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Health Tip: Meditation May Help Lower Heart Disease Risk
-- Meditation " may " help lower a person's risk of heart diseaase, the American Heart Association says. " The key word to remember is may, " the association said in a statement released in September. " The research is suggestive, but not definitive, " ... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 18, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Could doing too much exercise KILL you? This many hours puts you at risk of heart disease
TOO much exercise can kill you, scientists have revealed. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Gestational diabetes linked to heart disease risk
Researchers have found that a history of gestational diabetes is associated with a higher long-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease in women. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heart disease risk ‘INCREASED by doing MORE exercise’
HEART disease risk is higher in men that exercise more than those that don ’t exercise as much, research has revealed. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Avocado diet: Three ways the superfood can PREVENT heart disease
AVOCADOS have risen to superfood status thanks to their high nutrient content. Here are three ways eating them can help your heart. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brussels sprouts benefits: Daily dose 'could help prevent arthritis or stroke'
A DAILY dose of sprouts, broccoli, cabbage or cauliflower could help prevent a range of ailments from arthritis to stroke and heart disease, a new medical study reveals. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Daily dose of broccoli could prevent heart disease
Researchers from Penn State University found mice fed a diet supplemented with broccoli are better able to tolerate digestive issues. This may be due to a substance in broccoli that promotes gut health. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

WATCH: Beyond the scale: What to eat to lower your risk for 3 health issues
Dr. Jennifer Ashton and nutritionist Maya Feller discuss some foods you should add to every meal to reduce your risk of heart disease, dementia and cancer. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - October 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

Blood pressure: Eating THIS 45p chocolate will lower your heart disease risk
DARK chocolate can lower your blood pressure for just 45p. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Six - Month Tai Chi Program Improves Physical Activity in CHD
Improvements in activity, weight, QoL for patients with coronary heart disease refusing cardiac rehab (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - October 12, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Nursing, Pulmonology, Surgery, Journal, Source Type: news

Dementia stays as the leading cause of death
For the second-year running, the neurological disorder has claimed more lives than heart disease in England and Wales. It was responsible for 62,948 deaths registered in 2016. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Best supplements: Taking THIS amount of vitamin D could protect against heart disease
VITAMIN D is made by the skin when exposed to sunlight, however it ’s easy to become deficient during winter. This is the dose of supplement you should be taking daily. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Flu vaccines MUST be used to avoid deadly complications, urges Paula Radcliffe
FLU VACCINES must be taken by asthma, diabetes and heart disease sufferers, urged three-time London marathon winner Paula Radcliffe. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

World Health Organization: Childhood Obesity On The Rise
BOSTON (CBS) – The World Health Organization says the number of obese children and teens is now 10-times higher than it was 40-years ago. Poor food choice and lack of exercise are largely to blame but overweight kids don’t just have physical challenges. Children face psychological challenges as well. Obese children are more likely to feel stigmatized, are often bullied and may not do as well in school. Overweight children tend to become overweight adults, putting them at risk for heart disease, cancer, diabetes and other health effects. There is some good news; the rates of childhood obesity have leveled o...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Obesity World Health Organization Source Type: news

Marital ups and downs tied to shifts in heart health
(Reuters Health) - Married men who see their relationship with their spouse improve over the years may also experience positive changes in their health that can lower the risk of heart disease, a recent U.K. study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Three events is all it takes to end up with heart disease
A new study, conducted by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, has revealed such women had poorer endothelial function - a known risk factor of heart disease, the world's leading killer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Blood pressure: Eating THIS 65p vegetable will lower your heart disease risk
EATING spinach could lower your blood pressure for just 65p. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tai Chi: A Gentler Way to Exercise for Ailing Hearts
WEDNESDAY, Oct. 11, 2017 -- People with heart disease who shy away from traditional cardiac rehabilitation may benefit from tai chi. A small study found that the slow, gentle movements of this traditional Chinese practice may help increase physical... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 11, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Traumatic experiences may raise women's heart disease risk
Women who experience at least three traumatic events in a lifetime may have poorer endothelial function, which could raise the likelihood of heart disease. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Traumatic events take toll on the heart
(The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)) Today it seems about everything has been shown to lead to heart disease. Of course smoking is bad for you, as is high blood pressure. There's even mounting evidence that psychosocial factors can cause heart problems. A new study demonstrates how traumatic experiences can affect vascular health and, ultimately, heart disease. The study results will be presented during The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, Oct. 11-14. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

I ’ ve Been Seeing a Therapist for Years, So Why Am I Not Getting Better?
The answer: We need to address what’s happening inside the office as well as stigma. During the creation of the documentary Going Sane I interviewed Cindy Bulik. She is perhaps the most important researcher on anorexia today. She lives between UNC where she is a distinguished Professor of Eating Disorders and Sweden where she is a professor at the Karolinska Institute. Her current research is exploring genetic influences on anorexia and by the end of our interview she asked if my entire family would be willing to give a sample of blood for the study. She is not the single-minded professor oblivious to social customs...
Source: Psych Central - October 10, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Josh Sabey Tags: Disabilities Disorders Editorials Essays Medications Motivation and Inspiration Policy and Advocacy Psychology Psychotherapy Suicide Treatment Child Development child therapy Clinical Outcome evidence-based practices evidence Source Type: news

Vitamin D supplements could prevent heart disease and MS for JUST 2p
Cardiovascular disease and multiple sclerosis risk could be cut by taking 2p vitamin D supplements, according to This Morning ’s Dr Chris Steele. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Africa: African Summit for Combat of Heart Disease to Begin Tomorrow in Khartoum
[SNA] Khartum -The African Summit for Combating Heart Diseases in the continent is due to begin session tomorrow, Tuesday, at the Friendship Hall in Khartoum. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 10, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Surviving Congenital Heart Disease as Child Not a Ticket to Good Health
Title: Surviving Congenital Heart Disease as Child Not a Ticket to Good HealthCategory: Health NewsCreated: 10/9/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 10/10/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General)
Source: MedicineNet Kids Health General - October 10, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Researchers uncover new genes linked to congenital heart disease
Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital have discovered new genes associated with congenital heart disease in babies. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study will Explore Air Pollution ’s Impact on the Developing Fetus
New research will seek to understand the biological mechanisms that are triggered by exposure to air pollution during pregnancy and lead to lower birth weight in newborns, placing them at greater risk for chronic conditions such as coronary heart disease and hypertension later in life. The research will be conducted in Beijing by an international team of researchers. (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - October 9, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news

Children Who Survive Heart Disease Face Challenges
Many of these children can also suffer from illnesses such as autism and respiratory conditions, study says (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Surviving Congenital Heart Disease as Child Not a Ticket to Good Health
Many of these children can also suffer from illnesses such as autism and respiratory conditions, study says Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Congenital Heart Defects (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Congenital heart disease genes linked to autism and other disorders
Researchers found that many genes implicated in autism were also associated with CHD, and they found new genes that cause CHD in some patients. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - October 9, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Surviving Congenital Heart Disease as Child Not a Ticket to Good Health
MONDAY, Oct. 9, 2017 -- Though the majority of children with congenital heart disease survive into adulthood, they often struggle with a number of lifelong illnesses, researchers report. The health issues may include neurodevelopment disorders such... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 9, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Hypothyroidism in Infants With CHD Exposed to Excess Iodine Hypothyroidism in Infants With CHD Exposed to Excess Iodine
Is there an association between exposure to excess iodine and the development of hypothyroidism among infants with congenital heart disease?Journal of the Endocrine Society (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology Journal Article Source Type: news

New congenital heart disease genes uncovered
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) A new study from the NHLBI Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium (PGCG), part of the Bench to Bassinet Program, has helped shed new light on some of the underlying genetic causes of cases of CHD as well as the long-term outlook for patients who carry these mutations. The team, led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital, publishes its latest findings in Nature Genetics this week. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Congenital Heart Disease Genes Uncovered
Discoveries from “Bench to Bassinet” investigators may help answer parents’ questions about the genetic causes of heart conditions and long-term effects. (Source: BWH News)
Source: BWH News - October 9, 2017 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

New Congenital Heart Disease Genes Uncovered
Discoveries from “Bench to Bassinet” investigators may help answer parents’ questions about the genetic causes of heart conditions and long-term effects. (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - October 9, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Diabetes diet: THIS is what sufferers need to know about eating sugary foods
DIABETES sufferers can still eat sugary foods, like chocolate, in moderation this Halloween and Christmas. But for diabetes sufferers enjoying sweet treats too often can cause heart disease and even amputation. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: High-sugar diets raise heart disease risk in healthy people
A study finds that a high-sugar diet changes a healthy person's fat metabolism so that it resembles that of someone with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Thailand ’s physical activity drive is improving health by addressing NCDs
In 2011, when she was 64, Umpun, from Thailand ’s northern Angthong Municipality, was diagnosed with high levels of cholesterol and the dietary fat triglyceride. This raised the threat of suffering from a cardiovascular disease, Thailand’s – and the world’s – leading cause of death, including of people aged under 70. “My doctor advised me to start physical activity and change my diet, and after I started exercising I later found that my triglycerides and cholesterol level had decreased,” says Umpun, now 70 and a village health volunteer. “I enjoyed very much this physical act...
Source: WHO Feature Stories - October 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: cardiovascular disease [subject], cardiovascular disease, heart attack, heart attacks, cvd, heart diseases, heart disease, high blood pressure, hypertension, diet [subject], healthy diet, physical activity [subject], exercise, movement, Feature [doctype], Source Type: news

Africa: Africa Must Reboot Its Health Systems to Cope With Non-Communicable Diseases
[The Conversation Africa] When it comes to killer diseases in Africa many people think of infectious diseases like tuberculosis, malaria, or even Ebola. But the reality is that diseases like cancer, diabetes and heart disease - known as non-communicable diseases (NCDs) - are a major threat. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 5, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

This weekend
Americans love to celebrate weekends at the beach or by the pool. If that’s your plan, I hope your day includes a dose of sunshine. However, I have an important message before you cover yourself in sunscreen. Don’t do it! If you’re shaking your head in disbelief, I get it… What I just said goes against everything you’ve heard for the last 40 years or so from doctors, dermatologists and the mainstream media. But I’ve been telling my patients for decades that covering themselves in commercial sunscreen is bad advice.   In fact, since the start of the media campaign to push sunscr...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

The Sweet Way to Heal Your Wounds
We enjoy outdoor activities. My family will be coming over this year and I will fire up the grill for a delicious BBQ grass-fed beef. We’ll play games like badminton and horseshoes. Now while these games can be fun, they can lead to cuts and bruises. I want to aim you with an unconventional solution for those wounds.  For years now, sugar’s been a dirty word. It’s been blamed for everything from obesity, heart disease and diabetes to tooth decay and acne. But there’s something they don’t know.  Sugar’s better for you than all those artificial sweeteners and substitutes out th...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Potassium may help to prevent heart disease
Researchers have found that increasing dietary levels of potassium could help to reduce vascular calcification, which is a risk factor for heart disease. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Too much sugar raises the risk of heart disease
Researchers from the University of Surrey found just 12 weeks of a high-sugar diet increases the amount of fat stored in the liver and makes fat metabolism similar to a liver disease patient. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pfizer to FDA: Ban side effect warnings  
Big Pharma won’t be satisfied until every American adult — and even some kids — are taking one of their dangerous statin drugs. And they’ve resorted to desperate measures to achieve that goal. Here’s what’s going on… As you probably know, one of the most common side effects of taking statins is muscle pain. I see this all the time at my clinic when new patients come to see me. And if you or someone you know takes these drugs, you’ve probably seen it, too… But a new study claims that people only get statin side effects like muscle pain if they know they’re taking...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

Hockey Viewers' Hearts May Pay a Penalty
Attending an exciting game can double the heart rate of spectators Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: How to Prevent Heart Disease, Stress (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

This diet advice could kill you
The American Heart Association says sodium in salt raises blood pressure. They say it increases the risk for heart disease and stroke.  But the latest science says otherwise… A British review of 34 clinical trials showed that cutting down on salt reduced blood pressure only slightly for people with hypertension.1  And a new study in The Lancet found that some low-salt diets could put you at GREATER risk of heart disease and death.2 Researchers analyzed data from 133,118 people. They wanted to see if there was a link between high sodium and heart attack, stroke and death The results were startling. People...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Randall Hall Tags: Health Heart Health Men's Health Nutrition Women's Health Source Type: news

Is Watching Sports Bad for Your Health? Here ’s What New Research Says
Watching a sports match can stress your heart just as much as playing in the game itself, suggests a small new study in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology. Researchers found that people’s pulses increased by 75% when they watched a hockey game on television and by 110% when watching one in person—equivalent to the cardiac stress of vigorous exercise. Previous studies have linked watching sporting events to an increased risk of heart attack and sudden death among spectators, especially for people with existing coronary artery disease. The new research involved 20 adults living in Montreal who had no history of h...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized are sports good for you cardiovascular disease Exercise Exercise/Fitness health benefits hockey healthytime heart attack heart rate spectator sports Source Type: news

A need for bananas? Dietary potassium regulates calcification of arteries
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) Researchers have shown, for the first time, that reduced dietary potassium promotes elevated aortic stiffness in a mouse model. Such arterial stiffness in humans is predictive of heart disease and death from heart disease, and it represents an important health problem for the nation. The UAB researchers also found that increased dietary potassium levels lessened vascular calcification and aortic stiffness. Furthermore, they unraveled the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of low or high dietary potassium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Two weeks to bowel cancer?
There’s no doubt antibiotics have saved a lot of lives. But because they’ve been overprescribed for so many years we’ve ended up with a slew of health problems. For one thing, overuse of antibiotics wreaks havoc on your microbiome… That’s your body’s ecosystem. Your microbiome has 100 trillion or so bacteria, viruses and fungi. It affects just about every organ and body system. Some of these gut bugs cause disease and infection. But other good bacteria are called “probiotics.” They boost your immune system. They help you digest your food and turn it into vitamins. But in...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Randall Hall Tags: Cancer Health Men's Health Source Type: news

Avoid this “safe” ingredient
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is supposed to be protecting our food supply. But the sad truth is that it does very little to monitor what chemicals go into your food. And even when there’s science to prove the health risks of new ingredients, they drag their feet. It can take years… or even decades… before they pull harmful additives from the market.  When a processor wants to add a new chemical to food, the FDA doesn’t require any testing. The food company just sends a notice to the FDA. The notice says that the ingredient is &;dquo;generally recognized as safe” or G...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Randall Hall Tags: Brain Health Heart Health Men's Health Nutrition Women's Health Source Type: news