How low is too low? Lowering "bad" cholesterol by using medication could be bad for you, warn experts
(Natural News) Is there really “good” cholesterol and “bad” cholesterol? The medical community has branded low density lipoprotein, or LDL, cholesterol “bad” because high levels are linked to plaque buildup in the arteries, heart disease, and risk of ischemic stroke. However, a new study from Penn State University argues that LDL cholesterol is necessary in... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Best supplements for the heart: The supplement proven to reduce your risk of heart disease
BEST supplements for the heart: One of the gravest threats to life expectancy is heart disease so taking steps to protect your heart could mean the difference between life or death. Taking supplements for your heart has been met with a degree of scepticism over the years due to scant evidence, but recent research suggests a particular supplement may hold promise as a form of protection against heart disease. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heart attack: Look out for this symptom on your fingernails - it could signal your risk
A HEART attack can be a deadly occurrence. Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of it, and there's a noticeable symptom just on your fingernails that could indicate you have the disease. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How AI Can Predict Heart Attacks and Strokes
Artificial intelligence is making its way into health care, and one of its first stops is making sense of all of those scans that doctors order. Already, studies have shown that AI-based tools can, in some cases, pick out abnormal growths that could be cancerous tumors better than doctors can, mainly because digesting and synthesizing huge volumes of information is what AI does best. In a study published Feb. 14 in Circulation, researchers in the U.K. and the U.S. report that an AI program can reliably predict heart attacks and strokes. Kristopher Knott, a research fellow at the British Heart Foundation, and his team condu...
Source: TIME: Health - February 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Artificial Intelligence Heart Disease Source Type: news

Op-Ed: What can you do to protect yourself from heart disease? Make a lot of money
Dying from heart disease correlates more closely with your ZIP Code and bank balance than with your gene pool. (Source: L.A. Times - Health)
Source: L.A. Times - Health - February 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Haider J. Warraich Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic study looks at changes in outcomes for coronary revascularization
(Mayo Clinic) The most common type of heart disease -- coronary artery disease -- affects 6.7% of adults and accounts for 20% of 2 in 10 deaths of adults under age 65. The condition builds over time as inflammation and cholesterol-containing plaques settle in the heart's arteries, where they can eventually cause narrowing and blockages that lead to a heart attack. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Africa: Continent Is Way Behind the Curve in Managing Heart Disease - Here's a New Approach
[The Conversation Africa] The burden of noncommunicable diseases in sub-Saharan African is growing because of factors such as demographic changes and increases in life expectancy. These diseases include heart attacks, stroke, cancer, respiratory diseases and diabetes. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 13, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Good oral hygiene isn’t just for the mouth: It benefits brain health too
(Natural News) Heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases (e.g., stroke) are the leading causes of death in western countries. These diseases are caused by several factors, such as hypertension, high blood cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, smoking and obesity. However, recent studies have found that there is another unexpected contributor to the development of atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis (blood clot... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Keep Your Teen Moving To Reduce Risk Of Depression, Study Says
(CNN) — Science shows moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise is good for us — it improves sleep; lowers blood pressure; protects against heart disease, diabetes and cancer; reduces stress; boosts mood; and fights anxiety and depression. It’s especially important in adolescence, where the first signs of depression often begin, studies show. But unless your child is an athlete, it can be tough to wean them away from social media and the ever-present screen to swim laps or go for a blood-pumping jog. A new study has some good news: even light exercise may help protect children against developing depression. T...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Depression Source Type: news

ACC cardio-oncology course showcases research, treatments for cancer patients with heart disease
(American College of Cardiology) The American College of Cardiology will host the fourth Advancing the Cardiovascular Care of the Oncology Patient course in Washington on Feb. 14-16, bringing together top experts in both cardiology and oncology to equip clinicians and researchers with the tools needed to improve cancer patient care and treat their unique heart health needs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Keep your teen moving to reduce risk of depression, study says
Science shows moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise is good for us -- it improves sleep; lowers blood pressure; protects against heart disease, diabetes and cancer; reduces stress; boosts mood; and fights anxiety and depression. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women face some unique risks for heart disease
Heart disease is the leading cause of death for U.S. women, but many don't know when they're experiencing symptoms. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - February 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Chemical found in drinking water linked to tooth decay in children
IMAGE: Being exposed to PFAS--a class of chemicals found in drinking water--has been linked to higher rates of cancer, heart disease, thyroid dysfunction and other conditions. WVU School of Dentistry researchers...viewmore Credit: Aira Burkhart/West Virginia University Children with higher concentrations of a certain chemical in their blood are more likely to get cavities, according to a new study byWest Virginia UniversitySchool of Dentistry researchers. Manufactured chemical g roups called perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances are universal as a result of extensive manufacturing and use. Although manuf...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - February 11, 2020 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for U.S. women
February is American Heart Month, and the American Heart Association says cardiovascular disease claims more lives each year than all forms of cancer combined in the United States. It's typically seen as a man's disease -- but the reality is, one woman dies every 80 seconds in the U.S. from heart disease. CBS News medical contributor Dr. Tara Narula joined CBSN with more. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - February 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fayer Chronicles Her Journey in Medtech to Improve Women ’s Health
Marissa Fayer, a 20-year medtech executive, entrepreneur, and philanthropist stopped in to speak with MD+DI about the changes she has seen in healthcare and how women have helped shaped the medtech industry. She is the CEO and founder of non-profit HERHealthEQ and the president of advisory firm Fayer Consulting LLC,. MD+DI: You’ve made a tremendous impact in the healthcare industry – but tell me what led you to this field? Also, when you started your career how did the landscape in the profession look? Was it particularly diverse? How has it changed since you first started? Y...
Source: MDDI - February 11, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Business Source Type: news

Is age a risk factor for heart disease? Hear what women like you had to say about heart disease, including risk factors & heart attack symptoms. #HeartMonthpic.twitter.com/xkYqcolCOz
Is age a risk factor for heart disease? Hear what women like you had to say about heart disease, including risk factors & heart attack symptoms. #HeartMonth pic.twitter.com/xkYqcolCOz (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - February 11, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: ( at FDAWomen) Source Type: news

Since 1994, FDA ’ s Office of Women ’ s Health has funded studies providing valuable insight into sex differences in the diagnosis & treatment of heart disease, leading to a better understanding of the disease in women. Learn about current research here: https://go.usa.gov/xmuxW   pic.twitter.com/JfaOhoY2q9
Since 1994, FDA’s Office of Women’s Health has funded studies providing valuable insight into sex differences in the diagnosis & treatment of heart disease, leading to a better understanding of the disease in women. Learn about current research here: https://go.usa.gov/xmuxW  pic.twitter.com/JfaOhoY2q9 (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - February 10, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: ( at US_FDA) Source Type: news

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for U.S. men and women. And many @US_FDA regulated devices are used to treat various heart issues. Find out more about these devices that help keep the heart beating. https://go.usa.gov/xd9mB   #HearthHealthMonth
Heart disease is the leading cause of death for U.S. men and women. And many @US_FDA regulated devices are used to treat various heart issues. Find out more about these devices that help keep the heart beating. https://go.usa.gov/xd9mB  #HearthHealthMonth (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - February 10, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: ( at FDADeviceInfo) Source Type: news

AHA News: For Kids With Heart Defects, the Hospital Near Mom May Matter
MONDAY, Feb. 10, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- Heart problems are often associated with older people. But every year about 1 in 110 children in the United States are born with congenital heart disease, which include a variety of defects... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 10, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Some oestrogen therapies may reduce heart disease risks
Postmenopausal women using oral conjugated equine oestrogen hormone may have a reduced risk of developing heart disease, according to a study published inMenopause.Healio (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - February 7, 2020 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Philadelphia consortium awards $200,000 to developers of pediatric medical devices
The Philadelphia-based Pennsylvania Pediatric Medical Device Consortium awarded $200,000 in seed grants this week to four startup companies in its latest round of funding to support promising projects addressing the health needs of children. The four companies to receive $50,000 each are developing devices for children with heartbeat arrhythmias, congenital heart disease, cerebral palsy, and developmental dysplasia of the hip. The consortium is funded by the Food and Drug Administration and based… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 6, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

Why you'll be seeing red at work tomorrow
If you ’re seeing red at work tomorrow, it’s a good thing: The American Heart Association is calling on women to wear the color most associated with Valentine hearts on Friday to acknowledge the importance of heart health. Cardiovascular disease is the number-one killer of women, per the Centers for D isease Control and Prevention, and National Wear Red Day, nationally sponsored by CVS Health, encourages awareness of heart disease and stroke among women. The AHA’s GoRed for Women campaign… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 6, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

Eggs May Not Be Unhealthy For The Heart, Study Says
BOSTON (CBS) — For years doctors have warned people with high cholesterol not to eat too many eggs, but a new large study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition finds regular egg consumption may not be that bad for the heart. Researchers in Canada looked at data on almost 180,000 people from 50 countries and found that people who ate at least an egg a day were no more likely to have high cholesterol, cardiovascular events like heart attacks or strokes and no more likely to die prematurely than people who rarely ate eggs. That said, you can make eggs unhealthy by adding unhealthy fats, so be careful h...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch News Syndicated CBSN Boston Dr. Mallika Marshall Health News Heart Health Source Type: news

Many Americans Misinformed About Heart Disease Prevention
THURSDAY, Feb. 6, 2020 -- Many Americans are misinformed about the risk for heart disease, particularly in women, and are confused about modifiable risk factors, according to a survey released by the Cleveland Clinic to coincide with American Heart... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 6, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Study takes a stand against prolonged sitting
In many workplaces, standing desks and walking meetings are addressing the health dangers of sitting too long each day, but for universities, the natural question is how to make such adjustments in  classrooms.The question appealed to emerita dance professor Angelia Leung from the UCLA Department of World Arts& Cultures/Dance. Sitting too long was never an issue for Leung ’s students. But for most college students, desk time is more common than dance time. In an unusual collaboration between the arts and sciences, Leung partnered with Burt Cowgill, an assistant adjunct professor with the UCLA Fielding School...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 6, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Pregnant women with very high blood pressure face greater heart disease risk
(Rutgers University) Women with high blood pressure in their first pregnancy have a greater risk of heart attack or cardiovascular death, according to a Rutgers study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How to lose visceral fat: Diet plan proven to reduce the harmful belly fat - what to eat
VISCERAL fat is considered the most dangerous type of body fat. Influencing hormones within the body, too much of the stuff can predict ghastly side effects, including heart disease. But a certain diet has been proven to reduce its build-up in the body. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Study Finds an Egg a Day Does Not Increase Cardiovascular Risk
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 5, 2020 -- One egg per day is not tied to an increase in the risk for heart disease, including cholesterol levels, according to a study published onlune Jan. 21 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Mahshid Dehghan, Ph.D.,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 5, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

People on blood pressure, cholesterol meds often let healthy habits slip
Finnish researchers found that adults in their country at risk for heart disease and stroke who took cholesterol- or blood pressure-lowering medications were more likely to reduce their activity levels and gain weight. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

2 in 3 Americans Unaware That Heart Disease Is Leading Killer of Women
Title: 2 in 3 Americans Unaware That Heart Disease Is Leading Killer of WomenCategory: Health NewsCreated: 2/4/2020 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 2/5/2020 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - February 5, 2020 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Not all hormone therapy protects equally against heart disease in postmenopausal women
(The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)) Hormone therapy has proven to slow down heart fat deposition and the progression of atherosclerosis, depending on the type of hormone therapy and route of administration. A new study compared the effects of conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) and 17β-estradiol and contrasted oral and transdermal delivery to determine their effectiveness in preventing heart disease. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Meds are not a ‘free pass’ to start or maintain bad habits
People who started CVD meds were more likely to gain weight and cut exercise, as well as to drink less and quit smoking Related items fromOnMedica Should we recognise obesity as a disease? Statins of small and uncertain benefit in primary prevention Vitamin D supplements do not confer cardiovascular protection Pharmacists could offer high-dose statins direct to patients More Scottish GPs needed to fight heart disease (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 5, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

ICDs Have Come a Long Way in 40 Years
Michel Mirowski and his colleagues gave the field of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) a pretty good start, but what's more impressive is how far the technology has advanced since that first human ICD implant in February 1980. In the past 40 years we've seen ICDs become dramatically smaller, longer lasting, more capable, more personalized, subcutaneous (non-transvenous), and even MRI-firendly. And that's not to mention the advanced data connectivity and monitoring capabilities that the latest technologies offer. So without further ado, let's take a look at the current ICD landscape and the companie...
Source: MDDI - February 4, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Implants Source Type: news

2 in 3 Americans Unaware That Heart Disease Is Leading Killer of Women
TUESDAY, Feb. 4, 2020 -- More than two-thirds of Americans don't know that heart disease is the leading cause of death among U.S. women, a new survey reveals. Overall, 68% of respondents weren't aware that heart disease is the top killer of women,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 4, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Meat Still Isn't Healthy, Study Confirms
These latest findings might seem to contradict an earlier study -- published in the fall in the Annals of Internal Medicine -- that had meat fans cheering. That study reported researchers couldn't say with certainty that eating red meat or processed meat caused cancer, type 2 diabetes or heart disease. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Red And Processed Meat Are Not OK For Health, Study Says, Despite News To The Contrary
(CNN) — If you’ve been swayed by recent reports that red and processed meat isn’t harmful to your health, put down that bacon — there’s bad news. New analysis of long term data on nearly 30,000 people found a small but significant risk of death from any cause tied to eating two servings of processed meat or unprocessed red meat each week. Similar risks for cardiovascular disease were found for those eating two servings a week of processed meat, unprocessed red meat or poultry — although that last category might be due to frying or the consumption of skin, researchers said. There was no a...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Red Meat Source Type: news

Meat, poultry may increase heart disease risk by up to 2%
In research published in JAMA Internal Medicine, processed meat consumption increased heart disease risk by nearly 2 percent, while partaking in un-processed red meat appeared to increase risk by less than 1 percent. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Conflicting studies point to meat moderation as healthy diet
A new study on meat consumption has found that people who eat red and processed meat have higher risks of heart disease and early death - contradicting recent research that suggested cutting out meat has few health benefits. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Red meat DOES raise your risk of heart disease, study finds
The study by Northwestern University in Chicago found that red meat and processed meat raised the risk of dying prematurely of any cause by three per cent, but poultry and fish did not. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Untreated Sleep Apnea Puts Your Heart at High Risk
MONDAY, Feb. 3, 2020 -- Nearly 30 million Americans have a chronic health problem that more than doubles their risk of death due to heart disease. The culprit is obstructive sleep apnea, a disease in which the upper airway collapses during sleep,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 3, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Visit @MinorityHealth's Black History Month webpage throughout February for resources, events and more. Help increase awareness about the impact heart disease has on the African American community and the benefits of an #activeandhealthy lifestyle. #BHM http://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=3 & lvlid=13   … pic.twitter.com/kWstENokDh
Visit @MinorityHealth's Black History Month webpage throughout February for resources, events and more. Help increase awareness about the impact heart disease has on the African American community and the benefits of an #activeandhealthy lifestyle. #BHM http://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=3&lvlid=13 … pic.twitter.com/kWstENokDh (Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew)
Source: Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA): CDRHNew - February 3, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: ( at HHS_ASH) Source Type: news

Janssen to Highlight Depth of Solid Tumor Portfolio at ASCO GU
RARITAN, N.J., February 3, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today multiple data presentations from a robust solid tumor portfolio that will be featured at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary (ASCO GU) Cancers Symposium, taking place February 13-15 in San Francisco. Company-sponsored data presentations will include clinical results for ERLEADA® (apalutamide) and niraparib in prostate cancer; and BALVERSA™ (erdafitinib) in bladder cancer. “We are committed to improving outcomes in patients with prostate and bladder cancer where high unmet...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - February 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Heart disease risk grows as women move through menopause
(University of Pittsburgh) A marker for heart disease risk considerably worsens as women transition through menopause, according to a new analysis from the largest and longest running study of women's health in midlife. Black women experience this accelerated decline earlier in menopause than their white counterparts. The findings add to growing evidence that menopause is a critical time for changes in cardiovascular health and underscore the importance of women and their doctors focusing on heart health during the menopausal transition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Shift workers at risk for heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes
(American Osteopathic Association) Working nights disrupts individuals' circadian rhythm, the body's internal clock responsible for neural and hormonal signaling. When the circadian rhythm is desynchronized from the sleep/wake cycle, it causes a cascade of hormonal changes that lead to metabolic disorders and the development multiple chronic conditions. Kulkarni recommends several measures to prevent serious health issues associated with shift work. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Link between chronic kidney disease and heart failure is identified in patients
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) People with chronic kidney disease have a higher risk for heart disease and heart-disease death. Now, for the first time in humans, researchers have identified a pathological change that appears to link kidney disease to progressive heart disease. This offers a potential treatment target, which could have wide benefit because 14 percent of the US adult population has chronic kidney disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 3, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Meat isn't good for you
(Northwestern University) A large study links red and processed meat with higher risk of heart disease and death. Eating two servings of red meat, processed meat or poultry -- but not fish -- per week was linked to a 3 to 7% higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Eating two servings of red meat or processed meat -- but not poultry or fish -- per week was associated with a 3% higher risk of all causes of death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 3, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How to lose visceral fat: Cooking with this oil could help reduce the harmful belly fat
VISCERAL fat is hidden inside the body, cushioning organs such as the liver, pancreas and intestines. Too much of this "active fat" can lead to adverse health effects: it increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer. One simple swap in how you cook your food can help to reduce the harmful belly fat. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Top geneticist ‘should resign’ over his team’s laboratory fraud
Professor responsible for ‘reckless’ failure to properly oversee researchersA row over scientific fraud at the highest level of British academia has led to calls for one of the country ’s leading geneticists and highest-paid university chiefs to leave his posts.David Latchman, professor of genetics at University College London and master of Birkbeck, University of London – a post that earns him £380,000 a year – has angered senior academics by presiding over a laboratory that published fraudulent research, mostly on genetics and heart disease, for more than a decade. The number of fabric...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 1, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Tags: Research Genetics Birkbeck, University of London UCL (University College London) UK news Source Type: news

Heart disease: Swelling on this body part is a warning of the deadly condition
HEART DISEASE describes a range of conditions that affect the heart. The conditions refers to conditions that involve narrowed or blocked blood vessels hat can lad to a heart attack. Noticing swelling in this region of the body is a warning and could be an early sign of a heart attack. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - January 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How to lose visceral fat: The easiest and most effective way to help burn belly fat
HOW TO get rid of visceral fat: The trouble with belly fat is that it's not limited to the extra layer of padding located just below the skin. It also includes visceral fat which lies deep inside the abdomen and puts a person at risk of heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure. Fortunately there is an easy way to help shed your belly fat. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - January 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news