Best supplements for the heart: Lower cholesterol with three essential supplements
BEST SUPPLEMENTS: The leading cause of heart attacks is coronary heart disease, which is caused by having too much cholesterol in the blood. Keep cholesterol levels low and keep the heart healthy with three essential supplements. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

5 ways to protect yourself from heart disease during American Heart Month
Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - February 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Growing evidence linking violence, trauma to heart disease - Kuehn BM.
[Abstract unavailable] Language: en... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Guys, Can You Give Us 40? It May Show Heart Health
Men in their 40s who can do more than 40 push-ups at a time have a 96 percent reduced risk of heart attack, stroke and heart disease compared with men who did 10 or fewer. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Drowsy From Sleep Apnea? Watch for Heart Disease
(MedPage Today) -- Study unpacks associations between specific OSA symptoms and cardiovascular risks (Source: MedPage Today Neurology)
Source: MedPage Today Neurology - February 15, 2019 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Diet drinks linked to a higher risk of stroke after the menopause
A large, long-term study of postmenopausal women has linked higher consumption of diet drinks to a raised risk of stroke, heart disease, and death. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Push-up capacity may predict men's heart disease risk
(Reuters Health) - The number of push-ups a man can do in the doctor's office may be a good predictor of his risk of developing heart disease in the coming years, new research suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Women face a health risk from just TWO diet drinks a day
AS FEW as two diet drinks a day increase a woman's risk of stroke, heart disease and an early death, research suggests. And experts admitted they did not know which artificial sweeteners may be bad for health and which may be harmless. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Men who can do over 40 push-ups are at a 96% lower risk of heart disease, study finds
Instead of long, arduous treadmill tests for heart health, doctors at Harvard University are now recommending push-ups, as doing over 10 indicates a young man's heart is relatively healthy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Money troubles tied to higher risk of heart disease for African-Americans
(Reuters Health) - African-American adults who often struggle to pay bills may be more than twice as likely to develop heart disease than their counterparts who don't have much financial stress, a U.S. study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Artificially Sweetened Drinks Linked to Stroke After Menopause
FRIDAY, Feb. 15, 2019 -- Among postmenopausal women, consumption of artificially sweetened beverages (ASB) is associated with an increased risk for stroke, coronary heart disease, and all-cause mortality, according to a study published online Feb.... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 15, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

CVIA special issue on stable ischemic heart disease
(Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications) The journal Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA) has just published a new issue, Volume 3 Issue 3. This is a Special Issue on Stable Ischemic Heart Disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Know your heart health risk stats as well as your PIN number, public urged
Alliance of 40 health bodies set to ramp up efforts to cut cardiovascular disease and dementia rates in England Related items fromOnMedica Women less likely than men to achieve CHD targets NHS Health Check waste of time and money, says study First national joint awareness campaign on lung and heart disease launched Telling GPs which patients haven ’t had CRC screening improves uptake Diabetes, stroke and heart attack cut life expectancy (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 15, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Diet Sodas and Juices Are Linked to Higher Stroke Risk, Study Says
Diet drinks may seem like healthier options than sugary sodas and fruit drinks, but studies haven’t all backed up their health benefits. In the latest look at the popular beverages, researchers found that older women who drank more diet drinks had a higher risk of stroke and heart disease, as well as a higher risk of dying early from any cause, compared to women who drank fewer of the drinks. In a study published in the journal Stroke, researchers studied data from more than 81,000 post-menopausal women enrolled in the large population-based Women’s Health Initiative. Three years into the study, the women answe...
Source: TIME: Health - February 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Heart Disease Source Type: news

Diet Beverages Linked To Increased Stroke Risk & Heart Attacks
This study, as well as other research on the connection between diet beverages and vascular disease, is observational and cannot show cause and effect. That’s a major limitation, researchers say, as it’s impossible to determine whether the association is due to a specific artificial sweetener, a type of beverage or another hidden health issue. “Postmenopausal women tend to have higher risk for vascular disease because they are lacking the protective effects of natural hormones,” North Carolina cardiologist Dr. Kevin Campbell said, which could contribute to increased risk for heart disease and stroke...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Heart Attack Stroke Source Type: news

Diet Drinks Linked To Increased Stroke Risk & Heart Attacks
This study, as well as other research on the connection between diet beverages and vascular disease, is observational and cannot show cause and effect. That’s a major limitation, researchers say, as it’s impossible to determine whether the association is due to a specific artificial sweetener, a type of beverage or another hidden health issue. “Postmenopausal women tend to have higher risk for vascular disease because they are lacking the protective effects of natural hormones,” North Carolina cardiologist Dr. Kevin Campbell said, which could contribute to increased risk for heart disease and stroke...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Heart Attack Stroke Source Type: news

Novel software offers possible reduction in arrhythmic heart disease
(University of Birmingham) Potentially lethal heart conditions may become easier to spot and may lead to improvements in prevention and treatment thanks to innovative new software that measures electrical activity in the organ. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Use of clinical apps significantly improves quality of cardiovascular care
(American College of Cardiology) A pilot program using several clinical decision support tools in the outpatient setting to treat and educate stable ischemic heart disease patients has shown success in improving angina in these patients. Findings from the Florida Cardiovascular Quality Network study were presented at the American College of Cardiology's Cardiovascular Summit in Orlando. The conference brings together top experts to discuss and review innovative, relevant cardiovascular management and leadership strategies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

French pine bark, gotu kola combo prevents the buildup of deadly heart plaque by 95%
(Natural News) Around 610,000 people in the United States die every year due to heart disease, making it the leading cause of death for both men and women in our country. Coronary artery disease, the most common type of heart disease, is caused by atherosclerosis or the buildup of plaque in the arteries. According to a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Getting too little sleep raises heart disease risks by letting plaques build in blood vessels
A new study from Massachusetts General Hospital has found that not getting enough sleep raises levels of two types of white blood cells that build blockages in blood vessels. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Radiation therapy gets boost in Guatemala
U.S. and Guatemalan healthcare institutions are collaborating to bring radiation...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Cancer rates rising in lower-income countries Breast cancer on rise in low-income countries Breast cancer risk profiles differ in developing nations Air pollution tied to lung cancer, heart disease WHITIA scores win with Guatemala digital x-ray install (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 13, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Heart attack tied to edible marijuana is a warning to doctors
(Reuters Health) - As medical and recreational marijuana becomes legal in more and more places, experts worry there isn't enough science on the risks and benefits of the drug, especially for patients with heart disease. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Study helps solve mystery of how sleep protects against heart disease
. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 13, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Does PTSD Really Harm Veterans' Hearts?
Veterans with PTSD had higher rates of smoking, depression, anxiety disorders, sleep disorders, type 2 diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure and high cholesterol, but no single condition explained the association between PTSD and heart disease, a new study found. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Does PTSD Really Harm Veterans' Hearts?
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 13, 2019 -- By itself, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) doesn't raise the risk of heart disease for U.S. veterans, a new study finds. " Instead, a combination of physical disorders, psychiatric disorders and smoking -- that are... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 13, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Platelet 'decoys' outsmart both clots and cancer
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) What do heart disease, stroke, sepsis, and cancer have in common, aside from being deadly diseases? They're all linked to platelets, the cells in our blood that normally help our blood clot. New research from the Wyss Institute has created 'decoy' platelets that can both prevent blood clots and keep cancer from spreading. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 13, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Even a little is harmful: New study suggests having even two cans of soda per week increases risk of metabolic syndrome, including heart disease, diabetes, stroke
(Natural News) We have reached a sad state of affairs, where soda is now a must in our diet, even when we know them to be detrimental to our health. Medical researchers hope that by providing new reasons to stop indulging in these sugary drinks, we will see the light — and soon. Recently, researchers... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Yale doctor helps highlight need for worldwide focus on ‘silent killers’
Yale School of Medicine ’s Dr. Christine Ngaruiya is working with officials in Kenya to fight non-communicable diseases like heart disease and cancer. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 12, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Edwards Lifesciences Enters Into Agreement To Acquire CASMED
IRVINE, Calif. and BRANFORD, Conn., Feb. 12, 2019 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Edwards Lifesciences Corporation (NYSE: EW), the global leader in patient-focused innovations for structural heart disease and critical care monitoring, today a... Devices, Monitoring, Mergers & Acquisitions Edwards Lifesciences, CAS Medical Systems, CASMED, FORE-SIGHT, Cerebral Oximeter (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - February 12, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New technique may top ultrasound for heart disease risk
A new imaging technique known as volumetric multispectral optoacoustic tomography...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Carotid ultrasound scans prompt behavior change MRI of carotid artery aids cardiovascular risk assessment 3D ultrasound quantifies subclinical atherosclerosis Elastography can help evaluate carotid plaque Can femoral ultrasound find role in CV risk assessment? (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 12, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

CDC: Screening Policies for Critical Congenital Heart Dz Widespread
TUESDAY, Feb. 12, 2019 -- All 50 states and the District of Columbia have implemented newborn screening policies for critical congenital heart disease (CCHD), although there are opportunities for improving data collection, according to research... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 12, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

How Viagra puts a brake on a master growth regulator to treat heart disease
When normal cells grow, divide or do any job in the body, they do so in response to a whole slew of internal sensors that measure nutrients and energy supply, and environmental cues that inform what happens outside the cell. A protein called mTOR receives information from these signals and then directs the cell to take action. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - February 12, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Why Do South Asians Have Such High Rates of Heart Disease?
“ We all have someone in our first-degree circle that has either died suddenly or had premature cardiovascular disease, ” said one researcher. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: ANAHAD O ’ CONNOR Tags: Obesity Heart Diabetes Cholesterol Blood Pressure Diet and Nutrition Weight Asian-Americans Stroke Source Type: news

Food or Heart Meds? Many Americans Must Make a Choice
TUESDAY, Feb. 12, 2019 -- Millions of Americans with heart disease say they face financial strain because of their medical care, with some skipping meds or cutting back on basics like groceries. That's the finding of a new national study of heart... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 12, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

How Viagra puts a brake on a master growth regulator to treat heart disease
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) When normal cells grow, divide or do any job in the body, they do so in response to a whole slew of internal sensors that measure nutrients and energy supply, and environmental cues that inform what happens outside the cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 12, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

DNA methylation GrimAge strongly predicts lifespan and healthspan
(Rapamycin Press) When it comes to predicting lifespan, GrimAge is 18 percent more accurate than calendar age and 14 percent better than previously described epigenetic biomarkers. With regards to predicting time to coronary heart disease, GrimAge is 61 percent more accurate than chronological age and 46 percent better than previously reported epigenetic biomarkers. In spite of this significant enhancement however, it must be noted that neither age nor DNAmGrimAge is particularly good at predicting time to heart disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Immune cells in the gut slow metabolism
A type of immune cell found in the mouse gut slows metabolism and raises the risk of diabetes and heart disease. Targeting these cells in people might affect obesity and related diseases. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - February 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Intensive blood pressure control may lessen cognitive loss
In a study of older adults with a high risk for heart disease, intensive blood pressure control reduced the risk of developing mild cognitive impairment. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - February 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tuesday Tips: 8 ways to reduce your risk of heart disease
There are a number of heart-friendly habits you could incorporate in your life to help reduce your risk of heart disease. Simple things like eating fish twice a week or making sure you know your cholesterol numbers. Even having a pet can make a difference! Watch:?8 ways to reduce your risk of heart disease. Journalists: [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - February 12, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Soundwaves can treat heart disease by blasting open blocked arteries 
Research suggests a tiny, tube‑like device that sends soundwaves through diseased blood vessels can crack the hard calcium deposits that narrow them. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Almost half of U.S. heart disease patients struggle with medical bills
(Reuters Health) - Roughly 45 percent of Americans under 65 who have cardiovascular disease experience financial hardships from medical bills, a U.S. study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Heart societies endorse CT CAC for risk assessment
The American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology have...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: High CT CAC scores in athletes do not increase mortality CT CAC reveals high heart disease risk in South Asian men USPSTF dismisses CAC for heart disease risk assessment Deep learning can quantify CAC on low-dose CT CT CAC scoring tops age for predicting heart disease risk (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 11, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Study: Half of adults with heart disease have trouble paying medical bills
Nearly half of adults with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease are having a tough time paying to treat their condition, a study says. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nearly half of adults with heart disease can ’t afford their medical bills
Over 45% percent of heart disease patients report financial hardship due to medical bills, and nearly one in five say they can ’t pay their bills at all. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 11, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

FTC and FDA Send Warning Letters to Companies Selling Dietary Supplements Claiming to Treat Alzheimer ’s Disease and Remediate or Cure Other Serious Illnesses Such as Parkinson’s, Heart Disease, and Cancer
As part of its ongoing efforts to ensure that dietary supplements and other health-related products are advertised truthfully, and that efficacy claims made for such products are supported by competent and reliable scientific evidence, the Federal Trade Commission has joined the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in sending three warning letters to companies based in Florida, South Carolina, and New  Mexico. (Source: NCCAM Featured Content)
Source: NCCAM Featured Content - February 11, 2019 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: NCCIH Source Type: news

Eating  processed foods such as burgers, sugar and white bread increases risk of fatal diseases
Experts at Paris-Sorbonne University found that deaths from heart disease, cancer and other illnesses were directly linked to the consumption of 'ultra-processed food'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eating processed foods such as burgers, sugar and white bread increases risk of fatal diseases
Experts at Paris-Sorbonne University found that deaths from heart disease, cancer and other illnesses were directly linked to the consumption of 'ultra-processed food'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is CRM a Better Alternative than Stress Echocardiograms?
Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR) has the potential to be a non-invasive, non-toxic alternative to stress echocardiograms, catheterizations, and stress nuclear exams in identifying the severity of heart disease, according to a study. The study appears online Feb. 8 in JAMA Cardiology. Duke University Medical Center researchers looked at data from more than 9,000 patients who underwent CMR at seven U.S. hospitals, encompassing up to 10 years of follow-up. Research from the study shows that patients without any history of heart disease and at low risk based on traditional clinical criteria, those with an abnormal CMR scan wer...
Source: MDDI - February 11, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Cardiovascular Imaging Source Type: news

Heart-healthy Mediterranean diet reduces stroke risk by 60 percent
(Natural News) Each year, heart disease claims more than 600,000 American lives, making it the leading cause of death in the U.S.  However, people with this condition should not lose hope. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than a third of these cases could be avoided if people switched to a healthier... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Managing young women at high risk of heart disease
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) Deaths from heart disease have decreased in recent decades, but these decreases have not occurred in women younger than 50. A new review in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) provides guidance for physicians to identify and manage premenopausal women at high risk of heart disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news