New health calculator can help predict heart disease risk, estimate heart age
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) A new online health calculator can help people determine their risk of heart disease, as well as their heart age, accounting for sociodemographic factors such as ethnicity, sense of belonging and education, as well as health status and lifestyle behaviors. The process to build and validate the tool is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Baby's cardiovascular health compromised by gestational diabetes
A new study in theAmerican Journal of Physiology-Cell Physiology reports that gestational diabetes may increase the risk of heart disease in babies.Medical Xpress (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - July 20, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Drinking too much causes an imbalance of bacteria in your mouth and increases your risk of cancer
(Natural News) Aside from contributing to bad breath, it looks like drinking alcohol can disrupt the balance of both “good” and “bad” bacteria in your mouth. The results of a study determined that regular alcohol consumption can also increase an individual’s chance of developing cavities and gum disease, along with cancer and heart disease. Alcohol, mouth... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

GPs included in new diabetes ‘clinical champions’ drive
Three GPs form part of new 20-strong cohort of champions Related items fromOnMedica More Scottish GPs needed to fight heart disease GPs to receive help to improve patients ’ physical activity Put families at heart of helping obese children Apply different obesity criteria to BME patients GPs should recommend gradual, long-term weight loss (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - July 20, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Diabetes carries higher risk of cancer for women
Female diabetics have 6% greater risk of all-site cancer compared to males Related items fromOnMedica Preventing type 2 diabetes Scotland reveals plans to cut impact of type 2 diabetes Long working hours heightens risk of diabetes in women Job strain linked to heightened risk of early death in men with heart disease/diabetes GPs failing to follow women at risk after gestational diabetes (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - July 20, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Diabetes type 2: You may only need to walk this long to lower blood sugar levels
DIABETES type 2 and type 1 sufferers need to control their blood sugar levels to avoid spikes, which can cause blindness, heart disease and, in more extreme cases, amputations. Doing this short amount of exercise each day can help reduce blood sugar levels. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Good cholesterol may increase risk of heart disease in older women
Hormonal changes during menopause can cause the 'healthy' HDL blood fat to become harmful - by enlarging the particles, say scientists at the University of Pittsburgh. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Good cholesterol' may not always be good
(University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences) Postmenopausal factors may have an impact on the heart-protective qualities of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) -- also known as 'good cholesterol.' The findings bring into question the current use of total HDL cholesterol to predict heart disease risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Diabetes during pregnancy may increase baby's heart disease risk
(American Physiological Society) Gestational diabetes may increase the risk of blood vessel dysfunction and heart disease in offspring by altering a smooth muscle protein responsible for blood vessel network formation. Understanding of the protein's function in fetal cells may improve early detection of disease in children. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology -- Cell Physiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CCTA biomarker spots high-risk plaques in heart disease
An increase in pericoronary adipose tissue attenuation -- a biomarker associated...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: CCTA reduces unnecessary invasive coronary procedures Stress echo beats CCTA for evaluating chest pain CCTA usage rate rises sharply, but still eclipsed by MPI CCTA predicts heart events in stable chest pain patients Radiologists now use CCTA more than cardiologists do (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 18, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

More evidence that omega-3 supplements lack heart benefits
(Reuters Health) - Omega-3 fatty acids have long been touted as heart healthy, but taking them in supplement form does little to protect against heart disease, a large new analysis suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

More Pregnant Women Are Suffering From Heart Attacks
BOSTON (CBS) — The number of women who suffer from a heart attack while pregnant or soon after giving birth is on the rise. In fact, according to researchers at the NYU School of Medicine, the risk has gone up by 25-percent between 2002 to 2014. The overall risk of having a heart attack while pregnant is still very low, but after looking at more than 49-million births, researchers found that risk continues to climb. The cause is not completely clear but researchers believe several factors may contribute. Women are having children when they’re older. More women of reproductive age are obese. More have diabetes. ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Heart Attack Pregnancy Source Type: news

More Women Are Having Heart Attacks During Pregnancy and Birth
The number of women who have a heart attack during pregnancy, labor or in the weeks following birth appears to be rising. In a new study, published Wednesday in the journal Mayo Clinical Proceedings, researchers looked at more than 49 million births.Among the women who gave birth, 1,061 had a heart attack during their labor and delivery; 922 had heart attacks during their pregnancy, and 2,390 women had heart attacks after they gave birth. Overall, the risk of having a heart attack was relatively low. But the risk increased 25% from 2002 to 2014, the researchers found, which they call a concerning rise. Among women who had...
Source: TIME: Health - July 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Heart Disease Pregnancy Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Do omega-3 supplements really benefit the heart?
A major systematic review of clinical trials led by independent researchers finds 'little to no' evidence that omega-3 capsules benefit heart health. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

New research shows little effect of omega 3 on risk of heart disease, stroke or death
(Wiley) Omega 3 is a type of fat. Small amounts of omega 3 fats are essential for good health, and they can be found in the food that we eat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Artery hardening and thickness not affected by stopping hormone therapy
(The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)) Heart disease is still the number one killer of US women, and hormone therapy remains a top treatment for menopause symptoms. A new study connects these two facts to demonstrate little effect of hormone therapy on artery thickness as a precursor to heart disease. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

HIV infection doubles risk of heart disease, global study finds
(University of Edinburgh) People infected with HIV are twice as likely to suffer from heart disease, research has found. Analysis of global figures reveals that HIV-associated cardiovascular disease has more than tripled in the past 20 years as more people are living longer with the virus. The greatest impact is in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia Pacific regions, with Swaziland, Botswana and Lesotho particularly affected. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Media coverage of new Cochrane Review of Cochrane Review on omega-3 fatty acids
New evidence published today shows there is little or no effect of omega 3 supplements on our risk of experiencing heart disease, stroke or death. Below is a round-up for some of the media coverage.Fishy findings: Cochrane review finds omega-3 supplements don't help heartsonScimexOmega 3 supplements do not reduce risk of heart disease, stroke, or death, finds review onthe bmjOmega-3 pills and fish oil ‘useless’ for preventing diseaseonThe Times IT'S OIL A MYTH Omega-3 and fish extracts don ’t help your heart health, researchers claim onThe SunFish oil for a healthy heart'nonsense 'on BBC News‘B...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 18, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Scientific expert reaction to Cochrane Review on omega-3 fatty acids
This study provides no evidence to suggest that this dietary advice should change.”Read the press releaseSee the media coverageDeclared interestsProf Tim Chico: “No conflicts.”Dr Ian Johnson: “Ian Johnson has previously held honorary academic appointments in the medical school at the University of East Anglia.”Prof Tom Sanders: “Scientific governor of British Nutrition Foundation, Honorary Director of Nutrition HEART UK.”The Science Media CentreThe Science Media Centre is an independent venture working to promote the voices, stories and views from the scientific community to the ne...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 17, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

The welsh onion can combat the effects of a high-fat diet
(Natural News) More than just a cooking ingredient, Welsh onion (Allium fistulosum) has been used as a traditional medicine for treating colds, influenza, abdominal pain, headache, and heart disease. Research has yet discovered another health benefit of this superfood. In the study, published in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, researchers revealed that it... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

It ’s Nearly Impossible to Diagnose Alzheimer’s Disease in Living People. Bill Gates Wants to Change That
Name practically any disease or condition that afflicts the human body and there’s probably a good test for detecting it — preferably early, when there’s a chance that promising treatments can slow it down or even cure it. Cancer, inherited forms of heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, and even certain mental illnesses can be picked up by tracking hormones, genes or other things circulating in the body. But that hasn’t been the case with Alzheimer’s disease, the neurodegenerative condition that was first described in 1906, and more than a century later, still doesn’t have a blood test ...
Source: TIME: Health - July 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Disease healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Medical News Today: E-counseling can lower blood pressure, heart disease risk
New research shows that virtual counseling, when added to medical therapy, lowers high blood pressure and heart disease risk in people with hypertension. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hypertension Source Type: news

Phase III CAPSTONE-2 study showed that baloxavir marboxil reduced symptoms in people at high risk of complications from the flu
Roche today announced that the phase III CAPSTONE-2 study assessing the safety and efficacy of baloxavir marboxil in people at high risk of complications from the flu met the study ’s primary objective, and showed superior efficacy in the primary endpoint of time to improvement of influenza symptoms versus placebo The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines people at high risk for serious flu complications to include adults 65 years of age or older, or thos e who have conditions such as asthma, chronic lung disease, diabetes, or heart disease – for these people, flu can lead to hospitalisation ...
Source: Roche Media News - July 17, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Phase III CAPSTONE-2 study showed that baloxavir marboxil reduced symptoms in people at high risk of complications from the flu
Roche today announced that the phase III CAPSTONE-2 study assessing the safety and efficacy of baloxavir marboxil in people at high risk of complications from the flu met the study ’s primary objective, and showed superior efficacy in the primary endpoint of time to improvement of influenza symptoms versus placebo The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines people at high risk for serious flu complications to include adults 65 years of age or older, or thos e who have conditions such as asthma, chronic lung disease, diabetes, or heart disease – for these people, flu can lead to hospitalisation ...
Source: Roche Investor Update - July 17, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Children's Hospital Colorado, Mayo Clinic announce congenital heart defect collaboration
(Children's Hospital Colorado) Mayo Clinic and Children's Colorado are collaborating to provide solutions for patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, a rare and complex form of congenital heart disease in which the left side of the heart is severely underdeveloped. The collaboration includes collecting cord blood to be stored at Mayo Clinic. When heart surgery is performed, Children's Colorado surgeons will inject the baby's own stem cells back into the heart muscle to make it stronger. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

While men lose more weight on low-carb diets, women show improved artery flexibility
(University of Missouri-Columbia) According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 1 out of 3 American adults live with higher than normal blood sugar levels known as prediabetes. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine recently found that while men may lose more weight on low-carb diets, women actually see better improvements in artery flexibility. It's a finding that may help pre-diabetic women reduce their risk for heart disease through a low-carb diet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Better treatment of multiple conditions is ‘urgent challenge’
Nine in ten people with coronary heart disease in the UK are living with at least one other long-term condition, increasing the risk of an early death, a charity has warned. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - July 17, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Eczema a greater burden on patients than heart disease or diabetes
Quality of life with moderate to severe eczema lower than many other chronic diseases Related items fromOnMedica Severe eczema linked to cardiovascular problems Eczema drug reduces symptoms of severe asthma A.I. better at diagnosing skin cancer than humans (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - July 17, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Women's fertility may be related to heart disease risk factors
(Reuters Health) - Young women with unhealthy levels of fats in their blood may have higher odds of having just one child, or no children at all, a recent study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Heart patients with other illnesses in danger says British Heart Foundation
More needs to be done to cater for two million heart disease patients who also suffer from other conditions, a leading charity has said. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Women At Higher Risk of Dying From Heart Failure Than Men
BOSTON (CBS) – While most people still associate heart disease with men, it is still the number one killer of American women, as well as men. Now a new study out of the University of Ottawa finds women are at greater risk of dying from heart failure than men. In people with heart failure, the heart does not pump blood as effectively as it should which can lead to shortness of breath and fatigue. It can be deadly. In fact, researchers looked at 90,000 heart patients over five years and found that women are dying from heart failure at higher rates than men. They also found that while hospitalizations for heart failure ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Heart Failure Local TV university of ottawa Source Type: news

Working Yourself to Death: Long Hours Bring Risks
Putting in long hours at the office could make you more likely to get diabetes, heart disease and psychiatric disorders, research suggests. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - July 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

3D color X-rays could help diagnose cancer, heart disease and more
Image courtesy of MARS Bioimaging New Zealand scientists have performed the first-ever 3-D, color X-ray on a human, using technology that could improve medical diagnostics in oncology, cardiology, neurology and orthopedics. Based on traditional black-and-white X-ray technology, the scanner incorporates the Medipix3RX detector chip, a particle-tracking technology developed for the CERN Large Hadron Collider. It was developed by the Medipix3 Collaboration, which comprises CERN in Geneva and 18 research institutions worldwide. The scanner records the energy of each photon as it collides with pixels while the shutter...
Source: Mass Device - July 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Cardiovascular Diagnostics Imaging Neurological Orthopedics Research & Development CERN MARS Bioimaging Source Type: news

New Cochrane health evidence challenges belief that omega 3 supplements reduce risk of heart disease, stroke or death
New evidence published today shows there is little or no effect of omega 3 supplements on our risk of experiencing heart disease, stroke or death.Omega 3 is a type of fat. Small amounts of omega 3 fats are essential for good health, and they can be found in the food that we eat. The main types of omega 3 fatty acids are; alpha ­linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).  ALA is normally found in fats from plant foods, such as nuts and seeds (walnuts and rapeseed are rich sources). EPA and DHA, collectively called long chain omega 3 fats, are naturally found in fatty fish, su...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 16, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Grain-free food linked to heart disease in dogs
Dogs that eat grain-free diets may be more prone to develop a canine cardiovascular disease that has historically been seen in just a few breeds. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Veterinary Medicine and a group of veterinary diagnostic laboratories are investigating the potential link between canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and pet foods containing seeds or potatoes as main ingredients.  Breeds genetically predispose d to DCM, which often results in congestive heart failure,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - July 16, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

How Common is Recurrent Kawasaki Disease?
Patient Presentation A 3.5-year-old female came to clinic with a 2-day history fever up to 101°F. The evening before she had complained of a sore throat but had no rhinorrhea, cough or rash. She was drinking reasonably well and was urinating frequently. She had been to a birthday party where an older child had had strep throat. The past medical history was positive for Kawasaki Disease diagnosed at 17 months of age and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) on day 6 of fever. Her echocardiograms had been negative and she was being appropriately monitored by cardiology. The family history was positive for heart...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - July 16, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Afib Patch Test; Heart Failure and Genetics: It's PodMed Double T! (with audio)
(MedPage Today) -- This week's topics include a patch to diagnose atrial fibrillation, USPSTF recommendations on nontraditional risk factors for heart disease, the role of genetics in congestive heart failure, and multivitamins and heart disease. (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - July 14, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Heart Disease in Dogs May be Tied to Certain Foods
Large dogs such as Great Danes, Newfoundlands, Irish Wolfhounds, Saint Bernards and Doberman Pinschers have a genetic risk for canine DCM, a disease of the heart muscle that often leads to congestive heart failure. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - July 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dog Heart Disease May Be Linked to Potato-Based Pet Food, FDA Says
Potato-based pet foods may be causing heart disease in dogs, the U.S. Food & Drug Administration warned this week. The government agency is investigating a potential link between pet foods with peas, lentils, potatoes and other legume seeds and instances of canine dilated cardiomyopathy in dogs not typically vulnerable to the disease. “Highly unusual” reports of these dogs contracting the disease prompted the FDA to investigate their food sources, which, the agency notes, largely contained those certain ingredients. .@FDAanimalhealth is investigating the potential association between reports of canine di...
Source: TIME: Health - July 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Calfas Tags: Uncategorized onetime Pets Source Type: news

Full-fat dairy products do not increase heart disease risk
Saturated fats in dairy products do not negatively affect cardiovascular health or mortality, a study in theAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests.Daily Mail (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - July 13, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Saturated fats in dairy do not increase the risk of heart disease
Researchers from the University of Texas, Houston, found that eating full-fat dairy actually reduces the risk of dying from stroke by 42 percent. Yet guidelines recommend low-fat options. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A brisk walk doesn’t cut it for teenagers: They need vigorous, out-of-breath physical activity to prevent obesity, heart disease
(Natural News) It’s never too soon to start caring about your body. Teenagers, especially, could stand to gain a lot for taking steps to get fit. Still, with the impact of today’s technologies – it’s easier to sit at home and binge-watch television than go out and engage in physical activities. Unfortunately, this has become... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Multivitamins May Not Provide Heart Benefits
An analysis found no ties between multivitamins and the risk for cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease or stroke incidence or mortality. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Vitamins Heart Source Type: news

Medical News Today: How long does it take to recover from heart bypass surgery?
If someone has a blockage in the heart, they may need bypass surgery to lower the risk of a heart attack. It is the most common heart surgery performed on adults. The operation can take many hours, but the success rate is high. Recovery time varies from person to person but usually involves 1 week in the hospital. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Saturated fats in yoghurt, cheese and butter do NOT increase the risk of heart disease
Researchers from the University of Texas, Houston, found that eating full-fat dairy actually reduces the risk of dying from stroke by 42 percent. Yet guidelines recommend low-fat options. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Do You Really Need Less Sleep As You Age?
There’s no doubt that kids need more sleep than adults. Their growing bodies and brains burn through a lot of energy, and adequate rest and recovery are essential for proper development. That’s why the National Sleep Foundation recommends that teens get eight to ten hours of sleep a night, while younger kids require more. But what about adults? It’s common for people to sleep fewer hours in middle age than during their 20s or 30s—and to report feeling fine. But does a person’s sleep requirements diminish with age? “No,” says Dr. Leila Kheirandish-Gozal, director of clinical sleep r...
Source: TIME: Health - July 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized healthytime sleep Source Type: news

AHA: Southern Diet Could Be Deadly for People With Heart Disease
THURSDAY, July 12, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- People with a history of heart disease who eat a traditional Southern diet are more likely to die than those who follow a Mediterranean dietary pattern, according to new research. The... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Sharp rise in people labelled as hypertensive under new guidelines
62.5 million more people could become eligible for drug treatment Related items fromOnMedica Blood pressure measurement Blood pressure below treatable threshold linked to heightened dementia risk High blood pressure before pregnancy linked to heightened miscarriage risk Genes isolated for pulmonary arterial hypertension Job strain linked to heightened risk of early death in men with heart disease/diabetes (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - July 12, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

This Surprising Factor May Raise Your Risk of Alzheimer ’s
Outside of your genetic makeup, few things are definitively linked to Alzheimer’s disease and other degenerative brain conditions. Unlike heart disease, which is affected by behaviors like diet, exercise and smoking, science hasn’t documented many risk factors that make the brain more vulnerable to dementia—although there are hints that things like physical activity and brain games might help to protect against cognitive decline. But in a study published in the journal Neurology, researchers led by Dr. Zoe Arvanitakis, medical director of the Rush Memory Clinic at Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, fi...
Source: TIME: Health - July 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Blood Pressure Brain healthytime Heart Disease Source Type: news