Snacks
When you need to satisfy between-meal munchies, do you automatically reach for a salty snack? For many of us it’s the bags of pretzels and potato chips that call our name from the vending machine midafternoon. But the snack favorites tend to be high in sodium, a mineral that we should be limiting in our diets. According to the National Dietary Guidelines for Americans, everyone should aim to consume less than 2,300 milligrams (mg) of salt daily for better health. The American Heart Association recommends an even lower number — less than 1500 mg — to keep your blood pressure within a healthy range. For mos...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 31, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

People Who Order Coffee Black Are More Likely To Be Psychopaths
Dating someone new? Interviewing for a job? No matter your circumstances, it may be time to start paying attention to how the people around you order their coffee. A just-in-time-for-Halloween study published in the journal Appetite revealed that people who like their coffee black are more likely to posses anti-social and psychopathic personality traits.  [A moment for you to recall the people in your life who enjoy their coffee black.] The research, which comes from the University of Innsbruck in Austria, examined the taste preferences of about 1,000 people, finding those who preferred more bitter notes in ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 12, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Martian: Farming on Mars Is Not Science Fiction
In October 1982, I was close to achieving intellectual escape velocity. I had just been selected to receive a grant from NASA to study how to grow food to sustain astronauts on long-term space missions. This is not a trivial task. Thirty-three years later, my students and I are still tinkering with the inputs to the space farm. We have long been interested in the possibility of sustaining life away from Earth. Like Andy Weir's character, Mark Whatney, from The Martian, we calculate the mass and energy balances needed to maintain space colonies. The photo below shows radish and lettuce plants growing under light emitting d...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 2, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Topping Rose House
Last night my husband and I had the pleasure of dining at the Topping Rose House in Bridgehampton. We started with a delightful appetizer of pressed watermelon topped with crab--like a tropical sushi! I'd become a bit too smitten with their bread, so the staff was kind enough to let me order a second appetizer as my main course (with food waste at forty percent in the U.S. I think more farm to table establishments understand the changes happening in food culture): a lobster and vegetable ravioli. My favorite dish of the evening was the salted watermelon radishes with butter (photo). I loved the beauty of the radish as well...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The radish is linked to cardiovascular, urinary health, among other benefits
(NaturalNews) The warmer months are upon us, and so the craving for fresh, cooling foods becomes commonplace. A winter of roasted and toasty warm dishes gives way to the desire for lighter fare. If you are looking to add some tang and a burst of refreshing flavor to your spring and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Give Your Manhood A Sporting Chance
I went to a sporting goods store with my son last weekend and found it pretty much impossible to buy him a sports jersey that wouldn’t poison him with gender-bending chemicals. Almost everything these days is made of synthetic material or some new "techno" fiber that "wicks away moisture." It took me half an hour to find something made from real cotton. But here’s the problem… those hi-tech materials are full of nasty and dangerous chemicals. Too many popular sportswear brands, including Adidas and Nike, manufacture sportswear that contain chemicals linked to low-T, obesity, cancer an...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - June 8, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Dr. Al Sears Tags: Uncategorized Cancer estrogen testosterone Source Type: news

Michelle Obama Plants Vegetables With A Bunch Of Cute Kids In The White House Garden
Kids from around the country who participate in Let's Move programs joined first lady Michelle Obama to help plant the White House Kitchen Garden on Wednesday. Obama challenged community gardens across the nation to join them in planting the five vegetables they added: broccoli, spinach, bok choy, radishes and lettuce. The first lady also announced the launch of an interactive online map where Americans can find and get involved with Let's Move programs in their communities. Here are some photos from the event: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Great Herb Heist
For a long time, I’ve been warning you that the big box stores are being less than honest with you when it comes to supplements. In fact, it appears they want to rip you off. Investigators in New York State have discovered that the merchandising giants, riding high on the health-and-wellness wave, have been overcharging customers for cut-rate herbs, vitamins, minerals and other supplements. You may have read about it or heard it on the news. But it’s even worse than I previously thought. I started out warning you to stay away from synthetic multi-vitamins that require 400 times the recommended dose to do you an...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - March 11, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Dr. Al Sears Tags: Nutrition diet FDA herbs nutrients omega-3s supplements vitamins Source Type: news

Feed Your Inner Caveman
As an anti-aging specialist, I’ve spent a lot of time studying and treating osteoporosis among the many “older” patients who come to my wellness clinic. Many of them believe they must accept this painful and dangerous condition as an unavoidable part of aging. This means I also spent a lot of time debunking the osteoporosis propaganda put out by the medical establishment. I want them to learn about the natural ways they can keep their skeletons strong – at any age! Osteoporosis is a “silent” disease, because it gives no clue that you might have it until a slight bump or fall produces a n...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - February 11, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Dr. Al Sears Tags: Anti-Aging energy exercise protein Source Type: news

From A to Z, A Nerd's Guide To Herbal Tea
Stop right there: Before you reach for yet another cup of joe, consider the benefits of a nice cup of herbal tea. While it’s not quite tea by the proper definition -- traditional black, white and green teas are all derived from the Camellia sinensis plant, while herbal teas, or tisane, can be brewed with a wide variety of herbs and spices -- going herbal will add new flavor to your life. You can reap benefits for both your mind and your body by engaging in the centuries-old tradition of tea drinking. Since the world of herbal tea is so vast, we’ve partnered with Traditional Medicinals to put together an A-to-Z...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 29, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eat The Enemy: As Jellyfish Bloom, So Do Appetites Overseas
This story is part of "Eat The Enemy," a HuffPost series on edible invasive species, non-native plants and animals you can help contain from the comfort of your dinner table. Not all invasive species are edible, and some included in this series can be dangerous, including lionfish and wild boar. Please take caution when foraging or hunting for your own food. It's no secret that climate change is a problem for ocean dwellers. Coral reefs are suffering, mollusks are losing their skeletons and fish really don't like it hot. The seas are changing. Yet for one gelatinous creature, the deader the oceans get, the bet...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 18, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Eat The Enemy: As Jellyfish Bloom, So Do Appetites Overseas
This story is part of "Eat The Enemy," a HuffPost series on edible invasive species, non-native plants and animals you can help contain from the comfort of your dinner table. Not all invasive species are edible, and some included in this series can be dangerous, including lionfish and wild boar. Please take caution when foraging or hunting for your own food. It's no secret that climate change is a problem for ocean dwellers. Coral reefs are suffering, mollusks are losing their skeletons and fish really don't like it hot. The seas are changing. Yet for one gelatinous creature, the deader the oceans get, the bet...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 18, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vegetable Compound May Reduce Mesothelioma Treatment Side Effects
For a cancer as rare and difficult to treat as mesothelioma, innovative thinking is vital to making progress that helps survivors live longer and feel healthier. While experimental therapies for this disease have harnessed genetically modified viruses, leopard frog eggs and laser-activated drugs, innovation doesn’t always come from exotic sources. Sometimes treatment breakthroughs are hiding in plain sight. Take the veggies on your dinner plate, for example. A research team has reported an anti-cancer vegetable compound called PEITC could have interesting therapeutic benefits for pleural mesothelioma patients. The ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 9, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Joey Rosenberg Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

Drugs in the environment affect plant growth
By assessing the impacts of a range of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, research has shown that the growth of edible crops can be affected by these chemicals -- even at the very low concentrations found in the environment. The research focused its analysis on lettuce and radish plants and tested the effects of several commonly prescribed drugs, including diclofenac and ibuprofen. These drugs are among the most common and widely used group of pharmaceuticals, with more than 30 million prescribed across the world every day. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 5, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Vitamin N Deficiency Linked to ADHD
Approximately 11 percent of children ages 4 to 17 have been diagnosed with ADHD according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2011 statistics, accounting for 6.4 million cases nationwide. A majority are treated with stimulant medication often combined with behavioral therapy. For some, this approach is extremely helpful and leads to an improvement in quality of life and a reduction in risk taking behaviors often associated with ADHD. Not all cases, however, are successfully treated in this manner. Some will discontinue this approach due to its ineffectiveness or negative side effects leaving a void that still req...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 26, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How To Have A Paleo Thanksgiving
By Angela Haupt for U.S. News The pilgrims -- or the cavemen? On Thanksgiving, paleo dieters honor both. That means a holiday feast revolving around meat, fish, poultry, fruits and veggies -- with no refined sugar, dairy, legumes or grains. While that's problematic for Thanksgiving staples like bread stuffing, a few tweaks can save the turkey-filled day. "Almost any traditional Thanksgiving dish can be modified to become paleo," says registered nurse Katy Haldiman, health director of the Paleo Movement Magazine. Here are menu ideas for your paleo Thanksgiving. Appetizers Haldiman ticks off protein-heavy appetiz...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 23, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Well: Stir-Fries With a Touch of Thai
The list of ingredients for a stir-fry may look daunting, but the cooking time is less than 10 minutes, barely enough to heat up the kitchen. This week’s stir-fries abound in Thai flavorings, and there’s one that puts radish greens to good use. (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - July 18, 2014 Category: American Health Authors: By MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN Tags: Peas Food Cooking and Cookbooks Vegetables Coconuts Recipes medicine and health Recipes for Health Dieting and Weight Source Type: news

Well: Stir-Fries With a Touch of Thai
The list of ingredients for a stir-fry may look daunting, but the cooking time is less than 10 minutes, barely enough to heat up the kitchen. This week’s stir-fries abound in Thai flavorings, and there’s one that puts radish greens to good use. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 18, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: By MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN Tags: Peas Food Cooking and Cookbooks Vegetables Coconuts Recipes medicine and health Recipes for Health Dieting and Weight Source Type: news

7 Healthy Facts About Radishes
Though it's small in size, the earthy radish brings big flavor to the table. Try it in WebMD's Red Radish and Greens Salad recipe. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 26, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Recipes for Health: Shredded Beet and Radish Slaw With Rice Noodles
A salad that can stand alone, or make a great filling for spring rolls.     (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: By MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN Tags: Beets Recipes Medicine and Health Diet and Nutrition Source Type: news

Recipes for Health: Cucumber and Radish Salad With Yogurt and Cumin
Five dishes featuring cucumbers — a perfect food for hot end-of-summer days — inspired by cuisines around the globe.     (Source: NYT)
Source: NYT - August 30, 2013 Category: Nutrition Authors: By MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN Tags: Cooking and Cookbooks Recipes Cucumbers Medicine and Health Diet and Nutrition Source Type: news

Cruciferous Vegetables - Crammed With...
Cruciferous vegetables - broccoli, cauliflower, radishes, and several types of greens - are full of compounds that help prevent and fight cancer all through your body. Learn how these vegetables boost your health and why they are anticancer foods. (Source: About.com Breast Cancer)
Source: About.com Breast Cancer - June 10, 2013 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: breastcancer.guide at about.com Tags: health Source Type: news

Getting little ones to eat healthy
Having trouble getting your kids to eat spinach?  Here's some tips on how to "sneak" nutrition into your child's meals and get them involve with making healthy choices.          From the desk of Brittany Jimenez, RNBrittany Jimenez, RNAll Hands on Deck: Keep those little hands busy! While at the grocery store or farmer’s market let your child help to put fruits and veggies in the cart. Encourage them to pick out foods by colors and letters- turn shopping into a game! By being active participants at the store, you are also helping them to develop good e...
Source: Pediatric Health Associates - May 15, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Healthy Habits Source Type: news