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MI Linked to Increased Vascular Dementia, Not Alzheimer's MI Linked to Increased Vascular Dementia, Not Alzheimer's
A large, population-based study shows a specific increased risk for vascular dementia after MI, but not other forms of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

UN Agency Defers Action Cutting Ties to Tobacco Industry
Close-up of a woman hands hold and broke a cigarette. Credit: BigstockBy Thalif DeenUNITED NATIONS, Nov 21 2017 (IPS)Back in November 2008, the 193-member General Assembly decided, by consensus, to ban smoking and tobacco sales at the UN headquarters in New York: a ruling observed by all affiliated agencies worldwide, including the Geneva-based World Health Organization (WHO) which has severed links with the tobacco industry. But there still remains one holdout: the 187-member International Labour Organization (ILO) in Geneva whose Governing Body, which meets three times a year, has postponed once again its decision on whe...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Thalif Deen Tags: Development & Aid Global Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

More GP specialists needed to manage rising tide of cardiovascular disease
Heart failure cases are driving up GP workload despite the success of preventative measures to cut the rate of the disease, according to an analysis of UK data. (Source: GP Online News)
Source: GP Online News - November 21, 2017 Category: Primary Care Tags: 15.1 Cardiovascular Problems Source Type: news

MRI discovers heart damage among male triathletes
Using late gadolinium-enhanced MRI scans, German researchers found myocardial...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Some cardiac MRI findings predict future heart events Stress cardiac MR matches 320-row CCTA results Study shows feasibility of cardiac PET/MRI -- with caveats Cardiac MR tops ECG in finding hidden myocardial infarctions Late MRI enhancement predicts death risk in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - November 21, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

HIV/HCV Coinfection and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease HIV/HCV Coinfection and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease
Do individuals with HIV/HCV coinfection have an increased cardiovascular risk compared to those with HIV infection alone?Journal of Viral Hepatitis (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology Journal Article Source Type: news

Male triathletes may be putting their heart health at risk
(Radiological Society of North America) Competitive male triathletes face a higher risk of a potentially harmful heart condition called myocardial fibrosis, according to new research. The increased risk, which was not evident in female triathletes, was directly associated with the athletes' amount of exercise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How Medtronic & #039;s Pacemakers Are Now Harder to Hack
FDA approved Medtronic's Azure pacemakers, which feature the company's new BlueSync technology to protect patients from having their device hacked. The BlueSync technology is also now available with the Medtronic Percepta portfolio of quadripolar, MR-conditional cardiac resynchronization therapy pacemakers (CRT-Ps), the company said. BlueSync is intended to enable more secure wireless remote monitoring via Medtronic's CareLink Network, by limiting access to the device functionality and also by protecting patient data. Connected medical devices like pacemakers add value to patient care by enabling remote patient monito...
Source: MDDI - November 21, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Digital Health Cardiovascular Source Type: news

Mark's heart attack story could save YOUR life
John, the anaesthetist, told me when he came to see me on his Sunday round that I had just been ‘incredibly unlucky’, writes MARK DAVIES. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High blood pressure: ‘Real advance’ in combating condition that affects MILLIONS
SCIENTISTS have announced a ‘real advance’ in combating high blood pressure, a condition that affects millions and leads to heart attacks and strokes. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - November 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dog Owners Have Lower Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease, Swedish Data Suggest
Researchers looked at hospital visits in Sweden's public health care system and checked them against dog registration records. They found dog owners had lower rates of heart disease. (Image credit: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Camila Domonoske Source Type: news

Endovascular Repair of Ruptured AAA Improves Midterm Survival Endovascular Repair of Ruptured AAA Improves Midterm Survival
Endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm was linked to reduced mortality at 3 years, improved early quality of life, and reduced costs compared with open surgery in the IMPROVE trial.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Is your cardiologist KILLING you? Mind-blowing interview with Dr. Jack Wolfson reveals dangerous, dark secrets of cardiology
(Natural News) You’re about to hear some mind-blowing information that mainstream cardiologists either don’t know or won’t tell you. We recently sat down to interview Dr. Jack Wolfson, D.O., author of The Paleo Cardiologist and founder of The DrsWolfson clinic in Arizona. Dr. Wolfson is without a doubt the coolest cardiologist on the planet. Not... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why LivaNova Is Unloading Its CRM Business
LivaNova, formerly known as Sorin Group, has decided to get out of the cardiac rhythm management (CRM) business and shift more focus to its areas of strength.  The London-based company plans to sell its CRM business to Shanghai-based MicroPort for $190 million in cash. The business, which makes high-voltage defibrillators, cardiac resynchronization therapy devices and low-voltage pacemakers, generated about $249 million in net sales in the fiscal year 2016. The business has roughly 900 employees with operations chiefly in Clamart, France; Saluggia, Italy; and Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. The company said in Sept...
Source: MDDI - November 20, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Cardiovascular Medical Device Business Source Type: news

GVI partners with cardiologist to train African surgeons
A team of surgeons from Great Lakes Cardiovascular have completed their first live proctorship on pacemakers for 30 surgeons across Africa. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 20, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tracey Drury Source Type: news

GVI partners with cardiologist to train African surgeons
A team of surgeons from Great Lakes Cardiovascular have completed their first live proctorship on pacemakers for 30 surgeons across Africa. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 20, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Tracey Drury Source Type: news

Many U.S. schools don ’t teach CPR even when states require it
(Reuters Health) - Even though high schools in most U.S. states are required to offer training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to students, many do not, a new study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Telepharmacy Program Improves Adherence, Not CV Outcomes Telepharmacy Program Improves Adherence, Not CV Outcomes
A randomized proof-of-concept study, STICK2IT, showed a novel telepharmacy program improved adherence to cardiovascular drugs, but didn't affect outcomes.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Want To Live Longer? Scientists Say You Should Get A Dog
CBS Local — Looking for the secret to a longer life and a healthy heart? A new study in Sweden says owning a dog is the best medicine for cardiovascular health, especially if you’re single. Researchers from Uppsala University have released the results of a 12-year study that followed over 3.4 million Swedish adults, looking at their heart health and risks for heart disease. According to the findings, Swedes who owned a four-legged friend were found to have a lower risk of death and decreased chance of cardiovascular disease. The report revealed that the health benefits of having a dog in your life were even mor...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Cardiovascular Disease Cardiovascular Health Chris Melore Dogs Heart Health talkers Source Type: news

Maybe ER stands for extra revenue: Research reveals the expensive tests given in the emergency room are completely useless in determining whether a patient is having a heart attack
(Natural News) Naivete compels us to still clutch on to the notion that doctors still operate under their code of “first, do no harm.” Nevertheless, evidence colors our perceptions, with another study proving once again that hospitals — and medical professionals in general — are over-testing and over-treating patients. Worse, these additional procedures offer no... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lower your risk for heart disease when you make peanuts and tree nuts a regular part of your diet
(Natural News) Consuming most kinds of nuts may result in a decrease in risk of cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease. According to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, there is a lowered risk of developing such diseases in people who consume fresh nuts regularly, as compared to people... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

HOPE-Duchenne and Help at Last HOPE-Duchenne and Help at Last
The final day of AHA 2017 brought Dr Walton Shirley to tears with studies offering hope to ease the suffering she has witnessed firsthand.theheart.org on Medscape (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Expert Column Source Type: news

WATCH: Owning a dog linked to lower death rate, study says
Owning a dog is associated with a significantly lower risk of cardiovascular disease and lower death rate, according to a comprehensive study published by a team of Swedish researchers on Friday (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

Chronic Conditions Increasing Among Childbearing Women
Identification of at least one chronic condition rose from 66.9 to 91.8 per 1,000 delivery hospitalizations (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - November 20, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Nephrology, Neurology, Nursing, Psychiatry, Pulmonology, Rheumatology, Journal, Source Type: news

Can you predict a heart attack? Sudden DEATH odds estimated by scientists
HEART attacks can be caused by an irregular heartbeat. Scientists claim to have found a way of estimating the chances of these rare, abnormal, heartbeats, so they can predict the probability of suddenly dying from cardiac arrest. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bystander CPR Save Underscores Importance of Community Role
“Everyone has a part to play and when everything aligns, you get the best chance for a good outcome,” said Mike Roulette, an apparatus operator and paramedic with Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue in Portland, Oregon. Saves like the one involving Bob Brands are a daily reminder of why the work he does in the community is so important. Brands was taking a breather between go-kart races on Feb. 22, 2015, when he suddenly collapsed. An employee at the racing center immediately called 9-1-1. Evan Schenck, another racer, began CPR. Within moments, a sheriff’s deputy had arrived and was applying an automat...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 20, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeff A. Woodin, NRP, FAHA Tags: Patient Care Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

Medtronic wins FDA nod for Azure remote monitoring equipped pacers
Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) said today it won FDA approval for its portfolio of Azure pacemakers with BlueSync patient monitoring technology. The clearances cover both the Azure XT MRI and Azure S MRI pacers including single chamber and dual chamber models, the Fridley, Minn.-based company said. The newly cleared pacers have estimated lifespans of 13.7 years for dual chamber pacers, which Medtronic estimates is 27% longer than the earlier-gen devices. The Azure portfolio of pacers feature the company’s Reactive ATP algorithm intended to slow the progression of atrial fibrillation and BlueSynch technology which allows f...
Source: Mass Device - November 20, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiac Assist Devices Cardiac Implants Cardiovascular Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Medtronic Source Type: news

Diet warning: Eating SLOWLY could prevent these THREE deadly health conditions
A DIET to ward of obesity, stroke, heart disease and diabetes could be as simple as chewing your food more slowly, says a new study. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ted and Grace Anne Koppel on COPD, third leading cause of death in U.S.
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, is the nation's third biggest killer after heart disease and cancer. About 150,000 Americans die of COPD each year. Among women, it is more deadly than breast and ovarian cancers combined. Ted Koppel focuses on the disease for a report next weekend on CBS "Sunday Morning." His wife, Grace Anne, was given only a few years to live when she was diagnosed 16 years ago. The Koppels join "CBS This Morning" to discuss why they're advocating for more research into prevention and treatment. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The future of primary care: A return to its patient-centered roots
What if we told you that the best path forward for American healthcare innovation is to get back to its roots – starting in the hometown doctor’s office? Chances are it wouldn’t surprise you at all. We hear it over and over from our members, who tell us they want a human connection in the healthcare experience. That’s why Blue KC believes primary care is at the heart of a strong, patient-centered and integrated healthcare system that is team based and community aligned. Studies since the… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 20, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Greg Sweat Source Type: news

Diabetes warning: Type 2 sufferers more at risk of THIS deadly heart condition
DIABETES sufferers are more at risk of dying from heart failure, says new study. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Millennials Follow Dr. Dean Ornish
After 40 years as a public physician educating people on heart disease, Dr. Dean Ornish's work is finding new resonance among Millennials who are battling anxiety, depression and other wellness-related issues. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - November 20, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Eve Turow Paul, Women at Forbes Source Type: news

Getinge announces installation of 1,000th Hybrid operating room worldwide
As a pioneer in the design and installation of Hybrid ORs, Getinge is a trusted partner that offers a full range of products for these multi-disciplinary spaces WAYNE, N.J., Nov. 20, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Getinge, a leading ... Devices, Cardiology, Radiology Getinge, Hybrid OR (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - November 20, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

HeartStitch(R) "Sutures The Future" at the TCT in Denver, Colorado
HeartStitch® Showcases its Suture-Based Technologies at US Largest Structural Heart Conference TCT 2017 PROVIDES CLEAR FOCUS ON KEY MARKET SEGMENTS, PFO, MITRAL AND TRICUSPID VALVE STRUCTURAL HEART TREATMENTS FOUNTAIN VALLEY, Calif., Nov. 20, 201... Devices, Cardiology Nobles Medical Technology, HeartStitch, NobleStitch (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - November 20, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

NI child heart patients going to Dublin triple in number
Between January and September this year, 23 children travelled to Dublin from Northern Ireland. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Liberia:Liberians Urged to Observe Diet, Exercise Regularly
[Observer] Two visiting Indians doctors from Fortis Hospital, Prem Kumar and Priyank Bhatt, a urologist and cardiologist, respectively, have observed that the lack of dietary observation and exercise among Liberians can contribute to serious health risks. Drs. Kumar and Bhatt, who came to Liberia on an invitation from Varsay E. Sirleaf, Jr., CEO of Snapper Hill Clinic, noted that after examining more than 250 patients, they saw signs of critical stages of heart disease and urinary tract infections. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 20, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Personal Health: Clearing Up the Confusion About Salt
Excess sodium is responsible for most cases of hypertension, a leading risk factor for heart attacks, strokes and kidney failure. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JANE E. BRODY Tags: Salt Diet and Nutrition Blood Pressure Hypertension Labeling and Labels (Product) Restaurants Source Type: news

The health of your gut microbiome could predict your risk of heart disease, researchers find
(Natural News) The most common lifestyle risk factors of heart diseases and stroke are unhealthy diet, lack of physical activity, tobacco smoke, and heavy alcohol drinking, and in a new study, researchers have discovered another link between gut bacteria and health. The new study has found that the bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract could have... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bittium Exhibited Bittium Faros ECG Device and Software for Analyzing Cardiac Event-Based ECG and Long-Term Holter Measurements
Bittium exhibited its innovative products and solutions for cardiology at Medica 2017 on November 13-16 in Dusseldorf, Germany. At the event Bittium has showcased Bittium Faros ECG devices and the recently launched Bittium Cardiac Explorer software for analyzing Cardiac event based ECG recording and Bittium Cardiac Navigator software meant for accurate analyzing of long-term Holter ECG recordings. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - November 20, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Industry Business and Industry Source Type: news

Medical News Today: E-cigarette flavorings may impair heart muscle function
By studying heart muscle cells in the laboratory, researchers found that some flavorings in e-cigarette liquids, such as citrus, may have harmful effects. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Smoking / Quit Smoking Source Type: news

Tame work stress for your good health
Too much responsibility with too little authority. Angry customers. Unreasonable deadlines. Work that isn ’t engaging. Unproductive meetings.  On-the-job scenarios like these can send your stress through the roof. And too much stress for too long can have scary consequences like high blood pressure, headaches, heart disease, difficulty sleeping, anxiety and muscle pain.  If you can’t quit your j ob, then it’s crucial you learn how to handle the stress before it gets the best of you. Resist… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - November 20, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Content provided by Premier Health Source Type: news

For adults younger than 78, risk for heart disease linked to risk for problems walking
(American Geriatrics Society) A team of researchers from Sweden's Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm examined the factors that put older adults at higher risk for developing physical limitations as they age. Findings published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society suggest that reducing heart disease risk factors with appropriate treatments might help 'younger' older adults maintain their physical function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tame work stress for your good health
Too much responsibility with too little authority. Angry customers. Unreasonable deadlines. Work that isn ’t engaging. Unproductive meetings.  On-the-job scenarios like these can send your stress through the roof. And too much stress for too long can have scary consequences like high blood pressure, headaches, heart disease, difficulty sleeping, anxiety and muscle pain.  If you can’t quit your j ob, then it’s crucial you learn how to handle the stress before it gets the best of you. Resist… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 20, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Content provided by Premier Health Source Type: news

Can Fish Oil Help Reading?
Discussion Fats and fatty acids are essential for good human health. Saturated fats have hydrogen pairs linked to each carbon on the carbon backbone. They are solid or semi-solid at room temperature. Common examples are butter, lard, or hardened vegetable shortening. They are linked to higher cholesterol and triglycerides and only a small amount of them are recommended to be consumed in the diet. Unsaturated fats have one or more hydrogen atoms missing from the carbon backbone. They are liquid at room temperature. Monounsaturated fatty acids have one hydrogen pair that is missing from the carbon backbone. They are liq...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - November 20, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What is bigeminy?
A look at bigeminy, a condition where the heart's rhythm feels off-kilter. Included is detail on the definition and diagnosis of the condition. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Theory: Flexibility is at the heart of human intelligence
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Centuries of study have yielded many theories about how the brain gives rise to human intelligence. Some think it arises from a single region or neural network. Others argue that metabolism is key. A new paper makes the case that the brain's dynamic properties -- how it is wired but also how that wiring shifts in response to changing intellectual demands -- are the best predictors of intelligence in the human brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A dying vet needed CPR. Hidden video shows his nurse laughing instead.
By the late winter of 2014, James Dempsey had served in a world war, raised children, buried a wife and seen the best of his health behind him. As he prepared for a stay at a nursing home on the outskirts of Atlanta, the 89-year-old began to feel nervous. So his family hid a camera in his room at Northeast Atlanta Health and […]Related:The truth behind the ‘first marijuana overdose death’ headlinesIn a first, scientists edit genes inside a man’s body to try to cure a disease. What’s next?American Heart Association president has heart attack (Source: Was...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - November 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sit, relax, chew: Eating too fast increases your risk of obesity, high blood pressure, cholesterol more than five-fold
(Natural News) It looks like the weight loss tip to eat slowly has its merits. According to a recent study, eating too fast increases the “risk of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.” Research findings indicate that individuals who eat fast might end up eating more because their bodies don’t have the time to realize that... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Former CDC director's new effort to tackle global health issues
Resolve to Save Lives is a five-year, $225 million global health initiative that seeks to address major health issues on a global scale. Former director of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and Resolve's president and CEO, Dr. Tom Frieden, joins "CBS This Morning: Saturday" to discuss the two major areas the project focuses on: cardiovascular health and epidemic prevention. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - November 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Generous people 'listen to their hearts,' quite literally
New research measures interoception, or people's ability to 'listen' to their bodies, and their willingness to give away money. The heart plays a key role. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychology / Psychiatry Source Type: news