Another Opioid Scourge: Infection-Related Strokes
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 -- As abuse of injected heroin and other addictive opioids spreads throughout the United States, heart experts warn of a growing threat: strokes caused by infections contracted through dirty needles. " People need to be more... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 30, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Another Opioid Scourge: Infection-Related Strokes
Title: Another Opioid Scourge: Infection-Related StrokesCategory: Health NewsCreated: 1/30/2019 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 1/30/2019 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - January 30, 2019 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

What If You Were Your Own Blood Donor for Surgery?
Title: What If You Were Your Own Blood Donor for Surgery?Category: Health NewsCreated: 1/29/2019 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 1/30/2019 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - January 30, 2019 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Alter Ego(s) in CAD: Insights From a Recently Departed Patient Alter Ego(s) in CAD: Insights From a Recently Departed Patient
This anecdotal case presentation focuses on author Philip Roth's perhaps not-so-fictional alter-ego and his experiences with CAD and the distressing side effects of beta-blocker therapy.European Heart Journal (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Swiss Study Validates Spanish Tool for Stratifying Risk in ED Patients With Heart Failure Swiss Study Validates Spanish Tool for Stratifying Risk in ED Patients With Heart Failure
The MEESSI-AHF score accurately stratifies patients by 30-day mortality, according to an external validation study.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Extremely high blood pressure in African-Americans is 5 times the national average
(Rutgers University) Extremely high blood pressure that leads to strokes, heart attacks and acute kidney damage, classified as hypertensive emergency, is five times higher in inner-city African-American patients than the national average, according to a recent study co-led by a Rutgers researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research reveals new molecular player in heart enlargement due to cardiac disease
(University of North Carolina Health Care) In response to conditions such as high blood pressure and reduced blood flow to cardiac muscle, the heart can drastically enlarge (pathological hypertrophy), which preserves cardiac function in the short term but predisposes patients to intractable heart failure and sudden cardiac death if left untreated. Now, UNC School of Medicine researchers discovered the RNA-binding protein Lin28a is a crucial player in pathological hypertrophy. This finding could impact the development of more potent heart disease drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Athletes can rest easy: Extreme exercise does not raise heart disease risk or mortality
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) High volumes of exercise are safe, even when coronary calcium levels are high. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pregnancy-related stroke more common among black women
(American Heart Association) The risk of pregnancy-related stroke is much higher among black women than among white women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Opioid epidemic fueling a rise in infection-related stroke
(American Heart Association) The opioid epidemic is fueling a steep rise in infection-related stroke hospitalizations. Injecting opioids, such as heroin, can introduce bacteria into the body which travels through the bloodstream to infect heart valves. Clumps of infected tissue can break off and travel to the brain, resulting in stroke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Infection during delivery linked to greater risk of stroke after delivery
(American Heart Association) Women diagnosed with a bladder infection, pneumonia or sepsis during delivery were more than five times likely than uninfected women to be readmitted to the hospital for stroke within one month. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Counties with dirtier air have more stroke deaths
(American Heart Association) Counties with higher levels of fine particulate (PM2.5) air pollution have more stroke deaths and shorter life expectancies among their citizenry. About half of US counties have annual air pollution levels that exceed guidelines from the Environmental Protection Agency. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stroke risk factors on the rise in Native-Americans
(American Heart Association) Stroke risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease and smoking are common and on the rise among Native-Americans with clot-caused stroke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flu, flu-like illnesses linked to increased risk of stroke, neck artery tears
(American Heart Association) Flu-like illnesses are associated with an increased risk of stroke and neck artery dissection. The risk of stroke and neck artery dissections are greatest within a month of a flu-like illness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

E-cigarettes linked to higher risk of stroke, heart attack, diseased arteries
(American Heart Association) E-cigarette smokers may have higher odds of stroke, heart attack and coronary heart disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stroke risk factors increase among breast cancer survivors
(American Heart Association) Risk factors for stroke rise sharply in post-menopausal women in the first year after they are diagnosed with breast cancer, according to preliminary research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Clot buster use differs between black and white stroke patients
(American Heart Association) White stroke patients are much more likely than black patients to be treated in community hospital emergency departments with the clot-busting drug intravenous tissue-plasminogen activator, or tPA, according to preliminary research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Draining blood from bleeding stroke may prevent death
(American Heart Association) A minimally invasive surgery combining the use of a clot-busting drug and a catheter to drain blood from the brain of hemorrhagic stroke patients reduced swelling and improved patients' prognoses, according to preliminary research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Treating shingles after it appears doesn't reduce increased stroke risk
(American Heart Association) Stroke risk increased significantly in the days, weeks and months after shingles appeared, despite use of the shingles vaccine and antiviral therapy to treat it, according to preliminary research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Bugs' in the gut might predict dementia in the brain
(American Heart Association) The makeup of bacteria and other microbes in the gut may have a direct association with dementia risk, according to preliminary research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Women less likely to receive specialized medical evaluations after stroke
(American Heart Association) Hospitalized women with ischemic stroke were less likely than men to be evaluated by stroke specialists and get specialized diagnostic tests, according to preliminary research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Clot removal beyond normal treatment time, still improved quality of life after stroke
(American Heart Association) Stroke survivors have better quality of life three months after their stroke if the clot that caused the stroke was mechanically removed even hours beyond the ideal treatment window compared to those treated with drugs alone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stroke survivors' beliefs seem to reduce blood pressure
(American Heart Association) Stroke survivors who believe they can protect themselves from having another stroke had more than twice the blood pressure reduction of nonbelievers, according to preliminary research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Climate change may increase congenital heart defects
(American Heart Association) The rise in temperatures stemming from climate change may increase the number of US infants born with congenital heart defects between 2025 and 2035.The greatest percentage increases in the number of congenital heart defects are predicted in the Midwest, followed by the Northeast and the South. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New heart valve modeling technique enables customized medical care for patients
(University of Texas at Austin) Engineers at The University of Texas at Austin develop noninvasive way to simulate repairs to the heart's mitral valve allowing surgeons to provide patient-specific treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 30, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Sand apple shows potential as a natural cancer treatment
(Natural News) In 2018, the World Health Organization estimated that approximately 9.6 million deaths could be attributed to cancer, making it the second leading cause of death worldwide next to cardiovascular disease. What’s even more concerning is that there are already various forms of cancer treatment being given to patients that remain ineffective. Worse, some of these... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Royal Philips, American Heart Association join to boost cardiac arrest survival
  CPR training (Image courtesy of American Heart Association) Royal Philips (NYSE:PHG) and the American Heart Association have paired up to increase sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) survival rates in densely populated cities around the world. The Connected Pulse program combines education programs to increase awareness of CPR with the use of publicly-available automated external defibrillators (AEDs), and new technologies to strengthen the chances for survival until the patient reach the hospital. The American Heart Association estimates that 70% to 80% of sudden cardiac arrests occur outside the hospital. F...
Source: Mass Device - January 30, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Business/Financial News Cardiovascular News Well American Heart Association royalphilips Source Type: news

Infographic: Women and heart disease
Learn more about heart disease. Other health tip infographics: mayohealthhighlights.startribune.com? (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - January 30, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Plan and manage children ’s screen time, urge US experts
Directional link between excessive screen time and lower scores in developmental tests Related items fromOnMedica Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 Put families at heart of helping obese children Flu nasal spray fine for children with egg allergy Texting can improve flu jab uptake CCGs ’ duties for children with disabilities (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - January 30, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Heart disease and stroke deaths plummet in Scotland
Survival from stroke and heart attack is improving – but deprivation-related inequalities remain Related items fromOnMedica Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised Diabetes will soon cost NHS £16.9bn More Scottish GPs needed to fight heart disease Scotland reveals plans to cut impact of type 2 diabetes Stroke rates rocket in younger men and women (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - January 30, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Natco dares Novartis with new heart drug
According to data from AIOCD PharmaTrac, an agency that closely tracks pharmaceutical sales, Vymada had sales of Rs 68.3 crore for December 2018 on the moving annual turnover (MAT). (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - January 30, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Cancer Fears Have Triggered Blood Pressure Drug Recalls for Months. Now Patients Are ‘Leery’
Cynthia Brown had been taking the drug valsartan for about two years when she learned last August that it had been recalled over fears of potential carcinogen contamination. Brown, a writer and patient advocate living near Cincinnati, had been prescribed valsartan to control shortness of breath related to primary pulmonary hypertension, but suddenly she had a whole new concern: cancer. “I’ve always been very conscientious about my health. I never dreamed I’d be on all these medications, and I’m real funny about what I take,” Brown, 65, says. “Valsartan has made me leery of all medication...
Source: TIME: Health - January 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime Source Type: news

Breast Cancer and Atrial Fibrillation: A'Multiple-Hit Phenomenon?'Breast Cancer and Atrial Fibrillation: A'Multiple-Hit Phenomenon? '
A nationwide study shows that the long-term incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is elevated in patients with breast cancer, and the short-term incidence is higher among younger women.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

A 5th grader's boredom while visiting her mom's job led to $30,000 for the elderly in need
Ruby Kate Chitsey asked the woman in the wheelchair why she was staring intently through the glass doors. Her answer broke the fifth-grader's heart. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - January 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Acutus Medical touts 12-month AcQMap-guided AF ablation trial data
Acutus Medical today released 12-month data from the Uncover-AF trial of its AcQMap cardiac imaging and mapping system exploring its use in persistent atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. Results from the trial were presented at the 24th Annual AF Symposium in Boston, the Carlsbad, Calif.-based company said. Acutus Medical’s AcQMap system is designed to detect and display standard voltage-based and higher resolution charge-source maps, and is able to generate real-time, 3D images of the heart chamber using ultrasound. “We have mapped arrhythmias with the same technology for decades without asking if th...
Source: Mass Device - January 29, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Acutus Medical Source Type: news

New blood thinners better than warfarin for atrial fibrillation
(Reuters Health) - Patients with atrial fibrillation, a common heart rhythm disorder, should take newer blood thinners to prevent stroke instead of the old standby drug warfarin, U.S. doctors recommend. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

High BPM at Discharge Spells Mortality Risk After Heart Attack
(MedPage Today) -- Analysis suggests tweaking risk stratification for acute MI (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - January 29, 2019 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

High cholesterol: Six ‘super foods’ to lower cholesterol and reduce heart attack risk
HIGH CHOLESTEROL can lead to coronary heart disease, which is the biggest cause of heart attacks. Cholesterol can be lowered by making dietary changes, such as cutting down on saturated fat, but including other foods in your diet can also help to lower cholesterol levels. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - January 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Neovasc jumps on Tiara trial news
Neovasc (NSDQ:NVCN) said today that it won approval to advance a clinical trial for its Tiara transcatheter mitral valve replacement, sending its share price up on Wall Street. The Vancouver-based company said it closed out the Phase I requirements for the 115-patient Tiara-II trial in the U.K. and Germany, after several reviews. The Clinical Events Committee looked at adverse events, the Data & Safety Monitoring Board reviewed the data and government regulatory and ethics committees reviewed the interim clinical report on 20 patients. Neovasc said the approval means Tiara-II can proceed in those countries with no...
Source: Mass Device - January 29, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Clinical Trials Replacement Heart Valves Wall Street Beat neovasc Source Type: news

What If You Were Your Own Blood Donor for Surgery?
Among nearly 700 heart surgery patients studied, researchers found the tactic did seem to reduce blood transfusions. Patients who self-donated also had shorter hospital stays. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - January 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ReShape Lifesciences CEO Gladney to resign | Personnel Moves – January 29, 2019
ReShape Lifesciences (NSDQ:RSLS) said yesterday that its prez & CEO Dan Gladney will resign from his positions with the company, effective March 31. Gladney will remain with the company as board chair, San Clemente, Calif.-based ReShape Lifesciences said. The company’s board of directors said they will immediately begin to look for a replacement, according to an SEC filing.  AliveCor CEO Gundotra steps away AliveCor CEO Vic Gundotra is stepping away from his position at the head of the company, according to a recent CNBC report. Gundotra, a former senior VP with Google, said it will remain active on Ali...
Source: Mass Device - January 29, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Featured Adherium Limited AliveCor AxoGen Biocoat Cardinal Health Cirtec Medical Functional Neuromodulation georgiabio iCad Inc. Ra Medical ReShape Lifesciences SPR Therapeutics vasculardynamics Source Type: news

Best of both worlds: Herbal blend of traditional Chinese and African medicines found to treat inflammation
(Natural News) Traditionally, South African geranium (Pelargonium sidoides) has been used to treat diseases, such as respiratory and gastrointestinal infections, dysmenorrhea, and liver disorders. On the other hand, Chinese goldthread (Coptis chinensis) root has been traditionally used to treat gastroenteric disorders, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and liver injuries. The combination of these two herbs can be... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

6 medical device news stories to watch in 2019
Sandra Maddock, president & CEO of IMARC Research With new technology and groundbreaking medical device news making headlines every day, there has never been a more exciting time to be involved in clinical research. So much is changing so fast — faster than at any other time in the history of clinical research. At IMARC Research, we take pride in innovation. We’re constantly monitoring medical device trends and regulatory updates to determine how they might apply to the clinical research teams who enlist our oversight. We know this will be a transformational year, so we’re excited to kick off 201...
Source: Mass Device - January 29, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog IMARC Source Type: news

In-Hospital MI Linked to High Mortality Risk In-Hospital MI Linked to High Mortality Risk
Although protocols for myocardial infarctions that occur outside the hospital are standard, less is known about MIs that occur in-hospital, and new data indicate unexpectedly high mortality rates.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Morning Break: More Guns, More Kid Deaths; Culture Change; FDA's 2018 Record
(MedPage Today) -- Health news and commentary from around the Web gathered by the MedPage Today staff (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - January 29, 2019 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Lowering Blood Pressure Could Cut Risk Factor For Dementia
This study is in line with where the field of dementia research is going: preventing memory loss earlier,” said Laurie Ryan, chief of the Dementias of Aging Branch in the National Institute of Aging and contributor to the clinical trial. “Much like we have research-based interventions for heart health and cancer prevention, we hope to have guidance based on this and subsequent studies that will more definitively show how to slow or even stop dementia well before symptoms appear.” James Pickett, head of research at Alzheimer’s Society in the UK, said researchers have known for a while that keeping bl...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Alzheimer's Disease CNN Dementia Source Type: news

Cochrane's 30 under 30: Petter Brattstr öm
Cochrane is made up of13,000 members and over50,000 supporters who come from more than130 countries, worldwide. Our volunteers and contributors are researchers, health professionals, patients, carers, people passionate about improving health outcomes for everyone, everywhere.Cochrane is an incredible community of people who all play their part in improving health and healthcare globally. We believe that by putting trusted evidence at the heart of health decisions we can achieve a world of improved health for all.Many of our contributors are young people working with Cochrane as researchers, citizen scientists, medical stud...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - January 29, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Lydia Parsonson Source Type: news

What If You Were Your Own Blood Donor for Surgery?
TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 -- Heart surgery patients may fare better if they have their own blood " recycled " and given back to them during the procedure, a preliminary study suggests. The study focused on so-called " intraoperative autologous " blood... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 29, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

AHA: This Family Walks to Honor a Young Life Lost to Heart Condition
TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (American Heart Association) -- " I'm going to be there -- I'm part of Team Glenn! " Lauren Harris told her father, Glenn, in 2017. Although she was recovering from shoulder surgery, she told her dad she wasn't about to miss... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 29, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

MEESSI-Acute Heart Failure Risk Score Validated
TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 -- The Multiple Estimation of risk based on the Emergency department Spanish Score In patients with Acute Heart Failure (MEESSI-AHF) can accurately predict 30-day mortality in patients with AHF, according to a study published... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 29, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news