GLP-1 Agonists in Adolescents and Young Adults; Benefits of Cancer Drug Trials
(MedPage Today) -- TTHealthWatch is a weekly podcast from Texas Tech. In it, Elizabeth Tracey, director of electronic media for Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore, and Rick Lange, MD, president of the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center... (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - May 25, 2024 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

The N.C.A.A. Agreed to Pay Players. It Won ’t Call Them Employees
The immediate takeaway from the landmark $2.8 billion settlement that the N.C.A.A. and the major athletic conferences accepted on Thursday was that it cut straight at the heart of the organization’s cherished model of amateurism: Schools can now pay their athletes directly. But another bedrock…#ncaa #johnijenkins (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 25, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Semaglutide Significantly Improves Chronic Kidney Disease Semaglutide Significantly Improves Chronic Kidney Disease
The landmark FLOW study shows the benefits extend to kidney, cardiovascular, and mortality outcomes in high-risk patients with type 2 diabetes and CKD.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 25, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nephrology News Source Type: news

Tribes say their future is at stake as they push for Congress to consider Colorado River plan
Within the heart of the Navajo Nation and in the shadow of the sandstone arch that is the namesake of the tribal capitol, a simple greeting and big smiles were shared over and over again Friday as tribal officials gathered: “Yá‘át’ééh abíní!” It was a good morning indeed for Navajo President Buu…#navajonation #buunygren #windowrock #arizona #coloradoriver #nativeamerican #hopi #newmexico #utah #navajocouncil (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 24, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Europe’s crackdown on air pollution found to cut heart disease deaths
Fatalities increasing in many parts of world less successful in reducing dangerous pollutants, says research (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - May 24, 2024 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New Dutch right-wing coalition to cut research, innovation, and environmental protections
The far right’s stunning victory in the Netherlands’s parliamentary elections last fall will upset far more than the country’s immigration policies. An agreement by the four parties aiming to form a new government, presented on 16 May and debated in the House of Representatives on 22 May, also calls for cuts in science and innovation funding, rollbacks of environment and climate policies, and restrictions on the influx of foreign students. Scientists and their advocates are dismayed. “As a country we’re falling further behind if we implement these cuts,” Marcel Levi, chair of a broad group of institutes a...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 24, 2024 Category: Science Source Type: news

May 24 2024 This Week in Cardiology May 24 2024 This Week in Cardiology
Clues in SCAF, a DOAC antidote trial, another negative lytic trial in stroke, JAMA changes to observational studies, and BP in stroke care are the topics John Mandrola, MD, covers in this week ’s podcast.theheart.org on Medscape (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 24, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Commentary Source Type: news

Japan startup to seek approval for iPS cell therapy in global first
TOKYO -- A Japanese startup is poised to become the first in the world to seek government approval for a therapy derived from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, Nikkei has learned, with a less invasive alternative for treating heart disease. Osaka University-affiliated Cuorips has…#tokyo #osakauniversity #ministryofhealth #welfare (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 24, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Coinbase Slugs It Out With U.S. SEC in Effort to Get Key Crypto Question Answered
The exchange filed another response in court in its ongoing request to appeal a single legal point at the heart of the industry's dispute with the Securities and Exchange Commission.#coinbaseslugs #effort (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 24, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Doctor-designed food prescriptions could help patients cut medical costs for hypertension and cancer
Some doctors are offering their patients tailored nutrition plans, or prescribing specific heart-healthy foods to curb chronic illness. Getty Images; Alyssa Powell/BI Doctors' custom food prescriptions featuring beans and greens are helping patients prevent illness. A doctor said healthy food…#alyssapowell #healthcare #dextershurney #foodsmart #mayagarcia #shurney #beans #cruciferous (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 24, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is omega-3 oil good or bad for us – and does it matter where it is from?
Research shows fish oil may increase risk of people developing a heart condition or strokeOmega-3 oils, typically found in oily fish and fish oil supplements, are often said to have numerous health benefits, such as reducing the risk of heart attacks, dementia and joint pain.But recentresearch published in the journal BMJ Medicine shows that while fish oil supplements could reduce the risk for those who already have cardiovascular disease, they mayincrease the risk of someone developing a heart condition or stroke in the first place.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 24, 2024 Category: Science Authors: Anna Bawden and Nicola Davis Tags: Fish oil Heart disease Health & wellbeing Medical research Food UK news World news Source Type: news

Ozempic Protects Kidneys, Boosts Survival in Diabetes Patients With CKD
(MedPage Today) -- For people with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD), semaglutide (Ozempic) reduced the risk of major kidney events and death from cardiovascular causes, the phase III FLOW trial showed. Added to usual care, the... (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - May 24, 2024 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

I Hate Summer —and You Should Too
Wake me when it’s over—summer, that is. I know, I know, you just love it: the long days, the warm evenings, the trips to the beach, the afternoons at the ballpark when your favorite team is playing and the pennant race is tightening—and the temperature is skyrocketing, and your skin is blistering, and the beer is $6, and the drive home will be in 88° heat, which is fine if you don’t mind running the air conditioner, except that you’re burning through $4–a-gallon gas, because it’s summer-driving season and the giant oil companies didn’t get to be the giant oil companies wi...
Source: TIME: Health - May 24, 2024 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Evergreen healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Injury to a cardiopulmonary resuscitation provider by sternal wire - Ohkawa M, Tsuchiya A, Morita S, Nakagawa Y.
BACKGROUND: Median sternotomy is a common surgical procedure during cardiac and pulmonary surgeries. There are many reports of patient injury associated with wire breakage. However, there are only a few reports of healthcare worker injuries by sternal wire... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 24, 2024 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Women more prone to LV shear stiffness as they age, MRE reveals
MR elastography (MRE) reveals that women more prone to left ventricular (LV) shear stiffness in the heart as they age, researchers have reported. The findings are good news for patient care, as MRE is a noninvasive way of measuring the condition, a team led by Arvin Arani, PhD, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, reported. Study results were published May 23 in Radiology: Cardiothoracic Imaging. "Elevated myocardial stiffness causes poor function and restrictive diastolic filling that can lead to heart failure, even with a normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)," the group noted. However, the invasiveness of e...
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - May 24, 2024 Category: Radiology Authors: Kate Madden Yee Tags: MRI Cardiovascular Radiology Source Type: news