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AstraZeneca recalls physician sample bottles of heart drug
AstraZeneca is voluntarily recalling one lot of physician sample bottles of Brilinta — a blood-thinning drug prescribed to prevent stroke, heart attack and other heart problems — as a precautionary measure. The London-based pharmaceutical company, which has its U.S. headquarters in Wilmington, said the voluntary recall follows a report that a professional sample bottle containi ng eight, 90 milligram tablets of Brilinta also contained another medicine, Zurampic tablets, also manufactured by AstraZeneca… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 26, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

Novel LDL-Lowering Tactic Validated,'Still a Lot of Work Ahead'Novel LDL-Lowering Tactic Validated,'Still a Lot of Work Ahead '
It's early days for them, but two genetics-inspired agents took different aims at the same metabolic pathway, and cut lipoprotein and triglyceride levels and reversed experimental atherosclerosis.Heartwire from Medscape (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

May 26 Cardiology News May 26 Cardiology News
MRI in patients with cardiac devices, statins in the elderly, deprescribing, CRT and radial artery catheterization are discussed in this week ’ s podcast.theheart.org on Medscape (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

FFR-CT Accuracy; TnT Assay'Sense and Sensitivity'; Chocolate Lessens Afib?
(MedPage Today) -- Cardiovascular Daily wraps up the top cardiology news of the week (Source: MedPage Today State Required CME)
Source: MedPage Today State Required CME - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Red Meat Tied to Higher Risk of Dying From Many Diseases Red Meat Tied to Higher Risk of Dying From Many Diseases
Eating more red meat is associated with an increased risk of dying from eight common diseases including cancer, diabetes and heart disease, as well as “ all other causes ” of death, according to a U.S. study.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Fitness trackers' calorie measurements are prone to error
Conclusion This study assessed how accurately seven fitness trackers are able to measure the heart rate and calories burned of individuals taking part in several different activities. The data was compared against clinically approved medical devices to test the accuracy of data obtained by the fitness trackers. It found that although all seven trackers were fairly accurate at measuring heart rate, there was a high level of error when measuring the number of calories burned. The researchers hope this study will help individuals and physicians be aware of potential errors when interpreting the measurements obtained by fitnes...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Daily statins reduces the risk of heart disease or stroke in the over 40s
TAKING statins daily reduces the risk of heart disease or stroke in the over 40s, according to new research. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Statins may improve heart structure, function
Study suggests that people who use statins are less likely to have a thickened heart muscle and an enlarged heart - both risk factors for heart disease. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Statins Source Type: news

Girl grabbed by sea lion is getting meds to avoid disease
The girl pulled in the harbor by a sea lion in a heart-stopping viral video is on antibiotics to avoid contracting a dangerous bacterial disease from the sea lion's mouth. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heart attack cure - THESE drugs can reduce your risk AND tackle high cholesterol
HEART attacks can be a symptom of heart disease. However, experts have now reveal statins, a group of medicines which are prescribed by GPs to lower the level of bad - or LDL - cholesterol in the blood, can also reduce risk. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kid With Heart Defect Blasts Off 'Into Outer Space' In Sweet Video
A 7-year-old in Georgia got the chance to live out his space dreams, with a little help from virtual reality and Make-A-Wish.  Zayden Wright of Augusta was born with congenital heart disease and has had four open-heart surgeries and 38 heart catheterizations in his short life. Throughout every ordeal, Zayden has maintained a cheerful attitude, vivid imagination and enthusiasm for all things outer space.  Make-A-Wish Georgia surprised the little boy with a “trip to space.” The organization partnered with Walk West to make his wish “to go to Saturn in a red rocket ship” possible through...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tea Consumption and Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease Tea Consumption and Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease
This large prospective study aimed to clarify the role of tea in the prevention of ischemic heart disease, as prior studies have shown conflicting results.Heart (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Statins ARE effective at preventing heart attacks
Researchers from Queen Mary University of London found statins reduce heart volume by 2.4 per cent and increase nitric oxide production, leading to reduce blood pressure. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heart protecting gene found in Greek villagers
Villagers in northern Crete have low cases of heart disease despite their fatty diet. Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute researchers found a new cardioprotective genetic variant. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Statins help improve heart function and structure, study finds
Researchers using MRI scans of participants found those taking the cholesterol medicines were less likely to have a thickened heart muscle (left ventricular hypertrophy)Statins not only lower cholesterol but can improve the structure and function of the heart, research has shown.People taking the drugs were less likely to have abnormally enlarged hearts, a sign of stress and weakness, scientists said.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Statins Medical research Heart attack Health Science Society & wellbeing Biology UK news Source Type: news

Why Greek mountain villagers have healthy hearts
A new genetic variant, common among villagers, appears to prevent them from suffering cardiovascular disease, says a study published inNature Communications.BBC News (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - May 26, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

‘Healthy’ Greeks protected from heart disease by unique gene, new study reveals
GREEKS live long and healthy lives despite eating lots of animal fats thanks to a unique gene that protects them against heart disease, reveals a new study. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Gender Gap in Cardiology Is Embarrassing The Gender Gap in Cardiology Is Embarrassing
A tweet about the dearth of women in interventional cardiology and electrophysiology fellowships prompted Dr Mandrola to ask his female cardiology colleagues what shaped their subspecialty choices.theheart.org on Medscape (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Expert Column Source Type: news

Diesel pollution increases your risk of heart damage
Researchers from Queen Mary University of London found that inhaling small particles in diesel fumes makes the heart enlarge, reducing its ability to pump blood around the body. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gluten Consumption in Non-Celiac Adults and Risk of CHD Gluten Consumption in Non-Celiac Adults and Risk of CHD
This study looked at the possible risks and benefits of a gluten-free diet as it relates to coronary heart disease.The BMJ (formerly known as the British Medical Journal) (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Scientists identify protein linked to chronic heart failure
(Rockefeller University Press) Researchers in Japan have identified a receptor protein on the surface of heart cells that promotes chronic heart failure. The study, 'Corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 exacerbates chronic cardiac dysfunction,' which will be published May 26 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that inhibiting this protein could help treat a disease that affects more than 20 million people worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 26, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers develop faster and cheaper cardiac imaging test for developing countries
(European Society of Cardiology) Researchers in the UK and Peru have developed a faster and cheaper cardiac imaging test that can be used in developing countries, according to the results of the INCA-Peru study presented today at EuroCMR 2017. The scan is three times faster, less than one-fifth of the cost, and changed clinical management in 33 percent of patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Diesel pollution linked to heart damage
(European Society of Cardiology) Diesel pollution is linked with heart damage, according to research presented today at EuroCMR 2017. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Statins associated with improved heart structure and function
(European Society of Cardiology) Statins are associated with improved heart structure and function, according to research presented today at EuroCMR 2017. The benefits were above and beyond the cholesterol lowering effect of statins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Isolated Greek villages reveal genetic secrets that protect against heart disease
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) A genetic variant that protects the heart against cardiovascular disease has been discovered by researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators. Reported today in Nature Communications, the cardioprotective variant was found in an isolated Greek population, who are known to live long and healthy lives despite having a diet rich in animal fat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Diabetic Kidney Better than Wait List in ESRD Patients (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Recipients had 9% lower risk of dying from any cause (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - May 26, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Remission Up for Mepolizumab in Eosinophilic Granulomatosis
Significantly more weeks of accrued remission for mepolizumab treatment versus placebo (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - May 26, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Pharmacy, Pulmonology, Rheumatology, Journal, Source Type: news

American Thoracic Society, May 19 - 24
(Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - May 26, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Critical Care, Pulmonology, Conference, Source Type: news

New Interactive Module Aims to Clarify Professional Boundaries
Module focuses on potential boundary violations relating to treating family, colleagues, receiving gifts (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - May 26, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Cardiology, Dermatology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, ENT, Pathology Source Type: news

CONFIRMED: Omega-3s boost blood flow to regions of the brain responsible for learning and memory
(Natural News) It’s no secret that omega-3s are good for the heart and also help in preventing cancer, but a new study recently confirmed that the fatty acids are also good for brain health, boosting blood flow in the brain and potentially protecting it from dementia, particularly Alzheimer’s. The study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lipid rescue therapy for local anesthetic toxicity: is less more
DISCUSSION: Most of the “adverse events” associated with lipid rescue therapy have occurred after administration of relatively high doses. Although there have been no good studies demonstrating the maximum “safe” dose of intralipid for lipid rescue therapy, many authors recommended limiting the dose to that recommended by the FDA for nutritional support: 12.5 mL/kg (lean body mass) per day total. In specific cases it may be reasonable to consider extending the infusion beyond this, but such situations are likely rare. In this patient, who did not appear to have cardiovascular instability, it is...
Source: The Poison Review - May 25, 2017 Category: Toxicology Authors: Leon Gussow Tags: Medical adverse event intralipid lipid rescue therapy local anesthetic toxicity mepivacaine Source Type: news

Red meat tied to higher risk of dying from many diseases
Eating more red meat is associated with an increased risk of dying from eight common diseases including cancer, diabetes and heart disease, as well as “all other causes” of death, according to a recent U.S. study. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Two studies show the use of consumer wearables is increasing in clinical research, but limitations in accuracy still exist
The proliferation and ever-increasing sophistication of wearable activity trackers makes clear that we have come a long way from analog pedometers and clunky heart rate monitors, but new research suggests those metrics may be the only ones modern wearables can accurately track. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - May 25, 2017 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Dad's Shares Safety Warning For Parents Whose Kids Play Baseball
A Pennsylvania dad’s viral Facebook post is spreading a safety message for parents of young baseball players.  On May 16, John Curtin posted a photo of his son’s Under Armour heart guard shirt ― a special garment designed to protect athletes from potentially deadly blows to the chest.  “For all you parents that have children that pitch, do me a favor and run out and buy a heart guard shirt for your child,” Curtin wrote in the caption. “My 11 year old Ryan wears one, and it literally might have saved his life today.” The dad described his son’s scary ordeal.  &...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UTI, Chronic HTN Ups Stroke Risk in Women with Preeclampsia (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Majority of strokes occur in postpartum period (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - May 25, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

New Cholesterol Fighting Meds Target Key Gene
Two trials show promise for non-statin approach to heart health Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Cholesterol, Genes and Gene Therapy, Medicines (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - May 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Studies Defy Taboo of MR Imaging of Abandoned Cardiac Leads Studies Defy Taboo of MR Imaging of Abandoned Cardiac Leads
"Sites need to start disclosing that they're doing it, so we can have more useful discussions with our patients about what the risk is based on numbers of patients and data," said a lead author.Heartwire from Medscape (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for May 25, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. Artificial pancreas: These companies are racing to make one Medical device companies are close to achieving the holy grail of diabetes treatment: a combined glucose sensor, control algorithm and insulin infusion device that eff...
Source: Mass Device - May 25, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Less than 6 hours of sleep could raise serious risk
Cardiologist Dr. Tara Narula discusses how this can impact more than a third of the U.S. adult population (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - May 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fitness Trackers Reliable for Heart Rate, Not Calories Fitness Trackers Reliable for Heart Rate, Not Calories
Although the majority of devices tested had error rates below 5% for measuring heart rate, their estimates of energy expenditure were off the mark by much more, a Stanford study has found.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Internal Medicine News Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence accurately predicts stroke risk
[Image from unsplash.com]Machine-learning algorithms, a form of artificial intelligence, accurately predicted people’s risk of heart disease and stroke, according to new research from the University of Nottingham. Researchers and computer scientists compared the risk guidelines for heart disease and stroke from the American College of Cardiology with 4 machine-learning algorithms to analyze the risk of a patient having each. The results showed that the artificially intelligent algorithms were significantly more accurate at predicting cardiovascular disease than the regular medical models. Get the full story on our si...
Source: Mass Device - May 25, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Cardiovascular Research & Development AI artificial intelligence cardiovascular disease heart disease machine learning algorithms Stroke University of Nottingham Source Type: news

The Candid, Honest Reasons These Women Called Off Their Engagements
K.J., a single mom, had been in a relationship with Ben for three years before deciding that enough was enough: He didn’t seem to want to move in together, let alone get married. “With a broken heart, I went to break it off with him, and in a panic, he asked me to marry him,” she told HuffPost. “Our engagement was more stressful than ecstatic.”  In the end, the engagement didn’t pan out. But she’s not alone; many women and men call off relationships with people they they seriously considered marrying.  A common reason is fear of commitment, according to Elisabeth LaM...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Caring for the female athlete: A guide for athletes, parents and coaches
Since the passage of Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972, the number of girls competing in high school sports has increased from 295,000 to nearly 3.2 million, and more women are playing collegiate sports than ever before. As these numbers continue to rise, and girls and young women become more empowered through sports, awareness of the health issues specific to female athletes has become increasingly important. Dr. Kathryn Ackerman, medical director of Boston Children’s Female Athlete Program, and the program’s sports dietitian, Laura Moretti, share need-to-know information and offer str...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 25, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Ask the Expert Female Athlete Program Kathryn Ackerman Laura Moretti Source Type: news

Path to Empathy Deemed As Vital As Being Empathetic
Conclusion could be especially useful in context of medical professions, researcher says (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - May 25, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Dermatology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Nursing, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, ENT, Source Type: news

5 Ways We Can Begin Taking Preventative Measures Today To Improve Brain Fitness
This study was one of the catalysts for other researchers to begin exploring just how malleable the brain truly is, and how brain performance can be improved through deliberate practice. Combine these two categories of brain health—diagnosable diseases and “brain fitness”—and suddenly a new conversation has risen: can neuroplasticity-based brain training and related research-to-practice innovation actually impact mental health, help improve people’s lives, and finally, have a significant impact on the associated economic issues. BrainFutures thinks so. BrainFutures 2017, a conference set for ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Good Outcomes After TAVR for Failed Surgical Bioprostheses Good Outcomes After TAVR for Failed Surgical Bioprostheses
Patients who undergo transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for failed surgical bioprostheses have good 1-year outcomes with low mortality rates, according to results from the CoreValve US Expanded Use Study.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - May 25, 2017 Category: Surgery Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

PTSD Tied to Cardiac Inflammation
(MedPage Today) -- PTSD patients may be at higher risk of cardiovascular events (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - May 25, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Changing the Face of Cardiovascular Medicine Changing the Face of Cardiovascular Medicine
Dr Harrington leads a roundtable discussion on how to attract women and minorities to the practice of cardiology so the physician makeup can better reflect the patient makeup.theheart.org on Medscape (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Commentary Source Type: news

Ultrasound-drug combo treats pulmonary embolism in less time with fewer drugs
When venous clots break off and travel through a patient’s circulatory system, they can become trapped in the lung and block blood flow. This strains the heart’s ability to pump blood through the lungs and can ultimately lead to heart failure. Traditionally, patients with pulmonary embolisms are treated overnight with systemic infusions of tissue plasminogen activator. But, according to Dr. Victor Tapson at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, large doses of tPA are associated with side effects including intracranial bleeding and smaller doses can be safer and just as effective as the larger, c...
Source: Mass Device - May 25, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Clinical Trials Drug-Device Combinations Pharmaceuticals Vascular Wall Street Beat BTG Source Type: news

Democratic congressman has heart valve replacement procedure
The top Democrat on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee has undergone a heart procedure and will remain hospitalized for a few days (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - May 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news