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3 ways to cut variability in CT radiation dose
A Pennsylvania hospital network was able to reduce variation in CT radiation...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Iterative recon halves CT radiation dose for calcium score How accurate is CT radiation dose info on the internet? CT radiation dose tracking reveals global disparities Kids get more CT radiation at nonpediatric hospitals 8 strategies to optimize radiation dose in CT (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 7, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Eating Cheese Daily May Be Good For You, Study Finds
CBS Local — Cheese fans around the world, rejoice! The study you’ve been waiting for has arrived. Researchers have found that eating cheese every day is good for your health and may decrease your chance of developing heart disease. The findings, published in December’s European Journal of Nutrition, looked at 15 separate studies that followed over 200,000 people in the U.S. and Europe. Researchers say people who ate large amounts of cheese lowered their risk of developing heart disease by 14 percent and were 10 percent less likely to have a stroke compared to people who didn’t eat cheese. “Che...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Cheese Chris Melore Heart Disease Local TV talkers Source Type: news

Kidney disease patients should keep taking their medicines | Letters
Diet alone is not usually enough to reduce chemicals like potassium or phosphate that can build up in your body, so medicines to help do this are important, writesFiona Loud, director of policy at Kidney Care UKWe are concerned that the headline on your article (Kidney drug ‘may do more harm than good’, say experts, 25 November) is misleading and could result in kidney patients stopping taking their medicines. When your kidneys do not work properly, dangerous levels of chemicals like potassium or phosphate can build up in your body. People who have kidney disease are usually given dietary advice as to how to he...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 1, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Health Medical research The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) NHS Health policy Public services policy Politics Society Human biology Science UK news Chemistry Source Type: news

Visible signals from brain and heart
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Key processes in the body are controlled by the concentration of calcium in and around cells. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen have developed the first sensor molecule that is able to visualize calcium in living animals with the help of a radiation-free imaging technique known as optoacoustics. The method does not require the cells to be genetically modified and involves no radiation exposure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 30, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Calcium can breach benzene's defenses
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 30, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Yeston, J. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Organocalcium-mediated nucleophilic alkylation of benzene
The electrophilic aromatic substitution of a C–H bond of benzene is one of the archetypal transformations of organic chemistry. In contrast, the electron-rich -system of benzene is highly resistant to reactions with electron-rich and negatively charged organic nucleophiles. Here, we report that this previously insurmountable electronic repulsion may be overcome through the use of sufficiently potent organocalcium nucleophiles. Calcium n-alkyl derivatives—synthesized by reaction of ethene, but-1-ene, and hex-1-ene with a dimeric calcium hydride—react with protio and deutero benzene at 60°C through nucl...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 30, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Wilson, A. S. S., Hill, M. S., Mahon, M. F., Dinoi, C., Maron, L. Tags: Chemistry reports Source Type: news

Deep learning can quantify CAC on low-dose CT
CHICAGO - A deep-learning algorithm can automatically calculate coronary artery...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: CT CAC scoring tops age for predicting heart disease risk JACC: CT CAC scoring helps screen for CAD Coronary calcium predicts events, death, in younger adults JACC: Sedentary lifestyle puts calcium in coronaries Automated CAC fares well in CT lung screening scans (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - November 29, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

How having too much or too little of CHRNA7 can lead to neuropsychiatric disorders
(Baylor College of Medicine) Using new pluripotent stem cell technology, researchers have discovered unexpected effects on calcium flux on neurons from patients with neuropsychiatric disorders carrying either fewer or extra copies of the CHRNA7 gene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Transmembrane helix connectivity in Orai1 controls two gates for calcium-dependent transcription
The channel Orai1 requires Ca2+ store depletion in the endoplasmic reticulum and an interaction with the Ca2+ sensor STIM1 to mediate Ca2+ signaling. Alterations in Orai1-mediated Ca2+ influx have been linked to several pathological conditions including immunodeficiency, tubular myopathy, and cancer. We screened large-scale cancer genomics data sets for dysfunctional Orai1 mutants. Five of the identified Orai1 mutations resulted in constitutively active gating and transcriptional activation. Our analysis showed that certain Orai1 mutations were clustered in the transmembrane 2 helix surrounding the pore, which is a trigger...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - November 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Frischauf, I., Litvinukova, M., Schober, R., Zayats, V., Svobodova, B., Bonhenry, D., Lunz, V., Cappello, S., Tociu, L., Reha, D., Stallinger, A., Hochreiter, A., Pammer, T., Butorac, C., Muik, M., Groschner, K., Bogeski, I., Ettrich, R. H., Romanin, C., Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Networks of enzymatically oxidized membrane lipids support calcium-dependent coagulation factor binding to maintain hemostasis
Blood coagulation functions as part of the innate immune system by preventing bacterial invasion, and it is critical to stopping blood loss (hemostasis). Coagulation involves the external membrane surface of activated platelets and leukocytes. Using lipidomic, genetic, biochemical, and mathematical modeling approaches, we found that enzymatically oxidized phospholipids (eoxPLs) generated by the activity of leukocyte or platelet lipoxygenases (LOXs) were required for normal hemostasis and promoted coagulation factor activities in a Ca2+- and phosphatidylserine (PS)–dependent manner. In wild-type mice, hydroxyeicosatet...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - November 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lauder, S. N., Allen-Redpath, K., Slatter, D. A., Aldrovandi, M., OConnor, A., Farewell, D., Percy, C. L., Molhoek, J. E., Rannikko, S., Tyrrell, V. J., Ferla, S., Milne, G. L., Poole, A. W., Thomas, C. P., Obaji, S., Taylor, P. R., Jones, S. A., de Groot Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Coronary Calcium Helps Stratify 10-Year Cardiac Risk in Diabetes Coronary Calcium Helps Stratify 10-Year Cardiac Risk in Diabetes
Even in patients with long-standing diabetes, information on how calcified coronary arteries are is helpful for predicting future CVD risk, say the authors of a new MESA analysis.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Kidney disease drug recommended by Nice 'may do more harm than good'
Exclusive: Little evidence that phosphate binders improve patient wellbeing, warn experts, while one type may contribute to increased risk of cardiovascular diseaseThe UK ’s drug guidelines body is recommending a type of medication to treat chronic kidney disease despite no firm evidence that it benefits patients – and some signs that the drugs may do more harm than good, experts have warned.Phosphate binders are commonly prescribed to lower blood phosphate levels in patients with advanced kidney disease, including those on dialysis. High phosphate has been linked to worse patient outcomes, including bone and m...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Drugs The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) NHS Society Science Source Type: news

Current-induced strong diamagnetism in the Mott insulator Ca2RuO4
Mott insulators can host a surprisingly diverse set of quantum phenomena when their frozen electrons are perturbed by various stimuli. Superconductivity, metal-insulator transition, and colossal magnetoresistance induced by element substitution, pressure, and magnetic field are prominent examples. Here we report strong diamagnetism in the Mott insulator calcium ruthenate (Ca2RuO4) induced by dc electric current. The application of a current density of merely 1 ampere per centimeter squared induces diamagnetism stronger than that in other nonsuperconducting materials. This change is coincident with changes in the transport ...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sow, C., Yonezawa, S., Kitamura, S., Oka, T., Kuroki, K., Nakamura, F., Maeno, Y. Tags: Physics reports Source Type: news

Genetic Hypercalcemia May Have Causal Role in Migraine Genetic Hypercalcemia May Have Causal Role in Migraine
A study suggests a co-heritability between elevated serum calcium and migraine headaches, with serum calcium appearing to be a causal factor in the migraines.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Microtubules tune mechanotransduction through NOX2 and TRPV4 to decrease sclerostin abundance in osteocytes
The adaptation of the skeleton to its mechanical environment is orchestrated by mechanosensitive osteocytes, largely by regulating the abundance of sclerostin, a secreted inhibitor of bone formation. We defined a microtubule-dependent mechanotransduction pathway that linked fluid shear stress to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium (Ca2+) signals that led to a reduction in sclerostin abundance in cultured osteocytes. We demonstrated that microtubules stabilized by detyrosination, a reversible posttranslational modification of polymerized α-tubulin, determined the stiffness of the cytoskeleton, which set the mech...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - November 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lyons, J. S., Joca, H. C., Law, R. A., Williams, K. M., Kerr, J. P., Shi, G., Khairallah, R. J., Martin, S. S., Konstantopoulos, K., Ward, C. W., Stains, J. P. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Manage the menopause naturally without HRT
This article helps you identify some simple changes you can make almost immediately which will help you manage the menopause naturally. Hot flushes and night sweats are common symptoms. Eighty percent of menopausal women experience them. Many women feel embarrassed about hot flushes, but it’s not as obvious to everyone else as it may seem to you! Symptoms can be reduced by eating lots of plant foods, especially those rich in phytoestrogens, which help to rebalance your hormones naturally. Phytoestrogens are found in abundance in soya products, legumes, and in brassica vegetables, such as cauliflower, broccoli, Brusse...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - November 20, 2017 Category: OBGYN Authors: Susie Kearley Tags: Alternatives to HRT healthy diet menopause Source Type: news

How Long Do Late Preterm Infants Need Supplemental Feedings?
Discussion Premature infants have many problems to overcome because they just aren’t ready to live outside the uterine environment. Late premature infants are defined as birth between 34 0/7 weeks and 36 6/7 weeks gestation. In the U.S. this gestational age accounts for ~70% of all preterm births or ~300,000 births/year. Late preterm infants can have delayed oral feeding skills and failure to thrive along with increased hospital readmissions. Breastfeeding can be difficult as infants can have poor coordination and poor tone, along with decreased lactation in the mother. Learning Point Weight gain lags behind intraut...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - November 13, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Vitamin D & calcium supplements do not improve skeletal muscle strength of young men
According to a study, published inClinical Endocrinology, young men’s skeletal muscle strength and serum testosterone levels were not affected by 6 months of cholecalciferol or calcium supplementation.Healio  (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - November 10, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

The end of 'Pump Fiction'
(Aarhus University) Our cells move energy and matter to the places it is needed. But how do they do this in real time, and seen from the perspective of a single molecule? A Danish research team has successfully uncovered new basic insights into this invisible world, by doing experiments that track how a single molecule of the protein 'engine' known as the calcium pump works. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 10, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Perovskite in Earths deep interior
Silicate perovskite-type phases are the most abundant constituent inside our planet and are the predominant minerals in Earth’s lower mantle more than 660 kilometers below the surface. Magnesium-rich perovskite is a major lower mantle phase and undergoes a phase transition to post-perovskite near the bottom of the mantle. Calcium-rich perovskite is proportionally minor but may host numerous trace elements that record chemical differentiation events. The properties of mantle perovskites are the key to understanding the dynamic evolution of Earth, as they strongly influence the transport properties of lower mantle rock...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hirose, K., Sinmyo, R., Hernlund, J. Tags: Materials Science special/review Source Type: news

Controlling cellular calcium concentration
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Stern, P. Tags: twil Source Type: news

Dietary Calcium Intake Poor in Much of the World Dietary Calcium Intake Poor in Much of the World
Global dietary calcium intake is low in many parts of the world, especially in Asia-Pacific countries and in South America.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Papers of note in Science 358 (6363)
This week’s articles describe the identification of a mammalian protein that is required for endoplasmic reticulum–mitochondria tethering and regulates intracellular calcium dynamics in neurons. (Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment)
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - November 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: VanHook, A. M. Tags: STKE Editors ' Choice Source Type: news

Randomized Clinical Trial to Evaluate MTA Indirect Pulp Capping in Deep Caries Lesions After 24-Months
Conclusions: Both pulp-capping materials were found to be clinically acceptable at 24 months post treatment. (Source: Dental Technology Blog)
Source: Dental Technology Blog - November 2, 2017 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Lysosomal calcium in dendritic cell migration
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 2, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Balasubramani, A. Tags: twis Source Type: news

ER-mitochondria tethering by PDZD8 regulates Ca2+ dynamics in mammalian neurons
Interfaces between organelles are emerging as critical platforms for many biological responses in eukaryotic cells. In yeast, the ERMES complex is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–mitochondria tether composed of four proteins, three of which contain a SMP (synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial-lipid binding protein) domain. No functional ortholog for any ERMES protein has been identified in metazoans. Here, we identified PDZD8 as an ER protein present at ER-mitochondria contacts. The SMP domain of PDZD8 is functionally orthologous to the SMP domain found in yeast Mmm1. PDZD8 was necessary for the formation of ER-mitochondria...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 2, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hirabayashi, Y., Kwon, S.-K., Paek, H., Pernice, W. M., Paul, M. A., Lee, J., Erfani, P., Raczkowski, A., Petrey, D. S., Pon, L. A., Polleux, F. Tags: Cell Biology r-articles Source Type: news

Two Princeton astrophysicists receive funding to study merging neutron stars
(Princeton University) The TEAMS consortium (Towards Exascale Astrophysics of Mergers and Supernovae), including Princeton University's Adam Burrows and David Radice, will investigate how stellar explosions create elements. " Merging neutron stars produce the heaviest elements, " Burrows said, " but the oxygen we breathe, the iron in our hemoglobin, the calcium in our bones, the fluorine in our toothpaste -- these sorts of things are unambiguously products of supernova explosions: the death of a massive star. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 30, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

IOF study reveals low dietary calcium intake in Asia and Latin America
(International Osteoporosis Foundation) A new study led by an International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) research committee has found that daily average calcium intake among adults varies widely around the world. Critically low intake was found in certain Asian, African and Latin American countries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Best supplements for bones: Take THESE nutrients to prevent osteoporosis
BEST supplements for strong bones include vitamin D, calcium and magnesium, and the nutrients can help prevent osteoporosis. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fake high blood pressure news
Mainstream doctors are quick to prescribe drugs to bring high blood pressure down.  They may put you on one, two or even three of Big Pharma’s drugs. They include diuretics, beta-blockers, and calcium channel blockers.   These drugs have serious side effects. I’m talking about things like edema, dizziness, nose bleeds, rash and hearing loss. They can lead to cardiac failure, heart attack, depression, colitis, and arthritis pain.  It’s bad enough risking those side effects if you have to. But your doctor may be giving you these pills for NO good reason. You mi...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 19, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

Calcium Essential to Limit Osteoporosis but Avoid Excess, Say Europeans Calcium Essential to Limit Osteoporosis but Avoid Excess, Say Europeans
Calcium levels of 700-1200 mg/day are recommended in postmenopausal women, but excessive doses could be harmful, highlights a new clinical guide from the European Menopause and Andropause Society.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Cleaning up? Not without helpers
(University of Freiburg) Freiburg scientists explain assembly and transport function of 'old' calcium pumps by 'new' partner proteins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Excessive Exercise May Harm The Heart, Study Suggests
People who exercise excessively -- especially white men -- have more calcium build-up in the heart. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - October 18, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Alice G. Walton, Contributor Source Type: news

Global calcium consumption appears low, especially in Asia
(Brown University) A new systematic review of global daily calcium consumption suggests substantial regional differences -- it's lowest in East Asia and highest in Northern Europe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A Groundbreaking Astronomy Discovery Gave Scientists Their Best Look Ever at How Gold Was Created
(WASHINGTON) — It was a faint signal, but it told of one of the most violent acts in the universe, and it would soon reveal secrets of the cosmos, including how gold was created. Astronomers around the world reacted to the signal quickly, focusing telescopes located on every continent and even in orbit to a distant spot in the sky. What they witnessed in mid-August and revealed Monday was the long-ago collision of two neutron stars — a phenomenon California Institute of Technology’s David H. Reitze called “the most spectacular fireworks in the universe.” “When these things collide, all h...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized astronomy onetime Source Type: news

Low Serum Calcium Levels Linked to Cardiac Arrest
Low Serum Calcium Levels Linked to Sudden Cardiac Arrest (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - October 16, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Low Serum Calcium Linked to Sudden Cardiac Arrest Risk Low Serum Calcium Linked to Sudden Cardiac Arrest Risk
The risk of cardiac arrest more than doubled in those with the lowest calcium levels, but it's unknown how low is too low or the benefits of higher calcium intake or calcium supplementation.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Calcium in the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis: EMAS Clinical Guide
(Elsevier) Osteoporosis is common and affects 1 in 3 women. Calcium is vital for strong healthy bones and worldwide scientific societies have issued guidance about the daily requirements from childhood to old age. The European Menopause and Andropause Society (EMAS) has issued a new clinical guide with the aim of raising awareness of the importance of calcium in lowering the risk of osteoporosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Calcium lets T cells use sugar to multiply and fight infection
(NYU Langone Health / NYU School of Medicine) A calcium signal controls whether immune cells can use the nutrients needed to fuel their multiplication into a cellular army designed to fight invading viruses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 11, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

LA scientists find milk could prevent a cardiac arrest
Those with blood calcium levels in the lowest quartile had twice the odds of sudden cardiac arrest, scientists at Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Low calcium may raise cardiac arrest risk by twofold
Researchers have linked low blood calcium levels to a greater likelihood of sudden cardiac arrest, a leading cause of death in the United States. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Some Adolescent Girls With T1D Have Negative Calcium Retention Some Adolescent Girls With T1D Have Negative Calcium Retention
Negative calcium retention is common among adolescent girls with type 1 diabetes (T1D), new findings show.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - October 6, 2017 Category: Pathology Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Low calcium warning: Too little may increase risk of sudden death from cardiac arrest
TOO little calcium in the blood may increase the risk of sudden death from cardiac arrest, research has shown. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

5 pounds of THIS in your body?
Did you know that by the time you’re 50, you could have almost five pounds of toxins trapped inside your cells, tissue and organs? For millions of years, we had clean air and pure water. But in the past hundred years, our environment has changed faster than we can evolve with it. We weren’t designed to live in a modern world of manmade chemicals, toxins and pollutants. That’s why purging your body of pollutants is more important today than ever. Environmental toxins have become a major health threat. These toxins have linked with many of today’s chronic diseases including: • Cancer • Di...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

Vitamin D may prevent asthma worsening for some
Conclusion This review gathers the available trial evidence to address the specific question of whether giving people with asthma vitamin D supplements could have an effect on how many asthma exacerbations they have. The review has many strengths. It only included double-blind trials, where participants and assessors didn't know if people were taking vitamin D or a placebo. Researchers also made careful attempts to gather all relevant data and information on confounding factors, and all but one trial had a low risk of bias. But there are some limitations to bear in mind: With the relatively small number of trials and par...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Source Type: news

This diet advice could kill you
The American Heart Association says sodium in salt raises blood pressure. They say it increases the risk for heart disease and stroke.  But the latest science says otherwise… A British review of 34 clinical trials showed that cutting down on salt reduced blood pressure only slightly for people with hypertension.1  And a new study in The Lancet found that some low-salt diets could put you at GREATER risk of heart disease and death.2 Researchers analyzed data from 133,118 people. They wanted to see if there was a link between high sodium and heart attack, stroke and death The results were startling. People...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Randall Hall Tags: Health Heart Health Men's Health Nutrition Women's Health Source Type: news

Low serum calcium may increase risk of sudden cardiac arrest
(Elsevier) In a study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, researchers found that individuals with lower levels of calcium in the blood, which is easily monitored, are more likely to experience SCA than those with higher calcium levels. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 5, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

“Quackery” that saves lives
I’m used to being a target of mainstream medicine. I can’t even count the number of times I’ve been called a “quack.”  Let me give you just one example… For decades I’ve been treating my patients with a proven therapy. The FDA approved it way back in 1953. I use it to help my patients detox from mercury, lead, cadmium and other heavy metals. In fact, more than 100,000 people get this therapy every year in the U.S. But mainstream doctors still laugh at the idea of this treatment and think it’s pure bunk. I’m talking about intravenous (IV) chelation. Even though I...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Randall Hall Tags: Anti-Aging Health Heart Health Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: news

Study links vegetarian diet in pregnancy to substance abuse in offspring
Conclusion While having too little vitamin B12 in your diet during pregnancy can affect a baby's development, it remains to be proven whether a vegetarian diet in pregnancy can cause substance abuse problems in teenage offspring. The findings do not mean that vegetarian pregnant women need to start eating meat. It is already recommended that vegetarian and vegan mums-to-be take special care to ensure they get enough of certain nutrients that are found in meat and fish, such as vitamin B12, vitamin D and iron. The study identifies a possible link between having little or no meat consumption in pregnancy (which may have led ...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

Calcium: Strong Bones, Weak Heart?
Do calcium supplements really increase cardiovascular risk? Here ’s what the latest research says. (Source: ConsultantLive)
Source: ConsultantLive - October 3, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Irfan Qureshi Tags: Heart Health Joint/Bone Health Science Vitamins & Minerals Source Type: news