CT CAC predicts risk of death in smokers
The presence of coronary artery calcium (CAC) on CT scans was associated with...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: High calcium density on CCTA linked to lower risk of ACS CT CAC linked to cardiovascular mortality in young adults Elevated CT CAC scores linked to future heart failure Cardiac risk grows with higher coronary calcium scores Could self-rated health improve CT CAC scoring? (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 28, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Osteoporosis and Calcium
(Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - February 26, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Here's why you need phosphorus in your diet, a mineral that promotes bone strength
(Natural News) Phosphorus is a mineral that the body needs to perform important functions, such as repairing tissues and filtering waste. It is the second most plentiful mineral in the body – next to calcium – and it is used to keep the bones strong and healthy. However, as an essential mineral, phosphorus cannot be... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rethinking Milk: Science Takes on the Dairy Dilemma Rethinking Milk: Science Takes on the Dairy Dilemma
Authors of a new review in NEJM say eating too much dairy may cause harm to our bodies and the planet. One of the authors called calcium recommendations in the United States"fundamentally flawed."WebMD Health News (Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines)
Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines - February 19, 2020 Category: Endocrinology Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care News Source Type: news

Study: Fluoride good for teeth, but over-exposure may damage enamel
In a study, researchers report that while fluoride has benefits for teeth, over-exposure can damage the ability of enamel cells to take in and store calcium. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women's health and osteoporosis: Boost bone health and prevent fractures by following a healthy diet and supplementing with vitamin D
(Natural News) Calcium and vitamin D are essential for boosting your bone health. But did you know that there are guidelines for supplementation if you are female and have osteoporosis? Postmenopausal women who have been diagnosed with osteoporosis or are at risk of the condition require calcium and vitamin D. In a study for The Women’s Health... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Are the Different Types of Myasthenia Gravis?
Discussion Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a problem of the neuromuscular junction which causes muscle weakness. It can occur in all ages and have a range of symptoms from mild localized disease to mortality-threatening respiratory failure. MG occurs in 1.7-30 cases/million, with a prevalence of 77.7 cases/million. Pediatric patients comprise 10-15% of all patients with MG. In various Asian populations, the juvenile MG can be up to 50% of all of the MG cases. Fluctuations in muscle weakness is a hallmark of the disease. As a reminder, “[i]n normal synaptic transmission in the neuromuscular junction, the axon is depolarize...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - February 17, 2020 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Rethinking Milk: Science Takes On the Dairy Dilemma
Dairy products are rich in calcium and protein, and they have long been promoted as important for helping kids grow and helping kids and adults build and maintain strong bones. Now a new study questions whether diary deserves its health halo. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Janssen Announces Submission to U.S. FDA for New DARZALEX ® (Daratumumab)-Based Combination Regimen for Patients with Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma
RARITAN, NJ, February 10, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today the submission of a supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) seeking approval of DARZALEX® (daratumumab) in combination with Kyprolis® (carfilzomib) and dexamethasone (DKd) for relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. The sBLA is supported by results from the Phase 3 CANDOR study, which compared treatment with DKd to carfilzomib and dexamethasone (Kd) in patients with multiple myeloma who relapsed after one to three prior lines of therapy. “W...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - February 10, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Have your say on chronic hypoparathyroidism
A national survey of management of patients with chronic hypoparathyroidism is being conducted with the support of Parathyroid UK and the Society for Endocrinology by Jeremy Turner and Vivek Sharma.Help improve patient care by submitting data for up to five patients diagnosed with hypoparathyroidism in your institution before August 2019, and seen in your clinic within the last 2 years.In most cases it will make sense to coordinate with your department colleagues to avoid duplication of effort. In cases where there is a defined metabolic calcium lead, it may make sense to pass this survey on to t...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - February 10, 2020 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Removing CO2 from the atmosphere and the Desarc-Maresanus project
(Politecnico di milano) The research project 'Desarc-Maresanus' studied an alkalinization process to simultaneously address two environmental problems of enormous concern: the increase of the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere and the resulting acidification of the oceans. The process involves spreading calcium hydroxide on the surface of the sea, which would increase the seawater's capacity to provide a buffer to the acidity, halting the dangerous decrease of pH. This, in turn, can foster an additional removal of CO2 from the atmosphere, generating negative emissions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 10, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Preventing, healing tooth decay with a bioactive peptide
American Chemical Society Cavities, or dental caries, are the most widespread non-communicable disease globally, according to the World Health Organization. Having a cavity drilled and filled at the dentist's office can be painful, but untreated caries could lead to worse pain, tooth loss, infection, and even illness or death. Now, researchers inACS Applied Materials& Interfaces report a bioactive peptide that coats tooth surfaces, helping prevent new cavities and heal existing ones in lab experiments.Conventional treatment for dental cavities involves removing decayed tissue and filling the hole with materials, su...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - February 7, 2020 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Double X-ray vision helps tuberculosis and osteoporosis research
(Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY) With an X-ray combination technique, scientists have traced nanocarriers for tuberculosis drugs within cells with very high precision. The method combines two scanning X-ray measurements and can locate minute amounts of metals in biological samples at very high resolution, as the team reports in the journal Scientific Reports. To illustrate its versatility, the researchers have also used the combination method to map the calcium content in human bone, an analysis that can benefit osteoporosis research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 4, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The Big Number: 300,000 break their hips each year. Calcium and vitamin D could cut that number, research says.
Data from 17 studies of older people suggest that those who took both supplements were about 16 percent less likely to have such fractures. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - February 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Linda Searing Source Type: news

Janssen to Highlight Depth of Solid Tumor Portfolio at ASCO GU
RARITAN, N.J., February 3, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today multiple data presentations from a robust solid tumor portfolio that will be featured at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary (ASCO GU) Cancers Symposium, taking place February 13-15 in San Francisco. Company-sponsored data presentations will include clinical results for ERLEADA® (apalutamide) and niraparib in prostate cancer; and BALVERSA™ (erdafitinib) in bladder cancer. “We are committed to improving outcomes in patients with prostate and bladder cancer where high unmet...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - February 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

'Anorexia and exercise addiction caused my broken foot'
Hope Virgo's anorexia left with her a severe calcium deficiency that significantly weakened her bones. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - January 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

WPI researcher to probe link between cell death, calcification, and heart valve disease
(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) Worcester Polytechnic Institute researcher Kristen Billiar has been awarded a $154,000 grant from the American Heart Association to determine how cell death leads to calcium deposits that cause aortic valves to fail. The two-year project will involve laboratory experiments with cells grown in flat and three-dimensional shapes, and it will aim to discover ways to interrupt the process that leads to calcified nodules. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Microglia monitor and protect neuronal function through specialized somatic purinergic junctions
Microglia are the main immune cells in the brain and have roles in brain homeostasis and neurological diseases. Mechanisms underlying microglia–neuron communication remain elusive. Here, we identified an interaction site between neuronal cell bodies and microglial processes in mouse and human brain. Somatic microglia–neuron junctions have a specialized nanoarchitecture optimized for purinergic signaling. Activity of neuronal mitochondria was linked with microglial junction formation, which was induced rapidly in response to neuronal activation and blocked by inhibition of P2Y12 receptors. Brain injury–ind...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Cserep, C., Posfai, B., Lenart, N., Fekete, R., Laszlo, Z. I., Lele, Z., Orsolits, B., Molnar, G., Heindl, S., Schwarcz, A. D., Ujvari, K., Környei, Z., Toth, K., Szabadits, E., Sperlagh, B., Baranyi, M., Csiba, L., Hortobagyi, T., Magloczky, Z., Tags: Immunology, Neuroscience r-articles Source Type: news

Increasing vitamin C intake can reduce hip fracture risk by 44 percent: Study
(Natural News) When it comes to healthy bones, people often look to calcium and vitamin D. However, experts suggest adding an unlikely vitamin to the mix: vitamin C. In a recent study published in Osteoporosis International, a team of researchers from Tufts University, Harvard Medical School and the Boston University School of Public Health revealed that taking vitamin C can potentially reduce... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High calcium density on CCTA linked to lower risk of ACS
High levels of plaque calcification on coronary CT angiography (CCTA) scans...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: CCTA, functional tests stratify heart disease risk by age Onsite FFR-CT tops CCTA in detecting coronary stenosis CCTA reveals statins may lower mortality in low-risk CAD CCTA biomarker may predict mortality from heart disease CCTA biomarker spots high-risk plaques in heart disease (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 22, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Blue light triggers memory and emphatic fear in mice via a non-invasive approach
(Institute for Basic Science) IBS researchers have engineered an improved biological tool that controls calcium (Ca2+) levels in the brain via blue light. This monster-OptoSTIM1 causes a change in mice's fear learning behavior without the need of optic fiber implants in the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 21, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pulling the plug on calcium pumps -- potential new treatment strategy for pancreatic cancer
(Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund) UK scientists have identified a new way to kill pancreatic cancer cells by 'pulling the plug' on the energy generator that fuels calcium pumps on their cell surface. The study, published in the British Journal of Cancer, reports how switching off the cancer's energy supply causes the pancreatic cancer cells to become 'poisoned' by an irreversible build-up of calcium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 16, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Executive health programs buck imaging guidelines
Executive health screening programs at major U.S. hospitals continue to provide...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: CT CAC linked to cardiovascular mortality in young adults Elevated CT CAC scores linked to future heart failure Cardiac risk grows with higher coronary calcium scores ACC: Physicians omit CT CAC scores in 50% of cancer cases Heart societies endorse CT CAC for risk assessment (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 13, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Indian man develops an 'EGGSHELL' around his testicle
Doctors at King George's Medical University in Lucknow, India, diagnosed the 80-year-old after he went to hospital with blood in his urine. They found calcium had built up inside his scrotum. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Might manganese make gadolinium obsolete for MRI scans?
Could a manganese-based MRI contrast agent provide equivalent MR image quality...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Patients at risk for NSF might be safe with certain GBCAs Gadolinium MRI scans most common early in pregnancy MRI technique offers window into calcium activity Research road map drives inquiry into gadolinium's effects MGH researchers working on GBCA alternative (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 10, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Increasing vitamin C intake can reduce hip fracture risk by 44 percent: Study
(Natural News) When it comes to healthy bones, people often look to calcium and vitamin D. However, experts suggest adding an unlikely vitamin to the mix: vitamin C. In a recent study published in Osteoporosis International, a team of researchers from Tufts University, Harvard Medical School and the Boston University School of Public Health revealed that taking vitamin C can... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dermal sheath contraction powers stem cell niche relocation during hair cycle regression
Tissue homeostasis requires the balance of growth by cell production and regression through cell loss. In the hair cycle, during follicle regression, the niche traverses the skin through an unknown mechanism to reach the stem cell reservoir and trigger new growth. Here, we identify the dermal sheath that lines the follicle as the key driver of tissue regression and niche relocation through the smooth muscle contractile machinery that generates centripetal constriction force. We reveal that the calcium-calmodulin–myosin light chain kinase pathway controls sheath contraction. When this pathway is blocked, sheath contra...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 9, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Heitman, N., Sennett, R., Mok, K.-W., Saxena, N., Srivastava, D., Martino, P., Grisanti, L., Wang, Z., Maayan, A., Rompolas, P., Rendl, M. Tags: Cell Biology, Development r-articles Source Type: news

Air pollution may weaken bones
According to a study published inJAMA Network Open, inflammation caused by air pollution may reduce bone calcium levels and increase risk for osteoporosis and fractures.inews (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - January 6, 2020 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

To call or not to call: behavioral determinants influencing the decision of intensivists to consult poison centers for calcium channel blocker poisoning - Brassard E, Archambault P, Lacombe G, St-Onge M.
This study aimed to define the behavioral determinants influencing the decision of intensivists to consult a poison center (PC) when managing patients with calcium channel blocker (CCB) poisoning.Material and methods: Semi-structured... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Poisoning Source Type: news

Dendritic action potentials and computation in human layer 2/3 cortical neurons
The active electrical properties of dendrites shape neuronal input and output and are fundamental to brain function. However, our knowledge of active dendrites has been almost entirely acquired from studies of rodents. In this work, we investigated the dendrites of layer 2 and 3 (L2/3) pyramidal neurons of the human cerebral cortex ex vivo. In these neurons, we discovered a class of calcium-mediated dendritic action potentials (dCaAPs) whose waveform and effects on neuronal output have not been previously described. In contrast to typical all-or-none action potentials, dCaAPs were graded; their amplitudes were maximal for ...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 2, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Gidon, A., Zolnik, T. A., Fidzinski, P., Bolduan, F., Papoutsi, A., Poirazi, P., Holtkamp, M., Vida, I., Larkum, M. E. Tags: Neuroscience reports Source Type: news

OSU study suggests vitamin D can combat bacterial infection
A new study from Oregon State University reveals yet another potential benefit of vitamin D, which is known to promote calcium absorption and reduce inflammation. OSU scientist Adrian Gombart developed a new model to study vitamin D and found that it can dramatically reduce disease-causing bacteria in skin wounds. The findings were published in the Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. The study examines the role of the bioactive form of v itamin D in promoting production of an… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 30, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

OSU study suggests vitamin D can combat bacterial infection
A new study from Oregon State University reveals yet another potential benefit of vitamin D, which is known to promote calcium absorption and reduce inflammation. OSU scientist Adrian Gombart developed a new model to study vitamin D and found that it can dramatically reduce disease-causing bacteria in skin wounds. The findings were published in the Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. The study examines the role of the bioactive form of v itamin D in promoting production of an… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 30, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Preservation of Renal Function in Cardiac Surgery Patients Preservation of Renal Function in Cardiac Surgery Patients
Is the calcium sensitizer levosimendan more effective than beta-agonists for preserving renal function in cardiac surgery patients with low cardiac output syndrome?BMC Anesthesiology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Anesthesiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Antacids interfere with calcium absorption: Babies given antacids in their first year of life are more likely to have a bone fracture later in childhood
(Natural News) It’s becoming increasingly clear just how much antacids can interfere with your body’s ability to absorb calcium, and recent research shows that this isn’t just a problem you need to worry about as you get older. A study published in Pediatrics has found that babies who are given antacids during their first year... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vitamin D Needs Calcium to Help Lower Fracture Risk Vitamin D Needs Calcium to Help Lower Fracture Risk
Combination supplementation was associated in some trials with a 16% reduction in the risk of hip fractures.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines)
Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines - December 23, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Tags: Orthopaedics News Source Type: news

Vitamin D Alone Doesn't Prevent Fractures, New Study Finds
FRIDAY, Dec. 20, 2019 -- Taking calcium and vitamin D might help older adults curb the risk of a bone fracture, but vitamin D alone does not do the job, a new research review concludes. The analysis of 28 past studies found that older adults with... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 20, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Potassium channel dysfunction in human neuronal models of Angelman syndrome
Disruptions in the ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) gene cause Angelman syndrome (AS). Whereas AS model mice have associated synaptic dysfunction and altered plasticity with abnormal behavior, whether similar or other mechanisms contribute to network hyperactivity and epilepsy susceptibility in AS patients remains unclear. Using human neurons and brain organoids, we demonstrate that UBE3A suppresses neuronal hyperexcitability via ubiquitin-mediated degradation of calcium- and voltage-dependent big potassium (BK) channels. We provide evidence that augmented BK channel activity manifests as increased intrinsic excitabili...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sun, A. X., Yuan, Q., Fukuda, M., Yu, W., Yan, H., Lim, G. G. Y., Nai, M. H., DAgostino, G. A., Tran, H.-D., Itahana, Y., Wang, D., Lokman, H., Itahana, K., Lim, S. W. L., Tang, J., Chang, Y. Y., Zhang, M., Cook, S. A., Rackham, O. J. L., Lim, C. T., Tan, Tags: Neuroscience r-articles Source Type: news

Address Malnutrition, Not Just Food Security
By Jomo Kwame Sundaram, Wan Manan Muda and Tan Zhai GenKUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, Dec 17 2019 (IPS) Malnutrition remains a formidable challenge in most societies, with less than a tenth of countries in the world not experiencing at least one major malnutrition problem. In relatively more food secure countries, where almost everyone has enough to eat, and few live in fear of a sudden loss of access to food, micronutrient deficiencies and diet-related non-communicable diseases (NCDs) often still loom large. Jomo Kwame SundaramOne such country is Malaysia where rice is, by and large, available and affordable to almost everyone...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jomo Kwame Sundaram - Wan Manan Muda and Tan Zhai Gen Tags: Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Human Rights Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Trade & Investment Women's Health Source Type: news

Mammograms May Help Identify Heart Disease, Researchers Say
BOSTON (CBS) — Mammograms are routinely used to screen for breast cancer in women, but there’s mounting evidence that they may also help identify women at risk for heart disease. Mammograms don’t just detect breast tumors, but can also show calcium deposits in the arteries in the breasts, which has been linked to calcium deposits in the arteries in the heart. Calcium buildup in the coronary arteries is strongly associated with heart disease. Researchers at the University of California San Diego looked at nearly 300 women and found that those with calcified breast arteries were more than twice as likely to...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Health News Heart Disease Heart Failure Mammograms Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Can mammograms show who is at risk of heart failure?
Recent research suggests that mammograms may help identify women at risk of heart failure by revealing the presence of calcium buildup in breast arteries. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Say What … Using AI to Discover Signs of Heart Disease on Lung Cancer Screens?
Researchers are using artificial intelligence to measure a common marker of heart disease via lung cancer screenings. The research was presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). Low-dose chest CT is approved for lung cancer screening in high-risk people, such as long-time smokers. While these CT scans are intended to diagnose lung cancer, coronary artery calcium, a measure of plaque in the arteries, is also visible on CT. The coronary artery calcium score derived from CT is a well-established measure that helps doctors decide who should get cholesterol-lowering preventive medicatio...
Source: MDDI - December 4, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Digital Health IVD Source Type: news

T1DM May Up Progression of CAC During Menopausal Transition
TUESDAY, Dec. 3, 2019 -- For women going through menopause, type 1 diabetes is associated with higher coronary artery calcium (CAC) volume and accelerated progression of CAC over time, according to a study published in the December issue of Diabetes... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 3, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Protein defect leaves sperm chasing their tails
(Osaka University) A team led by researchers from Osaka University have characterized a protein, called VSP, that keeps sperm swimming in straight lines. Deletion of the protein caused sperm to swim in circles, significantly reducing fertilization rates. VSP also controlled the influx of calcium ions into the flagellum, which is necessary for propulsion of the sperm towards the egg. The researchers hope that their discovery will aid in the development of fertility treatments to enhance sperm motility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Taste-related protein provides target for drugs to treat neurological disorders
(Van Andel Research Institute) Understanding how the brain processes sweet, bitter and umami tastes may one day help researchers design more effective drugs for neurological disorders. Van Andel Institute scientists have for the first time revealed the near atomic-level structure of a calcium homeostasis modulator (CALHM), a type of protein that plays critical roles in processing taste stimuli and mitigating toxicity in brain cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pregnant mom-of-3 has dangerous chest surgery to save her baby's life
Mizel Tavarez, 39, was diagnosed with hyperparathyroidism, causing her body to overproduce calcium and putting her at risk of miscarriage until a risky operation fixed the glands. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

You CAN be vegan and still get your calcium
(Natural News) Dairy products are the most commonly known sources of calcium. But do you know that many vegan foods that are also rich in calcium? Here are 10 vegan sources of calcium: Soy foods – Soybeans are naturally loaded with calcium. Foods made from soybeans – such as natto, tempeh, and tofu – are also rich in... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta asks Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, President Donald Trump's then-physician, about the results of the President's 2018 physical that showed calcium in his coronary blood vessels. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - November 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Keeping a calcium sensor unSTIMulated
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Wong, W. Tags: twis Source Type: news

Cut dairy from your diet? You may be deficient in vitamin D, calcium
To determine what happens when you pass on a glass of milk, Marketplace spent months analyzing nutrition studies, interviewed doctors and dietitians, and reviewed one family's weeklong food diaries. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - November 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Master regulator in mitochondria is critical for muscle function and repair
(Thomas Jefferson University) New study identifies how loss of mitochondrial protein MICU1 disrupts calcium balance and causes muscle atrophy and weakness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 14, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news