AHA: A Diverse Diet May Not Promote a Healthy Weight
THURSDAY, Aug. 9, 2018 -- The long-standing recommendation to eat a variety of foods may not be a sound way to promote healthy eating patterns and a healthy body weight, according to an American Heart Association science advisory published online... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 9, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Can You Make'Sense' of This ECG? Can You Make'Sense' of This ECG?
An ECG is obtained on an older man with hypertension who has an irregular pulse. What's your diagnosis?Medscape Cardiology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Clinical Case Source Type: news

Will the Extravascular Method be a Game Changer for ICD Therapy?
Medtronic is aiming for a slightly different approach for implantable defibrillator therapy. Instead of using a transvenous approach the firm is looking at an extravascular method for ICD therapy. On Thursday, the Dublin-based company said it was beginning a pilot study of its Extravascular Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (EV ICD) system, in which a lead is placed outside of the heart and veins to deliver lifesaving defibrillation and antitachycardia pacing therapy all in one system. EV ICD’s size is similar to transvenous ICDs. The first patient implant was performed at Christchurch Hospital in Ne...
Source: MDDI - August 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Business Cardiovascular Source Type: news

Higher BMI in Young Adults'Likely to Cause' High BP, LV Mass Higher BMI in Young Adults'Likely to Cause' High BP, LV Mass
Researchers used genetic approaches to provide support for a causal relationship between higher BMI and hypertension and higher left ventricular mass.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Here ’s Why a Diverse Diet May Not Be the Healthiest Choice
Most healthy eating advice focuses on eating a variety of foods to ensure you’re sampling from a range of different food groups. That way, health experts say, you’re more likely to get everything that your body needs. But in the latest review of the topic, scientists found that having a diverse diet may not necessarily lead to better health. In a statement published in the journal Circulation, the American Heart Association reviewed the available studies and reported that there is little scientific support for the idea that a varied diet leads to good health outcomes — especially when it comes to lowering...
Source: TIME: Health - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

The Recommended Dose podcast: Alexandra Barratt on using both medicine and the media to explore and promote the critical role of evidence in healthcare
Episode 12 -Alexandra Barratt' It's not science or instinct...it's evidence and personal preferences. That's really, to me, the heart of shared decision making. ’This week ’s guest has led something of a double life, using both medicine and the media to explore and promote the critical role of evidence in healthcare. Now based at the University of Sydney, Alexandra Barratt's journey from clinician to journalist to global advocate for evidence based medicine and shared decision-making is a fascinating one.Here she talks with acclaimed journalist and health researcher ,Dr Ray Moynihan, about her varied career and...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - August 9, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Heart Failure and Hypertension: Where do β-blockers Belong?
The author wants your opinion on the habitual titration of β-blockers in patients with comorbid HF who are not at BP goal.   (Source: ConsultantLive)
Source: ConsultantLive - August 9, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Gregory W. Rutecki, MD Tags: Hypertension Source Type: news

AHA: Diets Should Stress Healthy Foods, Not Diversity
(MedPage Today) --'Eat variety of foods'mantra may actually promote obesity, group says (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - August 9, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

People take in more calories when eating a varied diet
A new advisory published by the American Heart Association has warned Americans that eating a diet with many food options can actually lead to you consuming more calories and to obesity. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women Have A Better Chance Of Surviving A Heart Attack With A Female Doctor
It's past time to take women's pain seriously. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What are the health benefits of cranberry juice?
Many people consume cranberry juice for its health benefits. These include benefits for a person ’s heart health, preventing infections, and better post-menopausal health. Side effects include potential interactions with medications and acid reflux. Learn more about the benefits and side effects of cranberry juice here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Should Mandatory Screening of Young Athletes End? Should Mandatory Screening of Young Athletes End?
John Mandrola reviews the most comprehensive study to date on cardiac screening of teenage athletes and sees the futility of searching for a deadly needle in a haystack.theheart.org on Medscape (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Expert Column Source Type: news

Experts weigh pros and cons of low-calorie sweetened drinks
(Reuters Health) - Low-calorie sweetened beverages such as diet sodas that use aspartame or stevia may be a good replacement for full-sugar sodas and fruit juices, but researchers are still unsure about their long-term health effects, according to a new American Heart Association Science Advisory. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Cardiovascular Systems touts 2-year Liberty 360 PAD study data
Cardiovascular Systems (NSDQ:CSII) yesterday released two-year results from the Liberty 360 study examining long-term clinical and economic outcomes for peripheral vascular interventions in treating patients with peripheral artery disease. Results from the trial were presented by Dr. Jihad Mustapha of Grand Rapids, Mich.’s Advanced Cardiac & Vascular Amputation Prevention Centers in a late-breaking presentation at the 2018 Amputation Prevention Symposium in Chicago. In the 1,204-patient “all comers” study, investigators examined effects of treatment with a number of different FDA-cleared devices ...
Source: Mass Device - August 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Vascular Cardiovascular Systems Inc. Source Type: news

Cardiogram integrates with Garmin wearables for heart health insights
Garmin wearable users now have the option to gain deeper insights into the their heart health, following an announcement that the consumer tech company'wearables will have the ability to integrate with heart health app Cardiogram. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - August 9, 2018 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: How red blood cells harm cardiovascular health in diabetes
It takes people with type 2 diabetes longer to recover from cardiovascular injury. They are also more exposed to it. But why? New research investigates. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes Type 2 Source Type: news

AHA: Obesity May Increase Risk for Peripheral Artery Disease
THURSDAY, Aug. 9, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- People with obesity are known to be at increased risk for coronary heart disease, the most common type of heart disease. Now, a new study shows obesity may also increase the chance of developing... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

American Heart Association Urges Screen Time Limits for Youth
THURSDAY, Aug. 9, 2018 -- The American Heart Association (AHA) is concerned about the impact screen time is having on sedentary behavior in children and teens, according to a scientific statement published online Aug. 6 in Circulation. Tracie A.... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 9, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Healthy Lifestyle With Diabetes Cuts Cardiovascular Risk
THURSDAY, Aug. 9, 2018 -- Greater adherence to an overall healthy lifestyle is associated with a substantially lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence and mortality among adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to a study published... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 9, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Healing of Apical Periodontitis after Nonsurgical Root Canal Treatment: The Role of Statin Intake
Journal of Endodontics DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2018.06.013Highlights•In this longitudinal clinical study, healing of preoperative apical periodontitis was evaluated in patients on statins and control patients.•The study controlled for the following confounding variables: age, sex, length of time to evaluation, statin agent, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.•A multivariate analysis showed a significant association between healing and the intake of statins (P 
Source: Dental Technology Blog - August 9, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

There ’s New Hope For Preventing Alzheimer’s — And It Could Be Within Your Control
Margaret Daffodil Graham tries to live a healthy life, particularly since she has a health issue that requires constant attention. Like more than 100 million other Americans, the 74-year-old from Winston-Salem, N.C., has high blood pressure, and she has been taking medication to control it since she was in her 30s. So when she read that her nearby hospital, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, was looking for people with hypertension to volunteer for a study, she quickly signed up, knowing the doctors would monitor her blood pressure more intensively and hopefully lower her risk of developing heart disease and stroke. What...
Source: TIME: Health - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Aging Alzheimer's Research Source Type: news

Lowering Your Blood Pressure Could Reduce Alzheimer ’s Risk, New Research Shows
Margaret Daffodil Graham tries to live a healthy life, particularly since she has a health issue that requires constant attention. Like more than 100 million other Americans, the 74-year-old from Winston-Salem, N.C., has high blood pressure, and she has been taking medication to control it since she was in her 30s. So when she read that her nearby hospital, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, was looking for people with hypertension to volunteer for a study, she quickly signed up, knowing the doctors would monitor her blood pressure more intensively and hopefully lower her risk of developing heart disease and stroke. What...
Source: TIME: Science - August 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Aging Alzheimer's Research Source Type: news

Lowering Your Blood Pressure Could Reduce Alzheimer ’s Risk, New Research Shows
Margaret Daffodil Graham tries to live a healthy life, particularly since she has a health issue that requires constant attention. Like more than 100 million other Americans, the 74-year-old from Winston-Salem, N.C., has high blood pressure, and she has been taking medication to control it since she was in her 30s. So when she read that her nearby hospital, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, was looking for people with hypertension to volunteer for a study, she quickly signed up, knowing the doctors would monitor her blood pressure more intensively and hopefully lower her risk of developing heart disease and stroke. What...
Source: TIME: Health - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Aging Alzheimer's Research Source Type: news

Researchers Think Preventing Alzheimer ’s Might Actually Be Within Your Control
Margaret Daffodil Graham tries to live a healthy life, particularly since she has a health issue that requires constant attention. Like more than 100 million other Americans, the 74-year-old from Winston-Salem, N.C., has high blood pressure, and she has been taking medication to control it since she was in her 30s. So when she read that her nearby hospital, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, was looking for people with hypertension to volunteer for a study, she quickly signed up, knowing the doctors would monitor her blood pressure more intensively and hopefully lower her risk of developing heart disease and stroke. What...
Source: TIME: Health - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Aging Alzheimer's Research Source Type: news

Hack attack can stop people's hearts
Researchers disclose an unfixed vulnerability that threatens medical devices. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Raising white kids to be racially sensitive -- and proactive
Parenting in the current political climate isn't for the faint of heart. Recently, my 9-year old daughter asked me, "Mama, I know it's really bad they're putting people in jail, but do those people think, 'Well, at least I'm safe from war?' " (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Only 3% of Americans know that being overweight increases cancer risk  
A new study from Washington University has found that just three percent of Americans were able identify obesity as a risk factor for cancer compared to heart disease or metabolic disorders. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

2017 US Hypertension Guidelines: Importance for Older Adults 2017 US Hypertension Guidelines: Importance for Older Adults
How do the 2017 ACC/AHA hypertension guidelines impact clinical practice when considering older adults with hypertension?Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Gut Microbiome Composition and Inflammation-arterial Stiffness Gut Microbiome Composition and Inflammation-arterial Stiffness
A new study investigates the relationship between gut microbiome composition and arterial stiffness. Could endotoxemia be a contributing risk factor for cardiovascular disease?European Heart Journal (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Young drinkers beware: Binge drinking may cause stroke, heart risks
(Vanderbilt University Medical Center) Research by Mariann Piano, senior associate dean of research at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, has found that young adults who frequently binge drink were more likely to have specific cardiovascular risk factors such as higher blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar at a younger age than non-binge drinkers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Epigenetic reprogramming of human hearts found in congestive heart failure
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) Congestive heart failure is a terminal disease that affects nearly 6 million Americans. Yet its management is limited to symptomatic treatments because the causal mechanisms of congestive heart failure are not known. Researchers have now described an underlying mechanism that reprograms the hearts of patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, a process that differs from patients with other forms of heart failure. This points the way toward future personalized care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Americans may have outgrown traditional advice of having a varied diet
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) When it comes to diet in the Western world of overconsumption where cheap convenience food rules, the age-old adage 'everything in moderation' has been put to the test, prompting the American Heart Association (AHA) to issue a science advisory led by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Estrogen may protect against depression after heart attack
(American Physiological Society) Estrogen may protect against heart failure-related depression by preventing the production of inflammation-causing chemicals in the brain. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology--Heart and Circulatory Physiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tbx6 revealed as crucial to heart and skeleton formation from stem cells
(University of Tsukuba) In a study of over 50 transcription factors, Tbx6 alone was able to stimulate mesoderm formation in laboratory-grown stem cells, and could cause those stem cells to become cardiovascular or musculoskeletal cells; the University of Tsukuba-led research team found that this essential role of Tbx6 in mesoderm and cardiovascular speci?cation is conserved from lower organisms to mammals. This research report validated a new direct reprogramming-based approach that may enhance future regenerative medicine research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A diverse diet may not be the healthiest one
(American Heart Association) Scientific evidence to date does not support the notion that eating a diverse diet is healthy or promotes a healthy weight. Some studies suggest that a diverse diet may increase food consumption and the prevalence of obesity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Tic'-tock
(Hiroshima University) Scientists in Japan have found a potential marker to identify which people with abnormally fast heartbeats are at high risk of developing heart failure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Asthma inhalers found to make women fat while increasing risk of heart disease
(Natural News) Corticosteroids in asthma inhalers could make women fat and increase the risk of metabolic syndrome, a recent study found. Corticosteroids are widely-used anti-inflammatory agents that come in many forms — such as inhalers, nasal sprays, tablets, injections and cream — and are prescribed to ease symptoms of asthma and other respiratory diseases. Metabolic... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Technology will help map UK ’s defibrillators
Plan to boost currently low use of public defibrillators Related items fromOnMedica CPR training drive for public to focus on youth Heart attacks are deadlier in colder months Fatal heart attacks strike 200 people every week Teach hands-only CPR from first year of secondary school Test could tackle underdiagnosis of MI in women (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 9, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Regular not excessive exercise link to better mental health
45 minute exercise three to five times a week had biggest benefits Related items fromOnMedica Diabetes and obesity higher among LGBQ teens Jogging protects heart more than walking Even athletes can ’t outrun the effects of a bad diet Higher weekly activity levels linked to lower risk of five chronic diseases Making health changes more effective as a couple (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 9, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

How much exercise you really need
The benefits of exercise are widely known: it helps you live longer and lowers risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes. A new study published Wednesday in The Lancet Psychiatry journal suggests that when done in moderation, it leads to better mental health as well. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study reveals how much exercise you really need
The benefits of exercise are widely known: it helps you live longer and lowers risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes. A new study published Wednesday in The Lancet Psychiatry journal suggests that when done in moderation, it leads to better mental health as well. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Exercise is good for your body and your mind, study says
The benefits of exercise are widely known: it helps you live longer and lowers risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes. A new study published Wednesday in The Lancet Psychiatry journal suggests that when done in moderation, it leads to better mental health as well. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Just 10 minutes of brisk walking per day cuts heart disease risk in over-60s by 6%
A new study from the University of Bristol found that adults above age 60 could cut their risk of heart disease, particularly women by up to six percent through moderate or high intensity exercise. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sixty-somethings who keep moving may lower risk of heart disease
(Reuters Health) - Adults in their early 60s who spend less time sitting around and get more exercise - even just a little gardening or a leisurely evening stroll - have better markers for heart disease risk than their sedentary peers, a UK study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Cardiac Monitoring Lacking in Patients With Breast Cancer Cardiac Monitoring Lacking in Patients With Breast Cancer
Less than half of women receiving trastuzumab underwent guideline-recommended cardiac monitoring, but observers suggest that more tailored monitoring may be the way forward.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Screening fails to predict most heart deaths in young soccer players
(Reuters Health) - Examinations of more than 11,000 adolescent soccer players in the UK over 20 years have found that routine heart testing prevented very few sudden heart-related deaths during exercise. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

More young footballers dying of heart problems than thought, FA study finds
FA increases number of screenings for youth players after study finds several players died of heart problems not spotted by testsYoung footballers are dying from heart problems at a higher rate than was previously thought, according to doctors who oversee the cardiac screening programme for the Football Association.Their evaluation of 20 years of screening young footballers at the age of 16 who are on the verge of a professional career also shows that most died about seven years after a heart check that showed no problem.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Heart attack Science Heart disease Football Sport Society Source Type: news

Footballer heart death risk 'underestimated'
Doctors say deaths are still rare but we need to open our eyes to the risk. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA Expands Recall Of Common Blood Pressure Drug Over Cancer Concern
(CNN) — The US Food and Drug Administration expanded the list of drugs being recalled that contain valsartan. The drug is used as a component in a set of drugs used to treat heart failure and blood pressure. The FDA initially announced a valsartan recall in July after lab tests discovered that some drugs could have been tainted with a substance linked to higher risk of cancer. The drug had previously been recalled in 22 other countries. The expanded recall includes some drugs that contain valsartan and hydrochlorothisazide. Not all of the drugs containing valsartan were impacted. N-nitrosodimethylamine or NDMA, the i...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Consumer Health News Local TV Recall Valsartan Source Type: news

Boston Scientific to submit last FDA PMA module for Lotus Edge aortic valve this month
Boston Scientific (NYSE:BSX) said today it plans to submit the final technical module for the FDA premarket approval application for its Lotus Edge aortic heart valve system by the end of next week. The good news follows a long string of hurdles the Marlborough, Mass.-based company has faced with the Lotus over the past few years. Last November, Boston Scientific announced news of a delay that resulted in a $3 billion drop in its market capitalization. Earlier that year in February, the company recalled the Lotus TAVR system over issues with its locking mechanism and said it didn’t expect to be able to get the d...
Source: Mass Device - August 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Pre-Market Approval (PMA) Regulatory/Compliance Replacement Heart Valves Boston Scientific Source Type: news