A cheap 1p diabetes pill can stop heart attacks and strokes
Two British studies found that those taking the drug metformin – which costs as little as 1p a pill – had lower blood pressure, lost weight and saw harmful thickening of the heart reversed. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A single one-hour meditation session can do wonders for your heart, study shows
(Natural News) As the years go by, more people struggle with anxiety and stress – two “mental monsters” that can significantly affect the well-being of millions every day. In some cases, these mental burdens can even affect our physical health. To address this concern, a team of researchers studied how a “single, hour-long meditation session”... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rikke Schmidt Kjaergaard on surviving being 'locked' inside her body.
Rikke Schmidt Kjaergaard's heart stopped for 40 seconds - and then she became 'locked' inside her body. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - June 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rikke Schmidt Kjaergaard on surviving locked-in syndrome
Rikke Schmidt Kjaergaard's heart stopped for 40 seconds - and then she developed locked-in syndrome. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - June 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pioneering keyhole procedure that seals leaking heart valves
People left breathless and even housebound by a common heart condition can now benefit from a pioneering keyhole procedure that spares them the ordeal of open surgery (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CVD and Walking; Bacteria and Resistance: It's PodMed Double T! (with audio)
(MedPage Today) -- This week's topics include the state of bacterial and fungal resistance worldwide, a nurse-led intervention in the ICU and outcomes for surrogates, cardiovascular outcomes and walking or biking to work, and procalcitonin and antibiotic use (Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry)
Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry - June 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Green tea compound may protect heart health
Some of the claims about green tea lack scientific backing. However, one compound found in the popular drink may help to protect against atherosclerosis. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Baylor St. Luke ’s suspends heart-transplant program, reviewing recent deaths
Baylor St. Luke ’s Medical Center is voluntarily suspending its heart-transplant surgeries for 14 days, the hospital announced June 1.  For the next two weeks, the hospital will not accept donor hearts for transplant. However, the suspension does not affect other heart-failure procedures, such as heart-pump imp lants, or any other transplant programs across the hospital, according to a statement posted on the hospital’s website.  “The hospital will use the time to complete a medical review… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 2, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Olivia Pulsinelli Source Type: news

Chest Pain Patient Diagnosed with Rare Cardiac Anomaly
Broken Heart A rare diagnosis for chest pain patient By Brendan Mulcahy, DO, PA-C, NRP; Haley Delligatti, BS, NRP & Talo Capuzzi, NRP An ALS crew is dispatched for a 60-year-old male in cardiac arrest. On arrival, the crew finds the patient apneic, pulseless and cool to the touch with obvious signs of death. The patient’s wife is visibly distraught and unable to present a detailed history to the crew. The patient is confirmed asystolic on the monitor and the crew pronounces him dead on arrival. The crew leaves the scene and returns to service. Shortly after returning to service, the crew is dispatc...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 2, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brendan Mulcahy, DO, PA-C, NRP Tags: Patient Care Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

Baylor St. Luke ’s suspends heart-transplant program, reviewing recent deaths
Baylor St. Luke ’s Medical Center is voluntarily suspending its heart-transplant surgeries for 14 days, the hospital announced June 1.  For the next two weeks, the hospital will not accept donor hearts for transplant. However, the suspension does not affect other heart-failure procedures, such as heart-pump imp lants, or any other transplant programs across the hospital, according to a statement posted on the hospital’s website.  “The hospital will use the time to complete a medical review… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - June 2, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Olivia Pulsinelli Source Type: news

FDA Class I Recall for Medtronic HeartWare VAD FDA Class I Recall for Medtronic HeartWare VAD
The recall, affecting more than 200,000 devices, is due to the possibility of interruption in the electrical connection between the system's power source and the HVAD controller.News Alerts (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Alert Source Type: news

Micro-CT reveals hawk mummy is actually a human fetus
When an international team of researchers acquired micro-CT scans of what they...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: RT educator unwraps secrets of Peruvian mummies CT, 3D printing bring Egyptian mummy back to life CT, MRI find atherosclerosis in mummy hearts How CT unraveled curiosities of King Tut CT provides fresh revelations about ancient Egypt (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 1, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Heart attack warning - this breakfast drink could slash your risk of deadly heart disease
HEART attack symptoms include chest pain, coughs and shortness of breath. You could lower your risk of myocardial infarction and deadly heart disease signs by adding this cheap drink to your breakfast diet, it ’s been revealed. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Old Age and ACE Inhibitors in HF: Bridging the Guidelines Gap? Old Age and ACE Inhibitors in HF: Bridging the Guidelines Gap?
A new analysis of SwedeHF registry data shows the same risk reduction from ACE inhibitors or ARBs in patients above age 80 as in those below that age; observers suggest age limits in HF trials should perhaps be done away with.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

As Aid Workers Move to the Heart of Congo ’ s Ebola Outbreak, ‘ Everything Gets More Complicated ’
Medical investigators will need to overcome the rural region ’ s extreme logistical hurdles to reconstruct transmission chains, vaccinate contacts and halt the spread. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: EMILY BAUMGAERTNER Tags: Epidemics Ebola Virus ZMapp (Drug) Vaccination and Immunization Humanitarian Aid Doctors Without Borders International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies United Nations Children's Fund World Health Organization Africa C Source Type: news

Cardiology Culture Has Many Running for the Hills
(MedPage Today) -- Practicing physicians demand leaders take action on key issues (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - June 1, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Emergency Drone System Displays Effective EMS and Rescue Applications
Unmanned aerial vehicles for EMS & rescue applications Drone systems have a strong potential to facilitate lifesaving medical interventions, such as transporting and delivering an AED. Photos courtesy Andreas Claesson Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) affects nearly 360,000 individuals in the United States and about 300,000 in Europe each year. Survival rates are low.1,2 In Sweden, 5,312 OHCA cases were reported to the Swedish register for cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (SRCR) during 2016.3 CPR was initiated either spontaneously by bystanders, guided from the dispatch center through telephone CPR or on arrival ...
Source: JEMS Operations - June 1, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Andreas Claesson, RN, EMT-P, PhD Tags: Operations Source Type: news

Jun 01, 2018 This Week in Cardiology Jun 01, 2018 This Week in Cardiology
Surgical left atrial appendage occlusion, renal denervation, a substudy of ORBITA, FFR and hypertension guidelines are discussed in this week's podcast.theheart.org on Medscape (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Commentary Source Type: news

Hancock Jaffe prices $8m IPO below the range
Medical device developer Hancock Jaffe Laboratories yesterday priced its initial public offering below the re-set range it issued last week, raising nearly $8 million. Irvine, Calif.-based Hancock Jaffe makes bioprosthetic implants designed to treat chronic deep vein insufficiency, heart valve conditions and coronary artery bypass graft. Last December the company said it planned to float nearly 1.9 million shares at $6 to $8 apiece, for gross proceeds of $11.3 million to $15.0 million, or $13.1 million at the midpoint. But last week Hancock Jaffe cut the amount of shares to roughly 1.1 million...
Source: Mass Device - June 1, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Funding Roundup Initial Public Offering (IPO) Wall Street Beat hancockjaffelabs Source Type: news

Male Thyroid Cancer Survivors Face Higher CVD Risk
Age at diagnosis, sex, BMI, and thyroid - stimulating hormone suppression therapy affect CVD risk (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - June 1, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cardiology, Endocrinology, Internal Medicine, Oncology, Journal, Source Type: news

Baby's life saved by five-minute heart test
A five-minute heart test saved the life of a baby born at Daisy Hill Hospital in Newry. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FFR for CABG; Homeless CVD Care; Alcohol Effect Divergence
(MedPage Today) -- Cardiovascular Daily wraps up the top cardiology news of the week (Source: MedPage Today Nephrology)
Source: MedPage Today Nephrology - June 1, 2018 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: news

Why You Should Pick Up the Pace When You Walk
This study could not definitively say if fast walking causes better health, or vice versa. It may simply be that fit, healthy people tend to walk faster than those who are ailing. But the researchers write in the paper that walking speed appears to affect mortality risk independent of total physical activity, perhaps thanks to “the increased relative exercise intensity” of walking fast. In other words, speedy stepping may strengthen the heart better than leisurely strolling, in keeping with long-standing associations between exercise and cardiovascular health. While Stamatakis acknowledges that how fast you wal...
Source: TIME: Health - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Heart attack risk slashed by drinking TEA? How a cuppa can lower bad cholesterol
HEART attack symptoms include chest pain, coughs and shortness of breath. You could lower your risk of heart disease and myocardial infarction signs by adding this cheap drink to your breakfast diet, it ’s been revealed. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Walking at a faster pace may delay death from heart disease
People who speed up their walking pace could live longer, according to a new analysis of mortality records and survey data. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Walk Briskly to a Longer Life
The researchers also found that people seemed to cut their risk of dying early from heart disease by 24 percent by walking at an average pace and 21 percent by walking at a fast pace, compared with walking at a slow pace. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Vegetarian diet reduces heart disease death risk by 40 percent
A recent review examines plant-based diets and heart health. It concludes that vegetarian and vegan diets significantly improve cardiovascular health. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

FT Health: Cancer optimism tempered by ‘financial toxicity’
Ilona Kickbusch, tobacco breaks hearts, smart toilets (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - June 1, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

AHA: Hollywood Silent on Request to Give R Rating to Movies With Smoking
FRIDAY, June 1, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- The silent film era ended nearly a century ago, but Hollywood is still mute when it comes to demands to change its rating system to award an R rating to most movies that feature tobacco. Last... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 1, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

AHA: Lifesaving Info Not Always a 911 Call Away
FRIDAY, June 1, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Keidryn Nimsgern's heart stopped when she was riding in her boyfriend's car while the two ran errands in a suburb of Madison, Wisconsin. Jake Suter had never called 911 before that frightening day... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 1, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Male Thyroid Cancer Survivors Face Higher CVD Risk
FRIDAY, June 1, 2018 -- Male thyroid cancer survivors have a nearly 50 percent higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) than female survivors within five years of cancer diagnosis, according to a study published online May 29 in the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 1, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Postmenopausal Sex Hormone Levels Associated With Later CVD
FRIDAY, June 1, 2018 -- In postmenopausal women, higher testosterone/estradiol ratios are associated with increased risks for incident cardiovascular disease (CVD), coronary heart disease (CHD), and heart failure events, according to a study... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 1, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Egg-xactly: Eating organic eggs does not increase your risk for cardiovascular disease
(Natural News) Eggs are sometimes referred to as “nature’s perfect food,” and it’s easy to see why. They’re healthy, easy to digest, and complete, and consuming them can even help you reduce your weight. Full of nutrients like B-vitamins, iron and zinc, they’re also incredibly nutritious. With so many benefits, you’d think everyone would be... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

4 Ways to Make Grilling Healthier This Summer
Cookouts are a summer staple. And while they do provide some health perks—fresh air, home cooking and time with friends and family—they can also come with risks. Follow these guidelines to make your grilled meals better for you. 1. Grill like a pescatarian Cooking most meat at temperatures above 300°F can produce potentially cancer-causing chemicals called heterocyclic amines (HCAs), according to the National Cancer Institute. But fruits and vegetables like corn, peaches, peppers, eggplant, pineapple, squash and watermelon hold up well on the barbecue and don’t form HCAs when they’re cooked. And...
Source: TIME: Health - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Video reveals what cigarettes really do to your heart
Released by the World Health Organization, the video aims to raise awareness of the effect of cigarettes on the heart and encourage smokers to quit. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: 'Healthy obesity' not so healthy for the heart
Women with 'metabolically healthy obesity' won't have conditions such as diabetes. Even so, they may still face a heightened risk of cardiovascular events. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness Source Type: news

Ask Well: How Many People Can ’ t Tolerate Statins?
Medical researchers, normally a genteel lot, disagree sharply on the extent to which side effects from statin drugs are a problem. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: RICHARD KLASCO, M.D. Tags: Cholesterol Muscles Statins (Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs) Placebos Heart Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Source Type: news

Researchers: A power failure in your fat cells could short-circuit your health
(University of Copenhagen The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences) The energy metabolism of the body's so-called brown fat cells is controlled by the fat molecule cardiolipin, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered in a new study. The research reveals that absence of cardiolipin in fat cells is causally linked to pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Multiomics' and the newborn mouse heart
(University of Helsinki) The heart of a neonatal mouse is capable of self-repair after tissue damage. However, this ability disappears during the first week of life. Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Finland, investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying myocardial regenerative ability. Advantages within the field could be of benefit, for example, in the development of novel treatments for patients to regain heart function after myocardial infarction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Walking faster could make you live longer: research
(University of Sydney) Researchers call for walking pace to be emphasized in public health messages, as analysis of over 50,000 walkers finds a faster pace is associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Smoking down, but tobacco use still a major cause of death, disease
Millions die prematurely each year due to tobacco use that causes cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks and stroke. (Source: PsycPORT.com)
Source: PsycPORT.com - June 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

Meet Portland's Startup of the Year and 15 small biz innovators
Welcome to the Portland Business Journal ’s 2018 Small Business Innovation Awards special publication. Small businesses are the heart and soul of Portland. This is a city that thrives on innovation and creativity, much of which is generated from the entrepreneurial minds of our small business leaders. We created this program to showcase some of Portland’s most impressive and innovative companies that continue to prove great ideas come from the smallest of enterprises. The challenges to launching… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 1, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Meet Portland's Startup of the Year and 15 small biz innovators
Welcome to the Portland Business Journal ’s 2018 Small Business Innovation Awards special publication. Small businesses are the heart and soul of Portland. This is a city that thrives on innovation and creativity, much of which is generated from the entrepreneurial minds of our small business leaders. We created this program to showcase some of Portland’s most impressive and innovative companies that continue to prove great ideas come from the smallest of enterprises. The challenges to launching… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 1, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

The damage is instantaneous: Researchers say even ONE high-fat meal sets you up for heart disease
(Natural News) If you think eating healthy throughout the week is enough to warrant you a high-fat cheat day, think again. Scientists report that just having a single high-fat meal is enough for our bodies to be at risk for cardiovascular disease. The study, published at Laboratory Investigation, stated that consuming a meal with a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cath Lab Recap: Robot Ultrasound Operator; Stenting for Cor Triatriatum
(MedPage Today) -- Interventional cardiology news to note (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - June 1, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Journal Highlights From the June Issue of JAMDA
Patients with chronic heart failure warrant noninvasive monitoring with communication technology apps vs. invasive implant-based telemonitoring, a New York study concluded. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - June 1, 2018 Category: Health Management Source Type: news

Green tea may help reduce risk of heart attacks
Initial studies show that a molecule in the tea might reduce plaque build up inside arteriesA substance found in green tea could help scientists find new ways to reduce the risk of heart attacks, research suggests, although experts say that doesn ’t mean you should rush to put the kettle on.The study found that a molecule in green tea, known as EGCG, can bind to a protein that is found in plaques linked to coronary artery disease and, under certain circumstances, make it more soluble.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 31, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Medical research Science Food & drink Heart disease Source Type: news

Biotech has an age problem: Too many startups, too little experience
Biotech ’s golden age is full of gray. As new technologies accelerate the pace of biotech discoveries, the first generation of life sciences legends isn’t ceding to a new wave of entrepreneurs. Instead, young founders and old-school company creators are reaching across the generation gap. That coopera tion could have a profound impact on how fresh ideas are spun into companies — and who pulls down ballooning venture capital rounds — in the Bay Area. At the heart of it all is a fear that… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 31, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Ron Leuty Source Type: news

Keystone Heart launches new TriGuard embolic protection study
Keystone Heart said today it launched the second phase of its Reflect trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of its third-generation TriGuard cerebral embolic protection device. In the trial, investigators will explore the use of the TriGuard 3 and its ability to protect a patient’s brain from emboli during transcatheter aortic valve replacement procedures, the Israel-based company said. “Knowing what we now know about the significant risks of stroke and other neurological injury associated with TAVR and other cardiovascular procedures, there is a clear unmet clinical need for cerebral embolic protection devi...
Source: Mass Device - May 31, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Neurological Keystone Heart Source Type: news

'Riot of processes': dunes of frozen methane detected on Pluto's surface
Dwarf planet ’s methane dunes, located near a glacier of nitrogen, come as a surprise to scientistsScientists have detected a large field of dunes on the surface of the distant, frigid dwarf planet Pluto apparently composed of windswept, sand-sized grains of frozen methane. The dunes, spotted on images taken by Nasa ’s New Horizons spacecraft during its 2015 flyby, sit at the boundary between a heart-shaped nitrogen glacier about the size of France called Sputnik Planitia and the Al Idrisi Montes mountain range made of frozen water, scientists said on Thursday.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 31, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Staff and agencies Tags: Space Pluto Nasa US news Science World news Source Type: news