Low-Carb Diets Linked to Higher All-Cause Mortality Low-Carb Diets Linked to Higher All-Cause Mortality
A low-carb diet was associated with earlier death from any cause, heart disease, and cancer in an observational study and meta-analysis, but one expert urges caution when interpreting the finding.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Could a wrinkled forehead mean you have hidden heart disease?
From a limp handshake to wobbly teeth, PAT HAGAN reveals the vital early clues that could save your life. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Statins use ‘of doubtful benefit’
THERE is no evidence that high levels of “bad” cholesterol cause heart disease and the widespread use of statins is “of doubtful benefit”, according to a study by 17 international physicians. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Should Healthy Seniors Take Aspirin Daily? New Study Raises Questions
In this study, 70 and older, no benefit at all and potentially some harm,” Agus said. “In age 50, there’s a clear benefit in people who have high risk for heart disease that’s greater than 10 percent chance, and there’s a benefit on cancer, particularly colon cancer, in that study. In age 60 and above, it’s really the decision of the doctor and the patient together.” According to Agus, the big takeaway from the study is to not start taking aspirin in your 70s if you aren’t already on it. “This is an important study and a well-done study and it means if you haven’t...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News aspirin Local TV Source Type: news

Study Doubts Worth of Daily Aspirin for Seniors
Daily aspirin is recommended for people between 50 and 69 if they are at increased risk of heart disease, according to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a guideline-setting expert panel. However, there's not been enough medical evidence to say whether aspirin would help elderly folks, the USPSTF says. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - September 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'No evidence' having high levels of bad cholesterol causes heart disease
High levels of LDL-C, known as bad cholesterol, has been considered a major cause of heart disease - the world's leading killer - for at least 50 years. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

News For Healthy, Older Patients: Toss Your Baby Aspirin
A study found that an enteric-coated, aspirin that is similar to the dose of a baby aspirin increased the risk of death, did not reduce the risk of heart disease or disability or dementia or cancer (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - September 17, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Harlan Krumholz, Contributor Source Type: news

3D-printed device aids knee replacement surgery
How might 3D-printed knee jigs help improve the quality of total knee replacement...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: 3D-printed hips may improve complex fracture diagnosis 3D-printed breast phantoms help refine mammography Study: 3D-printed mandibles may reduce OR time 3D printing bolsters care for congenital heart disease Flexible 3D-printed heart replicates size, texture (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 17, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

UA study: Sleep apnea, congenital heart disease may be deadly mix for hospitalized infants
(University of Arizona Health Sciences) Infants with congenital heart disease and central sleep apnea are four times more likely to die in the hospital, researchers find. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flawed research leads bad medicine, claims Doctor
THE almost four-decade campaign to lower cholesterol through diet and drugs has failed to curb heart disease because the fundamental hypothesis was fatally flawed. Quoting one of the founding fathers of the evidence-based medicine movement in my keynote lecture at the UK ’s first lifestyle medicine conference, Michael Shaeffer I told the 250 GP’s gathered that “half of what you learn in medical school will turn out to be either outdated or wrong within five years of your graduation – the trouble is no one can tell you which half so you have to learn to learn on your own”. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Daily aspirin unlikely to help healthy older people live longer, study finds
Researchers say drug has little benefit when taken by healthy people aged over 70Millions of healthy people who take aspirin to ward off illness in old age are unlikely to benefit from the drug, a trial has found.While a daily dose of the blood-thinning medicine can protect older people who have previously experienced heart attacks, strokes and angina, researchers found the drug did not extend the lifespan of healthy people over the age of 70.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Aspirin Health Science Heart disease Heart attack Stroke Older people World news Source Type: news

Where a Sore Throat Becomes a Death Sentence
Once a year, doctors travel to Rwanda to perform lifesaving surgery on people with damaged heart valves — a disease caused by untreated strep throat. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DENISE GRADY Tags: Heart Strep Throat Rheumatic Fever rheumatic heart disease heart valves heart surgery Team Heart Cecilia Patton-Bolman Dr. R. Morton Bolman III Dr. Joseph Mucumbitsi Rwanda Kigali (Rwanda) Source Type: news

A Boy Named Chance in a Land Without Heart Surgeons
I went to Kigali in Rwanda to report on the type of heart disease afflicting Chance and millions of other young people. I was supposed to be a fly on the wall. Before I knew it, I was trying to help. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DENISE GRADY Tags: Heart Strep Throat Rwanda Kigali (Rwanda) Source Type: news

Timing is everything: How body-clock medicine tackles age-old diseases
Discoveries about what makes our internal clocks tick could create new treatments for conditions like epilepsy, diabetes and heart disease. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - September 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

You CAN indulge in beer, wine and chocolate and still live a long life!
Researcher from Warsaw University found that when eaten alongside plenty of fruits and veg, the three treats reduce a person's risk of dying from heart disease by 20 per cent and cancer by 13 per cent. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Paying People To Lower Their Cholesterol Works But Is It Cost-Effective?
Offering financial rewards to patients who lower their bad cholesterol by adhering to statin regimens could help prevent heart disease, but there are lingering questions about whether such a strategy is worth the added healthcare costs. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - September 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Arlene Weintraub, Contributor Source Type: news

AHA: 5 Reasons You Could Develop Heart Disease Before 50
FRIDAY, Sept. 14, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, yet people generally associate it with an older, aging population. But heart attacks, strokes and other types of heart disease... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 14, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

AHA: More Work Needed to Curb Smoking Among Certain Groups
THURSDAY, Sept. 13, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Melvin Stubbs knows smoking cigarettes could give him heart disease, lung cancer or kill him. He said his habit hurts his wife and parents, who often urge him to quit. " That's one thing I... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

To Help Beat Heart Disease, Stay Upbeat
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - September 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Cardiology, Family Medicine, Neurology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, News, Source Type: news

Scientists Are Developing New Ways to Treat Disease With Cells, Not Drugs
When Nichelle Obar learned she was pregnant with her second child last year, she never expected that her pregnancy, or her baby, would make history. But when the 40-year-old food-and-beverage coordinator from Hawaii and her fiancé Christopher Constantino went to their 18-week ultrasound, they learned something was wrong. The heart was larger than it should have been, and there was evidence that fluid was starting to build up around the organ as well. Both were signs that the fetus was working extra hard to pump blood to its fast-growing body and that its heart was starting to fail. Obar’s doctor knew what coul...
Source: TIME: Science - September 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized medicine Source Type: news

To Help Beat Heart Disease, Stay Upbeat
THURSDAY, Sept. 13, 2018 -- Optimism and a sense of purpose can improve your heart health, new research suggests. Psychological well-being has cardiovascular benefits because people with a positive outlook are more inclined to lead a healthy... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 13, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

To Help Beat Heart Disease, Stay Upbeat
Title: To Help Beat Heart Disease, Stay UpbeatCategory: Health NewsCreated: 9/13/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 9/13/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - September 13, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Building a safer heart pump
(Penn State) Blood pumps are increasingly a bridge-to-transplant for patients with end-stage heart disease or heart failure, but blood clots and strokes can put patients in peril before they receive a donor heart. Now a four-year, $3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health may solve this problem and perhaps open the pumps' use for less-sick patients who could benefit from them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Recent intense activity in teens linked to healthier metabolic profile
Never too late to benefit from physical activity, but we must remove barriers to keeping it up Related items fromOnMedica Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 Diabetes risk lower with high intake of fruit and veg Apply different obesity criteria to BME patients More Scottish GPs needed to fight heart disease Sugar not saturated fat is the major issue for CVD (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 13, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Anthocyanins, abundantly found in berries, treat insulin resistance while managing cholesterol levels
(Natural News) Two of the biggest, most common health problems people face as they age are diabetes and heart disease. Although their mechanisms are different, scientists have discovered that one natural compound found in food can be helpful in both conditions. Anthocyanins are a type of antioxidant that have been linked to several impressive health... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cancer Will Kill Nearly 10 Million People This Year, Report Estimates
(CNN) — The number of people around the world who have cancer is “rapidly growing,” with 18.1 million new cases and 9.6 million deaths in 2018 alone, researchers estimate in a new report. By the end of the century, cancer will be the No. 1 killer globally and the single biggest barrier to increasing our life expectancy, according to the report, released Wednesday by the World’s Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer. Cancer by the numbers The researchers used data from 185 countries, looking at all the places in the body cancer can occur and taking a deeper look at 3...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Cancer Local TV Source Type: news

New Research Shows Eating More Dairy Lowers Your Risk Of Heart Disease
BOSTON (CBS) – A new study in the Lancet finds that milk really does a body good. Researchers found that eating more dairy is associated with a lower risk of heart disease, including whole-fat dairy foods like whole milk and full fat yogurt. Researchers surveyed more than 130,000 people in 21 countries over about nine years. They found that compared to people who don’t eat dairy, those who consume up to three servings a day have a lower risk of heart disease, stroke, and premature death from cardiovascular disease. Most experts recommend people get 2-4 servings a day of low or non-fat dairy, saying whole fat da...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Watch Listen Dairy Dr. Mallika Marshall Milk Source Type: news

It’s a moo-turn as experts say whole-fat dairy cuts heart risk
A DAILY glass of milk, a pot of yogurt old advice and knob of butter lowers the risk of heart disease and helps people live longer, experts said yesterday. Three servings of dairy a day, including whole fats such as milk, cheese, butter and cream, is associated with lower rates of heart disease and stroke, a study found. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Glass of milk, a cup of yogurt and a pad of butter could lower your risk of heart disease
A new study from McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, has found that eating three servings of dairy a day makes you two times less likely to suffer a stroke or from heart disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Even High-Fat Dairy Might Be Good for You
The study couldn't prove cause-and-effect, but folks who ate three servings of dairy per day had an overall lower risk of death during the study period than people who ate no dairy. They also had a lower risk of stroke and death from heart disease, researchers found. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - September 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: Are women with hot flashes at risk of sleep apnea?
Menopausal symptoms can be annoying, but did you ever think they could be life-threatening??A Mayo Clinic study found some common menopausal symptoms may be linked to obstructive sleep apnea?? a condition that can lead to serious health issues, including increased risks of?coronary heart disease,?high blood pressure?and?stroke. https://youtu.be/u2RENZT0Pzk Watch: The Mayo Clinic Minute Journalists: Broadcast-quality video [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - September 12, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Why Whole-Fat Milk and Yogurt Are Healthier Than You Think
For years, experts have recommended low-fat dairy products over the full-fat versions, which are higher in calories and contain more saturated fat. Recent research, however, indicates that full-fat dairy may actually be healthier than its reputation suggests, and that people who eat full-fat dairy are not more likely to develop cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes than people who consume low-fat dairy. They may even be less likely to gain weight. Now, new research published Tuesday in The Lancet, adds to that body of evidence. The research suggests that eating dairy products of all kinds is associated with a lower ri...
Source: TIME: Health - September 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Newborns with congenital heart disease have enlarged kidneys
(Springer) The hearts and brains of babies born with congenital heart disease are not the only organs affected by this common medical condition. Surprisingly, their kidneys tend to be enlarged at birth, says Gemma Scholes of the University of Melbourne in Australia, who is lead author of a study in the Springer Nature-branded journal Pediatric Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Changes in mitochondrial DNA control how nuclear DNA mutations are expressed in cardiomyopathy
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Differences in the DNA within the mitochondria, the energy-producing structures within cells, can determine the severity and progression of heart disease caused by a nuclear DNA mutation. When combined with a mutation in nuclear DNA in animals, one mitochondrial DNA variant greatly worsened heart disease, while a different variant had a protective effect. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Psychological well-being linked to better cardiovascular outcomes
Doctors should have patient-centred discussions on how to promote psychological well-being Related items fromOnMedica GPs defend practice on prescribing statins Health professionals vary hugely in disability assessments GPs should advise exercise for patients with chronic disease Genetic tendency to obesity no barrier to weight management More Scottish GPs needed to fight heart disease (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 11, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

The blood test that tells you if you're a night owl or a morning lark
Northwestern scientists have identified a link between 'circadian misalignment' and diabetes, depression, obesity, heart disease and asthma. In doing so, they developed a blood test. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women are a FIFTH more likely to die after routine surgery for coronary heart disease
EXCLUSIVE Researchers from Keele University analysed 6.6 million patients over 10 years and found women who have a percutaneous coronary intervention are more at risk than men. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heart disease blood test that's 98% accurate
The test takes 15mins and can be performed by a GP, with results available to patients within three days - so they no longer face an agonising wait to be referred to a specialist clinic for scans. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health Tip: Reduce Your Risk of Heart Disease
-- Heart disease is the leading cause of death among women in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. About one in four women is predicted to die from heart disease, the agency laments. As women age, their risk rises.... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 10, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Health Tip: Reduce Your Risk of Heart Disease
Title: Health Tip: Reduce Your Risk of Heart DiseaseCategory: Health NewsCreated: 9/10/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 9/10/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - September 10, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

' A Ticking Time Bomb for Heart Disease': What We Heard This Week
(MedPage Today) -- Quotable quotes from MedPage Today's sources (Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology)
Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology - September 7, 2018 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

Top scientists claim transfusions of young blood will put an END to sickness in old age
Publishing data in the journal Nature, Dame Linda Partridge, a UCL geneticist, says young blood could allow humans to live a life free of cancer, dementia and heart disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Harmless' virus carried by half of adults increases a person's risk of heart disease by a fifth  
Researchers from  Brighton and Sussex Medical School found that a person is at risk if they carry the CMV virus, which is a cousin of herpes and spreads via contact or bodily fluids. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pharmacists play vital role in improving patient health shows biggest review of evidence to date
Pharmacists serving non-hospitalised patients, such as in general practices and community pharmacies, may achieve improvements in patient health outcomes according to the most comprehensive systematic review of the scientific evidence to date.This press release originally was posted on the University of Bath website.A team of researchers led by Professor Margaret Watson from the University of Bath, working with Cochrane, NHS Education Scotland, and the Universities of Aberdeen, Brunel, California and Nottingham Trent, reviewed 116 scientific trials involving more than 40,000 patients. They compared pharmacist interventions...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - September 7, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

'Harmless' virus carried by half of adults increases a person's risk of heart disease by a fifth  
Researchers from  Brighton and Sussex Medical School found that a person is at risk if they carry the CMV virus, which is a cousin of herpes and spreads via contact or bodily fluids. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AHA: Nicotine Patch Safe for Smokers Hospitalized With Heart Trouble
FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Nicotine replacement therapy appears to be a safe option for smokers hospitalized for heart disease, even for critically ill patients on their first day, according to a new study. Researchers... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Greater CAD Incidence, Heart Mass in Firefighter Cardiac Arrests
FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 -- Most cardiac fatalities among firefighters have evidence of coronary heart disease and increased heart mass, according to a study published online Sept. 5 in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Denise L. Smith,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - September 7, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Evidence does not back primary CVD prevention with statins
Evidence does not support the widespread use of statins in healthy older people to prevent heart disease and stroke, according to the authors of a new Spanish study. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - September 7, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news