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Aussie flu symptoms: Having THESE five conditions entitles you to a FREE vaccine
AUSSIE flu can prove deadly, but getting vaccinated could protect you. Heart disease and diabetes sufferers get the jab free. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Regular takeaways in childhood raise risk of diabetes in adulthood
A study, published in the Archives of Disease in Childhood, reports children that regularly eat takeaway meals, at least once per week, have an increased risk of developing heart disease and diabetes later in life. Express (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - December 15, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Legal drugs kill more people than illegal ones: Research shows prescription drugs are the 3rd leading cause of death
(Natural News) According to Peter C. Gøtzsche, a Danish physician and medical researcher, prescription drugs are the third leading cause of death after heart disease and cancer. Based on the findings that Gøtzsche studied, it is possible that “psychiatric drugs alone are also the third major killer,” and this is primarily due to antidepressants causing the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Too Much Takeout Food Threatens Kids' Health
FRIDAY, Dec. 15, 2017 -- You can't beat the convenience of ordering out, but a steady diet of takeout food could raise your child's risk of heart disease and diabetes later in life. That's the word from British researchers who looked at the eating... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 15, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Heart disease and diabetes risk in later life INCREASED if children do THIS once a week
CHILDREN who eat takeaways at least once a week are more likely to develop heart disease and diabetes later in life, according to new research. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cardiovascular AI imaging dev Bay Labs raises $6m in Series A
Cardiovascular artificial intelligence medtech firm Bay Labs said today it raised $5.5 million in a Series A round to support clinical validation and further development of its cardiovascular imaging tech. The round was led by existing investor Khosla Ventures and joined by newly invested Data Collective, Greenbox Venture Partners, Minneapolis Heart Institute Ventures and Georges Harik. As part of the funding round, Khosla Ventures general partner Ben Ling and DCVC operating partner Armen Vidian will join the San Francisco-based company’s board of directors. “Bay Labs’ unique application of AI with ultras...
Source: Mass Device - December 14, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Cardiovascular Imaging Software / IT baylabs Source Type: news

As California fires rage, this device clears toxic smoke in any room in seconds, removing hazardous chemicals from the air
(Natural News) As wildfires continue to rage in California, toxic smoke is filling homes, apartments and businesses with airborne carcinogens that promote cancer, heart disease and respiratory problems like asthma. According to the UK Daily Mail, 1.6 million people have now been exposed to dangerous levels of smoke, adding that exposure “could be lethal for... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Curing cancer with integrative medicine safely and effectively
(Natural News) Claiming close to 600,000 lives a year, cancer continues to be a leading cause of death in the United States – right behind heart disease. But, for me, what makes this statistic so sad is that it’s completely avoidable – for millions of people! Unfortunately, Western medicine – totally controlled by the pharmaceutical... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sudan:Report - 'High Incidence of Heart Disease Among Children in Rural Sudan'
[Radio Dabanga] Khartoum -Up to two per cent of children in Sudan's rural areas suffer from heart disease, especially in Darfur, according to a new specialist report. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 14, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

High glucose levels impair foetal heart development
According to a study, published inelife, high maternal glucose levels during pregnancy affect normal development of heart cells, which can lead to congenital heart disease in babies.Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - December 13, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Liberia:Aids, NCDs, and the ABCs of Organizing
[New Dawn] Geneva -Non-communicable diseases (NCDs), like heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, and chronic lung disease, are responsible for 70% of all deaths. There is incontrovertible evidence that tobacco use, inactivity, unhealthy diets, and excessive alcohol consumption increase the odds of dying prematurely from an NCD. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - December 13, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New MRI tech could help doctors detect heart disease with better accuracy
(Binghamton University) Doctors might be able to better detect any disease or disorder that involves inflammation thanks to a new MRI imaging technology co-developed by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research reveals how diabetes in pregnancy affects baby ’s heart
Researchers at the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered how high glucose levels — whether caused by diabetes or other factors — keep heart cells from maturing normally. Their findings help explain why babies born to women with diabetes are more likely to develop congenital heart disease.The study, which was led by Atsushi “Austin” Nakano, a UCLA associate professor of molecular, cell, and developmental biology and member of the Broad Stem Cell Research Center, was published today in the journal eLife.When developing heart cell...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 12, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Why it's so bad to drink 12 Diet Cokes a day like Trump  
Diet soda - in reasonable amounts - has been linked to elevated risks for dementia, heart disease, diabetes, disrupted gut flora and more, so drinking 12 cans of Diet Coke a day could really wreak havoc. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

State Public Health Actions to Prevent and Control Diabetes, Heart Disease, Obesity and Associated Risk Factors, and Promote School Health
Article describes the CDC program,State Public Health Actions to Prevent and Control Diabetes, Heart Disease, Obesity and Associated Risk Factors, and Promote School Health, and the program's action model, design, and administration and management structure. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - December 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Eating mushrooms every day fights chronic disease: Button mushrooms are high in antioxidants, researchers discover
(Natural News) Eating small portions of mushrooms every day can make a big impact on your health. A recent study has found that mushrooms, particularly button mushrooms, contain important antioxidants that fight off chronic diseases, such as dementia, heart disease, and cancer. To reach this conclusion, researchers from Pennsylvania State University analyzed the relationship between mushroom... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nigeria:How Painkillers, Kidney Disease Increase Obesity, Diabetes Risk
[Guardian] New research from the largest study of its kind reveals patients taking painkillers alongside medication for heart disease, stroke or diabetes are 95 per cent more likely to become obese as the sedative drugs make people inactive and affect their metabolism. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 12, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Altmetric announces the top 100 list for 2017
This study revealed a Dinosaur species had teeth that it lost as it aged. Testing of an Ebola vaccine during the West African outbreak found that it was completely effective – offering hope should the virus return. The development of an artificial womb for lambs has opened new possibilities for their application amongst humans. Topical issues Some key themes stood out. Scientific research, technology, humanity and environmental science continue to intersect and capture the public’s attention. The most widely discussed research topics in 2017 were: Medical Science (53) Biological Science (17) Earth and Environ...
Source: News from STM - December 12, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Digital Featured Source Type: news

Research reveals how diabetes in pregnancy affects baby's heart
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) Researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered how high glucose levels -- whether caused by diabetes or other factors -- keep heart cells from maturing normally. Their findings help explain why babies born to women with diabetes are more likely to develop congenital heart disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Adult congenital heart disease: What patients and families should know
(Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed)
Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fact or Fiction? Debunking Exercise & Nutrition Myths for Preventing Heart Disease and Risk Factors
(Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed)
Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Screenings of newborns and athletes for genetic heart disease
(Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed)
Source: MayoClinic.com Full Feed - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Blood flow –sensing protein protects against atherosclerosis in mice
FINDINGSUCLA scientists have found that a protein known as NOTCH1 helps ward off inflammation in the walls of blood vessels, preventing atherosclerosis — the narrowing and hardening of arteries that can cause heart attacks and strokes.The new finding, from research conducted on mice, also explains why areas of smooth, fast blood flow are less prone to inflammation: levels of NOTCH1 are higher in these vessels.BACKGROUNDNOTCH1 was already known to be a key player in the development of blood vessels in embryos, but researchers weren ’t sure whether it was also critical to adults’ health. In a 2015 study, Lu...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Technology developed by LSUHealthNo to drive advances in obesity-related diseases
(Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center) For the first time, researchers led by Frank Lau, MD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery at LSU Health New Orleans, have successfully kept white fat tissue alive outside of the body for up to eight weeks. This breakthrough will pave the way for research advances improving treatment or prevention of such diseases as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer and others associated with white adipose tissue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heart Disease Tied to Ear Creases: That's Improbable!
(MedPage Today) -- Also, the toxicities of detox tea (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - December 10, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: How a single bout of exercise instantly protects the heart
The phenomenon of 'ischemic preconditioning' helps to explain how an acute bout of exercise can have immediate protective effects against heart disease. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Nigeria:Why Bald Men Are At Greater Risk or Having a Heart Disease - Bunmi Sofola
[Vanguard] Men who go bald on the crown of the head also have their risk of heart disease increased by a half, say scientists. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 9, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Maybe the healthiest wine in the world
When I was in South Africa last year, I met a revolutionary winemaker… His wine was completely organic. It had no toxins, and it contained powerful antioxidant properties. It was infused with a local herb called rooibos, also known as “red bush.” You may have seen rooibos tea on supermarket shelves. I immediately knew this wine should be made widely available in America — and I’m still hopeful a distributor will bring it here. I enjoy a nice glass of red wine from time to time, but the trouble with most of the wines sold in America is that they’re loaded with dangerous chemicals. Winema...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - December 7, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Health additives natural organic Sulfites wine Source Type: news

State Public Health Actions to Prevent and Control Diabetes, Heart Disease, Obesity and Associated Risk Factors, and Promote School Health
(Source: CDC Preventing Chronic Disease)
Source: CDC Preventing Chronic Disease - December 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

24 million opioid prescriptions were issued last year
Researchers from the University of Newcastle found people taking painkillers alongside drugs for heart disease, stroke or diabetes are more likely to have diabetes and a 'high risk' waist circumference. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Parental lifespan genes could hold clue to longer life
(University of Exeter) The study undertook a genome-wide search for variants influencing how long participants' parents lived. The team studied 389,166 volunteers who took part in the UK Biobank, with confirmation in the US Health and Retirement Study and the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. Eight genetic variants had already been linked for lifespan, mainly involved in heart disease and dementia. The latest study, published in the journal Aging NY, has expanded this to 25 genes in all, with some specific to mothers' or fathers' lifespan separately. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Now one in three British teenagers is already overweight
More than a third of British teenagers are overweight or obese, putting them in danger of diabetes and heart disease as adults, statistics show, with teenage girls more likely to pile on the pounds. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eating Cheese Daily May Be Good For You, Study Finds
CBS Local — Cheese fans around the world, rejoice! The study you’ve been waiting for has arrived. Researchers have found that eating cheese every day is good for your health and may decrease your chance of developing heart disease. The findings, published in December’s European Journal of Nutrition, looked at 15 separate studies that followed over 200,000 people in the U.S. and Europe. Researchers say people who ate large amounts of cheese lowered their risk of developing heart disease by 14 percent and were 10 percent less likely to have a stroke compared to people who didn’t eat cheese. “Che...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Cheese Chris Melore Heart Disease Local TV talkers Source Type: news

Disease has an inverse relationship with nutrition: Eat more fruits and vegetables to reduce risk of nearly all disease, research finds
(Natural News) A team of scientists from Imperial College London pulled together all the world’s available population studies that document fruit and vegetable intake. The ninety-five studies included two million people and accounted for 112,000 cases of cancer, 81,000 cases of cardiovascular disease, 47,000 cases of stroke, 43,000 cases of heart disease, and 94,000 premature... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Edwards Lifesciences acquires mitral repair dev Harpoon Medical for $100 million
Edwards Lifesciences (NYSE:EW) said today it acquired mitral valve repair developer Harpoon Medical for $100 million in cash, with the potential for an additional $150 million in milestone payments over 10 years. Harpoon is developing a system designed to enable echo-guided repair of mitral valve regurgitation through the stabilization of prolapse leaflets to restore coaptation and valve function. The device is currently investigational, though Harpoon is hopeful it will receive CE Mark approval in the European Union in the near future. “We believe the addition of Harpoon Medical’s technology and talented ...
Source: Mass Device - December 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Cardiovascular Mergers & Acquisitions Replacement Heart Valves Edwards Lifesciences Harpoon Medical Source Type: news

Edwards Buys Harpoon for up to $250 Million
Edwards Lifesciences may be best known for its leadership in transcatheter valve therapies, but the company appears to be turning to its surgical valve portfolio as part of its growth strategy for the coming year. The company's acquisition of Harpoon Medical, announced Wednesday afternoon, is the first major indicator of this shift. Harpoon is developing beating-heart repair technology for degenerative mitral regurgitation (DMR). Edwards paid $100 million up front for Harpoon and agreed to pay up to $150 million more in milestone payments over the next 10 years. The company has had an eye on Harpoon since 2015 wh...
Source: MDDI - December 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Medical Device Business Source Type: news

Non-ART Fertility Treatment May Raise Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease Risk Non-ART Fertility Treatment May Raise Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease Risk
Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ob/Gyn & Women ' s Health News Source Type: news

Pippa Middleton supports BHF Christmas Appeal to help fight congenital heart disease
British Heart Foundation (BHF) Ambassador Pippa Middleton paid young heart patients a surprise visit after pledging her support for the charity's Christmas Appeal, spending yesterday morning [Tuesday 4 December] at the paediatric cardiac ward at Bristol Royal Children ’ s Hospital to cheer up patients and listen to the many inspirational stories of young people living with a heart condition (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - December 6, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, International, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, Faculty of Health Sciences, Translational Health Sciences, Institutes, Institutes, Bristol Heart Institute; Press Release Source Type: news

Balding, premature graying tied to higher heart disease risk
Male-pattern baldness and premature greying are associated with a greater risk of heart disease before the age of 40 than obesity, according to a new study from India. Does this mean that doctors should be screening our hairline alongside traditional risk factors such as our weight and blood pressure? (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health Tip: 11 Harmful Effects of Smoking
-- Everyone knows that smoking is dangerous, increasing the risk of heart disease, cancer, lung disease and stroke. According to the U.S. National Institutes of Health, it may cause many other health problems among women: Decreased bone density... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 6, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Study suggests hot flashes could be precursor to diabetes
(The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)) Hot flashes, undoubtedly the most common symptom of menopause, are not just uncomfortable and inconvenient, but numerous studies demonstrate they may increase the risk of serious health problems, including heart disease. A new study suggests that hot flashes (especially when accompanied by night sweats) also may increase the risk of developing diabetes. Results are being published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Diesel vehicles in oil sands operations contribute to regional pollution
(American Chemical Society) Wildfires, cigarette smoking and vehicles all emit a potentially harmful compound called isocyanic acid. The substance has been linked to several health conditions, including heart disease and cataracts. Scientists investigating sources of the compound have now identified off-road diesel vehicles in oil sands production in Alberta, Canada, as a major contributor to regional levels of the pollutant. Their report appears in ACS' journal Environmental Science& Technology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 6, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Heart disease: Wine could protect against heart conditions this Christmas
DRINKING wine this Christmas time could lower the risk of dying from coronary heart disease, and could help to protect the heart, nutritionists have claimed. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

State-Mandated Newborn Screening Tied to Decrease in Infant Cardiac Deaths
Mandatory screening of newborns for critical congenital heart disease is associated with a significant reduction in early infant deaths, a JAMA study finds. Researchers analyzed... (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - December 6, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

High blood pressure warning: THESE sausages EXPOSED as having dangerously high salt levels
HIGH blood pressure is a growing problem in the UK with millions at risk of heart disease and strokes. A new report has revealed the supermarket sausages whose high salt content could be exacerbating the problem. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Air Pollution May Harm Babies Even Before They Are Born
Pollution raised the risk of low birth weight babies, which may increase the risk for diabetes and heart disease later in life. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Air Pollution Babies and Infants Heart Diabetes Pregnancy and Childbirth Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Eating cheese every day may help to protect heart health
Eating 40 grams of cheese every day could help to reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, suggests a new observational study. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Heart age quiz: This test will reveal YOUR risk of fatal heart attacks and strokes
HEART disease and strokes account for about 7,400 deaths in the UK every month. A three-minute Heart Age Test will reveal how healthy your heart is, and whether you ’re at risk of a fatal heart attack. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Type 2 diabetes symptoms: The SEVEN signs you should see a doctor REVEALED
TYPE 2 DIABETES is increasingly common, and sufferers risk heart disease and blindness. These are the seven signs you could be suffering. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Language patterns reveal the body ’s biological response to stress
FINDINGSCertain language patterns track the body ’s molecular response to stress more closely than a person’s own description of the stress, anxiety or depression that they are experiencing.BACKGROUNDPoverty, loneliness or post-traumatic stress disorder can have serious consequences on health, increasing the risk of cancer, Alzheimer ’s disease and heart disease, among other health problems. Previous research has shown that our genes respond to psychological adversity by increasing inflammation and reducing virus-fighting activity. These factors may contribute to social disparities in health.Steve Cole, a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 1, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news