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Janssen submits sNDA to FDA for Invokana to reduce risk of MACE
Janssen Research and Development has submitted a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Invokana (canagliflozin) to reduce the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - October 4, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Teens Who Avoid Veggies Could Face Heart Issues
Leafy green veggies are a good source of the vital nutrient (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Resuscitation Device Provides Continuous Oxygen Delivery During CPR
"No pause should be your cause," or so French medical device manufacturer Vygon believes. In March, JEMS Editor-in-Chief A.J. Heightman and I traveled to Paris to attend a one-day emergency symposium titled, Alveolar Ventilation by Continuous Chest Compression: b-card, a new device designed for use during cardiac arrest management. During the symposium, current cardiac arrest guidelines, the Boussignac Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation Device (b-card) and how the two are interconnected were discussed. The b-card is available and in use in Europe and Canada; however, it's not available or approved for sale in the Unite...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 4, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: W. Scott Gilmore, MD, EMT-P Tags: Patient Care Source Type: news

The cancer-stress connection
It’s no secret that stress can be deadly. It weakens your immune system… It increases your risk of heart disease… But new research shows that stress can be particularly deadly for people with cancer. A recent study in Australia found that stress allows cancer to spread six times faster. Aussie researchers tracked breast cancer cells in mice. They tagged the cancer cells with a fluorescent marker. Then they used state-of-the-art imaging to see tumor cells that had spread into the lymph system.1 What they saw was remarkable… The images showed that stress increases the number and size of lymph ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 4, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Cancer Health heart disease immune system stress Source Type: news

Outfox Your “ Aging ” Gene
Some people just seem to have all the luck when it comes to getting old. Like my 83-year-old patient who drinks a little too much Scotch, but still has a 3-handicap in golf. Or the 108-year-old who goes through a gallon of ice cream every week. If you ask them how they do it, they’ll give credit to their good genes… and there is some truth to it. We all have something called a FOXO3 gene. It helps protect us against aging. German researchers at the Christian-Albrechts University studied the FOXO3 gene in 380-plus centenarians, more than 600 people in their 90s, and more than 700 people between the ages of...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 4, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Anti-Aging Health Nutrition longevity Source Type: news

Fried foods? Use THIS oil.
You’ve probably heard some very confusing advice about which cooking oils are best for your health. Almost every time you read an article or watch a health show on TV, someone is recommending some good-for-you grease that’s somehow better, less cancer-causing, more antioxidant-rich, less (or sometimes more) fatty than the last. The problem begins with doctors and nutritionists — and Big Food — who like to classify cooking oils by categories of fat, claiming that one category is “good” and another is “bad.” Don’t listen to them. We already know that mainstream medicine a...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 4, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Nutrition Cancer cooking fat food oil Source Type: news

These foods fight deadly lung disease
Your lungs are under constant assault. That’s why COPD is the third leading cause of death according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 15 million Americans have it. COPD is short for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It’s a group of lung diseases like emphysema and chronic bronchitis. They constrict your airways. They make breathing difficult and can cause wheezing or coughing. Most doctors will tell you that smoking is the major culprit. But even if you never smoked you are still at risk of COPD. You see, our modern world is a big factor. Our air is full of chemicals. Bad air i...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 4, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Health Nutrition chronic obstructive pulmonary disease COPD lung disease lungs Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for October 4, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. This cardiac catheter uses light and ultrasound to measure plaques Researchers at the University of California at Davis combined ultrasound with light into a catheter probe to view the tiny arteries of the heart. The device use...
Source: Mass Device - October 4, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Pay Inequality, Work - Life Balance Top Concerns for Female Docs
Despite challenges, 86 percent say they are likely to continue practicing as doctors for rest of career (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - October 4, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Cardiology, Dermatology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, ENT, Pathology Source Type: news

Return to Work After MI Doesn't Always Last (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- One in four end up leaving jobs during the year following a heart attack (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - October 4, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Heart Attack Survivors Often Leave Job Behind
Danish research suggests more support needed for workers (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Too Little Vitamin K Could Harm Young Hearts
WEDNESDAY, Oct. 4, 2017 -- Bypassing leafy green veggies could take a toll on teens'heart health, new research suggests. Teens who ate the least vitamin K-rich foods -- such as spinach, cabbage, iceberg lettuce and olive oil -- had triple the risk... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 4, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Ambulatory BP Patterns Fluctuate Over Time in Children Ambulatory BP Patterns Fluctuate Over Time in Children
Ambulatory blood-pressure patterns are not stable over time in children, supporting the need for follow-up studies even in children with initially normal results, researchers suggest.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Surviving Heart Attack Often Means Leaving Job Behind
Danish research suggests more support needed for workers Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Heart Attack (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Routine Screening for Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis: One Yea, One Nay
(MedPage Today) -- Two clinicians look to CREST 2 for more answers (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - October 4, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

BioVentrix launches pivotal Revivent TC trial in US
BioVentrix said today it enrolled the 1st US patient in a pivotal clinical trial of its Revivent TC transcatheter ventricular enhancement system designed to treat patients with heart failure symptoms related to cardiomyopathy. The Revivent system is designed to eliminate the need for cardiopulmonary bypass or incisions in the heart by enabling the placement of small titanium anchors along the heart’s outer surface and along 1 of the inside walls, according to the San Ramon, Calif.-based company. The 1st US patient was enrolled at the UPMC Heart and Vascular Institute by Dr. Catalin Toma and Dr. Christopher Sciortino,...
Source: Mass Device - October 4, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiovascular Catheters Clinical Trials BioVentrix Source Type: news

Stopping Long-term Aspirin Linked to CV-Event Spike Stopping Long-term Aspirin Linked to CV-Event Spike
The elevated risk appeared shortly after patients stopped aspirin and did not appear to diminish over time, the investigators report.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

The Surprising Health Benefits of Saunas
Spending time in the sauna may help lower your chances of developing high blood pressure, say the authors of a recent study in the American Journal of Hypertension. Finnish men in the study who used the sauna four to seven times a week for about 19 minutes each time cut their risk of high blood pressure nearly in half, compared to those who visited just once a week. The study authors, from the University of Eastern Finland, published research in 2015 linking sauna bathing with a reduced risk of death from cardiovascular disease and sudden cardiac events. Now, they say, they may have one potential explanation for those earl...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized are saunas good for your health Blood Pressure healthytime Heart Disease how to lower blood pressure naturally hypertension Research steam room stress relief Source Type: news

This cardiac catheter uses light and ultrasound to measure plaques
[Image from Marcu Lab/UC Davis]Researchers at the University of California at Davis combined ultrasound with light into a catheter probe to view the tiny arteries of the heart. The device uses intravascular ultrasound and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) to retrieve structural and biochemical information about plaque in the arteries to help predict heart attacks more reliably, according to the researchers. Currently, doctors use angioplasty to view blood vessels in constricted regions. A contrasting agent has to be injected to be able to view the vessels in an X-ray, but sometimes an angioplasty could miss dangerous pl...
Source: Mass Device - October 4, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Cardiovascular Catheters Diagnostics Research & Development heart disease MedTech University of California at Davis Source Type: news

If Bedside Nursing Is Dead, Then What Is Nursing?
(MedPage Today) -- In this Revolution and Revelation, Milton Packer calls for return to old-school nursing (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - October 4, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Testing 30-Day Death Risk From Heart Failure
Researchers develop 13-point assessment (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘Not Too Soon for Us.’ Jimmy Kimmel Is Going to Keep Talking About Gun Control
Jimmy Kimmel shared another visceral response to the Las Vegas shooting — the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history — with a call for tougher gun control. On Tuesday’s Jimmy Kimmel Live!, the late-show host decried a number of lawmakers who said it’s “too soon”after the tragedy to discuss gun control legislation. “Not too soon for us,” Kimmel said, calling them “nuts.” “Maybe it’s too soon for you because deep down inside, you know, in your heart, you know you bear some responsibility for the fact that almost anyone can get any weapon they wan...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - October 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ashley Hoffman Tags: Uncategorized celebrities Gun Control Jimmy Kimmel Las Vegas las vegas shooting Late Night Television onetime politics Source Type: news

Morning Break: Abortion Bill Passes House; Gunshot Injuries Seldom Seen; The Dream Workout
(MedPage Today) -- Health news and commentary from around the Web gathered by the MedPage Today staff (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - October 4, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Statins cut risk of infection that causes sepsis
Research led by the Aalborg University Hospital in Denmark found long-term users had a 30% lower chance of getting of getting staph bacteria, linked to blood, lungs and heart infections. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The effects of major burn related pathophysiological changes on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drug use: an appraisal utilizing antibiotics - Udy AA, Roberts JA, Lipman J, Blot S.
Patients suffering major burn injury represent a unique population of critically ill patients. Widespread skin and tissue damage causes release of systemic inflammatory mediators that promote endothelial leak, extravascular fluid shifts, and cardiovascular... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Life-threatening and suspicious lesions caused by mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation - Milling L, Leth PM, Astrup BS.
Chest compression devices for mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) have become more common. Here, we report the case of a young woman who attempted resuscitated with LUCAS ™2 after she was found unconscious at home. At autopsy, we found extensiv... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

BioVentrix Announces First Patient Enrolled in the U.S. arm of IDE Study of the Revivent TC(TM) TransCatheter Ventricular Enhancement Treatment
SAN RAMON, Calif., and PITTSBURGH, Pa., Oct. 4, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- BioVentrix, Inc. a pioneer of technologies and procedures for less invasive treatment of heart failure (HF), today announced enrollment of the first patient ... Devices, Interventional, Cardiology BioVentrix, Revivent TC, TransCatheter, Ventricular Enhancement (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - October 4, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Surviving Heart Attack Often Means Leaving Job Behind
WEDNESDAY, Oct. 4, 2017 -- Recovering from a heart attack can be a long, painful process, and now a new study finds that almost one-quarter of those patients who returned to work ultimately left their jobs over the following year. The findings... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 4, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

ER Risk Score Predicts 30 - Day Mortality in Acute Heart Failure
Risk score based on 13 independent risk factors has excellent discrimination and calibration (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - October 4, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Internal Medicine, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nursing, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

Commercialization of Generics Impacts Adverse Event Rates
Adverse events up for generic users of losartan, valsartan, candesartan in month of commercialization (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - October 4, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Nursing, Pathology, Pharmacy, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

Smoking Cessation Support Less Likely for Cancer Patients
General practitioners less likely to support smoking cessation in patients with cancer than with CHD (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - October 4, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cardiology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Nursing, Oncology, Pharmacy, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

Anticoagulants With Other Drugs Raise Bleeding Risk in AF
And antithrobotic medications linked to higher rate of hematuria - related events in older adults (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - October 4, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cardiology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Neurology, Nursing, Oncology, Pharmacy, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

Scientists Support Genome Editing to Prevent Disease
Majority of survey respondents support gene editing to treat diseases but not human enhancement (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - October 4, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Cardiology, Dermatology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, ENT, Pathology Source Type: news

Scott Ward receives more than $5.2M in first full year as CEO of Cardiovascular Systems Inc.
In his first full year as CEO of Cardiovascular Systems Inc., Scott Ward was compensated more than $5.2 million. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 4, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Patrick Rehkamp Source Type: news

Scott Ward receives more than $5.2M in first full year as CEO of Cardiovascular Systems Inc.
In his first full year as CEO of Cardiovascular Systems Inc., Scott Ward was compensated more than $5.2 million. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - October 4, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Patrick Rehkamp Source Type: news

Will Apama Help Bos Sci Find Its Rhythm?
Boston Scientific has struggled to gain share in the $4.4 billion electrophysiology (EP) market, but a new deal should give it a much-needed boost. The Marlborough, MA-based company said it will pay up to $300 million for Apama Medical, a privately-held firm that is trying to treat atrial fibrillation (AF) with a radiofrequency (RF) balloon that combines the best of catheter- and balloon-based ablation. The deal calls for an up-front cash payment of $175 million and another $125 million payment based on clinical and regulatory milestones expected over the period of 2018 through 2020. The acquisition is expected to clo...
Source: MDDI - October 4, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Medical Device Business Cardiovascular Source Type: news

Skipping breakfast could increase risk of heart attacks
According to a study published in theJournal of the American College of Cardiology,adults who miss the first meal of the day are more than twice as likely to have blocked arteries.Telegraph (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - October 4, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Female hormones protect against heart damage from a messed up body clock
Canadian scientists strive to understand why heart disease manifests differently in men and women, which could open the door to new ways of understanding and treating the problem. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Iron deficiency increases risk of heart disease, but so does the wrong type of iron
(Natural News) Our bodies are finely balanced machines, but for many of us, this only becomes evident when we suffer a lack of a vital nutrient or mineral and start feeling the effects. Extra exam or other stress, for example, has left many of us depleted of vitamin B, and as women get older, they... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Blood Thinners Can Come With Dangerous Side Effects
Title: Blood Thinners Can Come With Dangerous Side EffectsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 10/3/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 10/4/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - October 4, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Measuring 30-Day Death Risk in Heart Failure Patients
Title: Measuring 30-Day Death Risk in Heart Failure PatientsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 10/3/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 10/4/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - October 4, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Use of High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin in Suspected MI Use of High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin in Suspected MI
Review the key principles underlying the safe and effective use of hs-cTn assays in enabling rapid and safe rule-out and rule-in of patients presenting in the ED with suspected myocardial infarction.Journal of the American College of Cardiology (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - October 4, 2017 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

University of Guelph researchers discover why females have heart health advantage
(University of Guelph) University of Guelph Prof. Tami Martino has revealed in a first-ever study the biological reasons why females have a heart health advantage over men and it's tied to ovarian hormones. Essentially the interplay between female ovarian hormones and a circadian 'clock' molecule protects the heart health of women until they reach menopause. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

One in 4 people leave work a year after a heart attack, Danish study finds
(American Heart Association) One in four people in Denmark who suffer a heart attack leave their jobs within a year of returning to work.Heart attack survivors with diabetes, heart failure, depression and lower educational and income levels were the most likely to not be working a year after their heart attack. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Changes in relative fit of human heat stress indices to cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal hospitalizations across five Australian urban populations - Goldie J, Alexander L, Lewis SC, Sherwood SC, Bambrick H.
Various human heat stress indices have been developed to relate atmospheric measures of extreme heat to human health impacts, but the usefulness of different indices across various health impacts and in different populations is poorly understood. This pape... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

‘The Best Decision I Ever Made.’ Watch Barack Obama’s Surprise Anniversary Video for Michelle
This article originally appeared on People.com. (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tierney McAfee / PEOPLE Tags: Uncategorized Barack Obama Michelle Obama onetime Source Type: news

‘The Worst Feeling in the World.’ A Mother’s Terror During the Las Vegas Shooting
Doris Huser’s memory of the Route 91 Harvest Festival in Las Vegas is a sickening blur, punctuated by perfect, still images: snapshots she will remember for the rest of her life. There is the image of the woman, her eyes vacant, lying on her back on the pavement in front of Huser: “I’ve been shot,” Huser recalled her saying. There is the woman whose wheel chair had tipped over in the panic after what would become the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history began. Her body had spilled onto the ground and people were leaping over her, terrified, scrambling for the only exit. There is the image ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Haley Sweetland Edwards / Las Vegas Tags: Uncategorized las vegas shooting onetime Source Type: news